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Virtual Cemetery Page 68

The Final Resting Places of 23rd PA Soldiers
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This is the Grave of Private Charles E. Smallwood Company G , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in New Jersey on January 20th 1844. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on September 6th 1861 . On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . Charles E. Smallwood was Wounded and captured by the rebels at The Battle of 2nd Fredericksburg , Virginia on May 3rd 1863, but escaped and returned to the ranks to the cheer of the men. He escaped in enough time to join the charge on the heights. At the expiration of his enlistment he re-enlisted and was transferred to the 82nd Pennsylvania, Company E, on September 9th 1864. He was mustered out of Service, seven months later on July 13th 1865. After the War, He moved to Philadelphia and worked as a Painter. He married Sarah and had one Child, Martha. His death occurred on January 24th 1912 of Chronic Bronchitis. He is buried at Greenmount Cemetery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in Section A, Lot 85, Grave 1. When in section A, look for the large Evergreen tree and his stone is buried under it.

You can view a Photo of Charles E. Smallwood with his blanketmate Richard J. Miller on Page 6 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.

This is the Grave of Private John H. Wayne Company I , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Mountville,PA on July 18th 1843. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on August 13th 1861 .On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . He was mortally wounded at the Battle of Malvern Hill on July 1st 1862 and died on July 28th 1862. He is buried at Mountville Cemetery, in Mountville Pennsylvania in Section C, Lot 82, Grave 1.
This is the Grave of Private George W. Woodruff Company O , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was born in Philadelphia in 1843. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on August 13th 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . On March 4th 1862, an order was given that Four Companies of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, L,O,P, and R, were to be transferred to the 61st Pennsylvania Volunteers. This order was met with much protest since the men enlisted as the 23rd PA Regiment and did not enlist to fight with the 61st PA. After a time, however the men obeyed the order. George W. Woodruff of Company O , now was transferred to Company H of the 61st PA Volunteers. He was mustered out of Service on a Sureons Certificate on January 28th 1863. After the War, he returned to Philadelphia and was employed as a clerk. He lived at 109 Race Street in Philadelphia. His death occured on October 31st 1872 of consumption. He was buried in Glenwood Cemetery in Philadelphia. That Cemetery was removed and George's remains where removed to Glenwood Cemetery in Broomall,PA. He is buried there in Section J, Lot 98, Grave 3, in an unmarked Grave. From the photo he is buried where the flower is on the ground, six feet to the right of Mary Wolfinger.
This is the Grave of Private Philip John Bieger Company B , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves” The Gymnast Company . He was born in Germany in 1841. His family moved to Philadelphia, where they settled. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on August 8th 1861 .On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . He was mustered out of Service on September 8th 1864. After the War, He returned to Philadelphia and was employed as a shoemaker. His death occurred on July 12th 1901 from Depression following a Stroke which paralysed him. He was buried in Glenwood Cemetery in Philadelphia. That Cemetery was removed and Philip's remains where removed to Glenwood Cemetery in Broomall,PA. He is buried there in Section T, Lot 23, Grave 2, in an unmarked Grave. From the photo he is buried where the flower is on the ground, eight feet in front of Forrest Hoffman's Grave.
This is the Grave of Private William Everhardt Company C , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Germany in 1831. His family relocated to Philadelphia. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on September 1st 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . William Everhardt was Wounded at The Battle of Cold Harbor Virginia on June 1st 1864, near Richmond. He was mustered out of Service on September 8th 1864. After the War, He returned to Philadelphia and worked as a Baker. His death occurred on November 25th 1883. While at work hanging beef to dry, he fell off a ladder and was hung. He was buried in Glenwood Cemetery in Philadelphia. That Cemetery was removed and William's remains where removed to Glenwood Cemetery in Broomall,PA. He is buried there in Section F, Lot 272, Grave 3, in an unmarked Grave. He is buried 18 feet to the direct left of Gladys M. Morecraft's Grave.

You can view a Photo of William Everhardt with his blanketmate Richard J. Miller on Page 13 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.



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Birney's Zouaves

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