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From left: A.Q. Porter, Eli Cupit, J.S. Burns, Emery Summers & O.T. Synnott. Masthead (c) 2003 David E. Godbold. USE BY PERMISSION ONLY.
 
Battles & Engagements
Biographies & Photos
A Brief Synopsis of the 33rd's History
1862 Chronology
1863 Chronology
1864 Chronology
1865 Chronology
Letters & Diaries
Original Officers
Rosters & Enlistment History
 
 

Click to view a larger version of the 33rd Mississippi Infantry flag

 

"I wish to mention for conspicuous gallantry Col. D.W. Hurst, Thirty-third Mississippi Regiment, who drove the enemy from their intrenchments at the head of his regiment with empty guns."

--- Brig.-Gen. John B. Villepigue,
Oct. 14, 1862

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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1862

April: After being organized and field officers elected in Grenada, MS., the 33rdBrig. Gen. S.A.M. Wood
was assigned to Brig. Gen. S.A.M. Wood's 3rd brigade, Army of Mississippi.

Brig. Gen. J.B. Villepigue

 

June: They were assigned to Brig. Gen. J. B. Villepigue's command --- part of Maj. Gen. Mansfield Lovell's 1st Division. On the 12th, while still in Grenada, there were 669 present and 310 absent. The only arms they had were "379 condemned muskets."

 

August: Co. C and perhaps others were ordered to Port Hudson, LA to reinforce Maj. Gen. J. C. Breckinridge's command.Maj. Gen. Mansfield Lovell

September: The troops were in camp in north Mississippi.


October: Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn, commander of the Army of West Tennessee marched his forces to Pocahontas on the 1st, and then moved southeast toward Corinth.

Pvt. M.V. Kees (Co. C) wrote in his diary that on the 2nd they, "Started at 6 o'clock in the morning, marched on until 6 in the evening and came to where the Yanks was camped and we ran them away from their camp and camped their ourselves."

Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn
The following day Kees continued, "We marched towards Corinth, driving the pickets in. They commenced fighting soon in the morning and fought all day; and we have driven the Yanks back."

Lt. R.H. Crozier, commanding Co. I, stated, "We were ordered (on the 3rd) to charge the enemy's works at a certain point on the Memphis & Charleston RR...with empty guns and without bayonets. The foe ingloriously and hastily retreated before we reached the breastworks."

In his report Villepigue said, "I wish to mention for conspicuous gallantry Col. D.W. Hurst, Thirty-third Mississippi Regiment, who drove the enemy from their intrenchments at the head of his regiment with empty guns."

On the 4th, Kees reported, "We commenced fighting about 4 in the morning and fought all day until 4 o'clock in the evening and we had to retreat back about 10 miles that evening." Losses of the 33rd.

By the 10th, the regiment had reached Holly Springs. Four days later they moved to Coldwater and "went into camp".

C.S.A. President Jefferson Davis

 

November: They evacuated Holly Springs and fell back to Abbeville, where they remained for the rest of the month.

December: On the 1st, they began their march to Grenada, and went into winter camp on the 8th. On Christmas Eve, the troops had a general review for President Jefferson Davis.


All photographs of Generals on this page are believed to be in the Public Domain.

For more information see Dr. Sidney W. Bondurant's
History of the 33rd Mississippi Infantry

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