Thursday Night Hikes: East Summit Avenue Hike Architecture Notes 2

Thursday Night Hikes: Summit Avenue East Hike Architecture Notes 2


Observations on Architectural Styles

Summit Avenue East Hike I

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

Webpage Creation: August 10, 2001

312 Summit Avenue: Haupt-Smith House/R. A. Smith Residence/David Stuart and Mary Stuart House;; Built in 1858, with a three story addition constructed in 1918 (1856 according to Peggy Korsmo Kennon and Robert B. Drake; 1857 according to Jennifer Kirby; 1874 according to Ramsey County property tax records; 1904 according to National Register of Historic Places;) Italianate/Italian Villa style; Cass Gilbert & John Knox Taylor, 1887 remodeling architects and Thomas Holyoke, post-1900 remodeling. The structure is reputed to be the oldest existing residence on Summit Avenue and is a two story, 10,205 square foot, 18 room, seven bedroom, six bathroom, stucco house. The house has tall, paired-curved windows, bracketed eaves, and a double front door. The original roof cupola was removed, probably in 1919 when Arthur Driscoll added a third story addition. The front terrace balustrade and the balustrade above the front door entrance also have been removed. The home was once converted to a multi-unit dwelling and is currently a three family home. The house is the oldest building standing on Summit Avenue. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that David Stuart resided at this address from 1858 to an unknown date before 1886 and that Robert A. Smith resided at this address from 1886 to 1897. The house was built by Robert A. Smith, according to Peggy Korsmo Kennon and Robert B. Drake. Jennifer Kirby indicates that the house was built for David Stuart, who died in 1857, that the house then went into foreclosure and was sold at a sheriff's sale in 1860, and that the house suffered two more foreclosure auctions during the American Civil War. The 1885 city directory indicates that General and Mrs. H. Haupt, their daughter, Reverend A. J. D. Haupt, H. Haupt, Jr., and Frank S. Haupt all resided at this address. The 1887 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Smith and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1889 and 1891 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Smith, their daughter, C. W. Copley, and W. G. Smith all resided at this address. The 1893 and 1895 city directories indicate that the Honorable and Mrs. R. A. Smith, Mr. and Mrs C. W. Copley, and W. G. Smith all resided at this address. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Arthur B. Driscoll, a member of the church since 1875, Helen G. (Mrs. A. G.) Driscoll, a member of the church since 1886, and Arthur G. Driscoll and Conrad G. Driscoll, members of the church since 1904, all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Arthur B. Driscoll resided at this address in 1907. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Arthur B. Driscoll resided at this address in 1907. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Driscoll, A. G. Driscoll, and T. G. Driscoll all resided at this address. Arthur G. Driscoll, Donald G. Driscoll, Egbert G. Driscoll, Robert Driscoll, and Theodore G. Driscoll all were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Arthur B. Driscoll, secretary and treasurer of McKibbon, Driscoll & Dorsey, Inc., resided at this address and that Arthur C. Driscoll, a salesman employed by the Merchants Trust & Savings Bank, Robert Driscoll, and Thomas H. Driscoll, a department manager employed by the Emporium, all boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Driscoll resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Arthur B. Driscoll resided at this address. In 1934, Arthur B. Driscoll, Helen Gotzian Driscoll, and Arthur G. Driscoll all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Arthur Gotzian Driscoll (1888- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1900 until 1905, who graduated from Yale University in 1909, who was a First Lieutenant in the 30th Field Artillery in France at the conclusion of World War I, was vice president of the Driscoll-McGuire Company, investments, and who had rowing and walking as hobbies, resided at this address. The Driscoll family were members of the Minikahda Country Club. Arthur G. Driscoll was a graduate of Yale University. David Stuart was a member of Stuart & Cobb lumber business. In 1856, Stuart, Cobb & Company erected a mill on St. Paul's upper levee, 500 or 600 yards above the Irvine