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A WORD FOR TODAY

Our Lord is so good, He grants us many blessings. We can see Him in the daily course of events, in our homes, our jobs, our lives. I pray that these words help you to grow in your faith and recognize His hand in even the most mundane circumstances.

The picture to the right is of a Celtic Chapel located in Cornwall England. This building is approximately 1700 years old, and contains a holy well known for its healing powers.

(Click for enlarged)






A WORD FOR TODAY, April 17, 2024

Lectionary Scriptures for April 21, 2024, Fourth Sunday of Easter: Acts 4:1-12; Psalm 23; 1 John 3:16-24; John 10:11-18

“There is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven that is given among men, by which we must be saved!” Acts 4:12, WEB

We have friends whose daughter is part of a popular Christian singing group. We went to see the group in concert when we lived in Arkansas. Our friends were at the concert to help with the singers’ young children. Our friends told us to go to the stage door at a certain hour and ask for them. They promised that we’d be given backstage access before the show. We hung out with the singers, got a few pictures and autographs. My friends’ names had clout.

I wrote devotions for a quarterly devotional book a number of years ago. It was a wonderful experience from the challenge of writing and editing to the comments I’ve received about my devotions. More than once, people who met me said, “You are Peggy Hoppes? I really enjoyed your writing.” My name meant something to those who had read my stories. My name isn’t going to get anyone backstage at a concert or show, but they might ask me to talk about my faith. When that happens, I bring up the name that has real clout.

The people mentioned in today’s passage were men of power and position. We are given the names of the high priestly family, but they were accompanied by the rulers, elders, and scribes. These men made up the Jerusalem Sanhedrin, which was the ruling body of the Jews. The court was made up of mostly Sadducees, a sect of Judaism that had did not believe in any resurrection. A doctrine of resurrection of the dead at the end of time had developed among some Jews, but the Sadducees adamantly rejected that doctrine. The disciples’ preaching about Jesus’ resurrection was gaining popularity with the people, and they knew they had to put a stop to it. Peter and John were arrested.

The catalyst for this arrest was the story of Peter commanding a lame beggar to walk by the name of Jesus. Peter then told the amazed crowds that it was not by his power or ability that the beggar was healed, it was by the power of the One they had crucified and who was raised from the dead. Peter then called for the people in the Temple to repent and turn to God to receive the forgiveness God has offered through Jesus Christ.

What exactly caused the Sanhedrin to arrest Peter and John? The question asked at the trial was “By what power, or in what name, have ye done this?” Peter answered that it was in the name of Jesus. Peter gave credit where credit was due. He named the One who had real clout in the Kingdom of God.

Would they have arrested the disciples for healing someone? The problem for the Sanhedrin was that they did more than heal the cripple. The disciples offered forgiveness of sins to those who repent, the same blasphemous crime that Jesus committed. The Sanhedrin, especially the high priests, rejected the very premise that gave Jesus the authority to transform the world: His resurrection. That authority was the capstone of everything the disciples preached. Jesus is the only way to salvation. This proclamation took the power away from the Jewish leaders. This was really the ‘crime’ for which they had been arrested. The disciples’ teaching threatened their authority, just as Jesus’ teaching threatened them. This was why they destroyed Jesus. This is why the world still threatens the faithful today.

Peter and John knew that they would face inquiry from the Temple leaders. Jesus had told them that they would be hated as He had been hated. They would suffer the same persecution; they would drink from the same cup. Yet, Peter faced this arrest and false trial calmly with confidence. It wasn’t his words or abilities that gave him hope or peace. It was the knowledge that Jesus Christ was his Shepherd.

We’ve all seen the images. A reporter and cameraman follow animal control officials into a compound where the caretakers have lost control. Animals are found in cages that are much too small, lying in their own waste. They are diseased and malnourished. The owners are arrested or fined for animal abuse and the animals are taken away to someone who will properly care for them. It is heartbreaking to see those animals: the cry for help in their eyes, the frighteningly thin bodies, and scruffy exteriors.

