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Birth of a
National Pastime

M. AUBRECHT

War Games
M. AUBRECHT

Civil War All-Stars
J. LUVAAS
CIVIL WAR TIMES

Return of IMHO
P. SPERANZA

Rivalry Quiz #3
BOSUX.COM

Best Game Ever
D. McCOURT

Pitching: Problems and Answers
H. FRIEND

2004 All-Star Game
M. AUBRECHT

Back Issues
THE ARCHIVES


Bombers Board
CLASSIFIEDS

Yankees Cartoons
Marvin Terry Prints

Ballpark Blueprints
Ballpark Architecture

Portrait Matt's
Restored Baseball Photos

SnapShots
Staff photographer (and season ticket holder - Section 11, Box 35, Row B) Brian DiSalvo has now posted his Yankees Game Photos online.


Pinstripe Press
HOT OFF THE PRESS

GoodNews
A new Christian-baseball newsletter dedicated to sharing a love for the Game and the Gospel.

Yankees Trivia
LAST MONTH

What Yankee hit the first homerun ever in the Houston Astrodome?

Answer:
Mickey Mantle had the first hit (single) and the first home run ever hit indoors. (April 9, 1965)
Book Shelf
ADDITIONAL READING

Baseball in
Blue and Gray
George B. Kirsch

From Pastime
to Passion
Patricia E. Millen


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FAN NETWORK

BaseballAlmanac
BaseballFever

UltimateYankees
Yankeesmania
YankeesBoard
BehindTheBombers
NewYorkYankees
TakeHimDowntown
Bosux.com
Harvey Frommer
Cecilia Tan
Steve Steinberg
VirtualLibrarySport
Portrait Matt's

Volume 16 June/July 2004 Civil War Theme

Return to Front Page

Email: The Highlander

Baseball and the Blue and Gray
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
Email: Michael Aubrecht Website: Pinstripe Press

THIS MONTH, we've decided to take our "Yankee" affiliation literally to focus on the origins of the modern game and it's evolution during the Civil War. As you can probably tell, I've always been a huge "history buff" and have spent just as many hours on battlefields as I have on baseball fields. Raised just a few hours from Gettysburg, PA, I later moved to Fredericksburg, VA (Spotsylvania County) where I reside to this day. Our area of Central VA is located in the middle of four major battlefields, and my neighborhood is just down the road "aways" from where General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson breathed his last. It's hard not to feel the presence of "ghosts" living in a tourist town that is populated by reenactors and all sorts of monuments, plaques and cannons. Recently, I completed a new section for Baseball-Almanac (some of which is previewed here) called "Baseball and the Blue and the Gray" and it was during my research that I was able to renew my interest in this part of American history. It somehow seems fitting to me that our "National Pastime" gained its popularity during our "Nation's Greatest Conflict". We hope you enjoy our look not only baseball, but also the historical time that gave birth to this game.


The Civil War Home Page
WEBSITE SPOTLIGHT
Dedicated to the participants, both North and South, in the great American Civil War 1861-1865
http://www.civil-war.net

THE CIVIL WAR Home Page is one of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Civil War related material available on the Internet. It contains thousands of pages of Civil War material including Photos, Battle Accounts, Documents, Southern Historical Papers, Troop Statistics, Letters & Diaries, Census of 1860, Maps, Official Records, Message Board, Dyer's Compendium, Fox's Regimental Losses, Regimental Histories, Genealogy, Biographical Information, Reenacting and Unit Information. Beyond mere baseball history, this site has something for everyone interested in the War Between the States.


"Modern baseball had been born in the brain of an American soldier. It received its baptism in the bloody days of our Nation's direst danger. It had its early evolution when soldiers, North and South, were striving to forget their foes by cultivating, through this grand game, fraternal friendship with comrades in arms." Albert Spalding
Abner Doubleday
PROFILE
Source: Baseball and the Blue and the Gray (Pinstripe Press)
Born: June 26, 1819 Ballston Spa, New York
Died: January 1893 Mendham, New Jersey

GENERAL DOUBLEDAY was an 1842 graduate of West Point (graduating with A.P. Stewart, D.H. Hill, Earl Van Dorn and James Longstreet) and served in both the Mexican and Seminole wars. In 1861, he was stationed at the garrison in Charleston Harbor. It is said that it was Doubleday, an artillery officer, who aimed the first Fort Sumter guns in response to the Confederate bombardment that initiated the war. Later he served in the Shenandoah region as a brigadier of volunteers and was assigned to a brigade of Irwin McDowell's corps during the campaign of Second Manassas. He also commanded a division of the I Corps at Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg as well at Gettysburg where he assumed the command of I Corps after the fall of Gen. John F. Reynolds, helping to repel the infamous "Pickett's Charge." Strangely, his outstanding military service has been all but forgotten yet his controversial baseball legacy still lives on. Regardless of being (or not being) the actual "inventor" of the modern version, Doubleday did apparently organized several exhibitions between Union divisions and was an apparent student and fan of the game. Many of these contests were attended by thousands of spectators and often made front-page news equal to the war reports from the field.

Did you know… Serious baseball historians still reject the notion that Doubleday designed the first baseball diamond and drew up the modern rules of the game, supposedly as a military cadet in 1839. Regardless, the City of Cooperstown, NY dedicated Doubleday Field in 1920 as the birthplace of the game.


Yankees Trivia
ANSWER IN NEXT ISSUE
Have a trivia question? Email it to us and maybe we'll use it.
Who was the last surviving full rank Civil War General (who lived to witness the days of Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig)?
Fast Facts
HISTORY 101

AT LEAST 618,000 Americans died in the Civil War, and some experts say the toll reached 700,000. The number that is most often quoted is 620,000. At any rate, these casualties exceed the nation's loss in all its other wars, from the Revolution through Vietnam. The Union armies had from 2,500,000 to 2,750,000 men. The Confederate strength, known less accurately because of missing records, was from 750,000 to 1,250,000.
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