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Recent Headlines
a la Mod:

Domino is
a "disarmingly
straight-forward"
work that "pushes
us to reexamine our
relationship to images
and their consumption,
not only ethically
but metaphysically"
-Collin Brinkman

De Palma on Domino
"It was not recut.
I was not involved
in the ADR, the
musical recording
sessions, the final
mix or the color
timing of the
final print."

Listen to
Donaggio's full score
for Domino online

De Palma/Lehman
rapport at work
in Snakes

De Palma/Lehman
next novel is Terry

De Palma developing
Catch And Kill,
"a horror movie
based on real things
that have happened
in the news"

Supercut video
of De Palma's films
edited by Carl Rodrigue

Washington Post
review of Keesey book

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Exclusive Passion
Interviews:

Brian De Palma
Karoline Herfurth
Leila Rozario

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AV Club Review
of Dumas book

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De Palma interviewed
in Paris 2002

De Palma discusses
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The Virtuoso
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The De Palma Touch

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Carrie...A Fan's Site

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No Harm In Charm

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The Master Of Suspense

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Fly Rule

Movie Mags

Directorama

The Filmmaker Who
Came In From The Cold

Jim Emerson on
Greetings & Hi, Mom!

Scarface: Make Way
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The Big Dive
(Blow Out)

Carrie: The Movie

Deborah Shelton
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Welcome to the
Offices of Death Records

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italkyoubored

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De Palma a la Mod
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Entries by Topic
A note about topics: Some blog posts have more than one topic, in which case only one main topic can be chosen to represent that post. This means that some topics may have been discussed in posts labeled otherwise. For instance, a post that discusses both The Boston Stranglers and The Demolished Man may only be labeled one or the other. Please keep this in mind as you navigate this list.
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Thursday, November 19, 2020
SAM IRVIN RECALLS MEETING DE PALMA IN 1975
AGE 19, HE ORGANIZED A DE PALMA FEST ON CAMPUS AT UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/samirvindepalma1975.jpg

In November of 1975, as Sam Irvin tells it, Brian De Palma was busy in post-production on the film that was still titled Deja Vu (released the following year as Obsession), and also casting Carrie during joint sessions with George Lucas, who was casting his new film, Star Wars. In the midst of all of this, as a sophomore at the University of South Carolina, Irvin managed to compel De Palma to attend a festival of De Palma films that Irvin put together on campus. Irvin posted the above photos today on Facebook, with the following description:
TBT: November 1975. The day I met my future boss Brian De Palma. As a sophomore at the University of South Carolina, at age of 19, I organized a festival of De Palma films (SISTERS, PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE, GREETINGS and HI, MOM!) at a movie theater on campus.

In THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER, I found a phone number for the casting office for CARRIE and managed to get De Palma on the phone and I invited him to come to Columbia, South Carolina, to appear at the festival.

I took De Palma to be a guest at a film class I was taking, taught by Professor Bernie Dunlap (in the center of these two photos) where De Palma drew storyboards in chalk on the blackboard and played cues on a cassette tape player of Bernard Herrmann’s newly recorded score for OBSESSION, De Palma’s latest film which was still in post-production (called DEJA VU at that time).

My friend Lee Tsiantis snapped these two photos of me (left), Bernie Dunlap (center) and De Palma (right).

In the summer of 1977, between my junior and senior year of college, I got my first professional job in the movie industry working as a production assistant, extra, and on-set journalist (for CINEFANTASTIQUE magazine) on Brian De Palma’s THE FURY starring Kirk Douglas and John Cassavetes.

Then, upon graduation in 1978, De Palma hired me to Associate Produce and Production Manage HOME MOVIES, a comedy he directed that summer, starring Kirk Douglas, Nancy Allen and Keith Gordon.

After that, De Palma hired me as his full-time assistant on DRESSED TO KILL starring Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen and Keith Gordon.

I owe my entire career to De Palma and everything I learned under his mentorship.


Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CST
Updated: Friday, November 20, 2020 12:05 AM CST
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Tuesday, October 6, 2020
HAND-PAINTED 'CAIN' GLASSWARE FROM POUR DECISIONS
AS 'FIND YOUR FILM' PODCAST DISCUSSES 'RAISING CAIN' & 'FEMME FATALE'
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/podcastcainglass.jpg

"Brian De Palma is hands down my favorite director," states Greg Srisavasdi in the description for the latest episode of his Find You Film podcast, "and thankfully Eric Holmes and Bruce Purkey are here to provide even handed insight into the Brian De Palma films Femme Fatale and Raising Cain!" Srisavasdi menions that they plan to do more De Palma episodes "as this is just the beginning!"

On the podcast's Instagram page, the episode is promoted with the image above, which shows a hand-painted Raising Cain glass credited to Pour Decisions by Carol.


Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CDT
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Monday, October 5, 2020
'CAN WE HAVE A CHAT ON ZOOM NOW, JAY?'
DE PALMA INTERVIEWED FOR JAY GLENNIE'S UPCOMING BOOK ABOUT 'RAGING BULL'
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/depalmaragingbull.jpg

"'Can we have a chat on Zoom, now, Jay?'" Jay Glennie captioned the image above with that quote today on Instagram, adding, "When Brian De Palma (so many great films: Carlito’s Way, The Untouchables, Carrie, Scarface, Mission: Impossible, Blow Out) emails to chat about Raging Bull you drop everything!"

Glennie interviewed Martin Scorsese last month via Zoom for the book, a "Making of Raging Bull" from Coattail Publications, in collaboration with Robert De Niro. If you register your interest in the book at the bottom of the Raging Bull page, you'll get on their email list and can then recieve a 10% discount when the book is released.

In an American Cinematographer review of the 2009 Blu-ray release of Raging Bull, Kenneth Sweeney quotes Scorsese from one of the disc's extra features: "When I was preparing for the picture, Walter Bernstein took me, with Jay Cocks and Brian De Palma, to the fights at Madison Square Garden for the first time. We sat all the way up in the seats, way up. Walter was sort of talking me through the fights — what was happening and such, and it was very hard to tell what was happening. Then I realized…I don’t know how to shoot two guys in a boxing ring! I just don’t know how to shoot it. De Palma looked over at me at one point and said, 'Good luck.'"


Posted by Geoff at 8:35 PM CDT
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Wednesday, September 30, 2020
COLLIDER SHARES EXCLUSIVE CINEPHILE BOOK PREVIEW
"A IS FOR AUTEUR", A 'LIL CINEPHILE BOOK IN WHICH D IS FOR DE PALMA
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/disfordepalma.jpg

Collider's Drew Taylor posted an exclusive look today at an upcoming children's book from the creators of Cinephile: A Card Game. Titled A is for Auteur, the book is writen by Cory Everett and illustrated by Steve Isaacs.

"A is for Auteur is officially described as a 'beautifully-crafted alphabet book to inspire the next generation of cinephiles,'" Taylor writes in the post. "It features 'references to more than 200 films from Alfred Hitchcock to Agnès Varda,' told in the style you’ve come to know and love from the card game. I’ve read the book and it’s incredibly fun and charming, with gorgeous illustrations and told in a sing-song-y nursery rhyme style that is perfect for leaving an impression on your budding movie lover."

Taylor then adds, "Along those lines we are also thrilled to debut an exclusive page from the book devoted to living legend Brian De Palma, who recently celebrated his 80th birthday. I mean, is that awesome or what?"


Posted by Geoff at 8:31 PM CDT
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Thursday, September 24, 2020
'BLOW OUT' & 'CARLITO'S WAY' ARE GATEWAY MOVIES
FOR NY TIMES COLUMNIST, BOTH FILMS DISPLAY THE FINER POINTS OF DE PALMA AS AUTEUR
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/nytimesdepalmaauteur.jpg

"One of the most enduring questions among cinephiles has been what exactly to do about Brian De Palma," Ben Kenigsberg states at the start of his "Gateway Movies" column today at The New York Times. "Detractors used to dismiss him as a talented recycler who riffed on the movies of great auteurs (Alfred Hitchcock most obviously and consistently) without achieving those auteurs’ nuance or depth. Admirers cast him as one of the most gifted stylists of his generation — every bit the peer of Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg, who came up in the film industry at the same time. In this view, he’s also a serious artist who has preserved classic Hollywood traditions even as he has slyly toyed with them.