In another example, a family has a heart for caring for animals. They take in a stray cat or two, but soon the numbers are unmanageable. They can’t afford to have the cats neutered, or they adopt the pets that are already pregnant. One or two cats quickly becomes a dozen, which quickly becomes too many for one home. Though they may offer food and water for the animals, it is difficult to keep a home with so many pets clean. Carpets become stained and the furniture infested with fleas. The house smells of urine. The people meant well. They had the heart to take care of the needs for animals, but they did not have the resources or knowledge to deal with the outcome. In the end, the picture is not pretty, and the animals are not given the care they need.

These two examples are models of bad shepherds. What does it mean to be a good shepherd? Here is a third example. In Warwickshire, England, animal control officers found a whimpering dog cowering inside a locked shed, obviously not given the care she needed. She was timid from abuse; she was dirty and starving. They took her to a wildlife sanctuary where the keepers help injured or abandoned animals heal before they are released back into the wild or given to good families. They took very good care of the dog who rebounded quickly. She was brought back to full health and her trust in human beings was restored. The man who runs the sanctuary, Geoff Grewcock, began looking for a new home for the dog they had named Jasmine. Jasmine had a different plan.

As new animals were brought into the sanctuary, Jasmine took it upon herself to be a one dog welcome wagon. She took care of the animals, loving them like a mother. It didn’t matter what type of animal was brought it, she stayed with them, lay with them, cuddled with them, cleaned them. She ensured their comfort and gave them the love and support they needed. I saw pictures of Jasmine interacting with deer, bunnies, foxes, badgers, guinea pigs, and even birds. In one picture, Jasmine was lying on a couch with some of her friends: two dogs, a deer, a rabbit, and an owl. Not only did Jasmine make the other animals trust her, but they also trusted each other even though in the wild they were enemies or prey.

Jesus is the Good Shepherd. John wrote about a shepherd as he might be in the field with a flock of sheep. It didn’t matter what dangers he might face; he never abandoned his flock. Unlike the hired hands, he stays with them despite the angry wolves.

Jesus is like Jasmine, embracing every hurt and frightened animal. He provides all we need so that we might have life and have it abundantly. In today’s Gospel passage, Jesus told the disciples that whatever happened to Him (and they would soon learn about His horrible end on the cross), He is not destroyed by others. He lays down His life for His sheep. Whatever happens, Jesus told them, He has the power and those who would harm Him do not. They might think they have the authority, but it is only Jesus who has the name that saves.

I use several resources to help me as I write the daily and weekly devotions. In one, Dan Nelson wrote, “How nice it would be just to be sheep. Then Jesus could take care of us, and we would not have to do anything.” There are definitely sometimes when I wish I would not have to make so many decisions, especially the hard ones that affect the lives of others. Oh, most of the decisions I make are unimportant, like what to have for dinner or which flowers to plant in my garden. Our lives wouldn’t be much different one way or another. However, I have to make decisions on a board on which I sit that could be life changing.

It is not just the decisions we make that affect others that are difficult. Have you ever wondered where you might be if you had made different decisions along the way? What if you went to a different school or pursued a different career? What if you didn’t turn down that prom date or go on that spring break trip? What might be different? Do you have any regrets? Do you think it would have been easier if there had been someone telling you what you should do every step along the way?

We aren’t sheep. As Dan Nelson said, “That is not the plan.” Jesus is our shepherd, but that doesn’t mean that He does everything for us. Instead, we are called to be shepherds right alongside our Lord and Master, helping others to live and learn and love.

There are times when we have the opportunity to speak a word of hope for our neighbors. These moments may seem insignificant. After all, Peter and John did little more than say, “Get up in the name of Jesus.” The man was healed, but if it hadn’t been for the crowds in the Temple at the time, we might never have heard that story.

