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De Palma a la Mod

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Recent Headlines
a la Mod:

Domino is
a "disarmingly
straight-forward"
work that "pushes
us to reexamine our
relationship to images
and their consumption,
not only ethically
but metaphysically"
-Collin Brinkman

De Palma on Domino
"It was not recut.
I was not involved
in the ADR, the
musical recording
sessions, the final
mix or the color
timing of the
final print."

Listen to
Donaggio's full score
for Domino online

De Palma/Lehman
rapport at work
in Snakes

De Palma/Lehman
next novel is Terry

De Palma developing
Catch And Kill,
"a horror movie
based on real things
that have happened
in the news"

Supercut video
of De Palma's films
edited by Carl Rodrigue

Washington Post
review of Keesey book

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Exclusive Passion
Interviews:

Brian De Palma
Karoline Herfurth
Leila Rozario

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AV Club Review
of Dumas book

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Interviews...

De Palma interviewed
in Paris 2002

De Palma discusses
The Black Dahlia 2006


Enthusiasms...

De Palma Community

The Virtuoso
of the 7th Art

The De Palma Touch

The Swan Archives

Carrie...A Fan's Site

Phantompalooza

No Harm In Charm

Paul Schrader

Alfred Hitchcock
The Master Of Suspense

Alfred Hitchcock Films

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a la Mod

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a la Mod

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and the Infield
Fly Rule

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Directorama

The Filmmaker Who
Came In From The Cold

Jim Emerson on
Greetings & Hi, Mom!

Scarface: Make Way
For The Bad Guy

The Big Dive
(Blow Out)

Carrie: The Movie

Deborah Shelton
Official Web Site

The Phantom Project

Welcome to the
Offices of Death Records

The Carlito's Way
Fan Page

The House Next Door

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Guillotine

FilmLand Empire

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A Lonely Place

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italkyoubored

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Nothing Is Written

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EatSleepLiveFilm

No Time For
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The former
De Palma a la Mod
site

Entries by Topic
A note about topics: Some blog posts have more than one topic, in which case only one main topic can be chosen to represent that post. This means that some topics may have been discussed in posts labeled otherwise. For instance, a post that discusses both The Boston Stranglers and The Demolished Man may only be labeled one or the other. Please keep this in mind as you navigate this list.
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Ambrose Chapel
Are Snakes Necessary?
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Thursday, February 25, 2016
'RAISING CAIN' BLU-RAY FROM SCREAM FACTORY
EXTRAS STILL IN PROGRESS FOR "COLLECTOR'S EDITION" DUE JUNE 28
Scream Factory announced today that it will release a "Collector's Edition" Blu-ray of Brian De Palma's Raising Cain on June 28, 2016. The pre-order page for the title currently mentions, "Extras in progress and will be announced at a later date." We certainly hope they are attempting to somehow include the Raising Cain Re-Cut from four years ago, in which Peet Gelderblom made an "attempt to approximate Brian De Palma’s original vision of Raising Cain, before the director chose to compromise its structure in post-production." You can watch the re-cut at Press Play.

Posted by Geoff at 5:37 PM CST
Updated: Thursday, February 25, 2016 5:39 PM CST
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Wednesday, February 24, 2016
TWEET: WHO'S THAT GIRL?
ZOOEY DESCHANEL RECOGNIZED ALLEN GARFIELD FROM 'HI, MOM!'


Ari Bass produced a short film featuring Allen Garfield in 2000: Men Named Milo, Women Named Greta.

Posted by Geoff at 9:14 PM CST
Updated: Wednesday, February 24, 2016 9:14 PM CST
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Monday, February 22, 2016
EBERTFEST: NANCY ALLEN TO PRESENT 'BLOW OUT'
35MM PRINT WILL SCREEN AT FEST IN APRIL, FOLLOWED BY ON-STAGE DISCUSSION


A 35mm print of Brian De Palma's Blow Out will screen at this year's EbertFest, with Nancy Allen in attendance. Allen will present the film, and participate in an on-stage discussion and Q&A following the screening. Blow Out was announced today as EbertFest revealed several films that will be screened at the 18th annual edition of the festival, which runs this April 13-17 in Champaign, Illinois. The fest had previously announced that it will open with Crimson Peak, with Guillermo del Toro in attendance. The other four films announced today are The Third Man, Northfork, Force Of Destiny, and the 1925 silent film, Body & Soul. Six more films will be revealed in the coming weeks.