"The 2016 documentary De Palma, now streaming on Netflix, gave the feeling of resolving the matter. The director sat down with fellow filmmakers Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow, much as Hitchcock had with François Truffaut, and went film by film through his career. No one who saw the documentary could doubt De Palma’s sincerity, the range of his work or, particularly, his command of film language. De Palma turned 80 this month, and at this point it seems uncontroversial to rank him among the living masters of the cinematic form.

"What recent appraisals haven’t settled, though, is a pettier tiff among De Palma’s fans, about the 'right' way to appreciate De Palma. You liked The Untouchables (1987) and think it’s one of his best? Too bad. If you’re talking to a De Palma fanatic, The Untouchables was a commercial effort, written by David Mamet, and to see it as superior to a De Palma-penned Psycho pastiche like Dressed to Kill (1980) is to miss his originality.

"My own enthusiasms, as Robert De Niro’s Al Capone might call them, have varied wildly over time, from skepticism to appreciation and back. But if even inveterate De Palma watchers sometimes get tsk-tsked for their taste, where does that leave newcomers? I propose that a good middle ground is to start with a De Palma classic from his freewheeling 1970s-’80s period, Blow Out, and to continue with one of his finest studio efforts, Carlito’s Way. Aficionados may howl at that one as insufficiently pure-grade. (David Koepp, not De Palma, wrote the script, which mostly plays it straight.) But in De Palma, the director himself remembers watching Carlito’s Way and thinking, 'I can’t make a better picture than this.'"

In fact, back in 2002, De Palma had chosen these very same two pictures to bookend a career retrospective at the Pompidou in Paris. Two sides of the same personal coin, the two films share a similar sense of tragedy, irony, and fate.

Earlier this month, the blogger at You Remind Me Of The Frame discussed De Palma's Phantom Of The Paradise as "a complex and intertextual satire" that nevertheless "operates independently" of its references. Kenigsberg echoes that viewpoint in his discussion of Blow Out:

Part of what makes “Blow Out” quintessential De Palma is that it wears its influences proudly — but also recombines them to make them fully the director’s own. The basic premise is consciously indebted to Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Blow-Up” (1966), which concerns a photographer who accidentally captures evidence of a murder. But De Palma’s film uses the setup to create a thriller, something that Antonioni’s study of disaffection in swinging London steadfastly refused to be.

Blow Out” centers on a movie sound man, Jack (John Travolta), who unwittingly records audio that could prove a fatal car accident was a political assassination. Antonioni is only the most superficial influence. De Palma borrowed the car accident off the bridge from the Chappaquiddick scandal involving Ted Kennedy. Jack pores over individual frames of the murder scene as if parsing the Zapruder footage, which gets a shout-out. De Palma has cited the Watergate operative G. Gordon Liddy as his inspiration for the villain (John Lithgow), who has vastly exceeded his mandate by killing and goes to extreme lengths to cover his tracks.

Although the film has something to say about what was at the time recent American history and the public’s capacity to turn a blind eye to corruption, on several levels “Blow Out” is a movie about movies and the apparent contradiction they contain.

On one hand, movies offer the promise of capturing the truth. Jack, who recorded the accident while making audio of whooshing wind for a horror movie, turns increasingly to film to prove his case. He cuts still photos of the accident from a magazine and animates them, synchronizing them to the audio he’s recorded to create a mini-documentary of the crime scene.

On the other hand, movies are inherently constructions, with the capacity to fabricate. “Blow Out” has already lied to us by opening with an elaborate fake-out: a sequence from the point of view of a slasher stalking coeds that turns out to be a film within the film. (This sequence represented De Palma’s first use of the Steadicam, which was then a novel device, and a tool he has used to extraordinary effect ever since.) The sequence ends with the stalker about to murder a showering woman, and she lets out a pitiful scream; cut to the screening room, where we learn that Jack hasn’t bothered to dub the actress. The search for a believable fake scream frames the movie. In the final irony, he will hear that perfect scream in real life.


Kenigsberg goes on to discuss the various vantage points De Palma provides the viewer in Blow Out's key repeated sequence, before transitioning toward Carlito's Way. "Few filmmakers are as adept at leading viewers through the geography of a sequence," he states. "My favorite example is in the final 20 minutes of Carlito’s Way, which is simply one of the most thrilling chases ever filmed." Read the rest at The New York Times.


