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Friday, December 23, 2011
BIRD'S 'MISSION' A HIT WITH CRITICS & PUBLIC
(MINOR) SPOILER: CODA PAYS TRIBUTE TO DE PALMA'S FILM
I'll get this minor SPOILER ALERT out of the way first (don't read if you don't want to know)-- Brad Bird's Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol ends with a cameo from Ving Rhames, playing Luther Stickell. After Ethan Hunt's latest adventure, Bird does a direct echo of the post-adventure scene in Brian De Palma's Mission: Impossible by pointing the camera at a Seattle cafe's television, on which can be seen a newscaster explaining away the "official" cover-up version of the events which have just transpired in the film. The camera then pans through the cafe to find Ethan and Luther sitting at a table, enjoying a drink together as the two discuss the latest mission. (Bird's film also touches on the J.J. Abrams Mission story after the De Palma homage... not sure if the John Woo Mission is in here somewhere or not.)

I liked Ghost Protocol quite a bit. Bird really brought the playfulness to it that he spoke of in interviews, and the film has more than a few laughs coming from several directions, while still keeping a palpable spy-genre tension. The opening prologue brings the viewer right into the movie with a fast-paced chill, followed by a highly entertaining jailbreak mission. Worth noting is that Paul Hirsch, who edited the De Palma Mission, returns for the new one, as well.

While I feel the new film is the best one since the first one, I still feel that De Palma's is the best Mission so far. De Palma's film moves in a cooly fluid, insidiously beautiful way, with a layered, subversive element to the images. Bird's film advances in animated leaps and bounds, thrilling to the moment. Each version works, but it seems to me that the De Palma film has so much more to say about the dirty business of being a spy, and it does so rather chillingly.

OWEN & ARMOND REALLY LIKE 'GHOST PROTOCOL'
Two critics who really like Bird's film are Entertainment Weekly's Owen Gleiberman and City Arts' Armond White. Gleiberman includes Ghost Protocol at number ten on his list of 2011's best films, calling it the best in the Mission series. "In an action-ride culture that offers so much fake adrenaline," states Gleiberman, "it's cathartic to encounter the real thing."

Meanwhile, White begins his review of Bird's film this way: "Brian De Palma’s 1996 Mission Impossible was a cartoon even though he didn’t direct it like one. The sheer, exhilarating pleasure of Mission Impossible IV (officially subtitled Ghost Protocol) comes from star-producer Tom Cruise’s ingenious decision to cast animation master Brad Bird." White later continues, "Whereas De Palma’s hyper clear visual style was gravely emotional even when the action was absurd, it didn’t quite transform the TV-based material into the Fritz Lang revelation De Palma intended (despite the helicopter/train Chunnel sequence’s very obvious reference to Lang’s 1929 Spies). Bird’s movie is lighter, yet more visionary."

White further compares Abrams to Bird and De Palma: "Co-producer J.J. Abrams tried and failed to make a deluxe TV-movie in Star Trek. Abrams simply lacks a cinematic eye comparable to Bird (comparable to De Palma? Forget it.) Bird’s conceptual staging of a prison break, a choreographed seduction at a ball in India and a chase during a desert dust storm display a big-screen sense of movement that harkens back to great animation as well as silent movie slapstick."

In the final paragraph of the review, White claims that the Besson stable of directors is still the crew to beat when it comes to the action genre: "If Ghost Protocol was any better, it would match the splendid advance of action movie aesthetics that Luc Besson has spearheaded in the Transporter movies (especially Olivier Megaton’s Godardian Transporter 3) as well as Angel-A, Taken, From Paris with Love and this year’s terrific Colombiana. These recent heroic action narrative innovations by Besson, Paul W.S. Anderson and Neveldine-Taylor are accomplishing what De Palma was after. Hollywood is slow on the uptake. Tarantino, Eli Roth and their ilk can only amp-up brutality; they lack visual wit. But in Ghost Protocol, Cruise and Bird are catching up. It is a rare pleasure to salute a Hollywood action movie that gets it right."


