Let's go back to our simple page.

 <BODY> Something 
Classical</BODY> 


Something Classical

This is the paragraph tag. Think of a paragraph as a block of text.

 <BODY> 
<P>Something Classical</P> 
</BODY> 


Something Classical

By itself it doesn't do much. Although with most browsers, starting a new paragraph does have the effect of skipping a line.

 <BODY> <P>Something Classical</P> <P>The Cleisthenic redistribution of the Attic Tribes</P> 
</BODY> 


Something Classical

The Cleisthenic redistribution of the Attic Tribes

This <P> tag is good for aligning text:.

 <BODY> 
<P ALIGN="left">Something Classical</P> <P ALIGN="center">Aristophanes' Humour</P> <P ALIGN="right">The Wasps</P> <P ALIGN="left"> Something 
Classical<BR>Something Classical<BR>Aristophanes' Humour</P> <P 
ALIGN="center"> Something Classical<BR>Aristophanes' Humour<BR>The wasps</P> <P ALIGN="right"> 
Something Classical<BR>Aristophanes' Humour <BR>The Wasps</P> 
</BODY> 


Something Classical

Aristophanes' Humour

The Wasps

Something Classical
Aristophanes' Humour
The Wasps

Something Classical
Aristophanes' Humpor
The Wasps

SomethingClassical
Aristophanes' Humour
The Wasps

Something about the <P> tag... although in the examples above I used a closing tag (</P>), it is not entirely necessary. Nearly all browsers will assume that when a new <P>aragraph has begun, the old one must have ended. So...

 <P>Some stuff <P>More stuff 

is the same as...

 <P>Some stuff</P> <P>More 
stuff</P> 

And one more thing before we move on, earlier we were talking about centering things. There's another way to center something: It's pretty self-explanatory. You can center one word or your whole page. Everything betwen the <CENTER> tags gets centered.

 <BODY> <CENTER>Something 
Classical</CENTER> </BODY> 


Something Classical