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Recent Headlines
a la Mod:

Domino is
a "disarmingly
straight-forward"
work that "pushes
us to reexamine our
relationship to images
and their consumption,
not only ethically
but metaphysically"
-Collin Brinkman

De Palma on Domino
"It was not recut.
I was not involved
in the ADR, the
musical recording
sessions, the final
mix or the color
timing of the
final print."

Listen to
Donaggio's full score
for Domino online

De Palma/Lehman
rapport at work
in Snakes

De Palma/Lehman
next novel is Terry

De Palma developing
Catch And Kill,
"a horror movie
based on real things
that have happened
in the news"

Supercut video
of De Palma's films
edited by Carl Rodrigue

Washington Post
review of Keesey book

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Exclusive Passion
Interviews:

Brian De Palma
Karoline Herfurth
Leila Rozario

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AV Club Review
of Dumas book

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De Palma interviewed
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and the Infield
Fly Rule

Movie Mags

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The Filmmaker Who
Came In From The Cold

Jim Emerson on
Greetings & Hi, Mom!

Scarface: Make Way
For The Bad Guy

The Big Dive
(Blow Out)

Carrie: The Movie

Deborah Shelton
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Offices of Death Records

The Carlito's Way
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italkyoubored

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De Palma a la Mod
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Entries by Topic
A note about topics: Some blog posts have more than one topic, in which case only one main topic can be chosen to represent that post. This means that some topics may have been discussed in posts labeled otherwise. For instance, a post that discusses both The Boston Stranglers and The Demolished Man may only be labeled one or the other. Please keep this in mind as you navigate this list.
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Wednesday, January 29, 2020
ADAM NAYMAN ON 'FORMALLY INNOVATIVE' REDACTED
ESSAY AT THE RINGER LOOKS AT "1917 & THE TROUBLE WITH WAR MOVIES"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/redactedtwosoldiers.jpg

Today, The Ringer's Adam Nayman posted an article with the headline, "1917 and the Trouble With War Movies." Feeling that the cinematic "immersion" of Sam Mendes' 1917 ultimately leaves the viewer too passive, Nayman turns to Francois Truffaut's statement that "Every film about war ends up being pro-war" as a guiding paradox. His article looks at several key war films throughout the history of cinema, including films made by Brian De Palma:
It’s telling, perhaps, that the movies associated with the Iraq War have less of an aesthetic legacy than those associated with World War I or II or even Vietnam. In 2005’s Jarhead, Mendes even deferred to Francis Ford Coppola by showing Marines watching Apocalypse Now for inspiration, conceding to the older film’s (and older conflict’s) hold on the collective imagination. For the most part, post-9/11 American war movies have been more attuned to politics and aftermath, with spectacle either miniaturized—as in the tense, horror-movie-like bomb-defusing sequences in Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker—or else eliminated altogether. The most formally innovative Iraq War movie, Brian De Palma’s Redacted, avoids the battlefield altogether, focusing instead on a panoply of multimedia perspectives to get across themes of division and disinformation; where his 1989 Vietnam film Casualties of War favored a dreamlike, lyrical detachment evincing distance from its subject matter, Redacted’s surveillance-style textures and artful integration of documentary material were evidence that the director was trying to speak to the here and now.

Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CST
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Tuesday, January 28, 2020
'BLOW OUT' TONIGHT FOR LIVE PODCAST IN SEATTLE
"THE SUSPENSE IS KILLING US" PODCAST - BRIEF INTRO & SHORT DISCUSSION AFTER
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/beaconcinemablowout.jpg

"We are proud to present Brian De Palma’s masterpiece Blow Out!" reads the Facebook event description from The Suspense Is Killing Us podcast. "We’ll be giving a brief intro and a short discussion after the movie." Ben Horak created the poster art above, and there will be prints for sale at tonight's screening at The Beacon in Seattle. Both pages offer this description of the film:
In the enthralling BLOW OUT, brilliantly crafted by Brian De Palma, John Travolta gives one of his greatest performances, as a movie sound-effects man who believes he has accidentally recorded a political assassination. He enlists the help of a possible eyewitness to the crime (Nancy Allen), who may be in danger herself, to uncover the truth. With its jolting stylistic flourishes, intricate plot, profoundly felt characterizations, and gritty evocation of early-1980s Philadelphia, BLOW OUT is an American paranoia thriller unlike any other, as well as a devilish reflection on moviemaking.