mill, which continued in operation four years, sawing about 2,000,000 feet annually, and which was destroyed by fire in 1860. Later owners and residents at this address included Brigadier General Herman Haupt, who lived there during the 1880's, and Robert Armstrong Smith, mayor of St. Paul, who lived there in the late 1880's and the 1890's. The Arthur B. Driscoll family owned the house from 1901 to 1949. Herman Haupt (1817-1905) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Jacob Haupt ( -1828) and Anna Margaretta Wiall Haupt (1786-1857) and a descendant of Johann Heinrich Sebastian Haupt (1715- ,) and was an Army and civil engineer who was appointed to the U. S. Military Academy-West Point by President Andrew Jackson upon the recommendation of Member of Congress John B. Sterigere in 1831 and graduated in 1835, but soon was able to resign under a clerical error to pursue civil engineering in private practice. Haupt became a professor of civil engineering, architecture and mathematics at Pennsylvania College, now Gettysburg College, from 1844 to 1847, was associated with the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1847, hired by John Edgar Thomson, the Pennsylvania Railroad Chief Engineer, survived an intended firing in 1851 for insubordination by Pennsylvania Railroad President William C. Patterson when he demonstrated the charges were based on fabrications, and ultimately became the chief engineer of the Pennsylvania Railroad from 1853 to 1856. Haupt was the chief of construction and transportation on Federal military railroads during the American Civil War for 18 months from 1862 to 1863, resigning after he was promoted from Colonel to Brigadier General, refused the promotion in order retain the ability to engage in private sector work, and was then pressured to accept the commission. Subsequently, Haupt was the general manager of Piedmont Airline Railway, the chief engineer of Tidewater Pipe Line Company, and, from 1881 to 1884, was general manager of Northern Pacific Railroad. During the 1881 to 1884, Haupt resided in St. Paul at this address and resided in Washington, D. C., in 1899. Haupt also was the president of the Minnesota Transfer Rail Road in 1883, a railroad that grew out of a need for a rail connection to the South St. Paul, Minnesota, Union Stockyards. In 1883, Haupt also founded the Northern Pacific Beneficial Association. He also was the inventor of the pneumatic drill and the Haupt bridge truss. Brigadier General Herman Haupt of Pennsylvania and Colonel William Walton Haupt of Texas were first cousins and served as officers on the opposing sides in the American Civil War. Herman Haupt accepted no payment for his services to the Union cause during the Civil War. Haupt authored General theory of bridge construction: Containing demonstrations of the principles of the art and their application to practice, published in New York by D. Appleton & Company in 1853, Herman's Wooing: A Parody on Hiawatha, published in Philadelphia by the Press of William Syckelmoore in 1881, Street Railway Motors: with descriptions and cost of plants and operation of the various systems in use or proposed for motive power on street railways, published in Philadelphia by H. C. Baird & Company in 1893, and Reminiscences of General Herman Haupt, published in New York by Ayer Company Publishing in 1901. General Herman Haupt died of heart failure, just outside Jersey City, New Jersey, while traveling from New York to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, riding in a Pullman railroad car named "Irma," and is buried at the West Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Herman Haupt married Ann Cecelia/Anna Cecilia Keller/Kellie (1821- ,) the daughter of Reverend Benjamin Keller/Kellie, a Lutheran pastor, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1838. Two of General Haupt's eleven children (seven sons and four daughters) became clergymen in St. Paul. The Reverend Doctor Charles Edgar Haupt (1854-1942) was born in Philadelphia, died in St. Paul, and was a Lutheran minister associated with St. Mark's and St. Matthew's Churches in St. Paul who received his Doctor of Divinity degree from the Seabury Divinity School, Faribault, Minnesota, in 1909. Reverend C. Edgar Haupt, before becoming a minister, was a surveyor, a banker, and a sawmill operator and he established St. Matthew's Church as a separate church in the late 1890's and returned to St. Matthew's Church as rector from 1909 to 1931. Reverend C. Edgar Haupt also took over the newly founded