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Recent Headlines
a la Mod:

Domino is
a "disarmingly
straight-forward"
work that "pushes
us to reexamine our
relationship to images
and their consumption,
not only ethically
but metaphysically"
-Collin Brinkman

De Palma on Domino
"It was not recut.
I was not involved
in the ADR, the
musical recording
sessions, the final
mix or the color
timing of the
final print."

Listen to
Donaggio's full score
for Domino online

De Palma/Lehman
rapport at work
in Snakes

De Palma/Lehman
next novel is Terry

De Palma developing
Catch And Kill,
"a horror movie
based on real things
that have happened
in the news"

Supercut video
of De Palma's films
edited by Carl Rodrigue

Washington Post
review of Keesey book

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Exclusive Passion
Interviews:

Brian De Palma
Karoline Herfurth
Leila Rozario

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AV Club Review
of Dumas book

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Interviews...

De Palma interviewed
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De Palma discusses
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No Harm In Charm

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The Filmmaker Who
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Jim Emerson on
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Scarface: Make Way
For The Bad Guy

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(Blow Out)

Carrie: The Movie

Deborah Shelton
Official Web Site

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Offices of Death Records

The Carlito's Way
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FilmLand Empire

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italkyoubored

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De Palma a la Mod
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Entries by Topic
A note about topics: Some blog posts have more than one topic, in which case only one main topic can be chosen to represent that post. This means that some topics may have been discussed in posts labeled otherwise. For instance, a post that discusses both The Boston Stranglers and The Demolished Man may only be labeled one or the other. Please keep this in mind as you navigate this list.
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Friday, May 1, 2015
'PASSION' REVIEW - ALFRED EAKER'S FRINGE CINEMA
"WARHOLIAN POP VIBE VIA MOD THRILLER"
An excerpt from Alfred Eaker's review of Brian De Palma's Passion, posted at 366 Weird Movies:

"Whittling down De Palma’s diving board to Hitchcock is also woefully inadequate. When an art critic listed 90 of Picasso’s influences, the artist wrote back: 'You forgot Gauguin.' Sergei Eisenstein, Jean-Luc Godard, Andy Warhol, Orson Welles, Michelangleo Antonioni, Sam Peckinpah, Francis Ford Coppola, Irvin Kirshner, Martin Scorsese and Robert Flaherty have all informed De Palma’s work and are filtered through his pre-existing sensibilities, which include a background in mathematics and avant-garde narrative. This diversity renders De Palma far more eclectic than any of his predecessors or peers.

"Contrary to the claims of populist criticism, an aesthetic path is rarely linear. De Palma’s malleability is evident in his returns to low budget satire (1980’s Home Movies), observational cinema (2007’s Redacted), and the Warholian pop vibe via mod thriller of 2002’s Femme Fatale and 2012’s Passion.

"De Palma once again makes use of a grandly dated split-screen, juxtaposed to Pino Donaggio’s hyper-lush score, dressing and undressing the oozing, ribald, kinky milieu. More than once, De Palma quotes Dressed To Kill, throwing in Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace as the AC/DC couple who go the distance to liven up a potentially dull advertising firm with dark red lipstick, Skype, high-heeled Euro fashion, chic Debussy, explosive sex tapes, provocative primary colors, slow-mo pursuits, and a gleaming stiletto.

"True to form, De Palma milks manipulative bad acting from his two leads, which punctuates the obligatory opulent set piece (an impressionistic ballet) and unfolding illicit crime caper.

"Passion giddily enjoys being a movie for the sake of movies. A few bourgeoisie critics have complained that De Palma is simply stuck on repeat mode, but if you are willing to entertain his inviting disregard for neorealist trends, you may discover a deepening of his art and be transported into a celluloid Canaan."


Posted by Geoff at 12:21 AM CDT
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Wednesday, April 29, 2015
'BODY DOUBLE' IN TORONTO MAY 7
2ND FILM IN THE NEON DREAMS CINEMA CLUB, FIRST THURSDAY EVERY MONTH


The Neon Dreams Cinema Club meets for a screening every first Thursday of the month, at The Royal Cinema in Toronto. The club kicked off last month with a screening of William Friedkin's To Live And Die In L.A., and continues May 7th with a 9pm screening of Brian De Palma's Body Double.

