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Recent Headlines
a la Mod:

Domino is
a "disarmingly
straight-forward"
work that "pushes
us to reexamine our
relationship to images
and their consumption,
not only ethically
but metaphysically"
-Collin Brinkman

De Palma on Domino
"It was not recut.
I was not involved
in the ADR, the
musical recording
sessions, the final
mix or the color
timing of the
final print."

Listen to
Donaggio's full score
for Domino online

De Palma/Lehman
rapport at work
in Snakes

De Palma/Lehman
next novel is Terry

De Palma developing
Catch And Kill,
"a horror movie
based on real things
that have happened
in the news"

Supercut video
of De Palma's films
edited by Carl Rodrigue

Washington Post
review of Keesey book

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Exclusive Passion
Interviews:

Brian De Palma
Karoline Herfurth
Leila Rozario

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AV Club Review
of Dumas book

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« June 2024 »
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Interviews...

De Palma interviewed
in Paris 2002

De Palma discusses
The Black Dahlia 2006


Enthusiasms...

De Palma Community

The Virtuoso
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The De Palma Touch

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Carrie...A Fan's Site

Phantompalooza

No Harm In Charm

Paul Schrader

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The Master Of Suspense

Alfred Hitchcock Films

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and the Infield
Fly Rule

Movie Mags

Directorama

The Filmmaker Who
Came In From The Cold

Jim Emerson on
Greetings & Hi, Mom!

Scarface: Make Way
For The Bad Guy

The Big Dive
(Blow Out)

Carrie: The Movie

Deborah Shelton
Official Web Site

The Phantom Project

Welcome to the
Offices of Death Records

The Carlito's Way
Fan Page

The House Next Door

Kubrick on the
Guillotine

FilmLand Empire

Astigmia Cinema

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A Lonely Place

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italkyoubored

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De Palma a la Mod
site

Entries by Topic
A note about topics: Some blog posts have more than one topic, in which case only one main topic can be chosen to represent that post. This means that some topics may have been discussed in posts labeled otherwise. For instance, a post that discusses both The Boston Stranglers and The Demolished Man may only be labeled one or the other. Please keep this in mind as you navigate this list.
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Sunday, May 12, 2024
PHONE BOOTHS & PAYPHONES IN DE PALMA (PART 8) - 'THE FURY'
CARRIE SNODGRESS AS HESTER, MAKING A CLANDESTINE CONNECTION
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/fury45th4.jpg


Posted by Geoff at 8:53 PM CDT
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Friday, May 10, 2024
PHONE BOOTHS IN DE PALMA (PART 7) - 'THE FURY'
KIRK DOUGLAS AS PETER SANDZA - "I NEED YOUR BODY, BABY!"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/fury45th6.jpg


Posted by Geoff at 5:53 PM CDT
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Wednesday, May 8, 2024
PHONE BOOTHS IN DE PALMA (PART 6) - 'THE FURY'
"LOOK, I'M AT THE BEACH, AND I MADE A CONTACT" - WILLIAM FINLEY AS RAYMOND DUNWOODIE
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/phoneboothfury1.jpg

Posted by Geoff at 10:33 PM CDT
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Sunday, September 10, 2023
'AS GRAND A PIECE OF GUIGNOL AS I HAVE SEEN'
SUNDAY TWEET - ADS FOR 'THE FURY' IN LONDON FROM 1978
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/furyrialtoad45.jpg


Posted by Geoff at 10:49 PM CDT
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Sunday, August 20, 2023
'YOU'D STILL NOT BELIEVE THIS MOVIE EXISTS'
WEEKEND TWEETS - WATCHING DE PALMA'S 'THE FURY' ON MAX
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/tweetfurychaotic.jpg


Posted by Geoff at 10:31 PM CDT
Updated: Sunday, August 20, 2023 11:05 PM CDT
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Thursday, August 10, 2023
'THE BEST CHASE EVER FILMED'
"IF YOU DON'T HAVE A BETTER IDEA, IT REALLY ISN'T WORTH BOTHERING"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/frenchconnect345.jpg

An excerpt from the chapter on The Fury, in the 2001 book Brian De Palma - Conversations with Samuel Blumenfeld and Laurent Vachaud, with the help of Google Translate:
The scene of the kidnapping of the two cops very quickly turns into a car chase and you don't feel very comfortable filming it.

Because I hate that. We've seen hundreds of them and it's very boring to watch. The best chase ever filmed is in William Friedkin's French Connection. If you don't have a better idea, it really isn't worth bothering to film a new one. I'm not like James Cameron, I don't enjoy filming endless chases with trucks, on bridges, it's not my style. It was my first time filming a car chase in The Fury. I took it as a challenge but quickly hated it. So I placed it in the fog to stylize it as much as possible. Because filming in a car, there is nothing more boring. What are you going to show? A guy moving the steering wheel, reflections on the windshield. There aren't many solutions to make it interesting.