Posted by Geoff at 8:56 PM CDT
Updated: Thursday, September 24, 2020 9:02 PM CDT
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Tuesday, September 22, 2020
NASHAWATY ON THE COENS' 'MILLER'S CROSSING' AT 30
'DANNY BOY' SEQUENCE IS "SINGLE GREATEST BRIAN DE PALMA WIND-UP THAT DE PALMA NEVER DIRECTED"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/dannyboy2.jpg

Today at Esquire, Chris Nashawaty's essay celebrates his favorite Coen Brothers movie, Miller's Crossing. "Released on this day in 1990," Nashawaty writes, "Miller’s Crossing is probably the Coens’ least celebrated masterpiece. The only movie in their top tier that doesn’t get enough love. I’m not sure that I know why that is, but if I had to venture a guess, I’d say that it’s probably because its plot is too dense and Byzantine, its tough-guy and double-dealing dame patter is too rat-a-tat fast to stick, and the performances are too layered and subtle to fully register until you’ve watched it three or four times. Actually, I can’t think of another film from a major Hollywood studio over the past 30 years that asks more from its audience—yet rewards them with so much for their efforts."

Deeper into the essay, Nashawaty digs into a couple of the film's key moments:

The opening scene of the film is so directly borrowed from Francis Coppola’s The Godfather that it goes beyond homage into outright theft. An immigrant visits a mob boss, hat in hand, asking for a favor. But before you can press charges, the Coens deliver the film’s now-iconic image as the opening credits appear—that black hat blowing in the wind like an ominous reverie that eludes the dreamer’s grasp. Carter Burwell’s score turns the image into pure undiluted poetry. There’s a reason why the very same theme was repurposed to sell the trailer for The Shawshank Redemption a four years later.

But what, you may ask, makes Miller’s Crossing better than Fargo or The Big Lebowski or No Country For Old Men or Inside Llewyn Davis? Of course, these things are all subjective. But I can’t think of another Coen brothers film with as much sheer ambition. It dares to turn a pair of traditionally streamlined genres (film noir, gangster pictures) into something so convoluted it borders on the Baroque. This isn’t a movie where characters double-cross one another, they triple- and quadruple-cross one another until your head starts to hurt. Tamping down the visual pyrotechnics of Raising Arizona, Sonnenfeld gives the film an almost-stately sepia period palette. His technique in the film’s greatest sequence, where Finney’s Leo unleashes tommy-gun justice on a pair of assassins sent to kill him while he’s at home lying in bed in his silk bathrobe listening to “Danny Boy” on the phonograph, is the single greatest Brian De Palma wind-up that De Palma never directed. Almost every actor in the film gives the best performance of their career in Miller’s Crossing, especially Turturro, Polito, and Harden, whose incestuous, “sick twist” Verna bristles with the sort of ferocious, tough-talking fatalism that would have put Gloria Grahame, Barbara Stanwyck, and Lauren Bacall out of work had the film been made in the ‘40s.


Posted by Geoff at 11:07 PM CDT
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Sunday, September 13, 2020
'MASTER OF OPERATIC MAYHEM'
EDGAR WRIGHT TWEETS A HAPPY 80TH BIRTHDAY MESSAGE TO DE PALMA
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/edgarwrighttweet80th.jpg

"A very happy 80th to master of operatic mayhem, Brian De Palma," Edgar Wright posted on Twitter this morning. "His films have thrilled me since I first became obsessed with cinema. I will shoot a split diopter shot in 32fps & then shoot 3 pages of exposition in a flashy one-r in his honor. Thank you for all the thrills, BDP." When someone commented that Wright was two days late, Wright responded, "Better late than never."

Posted by Geoff at 9:00 AM CDT
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Saturday, September 12, 2020
BRIAN DE PALMA'S 80TH BIRTHDAY ZOOM PARTY
WITH SPIELBERG, SCORSESE, KOEPP, JAY COCKS, WES ANDERSON, BAUMBACH, GERWIG, PALTROW, LEHMAN


"The Maestro, Brian De Palma, turned 80 today, and the Zoom toasts were flying," David Koepp wrote on his Instagram yesterday, in a caption to go with the snapshot above. "I love you, buddy. 80 more, please."