"Imagine a world where people’s worst impulses and darkest desires are stimulated by a landscape of synth-pop and bright neon lights," reads the website/Facebook description of the Neon Dreams Cinema Club. "Nothing is quite as it seems as you surrender yourself to the dazzling sights and soothing sounds of the Neon Dreams Cinema Club, a monthly film series exclusive to The Royal Cinema bringing you the best in delightfully surreal neo-noir cinema from the 70's, 80's, and beyond. So come on down, grab a beverage, get comfortable, and let us usher you into a state of adrenaline-fuelled excess."


Posted by Geoff at 9:53 PM CDT
Updated: Wednesday, April 29, 2015 9:00 PM CDT
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Monday, April 27, 2015
TWEETS & TUMBLRS
'UNTOUCHABLES' & EDWARD HOPPER / 'CARRIE' & 'DRESSED TO KILL' / WOMAN IN WHITE



Posted by Geoff at 11:01 PM CDT
Updated: Monday, April 27, 2015 11:03 PM CDT
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Sunday, April 26, 2015
MORRICONE: DE PALMA NEVER SMILES
"BUT HE IS A GREAT DIRECTOR: VERY GOOD AT CHOOSING STORIES... VERY ACCURATE"
This morning, Esquire U.K. posted Ennio Morricone's "What I've Learned -- The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly composer in his own words." Here are two or three (click the link above to read the whole thing)...

"I wake early. I do some physical exercise in the house. Then, around 7am, I go out to buy the newspapers. I read the newspapers. I wait for my wife to wake up and then we have breakfast. I start work around 8.30am. And that’s my day, that’s my routine."

"In Django Unchained [2012], there’s that sequence where a dog attacks and eats a man. That was too much. I sent a message to Quentin Tarantino and told him that was too strong."

"Brian De Palma never smiles. But he is a great director: very good at choosing stories, he pays a lot of attention to the screenplay and he’s very accurate."


Posted by Geoff at 10:14 AM CDT
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Thursday, April 23, 2015
ALLISON CRUTCHFIELD COVERS 'PHANTOM' SONG
'FAUX REAL II' - REAL BANDS COVERING FICTIONAL BANDS, OUT NEXT WEEK ON VINYL
Allison Crutchfield, singer/guitarist of the band Swearin' (and twin sister of Waxahatchee's Katie Crutchfield), has recorded a cover of the Paul Williams-written "Special To Me," the Phoenix audition song from Brian De Palma's Phantom Of The Paradise. The song appears on the compilation Faux Real II, which will be released on vinyl April 28, 2015, on Father/Daughter Records. The album, a sequel to last year's Record Store Day release Faux Real, features real-life bands covering songs by fictional ones-- songs written to be performed by characters from films, TV shows, cartoons, and so on. The cover of the album includes the credit, "Allison Crutchfield as Jessica Harper." You can listen to Crutchfield's version of the Phantom song on SoundCloud.

Crutchfield tells NME, "I first saw Phantom Of The Paradise at my dear friend Perry Shall's birthday. He'd organized a screening at his house because it's one of his favorites, and though I was wary to watch a movie I'd never heard of, I was immediately in love with everything about it. Every element is so nuanced and bizarre and oddly specific to this weird little scene that is ruled (and scored) flawlessly by Paul Williams. The song Phoenix sings in the audition scene is my favourite because it's literally her make-or-break moment and she handles it like a true badass singing a weird perfect pop song."

Posted by Geoff at 9:07 PM CDT
Updated: Thursday, April 23, 2015 9:11 PM CDT
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Sunday, April 19, 2015
'OBSESSION' SATURDAY AT BAM in NEW YORK
DCP, PAIRED WITH '4 VERTIGO', ALL PART OF SERIES "THE VERTIGO EFFECT"
Brian De Palma's Obsession will screen from DCP this Saturday, April 25th, at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, as part of the BAMcinématek series, "The Vertigo Effect". The series, which began April 16th, and runs through April 30th, is co-curated by C. Mason Wells. "Christian Petzold’s remarkable new film, Phoenix, is the latest in a long line of movies influenced by Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo," reads the BAMcinématek description of the series. "Nearly six decades after its release, this towering 1958 masterpiece continues to tantalize filmmakers with its many potent themes: erotic obsession, identity, doubles, and the link between sex and death. BAMcinématek presents a series of rich, fascinating works in which Vertigo’s shadow looms large."