The crowds saw a man they knew had been begging by the Temple gate jumping for joy. What did they think? Had he been faking? How can a man unable to walk one minute dance the next? The man wasn’t even a very good beggar. He didn’t care. Peter and John had to say, “Look at us” before the man even realized they were there. He was in despair and felt that nothing he did would make a difference. So, once in a while, as pilgrims passed by, he called out to them for money. He knew that most would ignore his pleas, but he cried out anyway because it was the only thing he could do.

I suppose that’s how we get to the point of thinking that we’d rather be sheep. The beggar was not living a good life, but it was much easier to be dropped on the doorstep of the Temple for the day than to deal with the realities of life. Bad circumstances make us think that we aren’t capable of making the right decisions, so we want someone else to do it for us. We’d never have to worry if we were sheep. We can blame others for our hunger. We can look to others for all we need.

But we aren’t sheep. As a matter of fact, God calls us to be shepherds.

So, as we go about our day, is there someone sitting at the gate who needs a word of hope from Jesus? The impact of that word might be greater than we would ever expect. The Good Shepherd has given us the gifts we need to make a transforming difference in the lives of those who are lost in the darkness of this world, but we can’t accomplish anything with those gifts if we are expecting others to do everything for us. We are blessed to be a blessing. It might seem hard sometimes. We might even fail to do what we should do. But we can go forth in faith knowing that Jesus has accomplished the hard work of salvation, doing our best to share His grace with others in whatever manner we are able. God knows our limitations and He is with us through it all.

We listen to His voice and follow Him because He knows us, and we know Him. It is in His care we will find peace and love.

A man works eighty hours a week to keep his family in a lifestyle to which they have become accustomed. The loving man who willingly sacrifices his time and energy for the sake of his family, but is he making the right sacrifice? Is the big house, the state-of-the-art electronics, and the expensive clothes worth the lost time together as a family? He loves his family by doing for them, instead of being with them. Perhaps the real sacrifice would be letting go of some of the stuff so that true love between people could be maintained.

Jesus sacrificed Himself for the sake of those He loves. He died on the cross so that we might have life. He did not do this so that we might have bigger houses or fancier clothes. He did not do this so that we would put the symbols of status ahead of the needs of others. What kind of life do we have if stuff is more important than people? We are called to live sacrificially for others. This means laying aside our own selves and desires to aid those who need our help.

We tell our children, our spouses, our neighbors, and others how much we love them, yet we spend so much time keeping up with an unsustainable lifestyle that we lose touch with those we love. We can say we love someone a thousand times, but they are empty words when we spend more time collecting material possessions than we do in the presence of those we claim to love. Our needs are not just physical. We need food, clothing, and shelter, but we also need love, companionship, mercy, grace, and forgiveness. These needs can be met around healthy, simple meals, smaller houses, and cheaper clothes. What we need most is to focus our lives on living under the Good Shepherd, trusting in Him to provide what we need, not what we want, so that we can be the shepherds He has called and gifted us to be. It is in Him we find comfort and peace, and it is from Him we receive everything we need.

Psalm 23 is one of the most beloved passages of scripture, perhaps even one of the best known. We love this passage because we find comfort in it, especially in tough times. It is, of course, used often at the bedside of the sick and dying and is very popular at funerals. In it we can experience God’s presence and His care through the good times and bad. It is familiar because we use it at least six times in the three-year lectionary, more than any other text every three years. It is also used for special festivals or remembrances. This Sunday is the fourth Sunday of Easter, which is Good Shepherd Sunday, so it is the psalm every year.

How do we look at something that is so familiar with new eyes?