Posted by Geoff at 7:48 PM CST
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Tuesday, December 20, 2011
T IS FOR TOGA - NSFW
SHORT HORROR FILM INFLUENCED BY DE PALMA

While we're on the subject of De Palma fans making films, last October, Drafthouse Films held an open competition for a four-minute horror film based on the letter T. The winning film will be part of The ABCs Of Death, which brings together 26 directors (most of them already established in the horror genre), each giving their four-minute perspective on a letter of the alphabet. De Palma a la Mod reader David Guglielmo directed the above short, T Is For Toga, for the competition. Although he did not win, Guglielmo's entry was directly influenced by the films of Brian De Palma, and so we present it here for your entertainment. Guglielmo also reviewed the Blu-Ray release of De Palma's Dressed To Kill for Films In Review last week.

Posted by Geoff at 9:25 PM CST
Updated: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 9:27 PM CST
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Saturday, December 17, 2011
NOW WITH SUBTITLES-- SHORT FILM FROM ROMAIN
'AN AFTERNOON IN PARIS'; TO SEE SUBTITLES, CLICK "SHOW ANNOTATIONS"

Romain Desbiens (who runs the site Brian De Palma: Virtuoso Of The 7th Art) has completed a new short film, Un Après-midi à Paris ("An Afternoon In Paris"), which you can watch above. The film now has subtitles-- if you cannot see them, make sure to click "show annotations" at the bottom of the YouTube player. The plot follows a man who has a break between trains in Paris, where by chance he sees an ex-girlfriend. Romain, who now goes by the name Romain Lehnhoff (because "nobody knows how to pronounce 'Desbiens' even in France"), says the story was "conceived in a symmetric way:

First part: the train arrives/the guy walks in the streets/meets the girl/discuss with her in a café.
Second part: they discuss in the room/they split up/she walks in the streets/the train leaves."

Certain shots in the film were inspired by Brian De Palma, especially the double-mirror shot in the red bathroom, which Romain says is his little reference to the sort of "natural split screen" during the meeting of Holly Body in Body Double. There is also a "Passerelle Debilly shot" that is very similar to a shot in De Palma's Femme Fatale. Romain also took inspiration from Conversations with Other Women, and says that An Afternoon In Paris is "a kind of story about french 30-year-old people of today, my generation, who don't really know what they want, and about the speed of life."


Posted by Geoff at 8:34 PM CST
Updated: Sunday, December 18, 2011 7:58 PM CST
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Thursday, December 15, 2011
ADDITIONAL DETAILS ON 'PASSION'
FILM WILL SHOOT FOR 10 WEEKS, FOR LATE 2012 RELEASE
Following yesterday's exciting scoop from Thompson On Hollywood's Liza Foreman, Deadline's international editor Nancy Tartaglione followed up today by stating that Rachel McAdams is set to star in Brian De Palma's Passion along with Noomi Rapace (yesterday's report said that McAdams was still "in talks"). The Deadline post adds that "a major male role and a smaller female role have yet to be cast. Those will likely be played by Europeans, with deals expected to be firmed up in January." The $20 million film, set to begin filming in Berlin March 5th, will shoot for ten weeks, looking toward a late 2012 release, according to Deadline. The German company Integral Films will be the co-producer along with France's SBS Productions, which is owned by the film's producer, Said Ben Saïd, who also produced Alain Corneau's Crime D’Amour, on which De Palma's film is based. As we've known for some time, De Palma has written the screenplay for Passion himself.

While none of the recent reports have mentioned it, we know from previous reports that De Palma's film was to be set in London. Filming was to be done on sound stages in Berlin, with exteriors to be shot in the U.K. De Palma told us in May that Thierry Arbogast (Femme Fatale) would be the cinematographer, and that the art director will be Cornelia Ott. In April, De Palma told Time Out New York's Joshua Rothkopf that he was in the process of getting Passion ready, "and there are going to be a lot of beautiful women in it." Asked to elaborate on the project, De Palma told Rothkopf, "It’s based on a French film called Love Crime with Kristin Scott Thomas. It has an extremely complex relationship between two women executives who are basically destroying each other—plus it has a murder in the middle. It’s great material to visualize and make erotic and fun."