Breck School, moving it from the small town of Wilder, Minnesota, to a large house in St. Paul's St. Anthony neighborhood before it moved to Luther Seminary in St. Paul and then to Golden Valley. The Reverend Doctor Alexander James Derbyshire/Derleyshire Haupt (1859-1934) was born in Greenfield, Massachusetts, attended public schools in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1882, served as a private tutor at the University of Pennsylvania from 1880 until 1882, graduated from the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1884, was ordained to the ministry in 1884, was one of the pioneer English Lutheran missionaries NorthWest of Chicago, built six churches and chapels in St. Paul, was a member of and was the president of the Ramsey County Bible and City Mission Society, was the chair of the rescue committee of the Christian Citizens League in 1895, was appointed by the mayor of St. Paul as a delegate to the Western Conference of Charities at Omaha, Nebraska, in 1898, was the president and secretary of the North West Alumni Association of the University of Pennsylvania, was the secretary of the Ramsey County Famine Fund Committee for Scandinavia in 1903, was the director of the St. Paul Society for the Relief of the Poor, was a founder and president of the English Evangelical Lutheran Synod of the Northwest, was a member of the National Conference of Charities, was the pastor of the Memorial English Evangelical Lutheran Church of St. Paul, was a Lutheran minister who was ordained in 1884 after graduation from the Philadelphia Lutheran Theological Seminary and who received his Doctor of Divinity degree from the Pennsylvania College (now Gettysburg College) in 1907, married Ida L. Boyer of Reading, Pennsylvania, and was the pastor of the Memorial Lutheran Church in St. Paul from 1883 to 1907. Alexander J. D. Haupt married Ida Louisa Boyer (1861- ) in 1885 and the couple had six children, Edith Haupt (1888- ,) Margaret Haupt (1890- ,) Alexander James Haupt (1891- ,) John B. Haupt (1895- ,) Ida Haupt (1896- ,) and George Haupt. Another son of Herman Haupt, Professor Lewis Muhlenberg Haupt, was a was a member of the U. S. Military Academy at West Point class of 1867, appointed in 1862 by Abraham Lincoln, was a Professor of Civil Engineering at the Towne Scientific School of the University of Pennsylvania from 1872 to 1892, received a presidential appointment to serve on the three member Nicaragua Commission to plan the Panama Canal, and was a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Philosophical Society, the National Geographic Society, the Geographical Society of Philadelphia, the American Association for the Advancements of Science, and the Engineers Club of Philadelphia. Herman Haupt, Jr. (1852-1926,) was another son of Brigadier General Herman Haupt and was instrumental in promoting Yellowstone National Park with a travel guide to the park that was published in 1883. Charles Edgar Haupt married Alexandra Dougan Haupt and the couple had a son, Theodore Gilbert Haupt (1902-1990), who was an artist employed by the New Yorker magazine. Lewis Muhlenberg Haupt married Isabella Christina Cromwell in 1873 and the couple had nine children. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mrs. Margaret Hudspeth, widow of George Hudspeth, boarded at this address. Arthur B. Driscoll (1862-1938,) the son of Frederick Driscoll and Anna L. Brown Driscoll, was born at St. Paul, was educated at the Jefferson public school, attended Professor F. A. Fogg's private school in St. Paul, attended the Hopkins' Grammar School in New Haven, Connecticut, was employed as a clerk in carpet department of Auerbach, Finch & Culbertson from 1883 until 1884, was a clerk in the paper and stationery department of the Pioneer Press Company from 1884 until 1887, married Helen E. Gotzian at St. Paul in 1885, was a wholesale hat and fur merchant, entered business as member of firm of McKibbin & Company, succeeded in 1891 by McKibbin, Driscoll & Dorsey, was a member of board of directors of C. Gotzian & Company, shoe manufacturers, was the president of the St. Paul Young Men's Christian Association, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Informal Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, and officed at the corner of Broadway Street and Fifth Street in 1907. Arthur B. Driscoll was associated with the St. Paul Dispatch-Pioneer Press and was the author of Records and recollections of Arthur B. Driscoll, 1862-1938, published in 1952. Robert Armstrong Smith (1827-1913,) was born in Booneville, Indiana, was educated at the University of Indiana, studied law, and graduated in 1850, first came to St. Paul in 1853 as a private secretary to his brother-in-law, the newly appointed territorial governor, Willis A. Gorman, was appointed treasurer of Ramsey County in 1856, served on the Ramsey County board from 1856 to 1868, held the position of territorial librarian until 1858, served on the St. Paul City Council from 1883 to 1887, was mayor of St. Paul from 1887 to 1903, was a state legislator from 1900 to 1908, was a prominent figure in the Democratic Party, was also an active St. Paul lawyer, financier, and vice president of Bank of Minnesota, and donated the current Mears Park (formerly Smith Park) to the city in 1888. Robert Armstrong Smith married Mary Elizabeth Stone in Indiana in 1850. Charles W. Copley was the secretary of the St. Paul Board of Police in 1904. In 1918 and 1920, Charles W. Copley resided at 20 North St. Albans Street. The Haupt burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes Rev. A. J. D. Haupt (1859-1934,) Charles Edgar Haupt (1854-1942,) Alena Cecilia Haupt (1893-1956,) Caroline Dean Haupt (1861-1930,) Frank S. Haupt (1856-1914,) John Nicols Haupt (1903-1917,) Katherine Haupt (1886-1916,) Eleanore Chapman Relf (1877-1946,) Frederic L. Chapman (1848-1934,) Ella H. Chapman (1848-1918,) Lucy L. Chapman (1876-1918,) and Ida L. Haupt (1861-1951.) Thomas Driscoll ( -1908,) Thomas Driscoll ( -1913,) Robert Armstrong Smith ( -1913,) Charles W. Copley ( -1922,) Frederick L. Chapman ( -1934,) Arthur B. Driscoll ( -1938,) Ida O. Haupt ( -1939,) Helen G./Gotzian Driscoll ( -1940,) Charles Edgar Haupt ( -1942,) and Arthur Gotzian Driscoll ( -1949) all died in Ramsey County. Caroline S. Haupt (1896-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Martin, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. Ida Louise Haupt ( -1951) died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is Stephen A. Balej. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Warner resided at the former nearby 315 Summit Avenue. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that R. P. Warner resided at the former nearby 315 Summit Avenue in 1907. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. Anna R. Warner, Miss Anne H. French, and Richmond P. Warner all resided at the former nearby 315 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Warner resided at the former nearby 315 Summit Avenue, the W. P. Warner House, a house designed by James Knox Taylor, built in 1882, and subsequently razed. The 1930 city directory indicates that Richmond P. Warner resided at the former nearby 315 Summit Avenue. R. P. Warner (1871- ,) the son of W. P. Warner and Anna W. Richmond Warner, was born in St. Paul, was educated in private schools in St. Paul, studied law in the office of his father, W. P. Warner from 1903 until 1904, was employed in the stock department and as a traveling salesman for Foot, Schulze & Company, wholesale boots and shoes for three years, was a wholesale grocer, was engaged with Griggs Cooper & Company, wholesale grocers, in 1899, became the treasurer of Griggs, Cooper & Company in 1901, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Nushka Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Minnesota Boat Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, and officed at the corner of Third Street and Broadway Street in 1907. Richmond Warner was the chair of the St. Paul Port Authority, was a champion of the river as a transportation artery, was active in the campaign for a 9-foot navigation channel, and was the namesake of St. Paul's Warner Road, the eastern extension of Shepard Road. Anna R. Warner ( -1940) died in Beltrami County, Minnesota. [See note on Charles Clarence Haupt for 676 Summit Avenue.] [See the note for Reverend Dr. Charles Edgar Haupt and Alexandra Dougan Haupt for 2647 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.] [See note on Arthur Brown Driscoll for 21 South St. Albans Street.] [See note on Frederick Driscoll for 266 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the Informal Club for 761 Goodrich Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note for the Northern Pacific RailRoad.] [See note for the Minnesota Transfer RailRoad.] [See the note for the Griggs, Cooper & Company for 901 Euclid Street.] [See note on the Nushka Club for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on the McKibbin, Driscoll & Dorsey Inc. for 136 Western Avenue North.]