We can look at it in the context of its place in the Psalms. Though many of the psalms were written separately, by different writers, at different times in the history of Israel, the editor of the book of Psalms (perhaps Ezra) was inspired by the Holy Spirit to put them together in an order that places these songs and prayers in ways that tell a bigger story. The Songs of Ascent (Psalms 120-134) are pilgrim psalms, sung as the Jews traveled toward Jerusalem for festivals. The Egyptian Hallel (Psalms 113-118) are used during the Passover Seder. Psalm 23 is part of the Shepherd Trilogy which is Psalm 22-24. Our understanding of Jesus as the Good Shepherd is much fuller if we read them together. The trilogy focuses on Christ the King. We see Him as the Suffering Servant, the Loving Shepherd, and the Reigning King. It is a trilogy of the past, present and future of our Eternal King Jesus.

Psalm 22 is also very familiar. We read it on Good Friday as we strip the altar. We do this because Jesus quoted Psalm 22 from the cross. He said, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” It prophetically tells us about the Passion of Jesus. He is forsaken. He is scorned and mocked. He thirsts. He is surrounded by ruthless people. His hands and feet are pierced. His garments are divided, and lots are cast for his clothing. As we read Psalm 22, we see the suffering of Jesus. The psalm also shows us, however, that the afflicted one is not forsaken. God has not hidden his face from him; God has heard his cry. Affliction is not the end of the story. The suffering one will eat and be satisfied.

Affliction leads to deliverance. Jesus knew, despite the cry of abandonment on the cross, that God can be trusted. He is faithful. One day the whole world will join in worship of Him. Psalm 22 gives us a vivid portrait of affliction, alludes to the resurrection, and then closes with a future-facing kingdom reign. Jesus fulfills in the Gospels everything we see in the psalm.

Psalm 24 is less familiar, but the theme of kingship continues. This comes at a high point when the King takes his place on the throne. It is a coronation song. The righteous king ascends to the Lord’s hill. He has triumphed, and he proceeds to the seat from which he will rule the nations, until every last one of his enemies become his footstool.

We see affliction and a glimmer of hope in Psalm 22. We celebrate a victorious monarchy in Psalm 24. Psalm 23 comes right in the middle. Psalm 23 is the bridge between affliction and triumph, both for Jesus and for us. The pain of the afflicted one in Psalm 22 is translated into contentment and trust in Psalm 23. There is still pain. Real pain. Darkness surrounds the suffering one, but God is the rescuer. God is the Shepherd. He leads and restores. Even though the afflicted one walks through the valley of the shadow of death, God is there to guide and rescue and comfort.

The afflicted one is forsaken, but not utterly forsaken. And therefore, the afflicted one doesn’t fear. In fact, he’s satisfied. He shall not want. God prepares a table for him in the presence of his enemies. He is victorious, and God anoints him. The afflicted one says, “Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life.” Even through affliction. Even through the valley. Even through the grave. God’s goodness and steadfast love and faithfulness will pursue those who trust in Him. Psalm 23 ends with the psalmist dwelling in the house of the Lord forever.

This is the hope that gave Peter, John, and the disciples they courage to stand for Jesus Christ.

The comforting words of these psalms may have been on their lips when they spent time in prison. They walked through many valleys as witnesses and ministers for Christ. They never knew what the next day would hold. They did know that the suffering servant obeyed God and that in the end He triumphed and is King. Peter and John trusted in the One who did know, and who had prepared that table of goodness on which they could feast even in the presence of their enemies. They were happy and content. They knew God’s lovingkindness surrounded them, despite the circumstances they had to face.

John wrote, “Let us not love in word, neither with the tongue; but in deed and truth.” What does it mean to lay down our lives for another? It means, like Peter and John, facing all our circumstances with the confidence that Jesus is the one with the authority to make things right in the world. It means living humbly in the world, realizing that our stuff is superficial, but a broken heart or shattered relationship requires mercy, compassion, forgiveness, and hope. Love isn’t found in the things we collect. God doesn’t dwell in that kind of love. He abides in the hearts of those who live in the forgiveness of God and share the transforming power of God’s grace with others. As the song says, “they will know we are Christian by our love” and that love is manifest through the deeds we do for the sake of others.