Posted by Geoff at 5:33 PM CST
Updated: Thursday, December 15, 2011 6:11 PM CST
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Wednesday, December 14, 2011
RACHEL McADAMS TO JOIN RAPACE IN 'PASSION'
DE PALMA MOVING FORWARD FOR MARCH 5 START DATE IN BERLIN
Thompson On Hollywood's Liza Foreman has an exclusive scoop today, stating that "Brian De Palma is wasting no time moving forward on Passion," which she adds is marked to begin shooting on March 5 in Berlin (previous reports had mentioned the film is to shoot in Cologne, Berlin, and London). Foreman adds, "Word is that Rachel McAdams is in talks to join Noomi Rapace in the film based on Alain Corneau's twisted murder tale" Love Crime. If so, Rapace and McAdams must really like each other, as they both star together in Guy Ritchie's Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, which opens Friday. This, to my mind, would be a dream cast for the leads in this film, which De Palma is scripting himself.

AND WHAT ABOUT 'THE KEY MAN'?
Foreman's article mentions that "De Palma had been prepping The Key Man for QED productions, which was readying for a late 2011/early 2012 shoot date." She does not say whether that production has stalled, or is still trying to make its planned start soon. De Palma would have a short but workable window in which to shoot The Key Man if they had it ready to go by early January, but if not, we might assume they were moving that project to late spring at the earliest. It seems likely we will begin to hear a little more about both projects in the very near future...

Posted by Geoff at 7:30 PM CST
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Tuesday, December 13, 2011
DE PALMA ON CIMINO, CIRCA 1995
"THE GUY WHO MADE 'THE DEER HUNTER' IS A GREAT FILMMAKER"
Thanks to Romain at the Virtuoso of the 7th Art for sending along an interesting paragraph from the October 2011 issue of Cahiers du Cinéma, which featured a cover story on Michael Cimino. For the issue, writer Jean-Baptiste Thoret journeyed with Cimino for three days between Los Angeles and Colorado, to see the landscapes of Cimino's cinema. On the trip, Thoret met Michael Stevenson, who was an assistant director on Cimino's Heaven's Gate. Stevenson told Thoret an interesting story, which Romain has kindly sent along to us:

I worked on Mission: Impossible with Brian De Palma. We came back from Roma, from a James Bond-like set, and we were going to shoot that scene on the train with Tom Cruise, Ving Rhames and Vanessa Redgrave. During a break, Brian sat on a chair and talked about cinema in general with his crew. Suddenly, Cimino's name came up. They knew I'd worked with him, so they invited me to join the conversation. Everybody was wondering why Cimino doesn't make movies anymore. Then, one of them said: "But is he really such a good film director?" De Palma shot daggers at him and told him, straight in the eye, with an icy calm: "The guy who made The Deer Hunter is a great filmmaker." That was the end of the conversation."

(Thanks to Romain!)


Posted by Geoff at 11:04 PM CST
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Monday, December 12, 2011
NANCY ALLEN INTERVIEW
IN LATEST ISSUE OF SHOCK CINEMA
Nancy Allen is the cover story interview in the new issue of Shock Cinema. The interview was conducted by Justin Bozung, and covers Allen's entire career, including her many films with Brian De Palma. Allen discusses how she had to endure slap after slap from Betty Buckley on the set of Carrie, as De Palma kept calling take after take, looking "for a certain reaction" out of Allen.

Allen recalls how De Palma had read the script for Robert Zemeckis' I Wanna Hold Your Hand, and told her, "This is really good. It's not for me, but there are some really good parts in it for you." Allen auditioned and got the part.

Also covered if De Palma's Home Movies, which Allen tells Bozung came about when De Palma and his friends, Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, were talking one day and wondering where all the young filmmakers were. From this came a project designed to teach students how to make a low-budget film. The three of them all invested in it, and then Kirk Douglas also kicked in some money (and acted in it, to boot).

Of course, the interview also delves fairly deeply into Allen's work on De Palma's Dressed To Kill (after Allen read it and told De Palma it was "amazing," he said, "I'm glad you like it. I wrote it for you.") and Blow Out. Amidst these discussions, Bozung asks Allen whether she thinks De Palma gets a fair rap being criticized for his cinematic "borrowings," considering that Quentin Tarantino's similar stylings frequently get him labeled as a "genius." Allen suggests that the difference in criticisms stem from De Palma being considered an outsider who "actively pushes it all away," while Tarantino "is right in the middle of it," a guy who "plays by Hollywood's rules" while De Palma "never has." Allen then adds: "I will say that personally, I feel very disappointed with where Brian has gone, hasn't gone or hasn't evolved to yet. I happen to think he's a brilliant filmmaker. I think he should stop writing and he should bring in a writer and do other people's stuff. I think that as human beings, unless we go through a dramatic incident that puts our life on a completely different course to a certain degree, we remain who we are or have been. We keep telling the same story from the same perspective in our life. Some of the movies Brian has done over the last few years-- the scripts and the stories-- have been very hashed over. Are you making this movie again? I think it's built up frustration for many. I don't know what to say. I would just love for him to do a great film again."

