Birney's Re-enactors

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          23rd Pennsylvania



Original Photos Page 9



Gallery of the 23rd PA
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This four generation family photograph depicts the war hero William J. Wray, on the right. His father William Corbin Wray, is the man in the center. The man on the left, is William Corbin Wray Jr, who died at the age of 24 and is buried in the same plot as William Wray. The infant is the war heros grandson, William John Wray Jr.

Photo of Sergeant William John Wray Company F , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Philadelphia on May 16th 1845. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on August 2nd 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . William John Wray was Wounded at The Battle of Fredericksburg Virginia on December 13th 1862. The bullet went through his left eye and shattered his jaw. The same bullet struck his friend and blanket mate , Patrick Hickey. Hickey carried Wray to safety. Wray was taken to General Hospital in York, PA. William was there being nursed back to health foe the next six months and was assigned to the Veterans Reserve Corps. In late June during the Gettysburg Campaign , Confederate General Jubal Early was attempting a run on Harrisburg. Wray volunteered to defend The Bridge at Wrightsville with McGowan's Invalids. During the Overland Campaign, he was at Fort Stevens when Early made his last attack on the Capitol. Wray, in charge of a Battery that was under severe fire, ordered a change of position of the Battery to prevent it from being deystroyed. He was mustered out of Service on November 23rd 1865. After the War, He returned to Philadelphia and became a Laywer fighting for Veteran Pensions. He fathered Nine children with his wife Lucy. On December 15th 1892, William John Wray was awarded the Congressional Medal of Homor for his Actions at Ft. Stevens.During General Early's advance on Washington, D.C., Sergeant William Wray earned the Medal of Honor for his heroic defense of the Capitol City. At a critical moment during a charge at Fort Stevens, amid a hail of fire and the rush of the Confederate soldiers, Sergeant Wray rallied the men of his company. His death occurred on June 1st 1919 at the Home of his brother Albert Wray, 5412 Webster Street . He was 74 Years Old and was buried in American Mechanics Cemetery in Philadelphia. In 1951 the area was developed and the bodies removed. His body was disinterred on September 11, 1951 and re-interred on September 13, 1951, along with several other Wray family members.He is buried at Philadelphia Memorial Park in Frazier, Pennsylvania in Division F Section 1, Lot 31, Grave 1.

William John Wray was a Pennsylvania Freemason,Member of Lodge # 9 . Corinthian Royal Arch Chapter #250. Republican Club of Philadelphia. Philadelphia Fireman (Goodwill Engine Company).

You can view Photos of William John Wray on Page 9 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.

You can view the Grave of William John Wray on Page 8 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Virtual Cemeteries pages.

You can view Pension Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Pension Records pages.

You can view Burial Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Burial Records pages.

This is the last known photograph of William J. Wray most likely taken in 1918 or 1919 shortly before his death. If you look closely you can see that Wray's eyelid over his glass eye is partly open. He looks though he is sleeping , yet he keeps his cigar in his mouth. He still is wearing his forage cap as a reminder of his Civil War days.

Photo of Sergeant William John Wray Company F , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Philadelphia on May 16th 1845. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on August 2nd 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . William John Wray was Wounded at The Battle of Fredericksburg Virginia on December 13th 1862. The bullet went through his left eye and shattered his jaw. The same bullet struck his friend and blanket mate , Patrick Hickey. Hickey carried Wray to safety. Wray was taken to General Hospital in York, PA. William was there being nursed back to health foe the next six months and was assigned to the Veterans Reserve Corps. In late June during the Gettysburg Campaign , Confederate General Jubal Early was attempting a run on Harrisburg. Wray volunteered to defend The Bridge at Wrightsville with McGowan's Invalids. During the Overland Campaign, he was at Fort Stevens when Early made his last attack on the Capitol. Wray, in charge of a Battery that was under severe fire, ordered a change of position of the Battery to prevent it from being deystroyed. He was mustered out of Service on November 23rd 1865. After the War, He returned to Philadelphia and became a Laywer fighting for Veteran Pensions. He fathered Nine children with his wife Lucy. On December 15th 1892, William John Wray was awarded the Congressional Medal of Homor for his Actions at Ft. Stevens.During General Early's advance on Washington, D.C., Sergeant William Wray earned the Medal of Honor for his heroic defense of the Capitol City. At a critical moment during a charge at Fort Stevens, amid a hail of fire and the rush of the Confederate soldiers, Sergeant Wray rallied the men of his company. His death occurred on June 1st 1919 at the Home of his brother Albert Wray, 5412 Webster Street . He was 74 Years Old and was buried in American Mechanics Cemetery in Philadelphia. In 1951 the area was developed and the bodies removed. His body was disinterred on September 11, 1951 and re-interred on September 13, 1951, along with several other Wray family members.He is buried at Philadelphia Memorial Park in Frazier, Pennsylvania in Division F Section 1, Lot 31, Grave 1.