Posted by Geoff at 7:46 AM CST
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Sunday, January 26, 2020
McQUARRIE ON DE PALMA'S 'MISSION IMPOSSIBLE'
"HE LET THE SCENE & LOCATION TELL HIM WHERE TO PUT THE CAMERA AND WHEN TO CUT"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/fishtank1.jpg

Yesterday, Tom Gregory directed a tweet to Christopher McQuarrie, who has written and directed the two most recent Mission: Impossible movies, and who will also be directing the next two films in the series back-to-back. "Watching the first M:I on tv in the UK," Gregory tweeted to McQuarrie, "and De Palma uses a lot of low and/or Dutch angles which fits the story/emotion etc perfectly. Do you find your camera positioning is an instinctive thing or an intellectual decision?"

McQuarrie, responding via two tweets, wrote back, "DePalma, while he certainly has flair, doesn't do anything in Mission just for show. His low angles in the fish restaurant, for example, create an intense sense of pressure and keep the fish tank above them in the story. He's not showing off. He's setting up. He let the scene and location tell him where to put the camera and when to cut. He understands that a scene is not just a series of lines, but a series of emotional impulses. The *visuals* tell the story. The dialogue is merely score. Watch the scene again without sound."


Posted by Geoff at 10:15 PM CST
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Wednesday, January 22, 2020
JACK KEHOE HAS DIED AT 85
BOOKKEEPER IN 'UNTOUCHABLES', MADE OTHER FILMS w/DE NIRO, PACINO, LINSON, MORE
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/bookkeeper13a.jpg

Jack Kehoe, who had a key role as the bookkeeper in Brian De Palma's The Untouchables, died January 14. He was 85. The Hollywood Reporter, citing a family announcement, reported today that Kehoe was "a resident of the Hollywood Hills" who suffered "a debilitating stroke in 2015."

In the 1970s and beyond, Kehoe ran in the same circles as Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Jill Clayburgh, and others. Before The Untouchables, Kehoe and De Niro had also both been part of the cast of James Goldstone's The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight. A year after The Untouchables, Kehoe appeared in Martin Brest's Midnight Run, which starred De Niro. Kehoe had also appeared in an early Art Linson production, Car Wash, in 1976.

From Mike Barnes' Hollywood Reporter article:

In '70s cult classics, Kehoe portrayed Scruggs, the cowboy who pumps gas, in Car Wash (1976) and the marksman "Set Shot" Buford in The Fish That Saved Pittsburgh (1979). His résumé also included Melvin and Howard (1980), Warren Beatty's Reds (1981) and The Pope of Greenwich Village (1984).

In the best picture Oscar winner The Sting (1973), directed by George Roy Hill, Kehoe portrayed the Erie Kid, the grifter who participates in the con game with Paul Newman and Robert Redford's characters to bring down Robert Shaw's crime boss.

He also was memorable that year as Tom Keough, one of the cops on the take, in Sidney Lumet's Serpico (1973), and he reteamed with Al Pacino on Broadway in 1977 in David Rabe's The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel.

Kehoe played Al Capone's (Robert De Niro) bookkeeper, Payne, in Brian De Palma's The Untouchables (1987) and Joe Pantoliano's two-timing employee, Jerry Geisler, in Midnight Run (1988).

Born on Nov. 21, 1934, in the Astoria section of Queens, Kehoe enlisted in the U.S. Army after high school and spent three years with the 101st Airborne Division.

After the service, he studied with famed acting teacher Stella Adler and appeared on Broadway in 1963 in Edward Albee's The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and in off-Broadway productions of Bertolt Brecht's Drums in the Night in 1967 and Eugene O'Neill's A Moon for the Misbegotten in 1968.