Posted by Geoff at 11:16 PM CDT
Updated: Thursday, August 10, 2023 11:20 PM CDT
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Thursday, March 16, 2023
VIDEO - PIANO ARRANGEMENT OF 'THE FURY' THEME
BRETT MITCHELL PERFORMS HIS SOLO PIANO ARRANGEMENT

Posted by Geoff at 11:37 PM CDT
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Wednesday, March 15, 2023
45 YEARS AGO TODAY, THE FURY OPENS IN U.S. THEATERS
PAULINE KAEL: "IT COULD BE THAT HE'S DEVELOPING ONE OF THE GREAT FILM STYLES"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/fury45th1.jpg

Brian De Palma's The Fury was released in U.S. theaters 45 years ago today. Filmed largely in the Chicago area (including a memorable sequence filmed at "Old Chicago" in Bolingbrook), it features an extraordinary score by the great John Williams. It's a magnificent film. In a 1980 interview with Rolling Stone, Jean-Luc Godard mentioned The Fury's standout use of slow motion, "where it was used for an entire sequence and wasn't just a gadget." The movie critic known as Pauline Kael, enraptured, wrote of The Fury in The New Yorker:
No other director shows such clear-cut development in technique from film to film. In camera terms, De Palma was learning fluid, romantic steps in Obsession; he started to move his own way in Carrie—swirling and figure skating, sensuously. You could still see the calculation. Now he has stopped worrying about the steps. He’s caught up with his instructors — with Welles in Touch of Evil, with Scorsese in Mean Streets. What distinguishes De Palma's visual style is smoothness combined with a jazzy willingness to appear crazy or campy; it could be that he's developing one of the great film styles—a style in which he stretches out suspense while grinning his notorious alligator grin. He has such a grip on technique in The Fury that you get the sense of a director who cares about little else; there's a frightening total purity in his fixation on the humor of horror. It makes the film seem very peaceful, even as one's knees are shaking.

At The Spool this week, Chicago-based critic Peter Sobczynski writes about The Fury at 45:
If this project, with its obvious echoes of Carrie, seems like an odd choice for De Palma to have chosen to follow, it appears that he looked upon it largely as a means to a particular end. At the time, he was keenly interested in doing an adaptation of Alfred Bester’s 1953 novel The Demolished Man, a sci-fi-thriller involving a murder in a futuristic telepathic society, and had even co-written a screenplay for it with author John Farris. As a way of working out the elaborate visual storytelling and special effects required to bring that project to life, De Palma elected to first make a film of Farris’s 1976 novel The Fury with the author doing the screenplay, changing a considerable amount of the narrative in the process.

At the time of release, Roger Ebert wrote in his review for the Chicago Sun-Times:
De Palma's almost nonstop action carries the film along well (and distracts us from the holes in its plot), and Kirk Douglas was a good casting choice as the avenging father. In his best roles, he seems to be barely in control of a manic energy, and this time, being chased down the L tracks, he seems just right. Cassavetes always makes a suitably hateful villain (he plays the bad guys as if they're distracted by inner thoughts of even worse things they could be doing), and Carrie Snodgress, returning to movies after several years of voluntary retirement, is complex and interesting as the government employee who falls in love with Kirk Douglas.

Big-eyed and beautiful Amy Irving, vulnerable and tough at the same time, is just fine. She was Sissy Spacek's "friend" and final victim in De Palma's "Carrie," and I guess it's only fair that this time she gets to unleash the Fury in the final scene. Is it as scary as the final moment in "Carrie"? Not quite, but it'll leave your head spinning.



Posted by Geoff at 11:05 PM CDT
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Thursday, February 23, 2023
SAM IRVIN WRITING MEMOIR OF HIS DE PALMA YEARS
THE BOOK, PLANNED FOR 2024, WILL COVER HIS TIME ON SET OF THE FURY, HOME MOVIE, DRESSED TO KILL
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/furysetoldchicago55.jpg

Sam Irvin's latest book, I Was a Teenage Monster Hunter!, "uniquely combines his exciting cinematic adventures, self-discovery, and documenting horror history through his self-published horror fanzine Bizarre," writes Daily Dead's Justina Bonilla. "Though Bizarre only lasted four issues, they are an amazing time capsule filled with interviews with horror royalty, from Vincent Price to Christopher Lee, with the book’s forward from Elvira, Mistress of the Dark aka Cassandra Peterson."

In the interview portion of the article, Irvin tells Bonilla that the book, the first in a series of memoirs, covers his life/career up until the time he met Brian De Palma. "And then, for 2024," Irvin says, "I will do the next volume of my ongoing series of memoir books, this one covering my De Palma years."

In the interview, Irvin talks about why the journal he had writen for the magazine Cinefantastique was never published:

Why did you stop publishing Bizarre?

The reason I stopped doing it, is that I ended up meeting Brian De Palma and had to start getting serious about figuring out a career in film. Between my junior and senior years of college, I ended up going to work for De Palma on The Fury. After I graduated, I became a full-time employee of De Palma as his assistant.

Then, I associated produced and was a production manager for his film Home Movies with Kirk Douglas and Nancy Allen. That's what launched my career.