Back when Roger Ebert started this festival back in 1999, he called it "Roger Ebert's Overlooked Film Festival," and focused on films that he didn't think had received their fair share of exposure or discussion. Blow Out might have fit that festival description quite well back then, even coming a few years after Quentin Tarantino brought renewed attention to the film by talking it up as one of his favorites and casting John Travolta in Pulp Fiction, etc., etc. These days, however (and thanks in no small part to Criterion), Blow Out is widely seen as De Palma's best film. Yet picking it for Ebertfest still highlights the fact that the film really does remain somewhat overlooked in the grand scheme of things, perhaps as a Travolta film (in the shadow of Pulp Fiction, Saturday Night Fever, Grease), and also as a De Palma film (in the shadow of more, shall we say, dazzling works such as Carrie, Scarface, or The Untouchables).

The blurb in the Ebertfest press announcement reads:

Roger Ebert considered “Blow Out” to be Brian De Palma’s finest film. From his review of “Blow Out”: “’Blow Out” stands by itself. It reminds us of the violence of ‘Dressed to Kill,’ the startling images of ‘The Fury,’ the clouded identities of ‘Sisters,’ the uncertainty of historical ‘facts’ from ‘Obsession,” and it ends with the bleak nihilism of ‘Carrie’.. But it moves beyond those films, because this time De Palma is more successful than ever before at populating his plot with three-dimensional characters.”

Posted by Geoff at 6:00 PM CST
Updated: Tuesday, March 1, 2016 2:45 AM CST
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Sunday, February 21, 2016
MORRICONE: DE PALMA MADE RIGHT CHOICE
IN DECIDING WHICH PIECE OF MUSIC TO USE FOR 'UNTOUCHABLES' COURTROOM CLIMAX


Ennio Morricone recently discussed a handful of his film scores with Entertainment Weekly's Madison Vain, and included a story about The Untouchables:
For the unforgettable final scene of Brian De Palma’s gangster epic, in which Prohibition agent Eliot Ness (Kevin Costner) brings Al Capone (Robert De Niro) to justice, Morricone presented nine possible options. As he remembers it, he hoped De Palma would choose any of them except the seventh—which, of course, is exactly the one the director wanted. “In the end, he was absolutely right,” the composer says. Celebratory music is a rare mode for Morricone, who favors more hypnotic, moody creations. “But De Palma chose the piece that was most like [the ending]—it showed the triumph of the police over the bad guys.”

Posted by Geoff at 11:54 PM CST
Updated: Sunday, February 21, 2016 11:58 PM CST
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Wednesday, February 17, 2016
'CARRIE THE MUSICAL' - BEST OF 2015 LISTS
RNH.COM ROUNDS 'EM UP FOR US
RNH.com ("Rodgers And Hammerstein") has rounded up a list of links to various "Best Of" lists for 2015 musicals and shows from Los Angeles and London that included Carrie The Musical. You can go to the page to find the links, along with quotes such as, "A powerful, poetic score brought Stephen King’s 1974 horror novel to life," "Immersive and enjoyable," and, "A stunning and moving adaptation of Ste[ph]en King's coming-of-age novel."
(Thanks to Lawrence!!)

Posted by Geoff at 10:17 PM CST
Updated: Friday, February 19, 2016 5:02 PM CST
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Monday, February 15, 2016
SO, I WAS WATCHING 'TOOTSIE' THE OTHER DAY...
AND COULDN'T HELP BUT THINK OF MARGO, GUARDIAN OF THE CHILDREN

Posted by Geoff at 11:54 PM CST
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Sunday, February 14, 2016
SCORSESE RECALLS 1973 NEW YORK CITY
MARQUEE IMAGE IN 'VINYL' PILOT CALLS BACK TO 'DEEP THROAT' DAYS
The pilot episode of HBO's Vinyl is directed by Martin Scorsese, who created the series along with Mick Jagger. The pilot, essentially a new two-hour Scorsese picture, begins with its main character, Richie Finestra (Bobby Cannavale) scoring some drugs on a New York street before being shaken by rowdy partiers into abandoning his car to follow them via some sort of Dionysian impulse into a building where the New York Dolls are performing to a crowd of rabid fans. Finestra observes motionless, but drugged-out impressed as the band has the crowd eating out of its hands. A little later in the movie (actually, after the story has flashed back a handful of days prior to its opening), Finestra is riding in a car and spies the marquee of a movie theater showing a double feature: Deep Throat and The Devil In Miss Jones.

"IT OPENED UP THE SOCIETY"

With the latter scene mentioned above, I couldn't help but be reminded of Scorsese's mention about going to see Deep Throat with Brian De Palma in the 1970s. The following is from page 116 of Richard Schickel's book, Conversations With Scorsese, during a discussion of Scorsese's Taxi Driver:

Schickel: The woman—a society campaign worker—is attracted to Travis because he’s so out of her league, as it were. Her Junior League, I guess. Which makes this notion of taking her to a porn movie—

Scorsese: Oh! I know. Well, you have to remember, a lot of people don’t remember now, but at that time, they were trying to make porn acceptable, with Deep Throat and Sometimes Sweet Susan, and pictures like that.

