I will be attempting to put a new work here as frequently as possible. It may be a finished painting or a small sketch, but it will be something...

Inspired by bodybuilding magazines, my Meatmen are extremes of masculinity. Hyper-sexualized beings of revealed muscle seemingly stripped of flesh.       sumi ink on vellum, 11�x14" each, 2/ 2/07

 

May 20, 2006. This is from yesterday's Rathayatra Parade downtown. A huge Indian Chariot being pulled by hand past the local Hooters as a guru blows into a conch shell.

These are from the Fairy Festival a few weeks back.

April 20, These sketches are from the circus. Look at that elephant paint! Such mastery. And that hula hoop woman- wow!

March 24, 2006

This week I set up my new exhibit at Goucher College. Here are a few installation views.

March 16, 2006

Last night's trip to Baltimore's infamous locale "The Block" produced these sketches.

The 2 o'clock Club

American Institute of Architects

American Institute of Architects

 "Salzburg Skizzenblock"

The work in "Salzburg Skizzenblock" was done during my residency with the Land of Austria Kunstlerhaus Artists Exchange, Salzburg, Austria in 2003-2004. Drawing with pen & ink on the streets as the faces flew past, I splattered the cobblestone passages of Salzburg's old city, adding my own ink to the continuum of artists who have worked in their streets.

 

 Opening reception Thursday May 4, 5:30-8pm

May 1- June 28, 2006


11 1/2 West Chase St., Baltimore, MD 


hours: Mon-Thurs 9am-4pm

www.aiabalt.com

 

Poodles and Paintings now on display at The Hawthorne Gallery

 1315 South Hawthorne Road , Winston-Salem, NC 27103

 w w w . hawthorneart . c o m

 

 A detail from Spoon Popkin's installation "The Ballad Of Sharon And Zebedee"

Excerpt from " Spoon Popkin At Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery through April 28"

By Robbie Whelan, Baltimore City Paper

An artist who works with "found art" is obliged to blur the lines between curator and artiste, which can either diminish the authenticity of his or her exhibitions or broaden his or her capacity for expression, depending on how you look at it. Spoon Popkin's solo show, which spans the past six years of the artist's career and is on display at Goucher College's Rosenberg Gallery, has the latter result on the viewer—her found art gives intelligent yet visceral context to the original, expressive paintings she pairs with it.

The meat of the show, however, is the right-hand side of the gallery, where Popkin has placed an entire wall of found art in the midst of her own jarring paintings to create a nightmarish landscape of psychological associations. On the left are a series of watercolors that look like half-completed studies. Fragmented images of statuesque, dismembered torsos, bloated, floating baby faces, and mouths locked in deep kisses are arranged irregularly. All of these images are highly sensual and sexually charged. Popkin's painting has a sense of raw urgency to it, as if these studies, if completed and painted cleanly, would be devoid of emotion.

Popkin's kind of art is, in many ways, some of the most satisfying. It strikes a perfect balance between what she is trying to say to her viewers and what she wants us to take from it. It's a technique that makes a highly effective use of psychological symbols and sexual overtones.

http://www.citypaper.com/arts/story.asp?id=11716

 

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new work
paintings
resume
biography and statement
reviews
upcoming and recent shows
contact
Elsie Dinsmore Popkin
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