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Domino is
a "disarmingly
straight-forward"
work that "pushes
us to reexamine our
relationship to images
and their consumption,
not only ethically
but metaphysically"
-Collin Brinkman

De Palma on Domino
"It was not recut.
I was not involved
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musical recording
sessions, the final
mix or the color
timing of the
final print."

Listen to
Donaggio's full score
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De Palma/Lehman
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in Snakes

De Palma/Lehman
next novel is Terry

De Palma developing
Catch And Kill,
"a horror movie
based on real things
that have happened
in the news"

Supercut video
of De Palma's films
edited by Carl Rodrigue

Washington Post
review of Keesey book

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Exclusive Passion
Interviews:

Brian De Palma
Karoline Herfurth
Leila Rozario

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AV Club Review
of Dumas book

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Saturday, June 8, 2024
PAYPHONES IN DE PALMA (PART 17) - BODY DOUBLE
"I've got to talk to someone. Today. The Beach Terrace motel? I'll wear something special. You'll see."
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/bdphone455.jpg


Posted by Geoff at 11:51 PM CDT
Updated: Saturday, June 8, 2024 11:56 PM CDT
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Tuesday, May 21, 2024
GREGG HENRY RECALLS FILMING ON STAGE 16 AT WARNER BROS.
NEW PORTION OF INDIEWIRE INTERVIEW FOR 40th ANNIVERSARY OF BODY DOUBLE
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/bdinthehole65.jpg

Indiewire's Samantha Bergeson has posted another portion of her "wide-sweeping interview" with Gregg Henry for the 40th anniversary of Brian De Palma's Body Double. Here's a bit of it:
“You remember exactly what the anxiety was of the day,” Henry said of rewatching “Body Double” for the interview. “Seeing the shots that were difficult…I don’t know if you remember the shot that sort of like when Sam first takes Jake up to the house? It’s the looking and seeing the view, you see it from outside and whatever and then takes him over to the Hollywood sign and the camera then goes from inside to outside the house, and it’s this long shot that goes out as the score sort of kicks in, and looking at us in the window and then it connects to the other house. All of that, we were on Stage 16, the big stage of Warner Bros. They built both houses in this stage so that he could execute these kind of shots.”

While the erotic thriller pays homage to “Rear Window,” Henry detailed just how much “craziness” was going on behind the scenes, including De Palma refusing to film the climax outside after one “freezing” night shoot.

“Speaking of that big stage, we shot the scene that takes place by the aqueduct, right where the grave ends up being dug,” Henry said. “We went out and shot the first scene scheduled there. I knew all of the freeway. It comes down on the mountains, that border, and they have some shots of it in the movie that are really, really cool. We were shooting up there, but it was freezing. It was so cold, and we’d be up there at like two in the morning, three in the morning, four in the morning, and Brian is like, ‘That’s it. We’re not shooting up here anymore.’ And so he then took the other corner of [Stage] 16 and built a piece of the aqueduct type. I think the schedule sort of widened a little bit for what was going be done on the stage that night, but it was so terribly cold out there.”

Upon being moved indoors, the “special shots” for that scene included Henry throwing dirt into the grave of Melanie Griffith’s character.

“I’m up on 25 feet, way up, so you get that long shot from underneath of the dirt coming down. Then all the stuff that took place there at that location instead of, you know, in the grave,” Henry said.


Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CDT
Updated: Wednesday, May 22, 2024 12:21 AM CDT
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Friday, May 3, 2024
GREGG HENRY TALKS TO INDIEWIRE - 'BODY DOUBLE' & DE PALMA
"I'M EXTREMELY PROUD TO HAVE DONE A LOT OF MOVIES WITH BRIAN"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/thisiscalledanexit40.jpg

As Netflix celebrates the 40th anniversary of Brian De Palma's Body Double, Gregg Henry talks to IndieWire's Samantha Bergeson about the film and working with De Palma:
“It wasn’t a box office smash and it wasn’t promoted heavily or endorsed by critics at the time,” Henry said. “It was not enthusiastically endorsed by the studio. They kept the opening on the down low, you know what I mean? Now, that might be just my opinion. Go talk to the marketing budget people who might tell you something different. But I don’t think so. I think it was pretty understated in terms of the publicity because it was dealing with porn stars and looking at Hollywood in a sort of satirical way. It had all kinds of dark sort of things and Brian could be prickly when dealing with those studio types as well.”

That “prickliness” from De Palma was rooted in the mainstream pressure within Hollywood to conform to a particular genre. De Palma, rather, built his auteurism upon commenting on the state of the film industry as a whole rather than succumbing to it.