Kehoe made his big-screen debut as the bartender in Jimmy Breslin's The Gang Who Couldn't Shoot Straight (1971) and followed that with a role in Peter Yates' The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973).

He appeared on television in the '80s reboot of The Twilight Zone, Miami Vice and Murder, She Wrote and in films including The Star Chamber (1983), D.O.A. (1988), Young Guns II (1990), Falling Down (1993), The Paper (1994), Gospel According to Harry (1994) and The Game (1997), his final onscreen appearance.

Kehoe chose not to work as often as others in the business.

"How much money does one person need in this life? How many cars can you own? How many houses can you live in?" he asked in a 1974 story in New York magazine. "I saw those TV series stars out on the coast riding around in their sports cars like kids with a ten-thousand-dollar toy, crashing into trees and driving off the edges of mountains because they're bored. They're not using themselves as actors anymore, and it all become about making money."



Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CST
Updated: Thursday, January 23, 2020 5:34 PM CST
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Monday, January 20, 2020
THAT TIME TMC HAD A BRIAN DE PALMA FILM FESTIVAL
JANUARY 1985, CABLE CHANNEL PROGRAMMED DTK, GET TO KNOW YOUR RABBIT, HOME MOVIES, SCARFACE
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/tmc1985fest.jpg

This morning, HBO Guide on Twitter posted the above fold-out from a 1985 program for The Movie Channel, which was hosting a Brian De Palma Film Festival that January (Tuesdays at 8:00 P.M.). "A gangster film, suspense thrillers and satirical comedies from one of the hottest directors in America," reads the program copy. De Palma's Body Double had hit U.S. theaters just two months prior, not yet ready for cable-- but this film festival was surely designed to prepare viewers for that film arrival on home video. Bookended by Scarface (the kick-off) and Dressed To Kill (the closer), this intriguing month-long festival featured two of De Palma's straight-up comedies in the middle: Get To Know Your Rabbit and Home Movies. The latter is probably more difficult to find now than it was 35 years ago, in 1985, six years after its in initial release.

Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CST
Updated: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 12:01 AM CST
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Wednesday, January 15, 2020
VIDEO - LUIS GUZMAN RECALLS 'CARLITO'S WAY' AUDITION
WORE OLD BEAT-UP LEATHER JACKET - "BRIAN DE PALMA STARTS CRACKING UP"


In the above People TV video, Couch Surfing, Lola Ogunnaike interviews Luis Guzmán as they couch surf through several of Guzmán's key roles, including his role as Pachanga in Carlito's Way:
Lola: One of my favorites.

Luis: Ohhh, yeah!

Lola: I mean, you're in a Brian De Palma movie, playing Al Pacino's sidekick!

Luis: You ever meet somebody, and your hands get all cold and sweaty?

Lola: Mmm-hmm...

Luis: And you're trying to be, like, really cool about it...

Lola: [laughing] Yes!

Luis: And stuff like that...

Lola: Yes

Luis: Well, that's what it was like for me to meet Al.

Lola: Now, how did you land this part? Did you have another friend who worked on this movie and set you up?

Luis: No-, no...

Lola: Okay.

Luis: My agent, that guy that I told you I got hooked up with by Richard Aster, sent me to an audition. It was funny, because the night before, my brother-in-law and his cousin found this old beat-up leather jacket in Tompkins Square Park. I put that jacket on, and I'm wearing it to the audition, and I get my first line out, and Brian, Brian De Palma starts cracking up. And then, they go, "Thank you," and I'm, "Aw, dang, he laughed at me, man." And I got home, and the casting director called me directly, at home, to tell me, "You got the part."