We don’t really know how much time passed between that first Easter Day and the day they were arrested. It was at least seven weeks, after Pentecost. The early Christian community, not yet identified by that name, was beginning to grow. As a matter of fact, those who believed after the healing of the crippled man numbered over five thousand men, not to mention the women and children. This was a quickly growing community of faith. They had established some customs, meeting together for meals, learning from the apostles, breaking the bread as Christ commanded, sharing everything with one another. They praised God together and were making a difference in the world in which they lived.

We can face our difficulties with the same trust and confidence. The Lord Jesus is our Good Shepherd, and we can trust that He will be faithful because He suffered death and was buried but was also raised from the dead. His resurrection gives Him the authority to transform the world. Now He walks with us, helps us through the good times and the bad. He prepares a place for us and provides all we need. Our cup runs over, not by any work of our own but because God loves us as His own. We are His sheep, and we need not fear.

Peter, like the rest of us, would probably have preferred just going to the temple that day to share in the fellowship, worship, and sacrifice being offered there. He was on his way to be a sheep - to be fed - as many of us do each Sunday. On his way, however, he met a sheep in greater need. Offering Christ to that man forced Peter to sacrifice his time, his freedom, and even eventually his life. It is rarely convenient for us to offer Christ to our neighbor. It can cause friction and even threaten our relationships. We have to sacrifice our time. We may even have to give up the things we think are important.

We don’t want to do it. We don’t want to take the risk. We don’t want to step out of our comfort zone. We want to be sheep: fed, watered, and led. Yet, the love of God calls us to be more. The Good Shepherd first loved us so that we will love. In this we will truly know God, know that we abide in Him and know that Jesus Christ is the name above all others’ names. For through His name, we see the power of God making everything right. And in faith we shall dwell in the house of the LORD forever.







If you would like to contact me, please use the following address, replacing the bracketed words with the symbol. Thank you for your continued interest, prayers and messages of encouragement.

   heart2love4god [at] aol [dot] com   


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A WORD FOR TODAY, April 16, 2024

“Likewise, you younger ones, be subject to the elder. Yes, all of you clothe yourselves with humility, to subject yourselves to one another; for ‘God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble.’ Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you in due time; casting all your worries on him, because he cares for you. Be sober and self-controlled. Be watchful. Your adversary, the devil, walks around like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour. Withstand him steadfast in your faith, knowing that your brothers who are in the world are undergoing the same sufferings. But may the God of all grace, who called you to his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after you have suffered a little while, perfect, establish, strengthen, and settle you. To him be the glory and the power forever and ever. Amen.” 1 Peter 5:5-11, WEB

There are so many things for us to worry about these days. In western society, we face the struggles of drugs and violence, worrying about our children every time they walk out the door. We worry about disease, pollution, and poverty. We are anxious about the decisions we make and how they will affect our lives and the world around us. In our personal lives, we are concerned about our health, finances, family and friends. We experience suffering of all sorts, emotional and physical. What has you worried today? A sick friend? A busy schedule? A lost relationship? The wrong job?

We each have anxieties that are part of our day-to-day living. These worries are not healthy for us and cause greater strain on our physical and emotional health. Even more, the worries place strain on our spiritual health. We need to face the fact that each of us has issues that we focus upon daily that waste our time and energy. When we recognize the stumbling blocks that can take over our lives, then we can do something about it.

God recognizes that there are issues in our lives that need to be handled. We do need to eat, rest in shelter, and take care of the sick. There are problems in our society that brings death and pain to our lives. He does not expect us to go around laughing gaily at every moment in the midst of pain and suffering. However, it is important that we do not let these issues make us anxious to the point of giving a foothold to the enemy.