318 Summit Avenue: William H. Lightner House; Built in 1893 (1892 according to Ramsey County property tax records); Richardsonian Romanesque in style; Cass Gilbert, architect. The structure is currently a three story, 8697 square foot, multifamily apartment house. The house was built for $26,000, making it one of the most lavish houses constructed on Summit Avenue in the early 1890's. The house has leaded glass, oak and mahogany woodwork, and a grand staircase. The building features Sioux quartzite likely mined in Southwest Minnesota with bands of Kettle River sandstone mined in Northeast Minnesota. William H. Lightner resided at 322-324 Summit Avenue, the Lightner-Young House, before 1893, but outgrew that house. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William H. Lightner resided at this address from 1894 to 1944. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Lightner resided at this address. In 1916, William Hurley Lightner was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Lightner and their daughter resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William H. Lightner and Carrie D. Lightner resided at this address in 1928. The 1930 city directory indicates that William H. Lightner, a lawyer and a partner, with Mark H. Gehan and Milton C. Lightner, in the law firm of Lightner & Gehan, which officed at the Endicott Building, and his wife, Carrie D. Lightner, resided at this address. In 1934, William Hurley Lightner and Carrie Drake Lightner resided at this address. The original owner and occupant of the house was William Hurley Lightner (1856-1936,) the son of Milton Clarkson Lightner and Martha Hurley Baldy Lightner, who was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, lived in Detroit, Michigan, in 1870, was listed as being from Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, in 1876 in the University of Michigan Register, graduated from the University of Michigan in 1877, moved to St. Paul in 1878, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1880, was a prominent St. Paul lawyer, was the law partner of George B. Young from 1883 until 1906 in the law firm of Young & Lightner, was a member of the St. Paul City Council, was a member of the general committee of the St. Paul Sound Money organization, with a visit by Robert Lincoln, son of Abraham Lincoln, in 1896, and was the president of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1912. William Hurley Lightner eventually moved to 506 Summit Avenue. In 1842, Rev. Milton C. Lightner, the son of Nathaniel Ferree Lightner and Maria Ellmaker, was the rector of Christ's Episcopal Church in Danville, Pennsylvania, a congregation in which Peter Baldy was a prominent member, and also was the rector of St. James Episcopal Church in Exchange/White Hall, Pennsylvania. In 1865, the Rev. Milton C. Lightner was nominated by the Episcopal Church House of Bishops as Missionary Bishop of Colorado, but his election was not confirmed by the House of Deputies. William H. Lightner was involved in George I. Desnoyer's claim to the estate of his father, Stephen Desnoyer of St. Paul, in attempts by Andreas Mechwart of Hungary to obtain United States patents for his grain-milling machinery, and in negotiations by the St. Paul & Northern Pacific Railway Company with the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway Company for trackage rights at the St. Paul Union Depot. Carrie Drake Lightner was the wife of William H. Lightner. The Lightner family lived in the house for more than 40 years. William Lightner and Carrie Lightner were members of the Somerset Club, the Minikahda Country Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. Ellis Island records indicate that Carrie Lightner traveled from Hamilton, Bermuda, to New York aboard the Fort Victoria in 1921 at age 58, along with William Lightner, age 65, and Eleanor Lightner, age 21, and that Carrie Drake Lightner traveled from Southampton, Great Britain, to New York aboard the Aquatania in 1924 at the age of 61, along with William Hurley Lightner, age 68, and Eleanor Lightner, age 29. In 1908, William H. Lightner was the vice president of the Minnesota Historical Society and the other officers of the society were Nathaniel P. Langford, President, Charles P. Noyes, Second Vice-President, Henry P. Upham, Treasurer, Warren Upham, Secretary and Librarian, David L. Kingsbury, Assistant Librarian, Nathaniel P. Langford, Gen. James H. Baker, and Rev. Edward C. Mitchell, members of the Committee on Publications, and Edward P. Sanborn, John A. Stees, and Gen. James H. Baker, members of the Committee on Obituaries. William H. Lightner was, for many years, the chancellor of the Episcopal Diocese of Minnesota, and was a member of the Episcopal Church House of Deputies in 1901 for the Church's General Convention in San Francisco. William Hurley Lightner (1856- ) was the son of Milton Clarkson Lightner (1820- ,) an Episcopal priest, and Martha Hurley Baldy Lightner (1825- ) and was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great great grandfathers Jacob Baldy, a captain in the Berks County, Pennsylvania, militia, and Leonard Ellmaker, a private in the