And then today, Piper De Palma posted the pic below on her Instagram. Let's follow the zoom around the room, so to speak: Brian De Palma, flanked by Susan Lehman and Piper, sits at twelve o'clock; then going clockwise, Noah Baumbach, Greta Gerwig, David Koepp, Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Jake Paltrow, Jay Cocks, and, in the center, Wes Anderson. A legendary line-up, indeed.

(Thanks to Adam Zanzie, via a Nick Newman tweet.)


Posted by Geoff at 3:55 PM CDT
Updated: Sunday, September 13, 2020 8:17 PM CDT
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Thursday, September 10, 2020
FILM SCHOOL REJECTS LOOKS AT DE PALMA'S OBSESSIONS
WITH "THE 10 MOST OBSESSION-WORTHY SHOTS OF BRIAN DE PALMA'S CAREER", BY ANNA SWANSON
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/depalmaobsessionssept102020.jpg

"To say Brian De Palma is a master of obsession is an understatement," states Anna Swanson at the start of the introduction to her article, "The 10 Most Obsession-Worthy Shots of Brian De Palma's Career," posted today at Film School Rejects (complete with the image montage shown above). "For more than fifty years," Swanson continues, "he’s demonstrated his skill as one of the best American filmmakers by creating works steeped in paranoia and abound with suspenseful sequences that would have made Hitchcock sweat. His films, while often revolving around characters driven by their own obsessions, have a unique ability to worm their way into viewers’ minds through technical achievement and thematic resonance.

"From early masterworks such as Phantom of the Paradise to the overlooked and incendiary Domino, De Palma is gifted at crafting moments that don’t just linger, they burrow. Whether it’s a mind-bending split diopter, a startlingly vibrant color palette, or an assaultive act of violence, his films are unforgettable. This made selecting only ten shots a near-impossible task. One could select one-hundred shots from any given De Palma film and it still wouldn’t be a complete catalog of his skill. But the following ten shots are the ones that immediately come to mind when thinking about what makes De Palma the director he is."

I'll leave it to you to go to Film School Rejects to discover which shots she has chosen (with gifs included), and what she has to say about them... but, well, when you read the first one here, I think you'll see that you're in for a treat:

Hi, Mom! (1970)

The Shot: A woman tests out her new camera by locating Robert De Niro‘s Jon Robin in her field of vision and zooming in on him.

The Obsession: One of De Palma’s signature components is voyeurism. In Hi, Mom!, a film very much about both active and passive forms of looking and observation, this moment highlights an intrinsic curiosity that is found across De Palma’s filmography. While aspiring pornographer Jon looks at his own equipment, this woman turns her attention to him in order to test out the zoom feature. She decides to zoom in on a stranger across the room. She remarks that he becomes blurrier the closer she zooms in, while the focus eventually adjusts as Jon turns his own camera on her.

It’s a rather insignificant moment, one that has very little bearing on the film’s narrative, but it captures some of the most prominent themes in the film. Here, the camera is a novelty, and the prospect of using it to capture footage of a stranger is a bit of lighthearted fun to the female patron, while to Jon it is a tool for invasive voyeurism. There’s a duality to the tool, one that contradicts and complicates any attempt to classify an inherent quality of the camera.

There are also contractions in its very mechanism. As the woman remarks, the closer she gets to Jon, the more the image becomes blurry. While she remains on the other side of the room, she gets a sense of proximity but loses clarity. This shot is also a remarkable comment on the impulses of both De Palma and his characters — when anyone has a camera in hand, they can’t help but aim it at another person. Sure, De Palma is a voyeur. Who isn’t?


Posted by Geoff at 11:16 PM CDT
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Wednesday, September 9, 2020
VIDEO - A SMALL COLLISION OF DE PALMA & HITCHCOCK
ALSO, 'CARLITO'S WAY' IN 8 MINUTES, AS BLOW UP/ARTE CELEBRATES DE PALMA'S 80TH BIRTHDAY



Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CDT
Updated: Thursday, September 10, 2020 12:42 AM CDT
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