The discussion also touches on some of the things that led to De Palma and Allen's divorce, and then continues with coverage of Allen's work with Paul Verhoeven, Paul Bartel, Steven Soderbergh, and more. A great interview-- look for the magazine on stands now, or order from the Shock Cinema website.


Posted by Geoff at 12:34 AM CST
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Friday, December 9, 2011
CRUISE ON THE LANGLEY SCENE IN 'M:I'
"DE PALMA KNEW WE HAD THE SHOT, AND HE JUST HELD IT, AND HELD IT"

Get More: Movie Trailers, Movies Blog


MTV News' Josh Horowitz
talked with Tom Cruise on the red carpet as he was promoting Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol, and asked him which of the set pieces in the M:I series was his favorite. When Cruise had trouble coming up with just one, Horowitz said it was hard to top the Langley break-in sequence of the first film. The article states that Cruise credits Brian De Palma for that scene's success. "I remember when I was doing it, my head kept hitting the floor," Cruise told Horowitz. "I was running out of energy, and we were running out of time. So Brian said, 'Look, if you don't get it on the next take, I'm going to have to edit that scene,' and cut to where I fall down. So I said, no, I don't want to do that. To one of the stunt guys, I said, 'Give me your pound coins out of your pocket.' I put the pound coins in my shoes, the tips, so that's what allowed me to be able to balance and keep off the floor for that whole shot. That kept my face from hitting the floor. And then De Palma knew that we had the shot, and he just held it, and held it. I was like, 'How long can I hold off the floor?' Brian had a fantastic laugh, and then he said, 'All right, cut.'"

Posted by Geoff at 6:23 PM CST
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Thursday, December 8, 2011
STONE & OTHERS TALK SCARFACE
ARTICLE IN DECEMBER ISSUE OF 'PLAYBOY' COVERS THE MAKING OF DE PALMA CLASSIC
Run out and get the December issue of Playboy while it's still on sale-- there's a very good article about the making of Brian De Palma's Scarface. Written by Stephen Rebello, the article features new interviews with Oliver Stone, Al Pacino, Martin Bregman, Steven Bauer, F. Murray Abraham, Robert Loggia, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, Miriam Colon, and even Armond White. While the article unfortunately lacks the input of De Palma himself, it provides a solid look at the battles that went into the making of Scarface. Here are some of the things touched on in Rebello's article:

BREGMAN, STONE, & PACINO DIFFER ON WHY LUMET WAS LET GO
De Palma and David Rabe took a stab at writing a period Scarface remake before giving up, after which the project went to Sydney Lumet. Stone, who had been working with Bregman for some time trying to get Platoon and Born On The Fourth Of July off the ground (with an eye toward Pacino to star in both), was hired for the job. "I passed on it when it was originally offered to me as a straight remake," Stone is quoted, "but I was intrigued when Sidney suggested we do it Marielito style. I was bored with all that Italian gangster stuff. It was never going to be a Godfather kind of movie; it was always going to be a street movie."

Bregman and Stone eventually had a falling while making the movie, and it still shows today in the Playboy article. Bregman tells how he brought the project to Universal president Ned Tanner. "Within three minutes Ned said, 'Go make it.' That was the easy part. The hard part was Sidney Lumet. Sidney's take on the material was totally political, incorrect and unfair to the president. He felt there was something sinister happening. I said, 'Sidney, you want to make a different kind of film. I suggest you go make it.' We came to a parting of the ways, which I don't think he ever forgave me for."

Stone provides a different viewpoint, telling Rebello, "I was given to understand that Sidney thought the script was too rough for him. If politics was the reason Sidney Lumet got fired, then I disagree with Bregman, because the government was up to no good, as had been documented since the 1970s, and the whole Iran-Contragate was starting to build. When Reagan came to power, word went out not only in Latin America but the whole world that the U.S. was open again for the old dirty business. Bregman is typically running away from the truth."