Pennsylvania State Troops. The siblings of William H. Lightner were Rev. Peter Baldy Lightner (1845-1902,) Edwin Nathaniel Lightner (1848- ,) Sarah Hurley "Sally" Lightner (Mrs. Ernest Taylor) Tappey (1851- ,) Charles Milton Lightner (1858-1886,) Clarence Ashley Lightner (1862- ,) Catherine Baldy Lightner (1863-1866,) and Frank Waterman Lightner (1868- .) Ernest Taylor Tappey was a medical doctor. Milton Clarkson Lightner was a lawyer, was an alternate delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1940, and was a Republican member of Minnesota State Senate from the 40th District who was elected in 1942. William Hurley Lightner II, prepared at St. Paul Academy and resided at 506 Summit Avenue while attending Yale University in 1939. Carrie Drake, the daughter of Elias Franklin Drake, married William Hurley Lightner in 1885 in Reading, Berks County, Pennsylvania. Mark H. Gehan (1892-1967) was a representative in the Minnesota House from the 37th District in St. Paul from 1925 to 1929 and was the mayor of St. Paul from 1934 to 1938, suceeding William Mahoney, who unsuccessfully sought re-election, and was suceeded by William H. Fallon. Mark Gehan was elected mayor as part of an anti-police corruption mood and dissatisfaction with the "O'Connor system" of dealing with visiting gangsters, especially by the St. Paul Women's Clubs. In 1937, Mayor Mark Gehan authorized placing a used car lot in front of the Capitol. Mark H. Gehan was a lawyer and was a partner with William H. Lightner and Milton C. Lightner in the law firm of Lightner & Gehan. William H. Lightner (1919-1991) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Finch, and died in Ramsey County. Eleanor Jackson Lightner (1893-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Dean, and died in Ramsey County. Mark H. Gehan (1892-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Hogan, and died in Ramsey County. Milton C. Lightner (1886-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Drake, and died in Ramsey County. William H. Fallon (1893-1981) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Conlin, and died in Ramsey County. Carrie H. Lightner ( -1929) died in Ramsey County. The property was last sold in 1996 for $410,000. The current owner of record of the property is Judith N. Dean.

322-324 Summit Avenue: Lightner-Young House; Built in 1886 (1888 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Richardsonian Romanesque/Classical Revival in style; Cass Gilbert and John Knox Taylor, architects. The 322 Summit Avenue portion of the building is three stories and 7592 square feet in area. The 324 Summit Avenue portion of the building is three stories and 6720 square feet in area. The double house was built for a cost of $23,000. The east facade has a large shingled dormer and has a raised curvilinear hood above the window. The original owners were the law partners William Hurley Lightner (1856-1936) and George B. Young (1840-1906.) Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William H. Lightner resided at 322 Summit Avenue from 1886 to 1893 and that George B. Young resided at 324 Summit Avenue from 1886 to 1911. The 1889 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William H. Lightner, Edward B. Young, and Mr. and Mrs. George B. Young resided at this address. The 1891 and 1893 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Lightner resided at 322 Summit Avenue and that the Honorable and Mrs. George B. Young and Edward B. Young resided at 324 Summit Avenue. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Drake and Miss M. F. McClung resided at 322 Summit Avenue and that the Honorable and Mrs. George B. Young and Edward B. Young resided at 324 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Caroline McC. Drake (1828-1895,) who died of apoplexy, resided at this address in 1895. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Edward Blake Young resided at 324 Summit Avenue in 1907. The 1915 Woman's Who's who of America, compiled by John William Leonard and published by The American Commonwealth Company of New York, indicates that Jessie Rice (Mrs. Charles Lyman) Greene resided at 324 Summit Avenue. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Charles Lyman Greene resided at 324 Summit Avenue. In 1916, Dr. Charles Lyman Greene was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at 324 Summit Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. V. Ashbaugh resided at 322 Summit Avenue and that Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Greene, their daughter, and Mrs. J. B. Rice all resided at 324 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Young and Mrs. E. N. Saunders all resided at 324 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Violet D. Young resided at 324 Summit Avenue in 1927. The 1930 city directory indicates that John F. Patterson resided at 322 Summit Avenue and that Mrs. Violet D. Young, the widow of Edward B. Young, resided at 324 Summit Avenue. In 1934, John F. Patterson, Sadie McLaughlin Patterson, John Patterson, and Kathleen Patterson resided at this address. Dr. C. L. Greene resided at 324 Summit Avenue in 1914. The previously separate