De Palma's film will screen two times April 25th, at 7pm, and 9:30pm, along with Les LeVeque's 9-minute long 4 Vertigo, in which "Hitchcock’s film is sped up, compressed, and jumbled into a nine-minute, kaleidoscopic hallucination," according to the BAMcinématek description. Of Obsession, the website states, "Nearly twenty years after his wife’s tragic death, a guilt-ridden man (Robertson) meets her exact lookalike (Bujold)—cue obsessive makeover and intricate series of double crosses. With a script by Paul Schrader, endlessly swirling camerawork, and a deliriously romantic score by Vertigo composer Bernard Herrmann, De Palma’s florid tribute to Hitchcock creates a spellbinding mood all its own."

Other films in the series include Larry Cohen's Special Effects, Lucio Fulci's Perversion Story, Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys, Mel Brooks' High Anxiety, and Chris Marker's La Jetée, among several others.


Posted by Geoff at 11:57 PM CDT
Updated: Monday, April 20, 2015 12:22 AM CDT
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Saturday, April 18, 2015
CRITERION SUITING UP 'DRESSED TO KILL'?
NANCY ALLEN'S THROWBACK TO LAST THURSDAY LETS THE CAT OUT OF THE BAG


Posted by Geoff at 1:45 AM CDT
Updated: Saturday, April 18, 2015 2:42 AM CDT
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Monday, April 13, 2015
'UNTOUCHABLES' TUESDAY IN CHICAGO
CHICAGO FILM CRITICS ASSOCIATION EVENT HOSTED BY PETER SOBCZYNSKI
Brian De Palma's The Untouchables will screen twice on Tuesday, April 14-- at 1pm and 7pm at the Elk Grove Theatre (sometimes referred to as the Elk Grove Cinema). This is a Chicago Film Critics Association special event, and will be hosted by Peter Sobczynski, who will also lead a post-film discussion. De Palma is Sobczynski's favorite director, so it should be lively.

Posted by Geoff at 11:32 PM CDT
Updated: Monday, April 13, 2015 11:36 PM CDT
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Thursday, April 9, 2015
STUNTMAN REVIEWS TOM CRUISE'S 10 BEST STUNTS
AND MENDELSON: WHEN 'GOLDENEYE' & 'MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE' REINVENTED THE MOVIE TRAILER
Vulture's Bilge Ebiri interviewed a veteran stuntman to get his take on Tom Cruise's "ten greatest stunts"-- and the top two are from Brian De Palma's Mission: Impossible. Here's Ebiri's introduction, and the stuntman's reviews of the top two stunts:
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When the trailer for the new Mission: Impossible film landed last month, it seemed all anybody could talk about was the stunt of Tom Cruise hanging off an airplane. And with good reason — ever since the first Mission: Impossible movie, Tom Cruise films have featured more and more daring stunts, often performed by the actor himself. Impressive stuff, to be sure. But what do real stuntmen think of Tom Cruise’s stunts? To get a professional’s opinion, we turned to Randy Butcher, a veteran Canadian stuntman, stunt coordinator, and director who is currently the stunt coordinator for Orphan Black and has worked on a variety of films, including X-Men, Dawn of the Dead, K-19: The Widowmaker, and countless others. He took a look at some of Cruise’s best-known and most impressive stunts, and offered his take on how they might have been done — and whether that really is Tom Cruise doing those stunts.

1. Mission: Impossible (1996): Breaking into Langley, suspended on a wire.

Butcher: This is the wire gag that everybody copied forever. I’ve personally copied it myself. That’s Tom, hands down. It’s a pretty contrived scene, but I was on the edge of my seat. He’s in a harness, and they’re using some Spectra Rope, which is better than cable. Whether it’s 30 or 40 feet, Tom is absolutely in that harness, using his own stomach muscles and his own balance to maintain that position and that shot. They don’t cut away from it at all.