Meanwhile, Pacino offers yet another possible reason Lumet was let go: "Sidney wanted final cut, but I never talked any of this over with Sidney, even years later when I wanted him to do Carlito's Way." (Interestingly, De Palma has said that the reason Universal was never able to re-release Scarface with a new hip hop soundtrack was because De Palma had final cut, and would not give them permission to change it up.)

BAUER TOLD DE PALMA, "I SHOULD PLAY JIM MORRISON" INSTEAD OF TRAVOLTA
The article mentions how De Palma wanted John Travolta to play the part of Manny Ribera, a part which ultimately wound up going to Bauer. Bauer recalls to Rebello, "Everyone knew Brian wanted his pal John Travolta, but the casting director called Brian and said, 'This boy is Manolo,' and sent me immediately to One Fifth Avenue to see Brian, who told me, ' You're really right for the part.' On his desk was Danny Sugerman's stupid book about Jim Morrison, No One Gets Out Of Here Alive, and everyone knew he wanted Travolta for that project, too. I said, 'I should play Jim Morrison,' and Brian said, 'Let's do one thing at a time.'" The article mentions that screen tests were also done for the role by Eric Roberts, A Martinez, and Erik Estrada, among others.

COURTENEY COX & SHARON STONE, AMONG OTHERS, TESTED FOR ELVIRA
Pacino's top choice to play Elvira, according to the article, was Glenn Close, and he also bounced around the names Meryl Streep and Jodie Foster for the role. Seeing the film now, these choices may seem odd, but Stone explains why to Rebello: "My original concept of that role was that she was a rich New York girl who was slumming." Bregman adds a list of names who screen-tested for the Elvira role: Courteney Cox (?!?), Jamie Lee Curtis, Isabelle Adjani, Marg Helgenberger, Camryn Manheim, Sharon Stone, Debra Winger, and Stephanie Zimbalist.

Michelle Pfeiffer, another key figure who was not interviewed for the article, went through months of auditions with Pacino (who thought she was too inexperienced) before finally landing the part when she played, according to Rebello, "a volatile confrontation scene that sent glassware and china flying, hitting Pacino and drawing blood." Pacino tells Rebello, "I was up in the air about the casting. Michelle Pfeiffer, well, I didn't understand who she was or what she was doing, but Marty wanted her. In the end I just deferred to him and Brian, and they were right."

Stone had to rewrite the role for Pfeiffer. "I dumbed down the dialogue, which worked," he tells Rebello. "Michelle Pfeiffer definitely does not seem like a rich New York girl, so she had to be rewritten as more of a typical American girl from Miami with good looks."

ABRAHAM: "NOTHING WENT FORWARD WITHOUT BRIAN AND AL HAMMERING THINGS OUT IN THE TRAILER"
There is so much more in the article, including:

-Abraham talking about the rehearsal process: "They don't like to spend that kind of money when you're making movies, but we rehearsed pretty intensely, and when we later came to shoot our scenes, that gave everything such a sense of urgency."

-Stone discussing why the production was falling behind schedule: "Brian moves at his pace, which is a sluggish one. There was tension. There wasn't the communication between Al and Brian that one would expect. Al likes being talked to, but Brian is from the Spielberg school, where it's all about the setup and getting the shot-- and the shot takes fucking forever. Making the movie became painful..." Loggia adds, "It's fair to say that, with the powerful personalities involved, De Palma was in way over his head. Pacino and some of the other actors had to steer the ship." However, Abraham offers a different viewpoint: "I got along with Brian very well. Who doesn't? Mr. De Palma was the boss, but nothing went forward without he and Al hammering things out in the trailer, sometimes for quite a while. But when they came out of that trailer, they really came out with something."