Posted by Geoff at 7:59 AM CST
Updated: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 6:09 PM CST
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Saturday, January 11, 2020
'CASUALTIES' RANKS ON VULTURE'S 50 BEST WAR MOVIES
KEITH PHIPPS - "IT REMAINS A TOUGH FILM TO WATCH"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/casualtiesbeer.jpg

Yesterday, as Sam Mendes' 1917 opened in U.S. theaters, Vulture's Keith Phipps posted his ranking of "the 50 greatest war movies ever made." The article includes the subheadline, "A look back at a genre that has inspired a century of cinema." Brian De Palma's Casualties Of War doesn't rank very high on Phipps' list, but two excellent Paul Verhoeven films, Black Book and Soldier Of Orange, didn't make Phipps' list at all, which speaks, perhaps, to the inherently subjective nature of one person's viewpoint. In the article's intro, Phipps thoughtfully discusses how war films are viewed and perceived, as well as what constitutes a "war film" for his list:
Speaking to Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune in 1973, Francois Truffaut made an observation that’s cast a shadow over war movies ever since, even those seemingly opposed to war. Asked why there’s little killing in his films, Truffaut replied, “I find that violence is very ambiguous in movies. For example, some films claim to be antiwar, but I don’t think I’ve really seen an antiwar film. Every film about war ends up being pro-war.” The evidence often bears him out. In Anthony Swofford’s Gulf War memoir Jarhead, Swofford recalls joining fellow recruits in getting pumped up while watching Apocalypse Now and Full Metal Jacket, two of the most famous films about the horrors of war. (On the occasion of the death of R. Lee Ermey, the real-life drill instructor who played the same in Full Metal Jacket, Swofford offered a remembrance in the New York Times with the headline “Full Metal Jacket Seduced My Generation and Sent Us to War.”)

Is it true that movies glamorize whatever they touch, no matter how horrific? And if a war movie isn’t to sound a warning against war, what purpose does it serve? Even if Truffaut’s wrong — and it’s hard to see his observation applying to at least some of the movies on this list — it might be best to remove the burden of making the world a better place from war movies. It’s a lot to ask, especially since war seems to be baked into human existence.

So, like other inescapable elements of the human experience, we tell stories about war, stories that reflect our attitudes toward it, and how they shift over time. War movies reflect the artistic impulses of their creators, but they also reflect the attitudes of the times and places in which they were created. A World War II film made in the midst of the war, for instance, might serve a propagandist purpose than one made after the war ends, when there’s more room for nuance and complexity, but it also might not.

Maybe the ultimate purpose of a war movie is to let others hear the force of these stories. Another director, Sam Fuller, once offered a quote that doesn’t necessarily contradict Truffaut’s observation but better explains the impulse to make war movies: “A war film’s objective, no matter how personal or emotional, is to make a viewer feel war.” The films selected for this list of the genre’s most essential entries often have little in common, but they do share that. Each offers a vision that asks viewers to consider and understand the experience of war, be it in the trenches of World War I, the wilderness skirmishes of Civil War militias, or the still-ongoing conflicts that have helped define 21st-century warfare.

Compiled as Sam Mendes’s stylistically audacious World War I film, 1917, heads to theaters, this list opts for a somewhat narrow definition of a war movie, focusing on films that deal with the experiences of soldiers during wartime. That means no films about the experience of returning from war (Coming Home, The Best Years of Our Lives, First Blood) or of civilian life during wartime (Mrs. Miniver, Forbidden Games, Hope and Glory) or of wartime stories whose action rests far away from the battlefield (Casablanca). It also leaves films primarily about the Holocaust out of consideration, as they seem substantively different from other sorts of war films. Also excluded are films that blur genres, like the military science fiction of Starship Troopers and Aliens (even if the latter does have a lot to say about the Vietnam War). That eliminates many great movies, but it leaves room for many others, starting with a film made at the height of World War II in an attempt to help rally a nation with a story of an operation whose success required secrecy, extensive training, and beating overwhelming odds.


Casualties Of War places at #44 on Phipps' list:
Brian De Palma’s brutal, fact-inspired film about the kidnapping, rape, and murder of a young Vietnamese woman didn’t catch on with audiences, helping to end the cycle of ’80s Vietnam War films and sidelining star Michael J. Fox’s attempt to cross over to more dramatic roles. It remains a tough film to watch, in part because De Palma shifts his skills as a creator of tense suspense films to a story of unbearable sadness in which a group of American soldiers (whose ranks include John C. Reilly and John Leguizamo in their film debuts) uses the permission of a violent, charismatic superior (Sean Penn) to engage in barbaric acts. Fox’s casting as the film’s moral center, and a man who suffers for his honesty, feels disorienting at first, but it works. Marty McFly looks out of place in such an awful situation, but that only drives the point home.