William John Wray was a Pennsylvania Freemason,Member of Lodge # 9 . Corinthian Royal Arch Chapter #250. Republican Club of Philadelphia. Philadelphia Fireman (Goodwill Engine Company).

You can view Photos of William John Wray on Page 9 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.

You can view the Grave of William John Wray on Page 8 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Virtual Cemeteries pages.

You can view Pension Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Pension Records pages.

You can view Burial Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Burial Records pages.

This is a post-war photo of William James Wray. You can see is glass eye which is wide open. Photo probably taken in the 1880's-90's while he is in his forty's or early fifty's.

Photo of Sergeant William John Wray Company F , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Philadelphia on May 16th 1845. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on August 2nd 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . William John Wray was Wounded at The Battle of Fredericksburg Virginia on December 13th 1862. The bullet went through his left eye and shattered his jaw. The same bullet struck his friend and blanket mate , Patrick Hickey. Hickey carried Wray to safety. Wray was taken to General Hospital in York, PA. William was there being nursed back to health foe the next six months and was assigned to the Veterans Reserve Corps. In late June during the Gettysburg Campaign , Confederate General Jubal Early was attempting a run on Harrisburg. Wray volunteered to defend The Bridge at Wrightsville with McGowan's Invalids. During the Overland Campaign, he was at Fort Stevens when Early made his last attack on the Capitol. Wray, in charge of a Battery that was under severe fire, ordered a change of position of the Battery to prevent it from being deystroyed. He was mustered out of Service on November 23rd 1865. After the War, He returned to Philadelphia and became a Laywer fighting for Veteran Pensions. He fathered Nine children with his wife Lucy. On December 15th 1892, William John Wray was awarded the Congressional Medal of Homor for his Actions at Ft. Stevens.During General Early's advance on Washington, D.C., Sergeant William Wray earned the Medal of Honor for his heroic defense of the Capitol City. At a critical moment during a charge at Fort Stevens, amid a hail of fire and the rush of the Confederate soldiers, Sergeant Wray rallied the men of his company. His death occurred on June 1st 1919 at the Home of his brother Albert Wray, 5412 Webster Street . He was 74 Years Old and was buried in American Mechanics Cemetery in Philadelphia. In 1951 the area was developed and the bodies removed. His body was disinterred on September 11, 1951 and re-interred on September 13, 1951, along with several other Wray family members.He is buried at Philadelphia Memorial Park in Frazier, Pennsylvania in Division F Section 1, Lot 31, Grave 1.

William John Wray was a Pennsylvania Freemason,Member of Lodge # 9 . Corinthian Royal Arch Chapter #250. Republican Club of Philadelphia. Philadelphia Fireman (Goodwill Engine Company).

You can view Photos of William John Wray on Page 9 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.

You can view the Grave of William John Wray on Page 8 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Virtual Cemeteries pages.

You can view Pension Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Pension Records pages.

You can view Burial Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Burial Records pages.

Photo of William James Wray taken between December of 1862 and March of 1863.Notice he is wearing his Zouave jacket and vest, but a pair of Federal light blue trousers.

Photo of Sergeant William John Wray Company F , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Philadelphia on May 16th 1845. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on August 2nd 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . William John Wray was Wounded at The Battle of Fredericksburg Virginia on December 13th 1862. The bullet went through his left eye and shattered his jaw. The same bullet struck his friend and blanket mate , Patrick Hickey. Hickey carried Wray to safety. Wray was taken to General Hospital in York, PA. William was there being nursed back to health foe the next six months and was assigned to the Veterans Reserve Corps. In late June during the Gettysburg Campaign , Confederate General Jubal Early was attempting a run on Harrisburg. Wray volunteered to defend The Bridge at Wrightsville with McGowan's Invalids. During the Overland Campaign, he was at Fort Stevens when Early made his last attack on the Capitol. Wray, in charge of a Battery that was under severe fire, ordered a change of position of the Battery to prevent it from being deystroyed. He was mustered out of Service on November 23rd 1865. After the War, He returned to Philadelphia and became a Laywer fighting for Veteran Pensions. He fathered Nine children with his wife Lucy. On December 15th 1892, William John Wray was awarded the Congressional Medal of Homor for his Actions at Ft. Stevens.During General Early's advance on Washington, D.C., Sergeant William Wray earned the Medal of Honor for his heroic defense of the Capitol City. At a critical moment during a charge at Fort Stevens, amid a hail of fire and the rush of the Confederate soldiers, Sergeant Wray rallied the men of his company. His death occurred on June 1st 1919 at the Home of his brother Albert Wray, 5412 Webster Street . He was 74 Years Old and was buried in American Mechanics Cemetery in Philadelphia. In 1951 the area was developed and the bodies removed. His body was disinterred on September 11, 1951 and re-interred on September 13, 1951, along with several other Wray family members.He is buried at Philadelphia Memorial Park in Frazier, Pennsylvania in Division F Section 1, Lot 31, Grave 1.