We hear cries of “We need to DO SOMETHING!” everyday, but we can’t agree on what we need to do. We can’t agree because we disagree about the root of the problem. We are divided about so many things, always insisting that our way is the only way. We even argue that our way is God’s way. The part we forget is that we are so busy trying to DO SOMETHING our way that we don’t even look to God for His help. Yes, it may seem frivolous to say “We should pray” and so we rush out and we march and make demands and argue with our neighbors because at least then we appear to be doing something, but those works will never make a difference. As I heard someone say today, “People blocking traffic will never change my mind about their issue because I need to get to where I am going. It will just make me angry, and might even turn my opinion against their cause.”

While we feel the need to DO SOMETHING, everything we do must begin with prayer. The root of our problem is not earthly objects or even human failure. The root of our problem is evil and the devil. We’ll never beat him with marches or demands. We will never overcome evil by “doing something.” We need God. It may seem impossible, but more will be accomplished if every march were turned into a prayer meeting so that we will turn our hearts and our actions back to God. What did Jesus do when He faced the struggles of His life and ministry? He prayed. He looked to His Father for comfort and encouragement and strength. The battle we are facing is not against one another, no matter how much we disagree. This is a spiritual battle that can only be fought with God’s power because it is against spiritual forces.

Now is the time for every one of us to stand firm in our faith and tell the devil to take a hike. Now is the time for each one of us to stop and pray. We can’t base our actions simply on our emotions. Fear, anger, hatred, and grief will never bring us to a place of peace. That’s the devil using our humanness to turn us from the only One who can truly change the world. The consequence of prayer will be a peace that passes all human understanding because through prayer we are trusting God to do what needs to be done. Let us pray with Peter who says, “But may the God of all grace, who called you to his eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after you have suffered a little while, perfect, establish, strengthen, and settle you. To him be the glory and the power forever and ever. Amen.” As we do so, God will reveal the things we can do to send the devil running and to make a difference in this worrisome world.




The following links provide some specially chosen scripture that tell the stories of the Birth and Passion of our Lord as Saviour Jesus Christ, as well as a fictional perspective of the Crucifixion. Spend time in God's Word, read about His life and learn of the wonderful gifts He has for you. Know Jesus Christ and honour Him today. Thanks be to God.

The Birth of our Saviour

The Story of our Saviour's Passion

The Crucifixion, a fictional perspective




When researching, I use several versions of the bible, including the New International Version and English Standard Version. Due to copyright restrictions, I have not included quotes for the scriptures on some of the archives, but highly encourage you to open your own bibles to read the scripture passages for yourselves. Where scripture is quoted, it is usually the American Standard Version or World English Bible which belong to the public domain. Any other versions used in quotes are identified.



The devotion posted on Wednesday is based on the Lectionary texts used by millions of Christians each Sunday. The Lectionary consists of four texts: an Old Testament passage, a Psalm, a passage from one of the Epistles and a Gospel text and follows the church calendar. Archives for these writings are found at Midweek Oasis.




You are welcome to use these words to share the Gospel of our Lord Jesus. Please remember to give credit to the Author who has given you these gifts, and keep in remembrance the vessel which He used to bring them to you. We pray that this site may be a blessing to you and anyone with whom you've shared it. Peggy Hoppes















If you would like to contact me, please use the following address, replacing the bracketed words with the symbol. Thank you for your continued interest, prayers and messages of encouragement.

   heart2love4god [at] aol [dot] com   


A Word for Today Devotional | Promote Your Page Too


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A WORD FOR TODAY, April 5, 2024

“For Yahweh’s word is right. All his work is done in faithfulness. He loves righteousness and justice. The earth is full of the loving kindness of Yahweh.” Psalm 33:4-5, WEB

I visited Philadelphia a few years ago and spent time wandering the historic district of the city. I didn’t do the most popular sites since I’d been there before, and I only had a few hours. It was interesting to see the places where important moments in United States history took place. I did not get to go inside Independence Hall or Carpenter’s Hall, but I did manage to go in Congress Hall and the Old City Hall where the Supreme Court met in those days. I walked through Benjamin Franklin’s post office, which was the first in the United States and I saw a printing press like he may have used back then. I even went into Christ Church Cemetery where Ben is buried with his wife Deborah.