The fact that we can always see that it’s Tom really helps make the scene. There’s a profile shot of him over the computer, and you can actually sense his struggle to maintain that balance, which really adds to it. I know it’s not cool to like Tom Cruise anymore, but I’m a fan of his. I think he’s an underrated actor. His physical mannerisms complement what’s happening inside his mind. I like watching him act.

2. Mission: Impossible (1996): Fleeing as a giant fish tank explodes behind him.

Butcher: I’ve done stuff similar to this. They have a build, they fill it with water, and the special-effects team goes through a great deal of trouble to place detonation devices on that glass. If memory serves, in the scene, Tom Cruise sticks some kind of explosive on the glass. And there’s a guy standing in front of it. And that guy is jerked backwards on a cable, which is taken out in post, of course. If you have the opportunity to watch this scene frame by frame, watch the top of the glass before the guy gets jerked through. As he rises into the air, they cut to the opposite side of the glass that he’s going to come through. And if you look closely, you will see that at the top of the glass is a little hole that breaks first — that’s where the cable is going through. They’ve probably cut a hole in the glass, fed the cable through it to his harness, then, on action, he’s jerked backwards, probably from an air ratchet. And as he blows through, special effects create that spider effect that completely shatters the tempered glass.

And once he’s come blasting through, he’s opened up this huge, empty space in front of this tank for Tom Cruise to come through. And if you watch, you’ll see that Tom is at first behind a pillar. So he was out of harm’s way when they jerked the guy through. Once the glass is blown through, he comes out from behind that pillar and runs through the scene, towards [the] camera. I would have personally no issue at all putting an actor in that spot. I have no doubt that that’s Tom Cruise. (I’m pretty sure that that’s not live fish in there, though.) His only danger is that when this glass does blow, some of the broken glass will be carried along by the water, but not at any speed that would turn it into a projectile and potentially harm Tom. Plus, the lens has compressed the distance so much that he could be quite far away and you wouldn’t necessarily know it.

On the TV series Orphan Black, I just put an actor through a window. I had a stunt double there, and the actor and I had a chat. He was into doing it, but the producers weren’t because it was the first shot of the day and we had to shoot in sequence because of the way this apartment was going to be destroyed. But I designed how to do it so this guy wouldn’t be harmed. I needed him to go through, but I didn’t need to drag him back — that’s where the danger would have been. And he did it. So we had his face coming through the glass, and not the back of the stunt guy’s head. And I can’t begin to tell you what a big difference that makes, to be able to see the actor’s face in a situation like that.

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FORBES' MENDELSON ON THE 'GOLDENEYE' & 'MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE' TRAILERS

After Vulture posted Louis Plamondon's 1995-flavored version of the new Avengers: Age of Ultron trailer the other day, Forbes' Scott Mendelson got to thinking about the ways in which that era's initial teasers for GoldenEye and Mission: Impossible "basically reinvented the modern action movie trailer and slowly-but-surely changed how trailers for action movies were constructed."

Mendelson continues, "Yes, I am aware that GoldenEye was actually the 18th 007 adventure. But for all intents-and-purposes, Pierce Brosnan’s entry into the franchise, which came six years after the box office failure of License to Kill left the franchise’s long term future in doubt, was something of a soft reboot back before Hollywood felt the need to retell the origin story every friggin time. Anyway, the initial teaser trailer announced that James Bond was back in movie theaters during the summer of 1995 (attached to Species) showed off Pierce Brosnan in a tuxedo, and then dove headfirst into a 50-second montage of nonstop action and excitement, offering nary a hint of voiceover, plot, or even much in the way of narrative coherence. It was arguably the first trailer to move so quickly that you could barely digest the images.