William John Wray was a Pennsylvania Freemason,Member of Lodge # 9 . Corinthian Royal Arch Chapter #250. Republican Club of Philadelphia. Philadelphia Fireman (Goodwill Engine Company).

You can view Photos of William John Wray on Page 9 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.

You can view the Grave of William John Wray on Page 8 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Virtual Cemeteries pages.

You can view Pension Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Pension Records pages.

You can view Burial Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Burial Records pages.

Photo of Patrick Hickey and William Wray of Company F. They were friends before the war and shared a tent as blanketmates. During the Battle of Fredricksburg a ball passed through Wray's left eye and then striking Hickey in the arm. Hickey helped to save Wray's life and get him to Surgeon Roller.

Photo of Sergeant William John Wray Company F , 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers, also known by their nickname, “Birney’s Zouaves”. He was born in Philadelphia on May 16th 1845. He enlisted into the 23rd Pennsylvania at the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia on August 2nd 1861. On September 8th 1861, he moved with the Regiment to Washington D.C, where he was encamped just three miles north of the Capitol on “The Queen’s Farm” at Camp Graham . He was there with the Regiment during the cold winter months and in December of 1861; Typhoid Fever broke out within the Camp which resulted in the Death of Fifty-One men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Volunteers. It was decided on March 12th 1862 to move the camp to higher ground in Bladensburg, Maryland to rid the epidemic and ready the Soldiers for campaign. The 23rd Pennsylvania moved to Bladensburg and were encamped at Camp Clark . William John Wray was Wounded at The Battle of Fredericksburg Virginia on December 13th 1862. The bullet went through his left eye and shattered his jaw. The same bullet struck his friend and blanket mate , Patrick Hickey. Hickey carried Wray to safety. Wray was taken to General Hospital in York, PA. William was there being nursed back to health foe the next six months and was assigned to the Veterans Reserve Corps. In late June during the Gettysburg Campaign , Confederate General Jubal Early was attempting a run on Harrisburg. Wray volunteered to defend The Bridge at Wrightsville with McGowan's Invalids. During the Overland Campaign, he was at Fort Stevens when Early made his last attack on the Capitol. Wray, in charge of a Battery that was under severe fire, ordered a change of position of the Battery to prevent it from being deystroyed. He was mustered out of Service on November 23rd 1865. After the War, He returned to Philadelphia and became a Laywer fighting for Veteran Pensions. He fathered Nine children with his wife Lucy. On December 15th 1892, William John Wray was awarded the Congressional Medal of Homor for his Actions at Ft. Stevens.During General Early's advance on Washington, D.C., Sergeant William Wray earned the Medal of Honor for his heroic defense of the Capitol City. At a critical moment during a charge at Fort Stevens, amid a hail of fire and the rush of the Confederate soldiers, Sergeant Wray rallied the men of his company. His death occurred on June 1st 1919 at the Home of his brother Albert Wray, 5412 Webster Street . He was 74 Years Old and was buried in American Mechanics Cemetery in Philadelphia. In 1951 the area was developed and the bodies removed. His body was disinterred on September 11, 1951 and re-interred on September 13, 1951, along with several other Wray family members.He is buried at Philadelphia Memorial Park in Frazier, Pennsylvania in Division F Section 1, Lot 31, Grave 1.

William John Wray was a Pennsylvania Freemason,Member of Lodge # 9 . Corinthian Royal Arch Chapter #250. Republican Club of Philadelphia. Philadelphia Fireman (Goodwill Engine Company).

You can view Photos of William John Wray on Page 9 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Original Photos pages.

You can view the Grave of William John Wray on Page 8 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Virtual Cemeteries pages.

You can view Pension Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Pension Records pages.

You can view Burial Records of William John Wray on Page 1 of the 23rd Pennsylvania, Burial Records pages.

William J wrays autograph on December 14, 1916.




Birney's Zouaves

© May 30, 2005 - "Birney's Zouaves" The 23rd PA Infantry Volunteers
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