“I think part of it is what we were just talking about a little bit ago is that there’s, you know, well, ‘How am I supposed to classify this? What pigeonhole can we put this in?'” Henry said. “‘Well, it’s funny but it’s kind of scary.’ ‘Well, it’s just a thriller.’ ‘Well, he said it is like ‘Rear Window.” Just on and on, the way people talk about Brian’s movies.”

According to Henry, “Body Double” has the ideal blend of the “definitive De Palma signature,” AKA it confused critics and studio marketing executives alike because it’s supposed to.

“I think that he had it before that but I think at that point in time, it’s like it becomes this sort of stamp along with the score,” Henry said of “Body Double” being distinctly De Palma-esque. “You can see like, you know, five seconds from across a large room and go, ‘Oh, that’s all pretty unusual.’ I mean, it’s unusual for, like, a singer’s voice or a painter’s paintings or anything.”

The tone of “Body Double” just might be what audience members are trying to unravel. While the film is no doubt a thriller, that’s not where the core tension comes from onscreen. Rather, it’s the toying with parody, power, and pleasure that De Palma deftly explores both with his camera work and script.

“I just think a lot of it is tongue in cheek,” Henry said. “A lot of scenes are humorous and poke fun at the movie business, certainly. It fires off in a lot of directions.”

Like that old Hollywood saying, films that criticize Hollywood don’t ever really find their appreciation in Hollywood. Don’t bite the hand, et cetera, et cetera. Henry finds “Body Double” “still funny” 40 years later, but also is aware that modern audiences may find some of the sequences a little more complex in today’s political climate.

“You watch it with your hand over your eyes,” Henry joked. “It was more fun than anything. It’ll be very interesting actually [to watch the discourse surrounding the re-release]. It was considered racy and dangerous for Brian to be taking this stuff on and doing it in the film. And now it’s racy and dangerous for a whole different reason. But maybe it’s the same reason, I don’t know.”

Henry continued, “I think some of the sense of humor might not play but some of the things that are funny to me, that are funny to Brian…I mean, he has that romantic spinning and 360 shot of the embrace which is really difficult to do and he does them really beautifully, with the score swelling. Those things make me laugh, you know. But then I don’t know if they make anybody else laugh. The same with the drilling scene. I just remember we’re talking about which bit we’re going to use and I’m saying to myself, ‘I know Brian’s going to go for that, which is huge,’ and that was the one he wanted. Then we’re shooting it in the blocking of it all. I had forgotten this, but it started with this crazy shot with using the drill horizontally, sort of going like as a sword going into her and everything. Then ultimately she’s on the ground and I said, ‘Well, I know what you want’ and I turned around with the drill and I sat down and started to swing it between my legs [like a penis]. And he said, ‘Yeah, that’ll be great.'”

From improvised phallic weaponry to cinematography Easter egg jokes, it makes sense why “Body Double” proved it could transcend its (or any) genre. “It’s sufficiently scary but it’s also very funny,” Henry said.

In fact, the only other director who can balance that tonal discrepancy between comedy and horror is James Gunn, according to Henry.

“I did James’ first movie, ‘Slither,’ with him, which has a similar sort of sensibility in terms of humor,” Henry said. “James and Brian are really my favorite people as directors.”

Like with De Palma, Henry continued to work with Gunn and appeared in the “Guardians of the Galaxy” trilogy.

As for “Body Double,” Henry couldn’t help but lament on the greatness of De Palma.

“I’m extremely proud to have done a lot of movies with Brian and I’m proud of being in this movie, even though it deals with some dicey and juicy areas,” Henry said. “I think he’s a masterful filmmaker and I think he is a stylist like very few directors are. It’s been an honor to be able to work with him.”


Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CDT
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Tuesday, April 16, 2024
BILL MAHER JOKES ABOUT STARRING IN 'BODY DOUBLE'
FROM THE MARCH 29 EPISODE OF REAL TIME WITH BILL MAHER ON HBO/MAX
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/maherbd1.jpg

Thanks to Brett!


Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CDT
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Wednesday, April 3, 2024
MUBI VIDEO - SARAH SHERMAN ON HER FAVORITE MOVIE POSTERS
POSTER FOR BODY DOUBLE IS HER ALL-TIME FAVE, HAS IT HANGING IN HER SNL OFFICE

Posted by Geoff at 8:14 PM CDT
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Thursday, December 28, 2023
VIDEO TWEET - WAXWORK PREPARES 'BODY DOUBLE' VINYL
EXPANDED PINO DONAGGIO SOUNDTRACK AVAILABLE NEXT WEEK
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/waxworkbd1.jpg


Posted by Geoff at 10:11 PM CST
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Wednesday, September 20, 2023
TWEET - ADS FOR 'BODY DOUBLE' IN LONDON, 1985
CENSORED VIDEO VERSION RELEASED DAY AFTER FULL-ON THEATRICAL
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/londondb4a.jpg


