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Serrasalmus odyssei

Hubert, N.& Renno J.-F, 2010

The molecular and evolutionary perspectives of a new species, S. odyssei.

 

FROM FRANK MAGALLANES (OPINION)  Book review of Description of a new Serrasalmus species, Serrasalmus odyssei n. sp. [pp. 52-59]. In: Evolution of the neotropical ichthyofauna -- molecular and evolutionary perspectives about the origin of the fish communities in the Amazon. VIEW

 

ABSTRACT

Rivers and lakes of South America host 4000 fish species representing 30% of the world freshwater fish diversity. Together with a large panel of life history traits, this diversity has thus far fascinated biologists. The biogeography of the Amazonian fishes remain poorly explored, however, by contrast with the great amount of information available for South American terrestrial biotas for which several hypothesis of diversification have been developed. Yet, recent molecular studies pointed to the importance of the orogenic activity of the Andes, the marine highstand of the late Miocene, the climatic fluctuations of the Pleistocene or headwater capture events for the dynamic of the Amazonian biodiversity. The contribution of these factors in promoting biodiversity in freshwater fishes, however, is still debated. In the present contribution, the potential impact of such events during the history of the Amazon has been addressed through a combined used of biogeographic, phylogenetic and phylogeographic approaches at both regional and local scales. Present results suggest that geographic isolation as a consequence of past habitat fragmentation during major climatic and geologic changes significantly increased the diversity of Neotropical fishes. Link for the abstract can be found here.

 

DESCRIPTION

 

Dorsal soft rays (total): 13-15; Anal fin rays 28 - 33. This species is distinguished from its congener in the Upper Amazon by the following set of characters: short supraoccipital spine 0.13-0.17% of SL (vs. typical range between 0.17-0.22% of SL in Serrasalmus but sometimes reaching 0.15 and 0.16 in S. hollandi and S. altispinnis); shallow body 0.45-0.57% of SL (vs. typical body height 0.50-0.62% in Serrasalmus); short dorsal fin, between 0.18-0.20% of SL and 13-15 branched rays (vs. 0.19-0.24% of SL in Serrasalmus); short anal fin, typical 0.32-0.37% of SL with 28-33 branched rays, but overlapping sometimes with other Serrasalmus); adipose fin located on the very posterior part of the body and distant from the dorsal fin end, typically R15 ranging between 0.19-0.22% of SL, but overlapping with other Serrasalmus with R15 ranging between 0.17-0.21% of SL); low number of scales between the lateral line and the dorsal fin, 23.5-29.5 (vs. 28.5-36.5 in other Serrasalmus); an intermediate number of prepelvic serrae 20-24. Holotype: MNHN 2005-2216. Paratypes: many at MNHN.

 

 

BODY COLOUR PATTERN

Body silvery, anal fin red and caudal fin with a sub-terminal  hyaline part and a black border. In specimens, up to 130-140 mm SL, body spots apparent. Eye silvery blue with a vertical band through the pupil. Throat, subopercle and external part of the preopercle orange-colored. In ethanol, background color pale yellow or light tan. Humeral spots reaching the anal fin but lacking around the pectoral fin. Humeral blotch apparent in specimens up to 130mm. Head ground color similar to body but slightly darker. Pectoral and pelvic fins hyaline. Anal and dorsal fins with a dark margin. Caudal fin very dark with only a subterminal hyaline band.

 

ECOLOGY

Serrasalmus odyssei is reported from the clear to black water rivers of the Upper Madeira where it seems to be scarce in white waters. Serrasalmus odyssei is located in the shallow part of the river near the shores especially where dead woods accumulate while being scare in the running part of the rivers. In this habitat, S. odyssei seems to be common in syntopy with young S. rhombeus individuals of equal size.

 

FIG 1

Description of a new Serrasalmus species, Serrasalmus odyssei n. sp. [pp. 52-59]. In: Evolution of the neotropical ichthyofauna -- molecular and evolutionary perspectives about the origin of the fish communities in the Amazon. VDM Publishing House, Verlag Dr. Muller, Saarbucken, Germany. Evolution of the Neotropical Ichthyofauna.:  p; 49

FIG 2

Intenez River, 13 October 2002, 128 mm, Bolivia, by Nicolas HUBERT

Length: 16.7 cm SL male/unsexed

FIG 3

Description of a new Serrasalmus species, Serrasalmus odyssei n. sp. [pp. 52-59]. In: Evolution of the neotropical ichthyofauna -- molecular and evolutionary perspectives about the origin of the fish communities in the Amazon. VDM Publishing House, Verlag Dr. Muller, Saarbucken, Germany. Evolution of the Neotropical Ichthyofauna.:  p; 51

 

ETYMOLOGY


Name applied to the locally known piranha 'suave' and refers to the taxonomic confusion with this species at the beginning of the fieldwork during the present study.

 

DISTRIBUTION

 

Known only from Rio San Martin and Rio Paraqua from the Itenez watershed, Rio Manuripi from the Beni watershed and Rio Yata. Only abundant in the Itenez watershed, rare elsewhere.

 

REFERENCES

 

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UPDATED: 12/27/2011