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Indo-European Resources

I have often noticed that when you're looking for information in a subject on the web, often you'll find that all the good stuff is completely drowned out in a flood of useless or trivial information. Since Indo-European studies are exactly such a subject, I've tried to remedy that by making this page of resources.

The Basics IE Languages and Language Families Linguistic Theory pertaining to IE IE History, Literature, and Culture Areas Peripheral to the IE World International Organizations and College Programs Schleicher's Tale

Local resources:

The Basics

IE Languages and Language Families

Linguistic Theory pertaining to IE

IE History, Literature and Culture

Areas Peripheral to the IE World

The following peoples all lived on the edge of what has traditionally been the world of the Indo-Europeans. Understanding their lives and stories is still important, however, in that gaining insight into so similar a lifestyle may ultimately give understanding as to how the IE peoples lived so long ago.

International Organizations and College Programs

Schleicher's Tale

The following was an experiement by the great German Indo-Europeanist and linguist August Schleicher to see whether one could create an extended passage of text in reconstructed Proto-Indo-European. Considering the fact that the Indo-Europeans left us a great heritage in their oral culture, tale-telling and such, it seemed only fitting to create just such a text. As the theoretical basis of Indo-European evolves, so will the form of this text, which is now about a 100 years old.

Owis Ekwskwe

Gwrri owis, kwesyo wl@n ne st, ekwns espeket, oinom ghe gwrrum woghom weghontm, oinomkwe megam bhorom, oinomkwe ghmmenm ku bherontm.

Owis nu ekwomos ewewkwet: "Kr aghnutoi moi ekwns agontm nerm widntei".

Ekws tu ewewkwont: "Kludhi, owei, kr ghe aghnutoi nsmei widntmos: neer, potis, owim r wl@nm sebhi gwhermom westrom kwrnneuti. Neghi owim wl@n esti".

Tod kekluws owis agrom ebhuget.

[The] Sheep and [the] Horses

On [a] hill, [a] sheep that had no wool saw horses, one [of them] pulling [a] heavy wagon, one carrying [a] big load, and one carrying [a] man quickly.

[The] sheep said to [the] horses: "[My] heart pains me, seeing [a] man driving horses".

[The] horses said: "Listen, sheep, our hearts pain us when we see [this]: [a] man, [the] master, makes [the] wool of [the] sheep into [a] warm garment for himself. And [the] sheep has no wool".

Having heard this, [the] sheep fled into [the] plain.

For those who are interested, I also have a Degaspregos version of this.


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