When did you decide to step away from magazine writing to focus on your film career?

I became friends with Fred Clark, who was the editor of Cinefantastique. When I was working on The Fury, I got an assignment from Fred to write a journal on the making of The Fury. I still wanted to be writing for about horror movies and stay in that world.

Fred promised that The Fury would be on the cover. So, I interviewed everybody on the film from Kirk Douglas down, including composer John Williams and the editor Paul Hirsch, who edited Star Wars. Then, Fred saw Star Wars. He decided to bump our issue, so he could do a double issue on Star Wars. Okay, fine. Star Wars deserved it.

In the meantime, I insisted to Fred that, “You've got to run my interview with Amy Irving. You can't wait, because she talks about for the very first time ever, her relationship with Steven Spielberg. They were living together and it had not been revealed anywhere. I have this huge scoop.

What was the result?

So, Fred assured me that he’d run the Amy interview in the Star Wars issue, as kind of a teaser for the big coming issue on The Fury. Then, The Fury opens. Fred sees it, hates it, and decides that he is not going to put it on the cover. He cuts my journal on the making of it in half and on the cover, he instead puts the composer Hans Salter, who composed some of the scores of the 1940s Universal horror movies. I love Salter and his scores, but could there be anything less commercial? It felt like such a slap.

De Palma was not happy, and I was embarrassed. It made me look bad. I felt really bad about the whole thing.

It put such a bad taste in my mouth, that when I got asked to do articles on other films that I was working on, like Dressed to Kill, I just ended up turning it down. It kind of extinguished my wanting to continue to be a journalist in that realm. Instead, I focused on being a director.


Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CST
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Thursday, January 12, 2023
PATRICK MCNAMARA HAS PASSED AWAY
NEW ORLEANS-BASED ACTOR MADE HIS FILM DEBUT IN DE PALMA'S 'OBSESSION', BILLED AS J. PATRICK McNAMARA
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/mcnamara14.jpg

Patrick McNamara, who made his film debut in Brian De Palma's 1976 film Obsession (under the name J. Patrick McNamara), has passed away. Following Obsession, in which McNamara portrays the "third kidnapper," De Palma continued to cast the actor as shadowy watchdog/dirty-deeds/fix-it characters in The Fury and Blow Out. During these years, he also had roles in Steven Spielberg's Close Encounters of the Third Kind and 1941.

Here's a portion of the obituary from Nola.com:

Patrick McNamara, an actor, director, teacher and producer who established the short-lived Energy Theatre in New Orleans in the mid-1970s, died of pneumonia on Jan. 2 at Ochsner Medical Center, his wife, Carol Stone, said. He was 80.

“Patrick was the most interesting person I ever knew. Nobody wore a coat of so many colors like he did,” said Amanda McBroom, an actress, singer and songwriter who performed in “A Witness to the Confession” at Energy Theatre.

“He was interested in everything, and he was really talented at so many things. He had a divine combination of extreme compassion and humor and lightness with a major dark streak … in the middle of all the light. … He loved the uncertainty of life.”

A native New Orleanian who graduated from De La Salle High School, McNamara grew interested in acting when he performed in plays at the University of New Orleans to improve his public-speaking skills, Stone said.

After a brief stint at Tulane Law School, he moved to New York to embark on a full-time career as an actor, starting in Ellen Stewart’s Café La Mama Experimental Club, an avant-garde troupe in Manhattan’s East Village. He also taught voice, and he performed at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

“He found amazing things to do,” Stone said. “His spirit was magical. Whatever he pursued, he pursued it as far as he could.”

He amassed a long list of film credits, including Brian De Palma’s “Obsession,” which was shot in New Orleans, two movies directed by Steven Spielberg – “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” and “1941” – and the comedies “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” and “Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey,” in which he played Bill S. Preston’s father. His television appearances included “Star Trek: The Next Generation.”

Although his given name was Patrick John McNamara, he was often billed as J. Patrick McNamara because when he joined Actors’ Equity, he was told another Patrick McNamara was already in show business, Stone said. He solved that problem by putting his middle initial first.

“He was a solid actor,” said David Cuthbert, a former theater critic for The Times-Picayune. “He was believable, and he was real. You’d look at him in ‘Close Encounters,’ and you’d see the same things you’d seen onstage.”

McNamara returned to New Orleans to found Energy Theatre, which opened in March 1974 in the Prytania Theater in Uptown New Orleans. The first attraction was the musical revue “Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in Paris.” Audiences loved it, he said in a 1976 Times-Picayune interview, but the theater was never more than 40 percent full, and local actors resented that no local performers were in the cast.

Moreover, he said, “I’m one of the world’s worst fundraisers.”

McNamara staged strong plays, including “That Championship Season,” “The Hot L Baltimore” and “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” with Geraldine Fitzgerald, but audiences didn’t come. In the newspaper interview, he announced he was moving to Los Angeles.

Energy Theatre “should have lasted longer than it did,” Cuthbert said.



Posted by Geoff at 7:59 AM CST
Updated: Thursday, January 12, 2023 5:27 PM CST
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