"That’s not a criticism, but it was edited within an inch of its life and made the conventional action movie trailer, full of voiceover exposition, explicit plot points, and long take action sequences, feel downright slug-like by comparison. The James Bond franchise had one shot to reclaim its hold on the popular zeitgeist and make a case for its continued relevance in a world with Die Hard and Batman, and it wasn’t going to take any chances by coming up for air. And it was perhaps the most action-packed and relentlessly breathless action movie trailer you had ever seen. The next prime example of this somewhat new form of trailer construction came not with the second GoldenEye trailer (which was a conventional 1990′s sell with voice over and copious plot reveals), but rather the initial two teasers for Brian De Palma’s Mission: Impossible.

"What did audiences need to know about the Paramount release, which at the time was pegged to be the biggest grossing film of the summer (it sounds crazy now, but ID4 was not considered a sure thing even as late as June of 1996) other than that it was an adaptation of the popular ensemble spy action show and that it starred Tom Cruise? Nothing, which is what Paramount’s marketing department gave them outside of those two facts. The initial Mission: Impossible teaser dropped in late 1995 and didn’t even bother with a single line of dialogue, voice over or otherwise. They merely gave us 55 seconds of Tom Cruise and friends engaged in non-stop action set to Lalo Schifrin’s classic theme song culminating in that climactic 'Cruise flies off an exploding helicopter onto a train' bit that was one of the coolest things you had ever seen back then. That final shot of Cruise leaping from the exploding helicopter was the best money shot in a trailer I had ever seen. But upon seeing the film, my heart sank as I realized that golden money shot was actually the climactic death of the primary villain.

"So yes, I’ve been complaining about studios giving away the action finales of their films in the trailers for at least twenty years.

"The next trailer offered little-to-no plot beyond the introductory 'this is your mission' set-up and merely cryptic lines ('a simple game…') to power along what was basically 80 seconds of context-free action and just enough quotable dialogue to allow us to catch a moment’s breath. Ironically, if I may digress for a bit, it now exists as a classic example of both misdirection and spoiler-by-insinuation. If you actually pay attention to the trailer, you’ll see pretty much every major action moment in the film, which in turn makes the film appear to be far more action-drenched than it actually is. It falsely sets up Emmanuelle Béart as a damsel-in-distress spoiling not every action moment in the film but also quite a bit of the narrative. But I digress, the initial teasers for GoldenEye and Mission: Impossible were designed to be seen a few times in a theater, but they were also tailor made for the Internet, which was in its mainstream infancy."


Posted by Geoff at 11:58 PM CDT
Updated: Thursday, April 9, 2015 11:04 PM CDT
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Wednesday, April 8, 2015
'BODY DOUBLE' THURSDAY NIGHT IN ASHEVILLE, NC
THURSDAY HORROR PICTURE SHOW, HOSTED BY CRITICS KEN HANKE & JUSTIN SOUTHER


Brian De Palma's Body Double will screen at 8pm Thursday (April 9, 2015) at The Carolina, movie theater six, in Asheville, North Carlina. The screening is free, as part of the weekly Thursday Horror Picture Show, which is hosted by Mountain Xpress movie critics Ken Hanke and Justin Souther.

Hanke wrote a review of the film in advance of the screening in which he says he is "not quite a four-square fan" of De Palma. "My introduction to him was Phantom of the Paradise (1974), which I saw first-run at least twice and then many times during the days of the midnight cult movie. It probably remains my favorite — nearly matched by Carrie (1976). Those are my De Palma touchstone works — the ones I never tire of and have no reservations about. After that, it gets tricky, but I’m finding increased admiration for much of his subsequent work and am slowly reassessing it. Well, I’m reassessing some of it. I have no interest in revisiting Scarface (1983) or Raising Cain (1992). That brings us to Body Double, which I more or less enjoyed when it came out, but didn’t think was by any means great. I liked it enough, however, to pick it up for five bucks when I came across it in a Wal-Mart dump bin — and then promptly left on the shelf for years before getting around to actually watching it. I’m sorry I waited. I’m not sure it’s a great film, but it might be a great movie, and it’s definitely great De Palma. It’s also neck and neck with his much-maligned The Black Dahlia (2006) for the screwiest picture he ever made — but it’s a lot more fun."

Posted by Geoff at 11:19 PM CDT
Updated: Thursday, April 9, 2015 12:20 AM CDT
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