Guide to getting and playing better gigs


   

Increase Gig Attendance

     
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Getting to know your potential fans on a personal basis is still the way to get people to do what you ask. It's easy to think you're working hard by sending out 500 unsolicited packages to labels or sending a bulk email about a new gig to fans, but that's just a waste of time for the most part. If you want to make a living in music, you need to do something every day to put things in place so that it'll happen for you. Sitting around and waiting for that A&R guy to hear you on a European radio station and phone you up with a 1,000,000 contract isn't going to work. Having the next show you do come off great will.

Start visiting the clubs you play a couple of weeks ahead of time and get to know the people in the audience. Hand them a demo tape, a flyer, or a leaflet. Make sure it has the number for your band's info line on it! Spend a little time with them and get their address to add to your mailing list if they seem interested in local music.

A week before your gig, send out postcards to the people that you met with a personal note thanking them for supporting live music and reminding them about the upcoming show. Even something small like "Hey, Tina!" will work wonders. Just make sure it's personal! A hundred or so postcards and a few pounds for stamps and blank tapes might not sound like a lot, but I promise you any money invested in a promotion like this will come back to you in the form of increased gig attendance and merchandise sales. Then you can do it again next week! The music business is not rocket science. You make a product, you distribute the product, you promote the product, and people purchase it.















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