Posted by Geoff at 11:22 PM CDT
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Wednesday, August 23, 2023
'EVERYTHING GOES NEON, AND YOU GET THE SPLIT-SCREEN'
'BODY DOUBLE' DISCUSSION ON LATEST EPISODE OF 'THE HORROR VISION' PODCAST
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/tweetelementspodcast.jpg

Missi Schmid:
One of my favorite things is, you briefly mentioned that the movie kind of flips halfway through, and it’s like we get pulled into a different world. But there’s this one scene when he goes to Club X, when they’re doing that whole Relax song, where you see him and there’s that door labeled “Sluts,” and he’s standing there. The camera follows him, and we see the Holly character behind the swinging door. So the door is swinging, but we get glimpses of what she’s doing. The camera follows him in, but then everything goes neon, and you get the split-screen, where you’re watching her dance and you’re watching him watch her. And then when they close the door, she pulls him into her scene. And pulls him into her world. And everything turns upside down. And that’s probably my favorite part of the movie.


Posted by Geoff at 10:42 PM CDT
Updated: Wednesday, August 23, 2023 11:16 PM CDT
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Tuesday, June 27, 2023
JONNY POLONSKY GUITAR SOLO BRINGS 'BODY DOUBLE'
DONAGGIO THEME CAMEOS AS SLIDE GUITAR SOLO ON NEW ALBUM'S OPENING TRACK "EVERYWHERE ALL THE TIME"


Jonny Polonsky is interviewed by Guitar Player's Richard Bienstock:
The songs on Rise of the Rebel Angels go in so many directions stylistically. There’s rock, power-pop, glam, folk, piano ballads, punkier things. Where do you take musical influence from?

There’s so much. I love the Pretenders; Chrissie Hynde is a huge hero. Jeff Buckley. Oasis. The Beatles, obviously. Frank Black and the Pixies. Tom Waits. Mark Lanegan. The Replacements. Prince. I also love stuff like System of a Down – I’m really a huge fan of Daron Malakian’s guitar playing and songwriting.

And Julee Cruise – those records where Angelo Badalamenti did the music and David Lynch did the words: I’m a massive fan of those, especially the first one, [1989’s] Floating Into the Night. And of course I love all the ’70s glam stuff, like T. Rex, Bowie, Mott the Hoople. Sweet, Slade… All of that.

You play a variety of instruments on the record. But is guitar your go-to?

It’s definitely the instrument I feel most fluent on. I love drums and I love piano, but guitar comes easiest to me and it’s the one I’ve been playing the longest.

Is it your main songwriting tool?

Usually. Sometimes I’ll write on piano, or a synth sound will trigger something in me. Every once in a while I’ll write something in my head, like on a plane flight or when I’m out walking. But usually it’s from messing around on an acoustic guitar and finding some chords or a melody that feels good.

That’s what happened with, for instance, “Wrong Dove,” which is the second-to-last song on the album. I was just goofing around on the couch with a 12-string acoustic. And in retrospect, I can see that I’d been listening to a lot of [musician and producer] Alex G. I can hear that in it. It has that same kind of high falsetto vocal.

There’s also some great lead guitar work on the record, in particular on songs like “Everywhere All the Time,” and the first single, “Let It Rust,” which have very expressive slide work. And the closing track, “Live to Ride,” features a really over-the-top multitracked lead.

“Everywhere All the Time,” the lead in that is the melody from the theme from Body Double, the Brian De Palma film, which I’ve always loved. There’s always little musical Easter eggs that I’m intentionally or unintentionally leaving in. And I just thought that sounded cool in the song.

And something like “Live to Ride” – sometimes I get tired of having a pop tune with, like, a really tasteful solo. So on that one I was thinking more like Steve Vai, like, “How can I like ruin this song?” [laughs] And don’t get me wrong – I love Steve Vai. That’s not disparagement. I just thought that most people wouldn’t take a tune like that and put like a shredding solo on it. To me that felt sort of vulgar and inappropriate, which is why I wanted to do it. That one was done with the Schecter with the Sustainiac and the Floyd Rose, and I double- and triple-tracked it in places.


Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CDT
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Saturday, May 13, 2023
THE MOST 'LOS ANGELES' FILM OF ALL TIME
DAVID ROBERT MITCHELL ON 'BODY DOUBLE', 'THE LONG GOODBYE', 'UNDER THE SILVER LAKE'
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/bdshades55.jpg

Le Forum des images in Paris is currently in the midst of "Portrait de Los Angeles," a program of films (and classes/events about the films) set in Los Angeles. Brian De Palma's Body Double and The Black Dahlia are both included, as are works such as Chinatown, The Big Lebowski, Boogie Nights, Mulholland Drive, Once Upon A Time...in Hollywood, Heat, American Gigolo, The Canyons, Licorice Pizza, Sunset Boulevard, Pleasure, Shampoo, The Long Goodbye, and many more.