Schickel: I went to a few of those.

Scorsese: It was okay to go with a girl. But Brian De Palma and I went to see Deep Throat, and he said, Look at the people around us, it doesn’t feel right. There were couples. I said, You’re right. We should be with all these old guys in raincoats. It was a wonderful kind of hypocritical thing that was happening—it opened up the society.


Posted by Geoff at 11:57 PM CST
Updated: Monday, February 15, 2016 12:23 AM CST
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Saturday, February 13, 2016
JOSH FRIEDMAN'S TWITTER 'ASK ME ANYTHING'
'BLACK DAHLIA' SCREENWRITER ON THE LONGEST SCRIPT HE EVER WROTE, MORE





Posted by Geoff at 6:43 PM CST
Updated: Saturday, February 13, 2016 6:43 PM CST
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Thursday, February 11, 2016
VIDEO: UNBOXING CARLOTTA'S 'BODY DOUBLE' SET

Posted by Geoff at 6:09 PM CST
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Wednesday, February 10, 2016
ON DE PALMA'S 'FEMME FATALE' & 'PASSION'
"DOUBLE VISION" COLUMN NOTES HOW THE TWO FILMS "RHYME WITH EACH OTHER", DREAM IMAGERY & LOGIC, ETC.
Dim The House Lights began an “occasional column” this week called “Double Vision,” and the second installment finds Ross Birks linking Brian De Palma’s Femme Fatale with his most recent feature, Passion. “If you’re going to pair up two Brian De Palma erotic thrillers,” Birks writes, “nine times out of ten you’d go for Dressed to Kill and Body Double. Upon recently revisiting De Palma’s canon for the umpteenth time, however, I found a better pairing: Femme Fatale and Passion. Made ten years apart these two films showcase a late-career De Palma returning to the genre he helped define with a newfound enthusiasm and experimentation."

In between writing about the two films, Birks notes how Raising Cain, made ten years prior to Femme Fatale, "foreshadows what De Palma would explore" in these two later works. "In that film," Birks writes, "John Lithgow plays Cain, a psychologist suffering from multiple personality disorder and De Palma constantly shows us the world from Cain’s POV in each of his different guises making reality increasingly difficult to pin down. The same can be said for the final act of Passion. After being accused of murder, Isabelle (Rapace) appears to regress into her own consciousness. De Palma teases the audience with multiple fake outs and double fake outs, sometimes never clarifying what is real and what isn’t."

While Birks does not leave out mention of the use of dreams in De Palma's previous films, his focus on these three actually makes for an intriguing trilogy, each conveniently ten years apart (it is an odd recent phenomenon that a movie's film festival screening year has become its official year of release: Passion, which played several fests in 2012 but was not officially released in any country until 2013, is referred to in most cases, even the IMDB, as a 2012 film). Each of the three feature long, extended dream sequences in the middle of the film. The dream at the center of Femme Fatale is clearly delineated, yet the whole film comes to seem marked by a transcendent sort of dream logic that feels sprung from multiple dreamers. As such, it does make for a graceful centerpiece in a trilogy that would keep any audience on its toes, as the nightmares from Raising Cain and Passion keep the viewer guessing what is dream, what is real, and by the way, whose dream are we in now?

Birks continues, "Passion‘s centerpiece, at least from a De Palma obsessive’s point of view, is an extended split screen sequence that intercuts a ballet performance with a stealthy murder in the giallo tradition and culminates with Isabelle jolting awake in her bed just as Christine (McAdams) has her throat slashed open. For a time, it isn’t clear if the previous scene really occurred or was just a variation of what actually transpired. From then on the film becomes hyper-real, bathed in expressionistic shadows and Dutch camera angles that are at odds stylistically with the film’s rather composed first hour. Even the story becomes excessively nonsensical with twist piling on after twist to the point of absurdity. The 'it was all a dream' trope has become one of the most groan-worthy in cinema so De Palma’s commitment to it in both Passion and Femme Fatale is all the more daring and admirable. It’s as if he saw utilizing that twist as a challenge in itself and wanted to explore the possibilities. Perhaps if he was subtler about it audiences would have been more receptive (see Mulholland Dr.) but De Palma has never been about subtlety, which is actually one of things I respond to most in his work."


Posted by Geoff at 4:19 AM CST
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