The Franklin’s grave wasn’t extraordinary, except in one way. The stone is a large slab that was flat on the ground with just their names engraved. What made it interesting is that it was covered in pennies. Apparently, it is good luck to throw a penny on his grave. The practice comes from one of the most famous quotes of Ben Franklin, “A penny saved is a penny earned.” How ironic is it that the tourists throw away a penny for good luck when Franklin taught that they should save that penny?

My daughter joined me, and we went into Declaration House, a replica of the original house where Thomas Jefferson lived while he wrote the Declaration of Independence. The building was in the same place but had fallen into disrepair many years ago. The tour guide told us that there had been a hot dog stand on the spot when he was growing up. In 1976 they decided to rebuild the house and restore the rooms as best they could. The guide admitted that only a few things were original to the house, although everything was from that time period.

I think that’s what surprised me the most about the items on display around the historic sites. While items were historically correct, they weren’t always the actual items used in those days. The guide in Congress Hall pointed out specifically which chairs were original, including that of the Speaker. Others were questionable. It is hard to know for sure hundreds of years later; after all it is unlikely anyone at the time thought about saving them for future generations to see on field trips and vacations.

I think the most surprising sign was near the Declaration of Independence. It said that the documents are rotated to protect them and that it is possible the document in the case at that moment was just a replica. There was no way to know for sure whether or not it was one of the original copies. There is not just one copy of the document; many were made in 1776 which were sent to authorities and governments to inform them about what was happening in Philadelphia. In 2009 a copy was even found in the British Archives, though no one knew how it got there. The original is in the National Archives in Washington, so the one in Philadelphia would naturally be one of those original copies. However, I learned that the one I was seeing might not have even been one of those originals; it might have been a replica.

Does it matter? Is it really the piece of paper that guarantees the freedoms intended by the founding fathers? Is my freedom any less real because I saw a copy or a replica of the original? Is the history false just because the items on display are not exactly those used in those days? No. Those displays help us see and understand the times and experiences of the first Americans. It is the spirit of the founding and the intent of the founders that gives us the great nation we have.

If we can’t possibly know whether a 250ish year-old inkwell is real, have you ever wondered how we can know if the words in the scriptures are real? How do we know that the message we hear from ministers, teachers, and writers is real? Many people don’t believe. With hundreds of translations available of the Bible and a million interpretations of it how do we know what is true? We cannot rely on the things of men, but we can rely on the Spirit and intent of God to know what is real. He is faithful. He loves righteousness and justice. Everything of God is centered in loving kindness. That’s how we know it is real.




The following links provide some specially chosen scripture that tell the stories of the Birth and Passion of our Lord as Saviour Jesus Christ, as well as a fictional perspective of the Crucifixion. Spend time in God's Word, read about His life and learn of the wonderful gifts He has for you. Know Jesus Christ and honour Him today. Thanks be to God.

The Birth of our Saviour

The Story of our Saviour's Passion

The Crucifixion, a fictional perspective




When researching, I use several versions of the bible, including the New International Version and English Standard Version. Due to copyright restrictions, I have not included quotes for the scriptures on some of the archives, but highly encourage you to open your own bibles to read the scripture passages for yourselves. Where scripture is quoted, it is usually the American Standard Version or World English Bible which belong to the public domain. Any other versions used in quotes are identified.



The devotion posted on Wednesday is based on the Lectionary texts used by millions of Christians each Sunday. The Lectionary consists of four texts: an Old Testament passage, a Psalm, a passage from one of the Epistles and a Gospel text and follows the church calendar. Archives for these writings are found at Midweek Oasis.




You are welcome to use these words to share the Gospel of our Lord Jesus. Please remember to give credit to the Author who has given you these gifts, and keep in remembrance the vessel which He used to bring them to you. We pray that this site may be a blessing to you and anyone with whom you've shared it. Peggy Hoppes