All three of David Robert Mitchell's features to date - The Myth Of The American Sleepover, It Follows, and Under The Silver Lake - are also part of the series, as he was there last week for the retrospective of his films, and also presnted a Masterclass and "carte blanche," for which he chose two of the series' other films to speak about about. With help from Google Translate, here's what Télérama's Augustin Pietron-Locatelli writes:

On the occasion of its “Portrait of Los Angeles” cycle, the Forum des images received filmmaker David Robert Mitchell. Inhabited by the works of those who had filmed it before him, he superbly staged the city of angels in “Under the Silver Lake”.

He has seen films about it, and his own are full of references: in three feature films, David Robert Mitchell proves his mastery of a wide range of American genres. A reinterpretation of the teen movie, The Myth of the American Sleepover (2010, unreleased in France), his idea of Hitchcockian horror with It Follows in 2014, and then Under the Silver Lake, a hallucinated film noir, a little shunned during its passage in Official Selection at the Cannes Film Festival 2018.

Originally from the suburbs of Detroit, "DRM" only landed in Los Angeles for its third feature film. But he knows by heart the classics that depict the city: he is well suited to draw a portrait of them. When we meet the American filmmaker before his first session presentation at the Forum des images in Paris, we discover a man who certainly does not look 48 years old. And who doesn't seem to have come down from an eleven-hour plane flight either... For his carte blanche, clever, he presents two films "which are dear to him", but which, above all, he evokes the air of nothing in his own feature films.

First, The Long Goodbye (1973), which was already haunting the balconies of posh villas… “Is the atmosphere of Robert Altman’s film reflected in mine? A little, but it's the fault of this sacred city, and of all these films about Los Angeles which overwhelm my subconscious," warns the filmmaker. Then, Body Double (1984), by Brian De Palma: “The most “Los Angeles” film of all time. I loved rediscovering it once I settled in California. It’s a brilliant work on voyeurism, strange and full of changes of tone…”

He is reminded that there is a lot of Body Double in Under the Silver Lake. He nods laughing. And continues: “Of course, just like there is a lot of Rear Window in Body Double. I love Hitchcock's films but De Palma takes his language, his techniques, pieces of history and transforms them, takes them further." Mitchell's third film also has this “patchwork” side crossed by references and reinterpretations; the filiation is essential, but we will not make him say that he prefers De Palma. “Do you realize what that would entail? I like both of them. I'm not very good at these rankings that sanctify."

David Robert Mitchell has his own relationship to idols. He cites them willingly, but denies doing so for free. “I am for the 'light' reference, which does not exist for the wink but to share a feeling, which the film arouses in me." Its main character, Sam (Andrew Garfield), for example, pursues a young blonde woman, Sarah (Riley Keough), who cannot fail to recall Naomi Watts in a certain David Lynch film on a certain Californian road. "Mulholland Drive? I built myself by idolizing Lynch. I wouldn't want to imitate him, especially not. I love him so much it must be accidental. Because I had already been told that after The Myth, for which I was thinking of everything but that. I'm probably inhabited… " In fact, Sarah evokes a completely different reference: the young woman speaks to Sam from a swimming pool, "the" scene of Something's Got to Give, the unfinished film - and cult - by George Cukor with Marilyn Monroe.

The director is aiming for the same thing with Los Angeles, and continues to reflect images that we already know, while opening new windows. It's the look of a Michigan native who grew up "super far from movies, while loving them very much". He also shot his first two feature films in Detroit. Then moved to Los Angeles, a city he struggled to “apprehend” at first, to tell himself that he was at home there. But Under the Silver Lake passes for a “Backpacker's Guide” created by a native who knows the city like the back of his hand, with places that we have not seen elsewhere. He tempers: “I arrived in LA with images in mind, seen in all the films all my life. Suddenly, I can reevaluate them by comparing them with the real thing. But the reality presented in the film no longer really exists. It is a set of micro-events, images and clues from my experience arriving in town."

All the same, we come across immutable landmarks. How many times have we filmed the Griffith Park observatory since Rebel Without A Cause? The references even start to intertwine, like in La La Land, where the characters watch the Nicholas Ray movie and then race down the hill. David Robert Mitchell also stages it in his feature film on Los Angeles. Sam performs a sketch with the statue of James Dean in front of the observatory. When asked what the intensity of the place is, "DRM" sketches a smile. "I wish I had a more interesting answer, a director's answer, let's say... But I love this place, and the films that have exploited it. Just going there is magic. In Under the Silver Lake, I think I scrutinized the statue with my director's gaze. But in real life, it's not even a movie anymore. It's just the whole soul of LA in one place!"


Posted by Geoff at 11:50 PM CDT
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