-The article also delves into the screenplay cuts that drove Stone to drive the crew mad before being banned from the set. "Universal was putting enormous pressure to cut things out, to get the movie finished," Stone tells Rebello. "They were banging on De Palma's door, but the energy on the set was slowing all the time. There wasn't the energy to complete the movie. It was horrible." Rebello then describes an early scene that was cut from the film and never shot:

Some on the crew believe that Stone's conflicts with the production began when he learned early in the filming that Universal had cut from his screenplay a lengthy opening sequence that took Scarface and Manny from the docks of Mariel on a storm-tossed raft trip to the U.S. Recalls Bauer, "Once Oliver learned that whole scene had been cut, he was always crazy and mad on the set. He finally got in Brian's way and became a pain in the ass. But he was right. The sequence had a semi-retarded kid falling overboard, and Tony Montana jumps in and saves his life. It established he's not just a monster. We never shot any of it. Right away they cut at the heart of the movie." Recalls Bregman, "Anything that was cut was because we didn't want to make a four-hour movie." Today Stone agrees that economics dictated the cuts, but adds, "My problems were with Bregman, a forceful individual and tough man to get along with. Our relationship ended badly. We had other things we were developing but never worked together again."

PACINO ON TONY & GINA: "I DIDN'T SEE IT AS INCESTUOUS AT ALL"
Perhaps the most interesting part of the article is the discussion of Pacino's refusal to accept any kind of incestuous angle between his characterization of Tony Montana and Tony's sister, Gina. Bauer recalls Pacino calling De Palma "a pervert" as he told Bauer about a heated meeting he'd had with De Palma and Stone. According to Bauer, as Pacino relayed it to him, "Oliver kept going, 'Al, I wrote it that way because I feel your love for her is unhealthy,' and Brian said that he thought it made the story more sick and complicated. Al said, 'It's not already sick and complicated enough that this guy wants everything? He wants to protect and control his sister. Look, I'm playing a monster, but not that kind of monster.'" And Pacino today tells Rebello, "I didn't see it as incestuous at all. How Tony felt for her was coming from a need to preserve something separate and pure in his life." And watching the scene near the end, where Gina enters Tony's office and begins teasing him, saying, "You can't stand for any other man to have me, Tony-- You want me for yourself," Pacino, the method actor, plays him as a man in shock. He (Tony) truly never consciously realized the incestuous core of his obsession with her, and now it is perhaps driving him insane, seeing and hearing her tease him in this manner.

A WOMAN ALONE, AND 100 FEMALE EXTRAS
The Rebello article curiously quotes only one unnamed actor in the following paragraph about De Palma's work with Pfeiffer on the set:

De Palma's work method was tougher on certain actors than others. Says one of the film's stars, "Brian wasn't there for Michelle Pfeiffer and manipulated her brutally. He's obsessed with women but in a very creepy way." During two days of filming the explosive scene with Pacino and Pfeiffer at the old-school Italian restaurant Marino on Melrose Avenue, Bauer says, De Palma "made Michelle feel like a scared, lonely little girl in a world of men. He did the right thing, but it was hard to watch. That poor girl was always alone, always on edge, very vulnerable, brave but alone in her performance. She lived on the phone with her acting coach Peggy Feury. She needed some kind of lifeline."

During the two weeks of filming the Babylon Club sequence, the article states, hundreds of female extras were brought in. Bauer tells Rebello, "Three hundred extras-- 100 of whom were great-looking girls-- and I had a little dressing room rendezvous once a week, at least. I've never been a dog or a misogynist. I'm obsessed with feminine beauty. With these women wanting to, why would I be aloof when there's a naked woman around?"


Posted by Geoff at 12:38 AM CST
Updated: Thursday, December 8, 2011 12:42 AM CST
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Monday, December 5, 2011
NOOMI RAPACE TALKING WITH DE PALMA ABOUT 'PASSION'
"HE WANTS TO DO THIS MOVIE WITH ME THAT'S A REALLY, REALLY COOL SCRIPT"
Noomi Rapace, the half-Swedish, half-Spanish actress who became film's original Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, tells Collider's Christina Radish that she is talking with Brian De Palma about starring in Passion, his remake of Alain Corneau's Love Crime. Here is what Rapace told Radish when asked what she might be doing next...

I don’t know if it’s next, but in March, I will start this movie with Colin Farrell, called Dead Man Down. It’s a fantastic script. I might do a movie with Brian De Palma before that. I’m talking to him, and he wants to do this movie with me that’s a really, really cool script. It’s called Passion. I love Scarface and Carlito’s Way. He’s done fantastic films, and it’s been really interesting, talking to him. So, I might do that before, and then go do the movie with Colin. And then, after that, I have a couple of things, but I can’t really talk about them yet.

Posted by Geoff at 8:10 PM CST
Updated: Tuesday, December 6, 2011 8:46 PM CST
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