Posted by Geoff at 10:07 AM CST
Updated: Saturday, January 11, 2020 10:10 AM CST
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Thursday, January 9, 2020
NOEL VERA - 'DOMINO' A MESS, BUT ALSO STYLISH, FUNNY
"DE PALMA HAS THE BALLS TO DARE, AND IN MY BOOK DARE WELL"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/entrancejoedomino2.jpg

In part one of his "In my book best of 2019," Business World's Noel Vera includes the latest works from Quentin Tarantino and Brian De Palma:
Finally there’s Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood, which helped sharpen my fondness for yet another disreputable filmmaker who deals with lurid pulpy material — only difference being this filmmaker has talent and likes to take vicious jabs at the political establishment, often to his disadvantage. Brian de Palma’s Domino is a mess, but no more so than his other seemingly tossed-off efforts (Body Double, Snake Eyes, Mission to Mars). It’s stylish and funny, with some of its best broadsides aimed at the CIA; there are audacious setpieces and you can debate how successfully they’re executed but De Palma has the balls to dare, and in my book dare well. The filmmaker, alas, has disowned his work, declaring this wasn’t the film he intended; on the plus side you hope (as in the case of Snake Eyes) that a director’s cut will be made available some day.

Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CST
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Wednesday, January 8, 2020
'CASUALTIES' PART OF KAEL SERIES NEXT WEEK - CHICAGO
KAEL'S CAUSES CÉLÈBRES RUNS JAN 10-22 AT GENE SISKEL FILM CENTER
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/kaelscauses.jpg

Brian De Palma's Casualties Of War will screen at the Gene Siskel Film Center in Chicago on Saturday, January 18, and on Tuesday, January 21st. The screenings are part of a series centered around critic Pauline Kael, who wrote a deeply impassioned New Yorker review of Casualties Of War upon its initial release in 1989. The series, "Kael's Causes Célèbres," runs January 10-22, featuring "seven films that are especially important in defining Kael's taste and influence," Martin Rubin, associate director of programming at the Gene Siskel Film Center, states in the program notes. Also screening alongside the series is the recent documentary, What She Said: The Art Of Pauline Kael.

Here's Rubin's program description of Casualties Of War:

One of Kael's last great causes célèbres was CASUALTIES OF WAR, a film that divided critics and represented a marked change-of-pace for a director whose stylish thrillers she had long championed. Based on a real incident from the Vietnam War, it tells of a American reconnaissance squad, sexually and otherwise frustrated, who are incited by their sergeant (Penn) to kidnap a Vietnamese girl, over the increasingly urgent (and risky) objections of one of the soldiers (Fox). What's remarkable is how many of the characteristic elements of De Palma's thrillers and crime films (ominous p.o.v. tracking shots, split-focus widescreen frames, voyeurism, complicity, lingering guilt, the link between sex and violence, etc.) are adapted so effectively to a very different context, rendering the Vietnam War as an expressionistic nightmare rooted in reality rather than in genre tropes. 35mm widescreen.

Posted by Geoff at 11:58 PM CST
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Tuesday, January 7, 2020
'I'M RICKY!' - TRAILER FOR NICOLAS CAGE STAND-IN DOC
CAGE-A-RAMA CONTINUES WITH 'UNCAGED' SCREENING THURSDAY IN LONDON

As a quick follow-up to its Cage-a-rama 2020 fest in Glasgow this past weekend, Matchbox Cineclub will screen Uncaged - A Stand-In Story this Thursday night at Genesis Cinema in London. The film is about Marco Kyris, who was Nicolas Cage's official stand-in from 1994-2005. Kyris will be at the screening to participate in a Q&A. The evening will open with a screening of Con Air.

Posted by Geoff at 11:59 PM CST
Updated: Wednesday, January 8, 2020 12:11 AM CST
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