houses were joined into one house, but now the structure is a multifamily apartment house. The 1908 city directory indicates that Edward B. Young, associated with Lightner & Young, resided at this address. John F. Patterson was a graduate of the University of Minnesota. The Patterson family were members of the St. Paul Athletic Club and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. George Brooks Young was the lawyer for James J. Hill for a time, also was a justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1874 to 1875, and edited the General Statutes of the State of Minnesota of 1878. George Brooks Young (1840-1906) was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Alexander Young, a Unitarian clergyman and an overseer of Harvard College, and Caroline James Young, attended Boston, Massachusetts, public schools, graduated from Harvard in 1860, read the law in the office of Henry A. Scudder in Boston, graduated from the Harvard University Law School in 1863, moved to New York City in 1864, studied in the office of William Curtiss Noyes, was admitted to the practice of law in New York, was the managing clerk in the office of David Dudley Field, married Ellen Fellows ( -1904/1905) of Edgartown, Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, in 1870, came to Minneapolis in 1870, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota, and engaged in the practice of law until 1874, was appointed by Governor Cushman Davis an associate justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court, served as an associate justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1874 until 1875, moved to St. Paul, was a partner with Stanford Newel in the law firm of Young & Newel, located at 62 East Third Street in 1879, resided at 13 East Tenth Street in 1879, was the reporter of the Minnesota Supreme Court from 1875 to 1892 and compiled 27 volumes of the Court's reports, became a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1879, entered into a partnership with William H. Lightner in the law firm of Young & Lightner in 1883, was a lecturer on conflict of laws at the University of Minnesota Law School, was chancellor of the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Minnesota, was a member of the Selden Historical Society, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was vice president of the Harvard Law School Association, was the chief counsel for the Northern Securities Company from 1902 until 1904, during litigation with the State of Minnesota and with the United States, and is buried in Edgartown, Massachusetts. Edward Blake Young (1864-1927,) the son of Rev. Edward J. Young and Mary Clapp Blake Young, was born in Newton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, was educated in the public schools of Cambridge, Massachusetts, attended Harvard College in 1885, was admitted to the practice of law in Massachusetts in 1887, was engaged in the general practice of law in Minnesota, married Violet Lee Dousman (1875-1940,) was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars in Minnesota, was the genealogist for the Society of Colonial Wars in Minnesota in 1906, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Town & Country Club, was a member of the St Paul Club, was a member of the Minnesota Boat Club, officed at the Gilfillan Block in 1907, was the first vice president of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1927, and died in Ramsey County. Charles Lyman Greene (1862- ) was the son of Dr. William Warren Greene (1831-1881) and Elizabeth Lawrence Greene, studied medicine at the University of Michigan, was a doctor in Minnesota in 1898, was a Colonel in the U. S. Army in 1917, was the author in 1906 of The Medical Examination for Life Insurance and Its Associated Clinical Methods: With Chapters on the Insurance of Substandard Lives and Accident Insurance and in 1926 of Medical Diagnosis for the Student and Practitioner, published by P. Blakiston's Son & Co., married, and had two daughters, Dorothy Lawrence Greene, who married Alfred J. Schweppe and lived in Seattle, Washington, and Jessie Greene, who married Dr. Frederick Ramsay Ritzinger and lived in St. Paul. Jessie Rice Greene (1862- ) was born in St. Paul, the daughter of Justus Burdick Rice and Eliza Garland Rice, was educated at a private school and Central High School in St. Paul and at St. Mary's Hall in Faribault, Minnesota, married Dr. Charles Lyman Greene in St. Paul in 1886, was an Episcopalian, was associated with several church societies, is a member of the Colonial Dames, was a member of the Town & Country Country Club, and was a member of the Lafayette Club, and opposed woman's suffrage. Jessie Rice Greene and Charles Lyman Greene had two children, Mrs. Jessie Rice Greene Ritzinger (1887- ) and Dorothy Lawrence Greene (1896- .) Edward B. Young was an elected member of the executive council of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1916. Harry T. Drake and Alexander M. Drake were sons of Caroline McC. Drake. Harry Trevor Drake was the son of Elias Franklin Drake (1813-1892,) who came from Ohio to Minnesota, was president of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad and was active in Republican politics in Minnesota. Harry Trevor Drake (1857-1933) was born in Xenia, Greene County, Ohio, and married Emma Bigelow (1860-1940.) Emma Bigelow was the daughter of Charles Henry Bigelow (1835-1911) and Alida Wood Lyman (1839-1923.) Charles Henry Bigelow was the president of the Saint Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company in 1894. Charles Henry Bigelow married Alda Wood Lyman and the couple had six children, Emma Bigelow (1860-1940,) George Lyman Bigelow (1863-1917,) Charles Henry Bigelow II (1866-1945,) Frederic Russell Bigelow (1870-1946,) Albert Anson Bigelow (1872-1919,) and Dean Bigelow (1875-1885.) Harry Trevor Drake and Emma Bigelow Drake had three children, Elias Franklin Drake (1883-1953,) Charles Bigelow Drake (1886-1965,) and Harry Trevor Drake, Jr. (1889-1961.) Charles Bigelow Drake married Louise Delano Hadley in St. Paul in 1916 and the couple had three sons. Harry Trevor Drake married Ann (Nancy) Page Tiffany in St. Paul in 1916. Elias Franklin Drake built a summerhouse at 2526 Manitou Island in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. Harry T. Drake was the commodore of the White Bear Yacht Club in 1898 and captained the 17 foot yacht "Xenia." Mr. and Mrs. Harry T. Drake, Mr. Franklin Drake, Dr. and Mrs. Carl B. Drake, Mrs. Frances B. Drake, and Mr. Harry T. Drake were members of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church in 2001. In the 1889 Wisconsin Supreme Court case of Otto Streissguth and Harry T. Drake vs. B. Bessigner and Samuel Reigelman, Streissguth and Drake were represented by Eau Claire attorneys James Wickham (1862-1944) and Frank R. Farr (1860-1932.) In 1893, Harry T. Drake, Alexander M. Drake and William H. Lightner platted Drake's Addition and Drake's Subdivision in Hartford, Minnehaha County, South Dakota. Alexander M. Drake was the founding father of Bend, Oregon, arriving in Oregon with his wife, Florence Drake, in 1900, hauled-in machinery from Minnesota to Bend, Oregon, to set up a profitable mill operation along the Deschutes River at the south end of town in 1901, purchased large tracts of timber land to provide logs for his mill, formed the Pilot Butte Development Company to construct a canal system and plat the town of Bend, Oregon, constructed a dam in 1909 on the Deschutes River, which created Mirror Pond and the first power plant in Bend, Oregon, platted the upscale Park Addition in 1910, sold his controlling interest in Pilot Butte Development Company, including Park Addition, to a newly formed company, The Bend Company, in 1911, and sold his last land holding in Bend, Oregon, in 1912. Ellen F. Young (1847-1905) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. John F. Patterson (1880-1958) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Evans, and died in Ramsey County. Sadie Patterson (1883-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Smith, and died in Ramsey County. Caroline Drake ( -1913,) Lawrence Vernon Ashbaugh ( -1923,) Edward B. Young ( -1927,) Charles Lyman Greene ( -1929,) Harry Trevor Drake (1857-1933,) Charles Henry Drake ( -1943,) Frederic Russell Bigelow ( -1946,) Franklin Drake ( -1953,) and Edward Nelson Saunders ( -1957) all died in Ramsey County. Edward F. Drake (1878-1959) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Harry Trevor Drake (1889-1961) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bigelow, and died in Ramsey County. Jessie G. Ritzinger (1887-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rice, and died in Ramsey County. Louise Hadley Drake (1892-1987) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Luce, and died in Ramsey County. Frances B. Drake (1920-1975) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Muzzy, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the double house is VF Associates LLC, located at 61 St. Albans Street South. [See note on Taylor for 365 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William H. Lightner for 318 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.]

323 Summit Avenue: Edward Nelson Saunders House/John W. Roche House; Built in 1892 (1880 according to the National Register of Historic Places and 1893 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Victorian Romanesque/Renaissance Revival/Romanesque Revival in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. The structure is a two story, 8971 square foot, 19 room, ten bedroom, five bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The house reportedly was built for Edward Nelson Saunders (1877-1953), who was president and treasurer of the Northwestern Fuel Company and a president of the Minnesota Club. Construction of the house cost $35,000 (Sandeen and Larson.) Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that John W. Roche resided at this address from 1863 to 1892 and that Edward N. Saunders resided at this address from 1893 to 1937. The 1885, 1887, and 1889 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. John W. Roche and John W. Roche, Jr., resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John W. Roche, their daughters, and John W. Roche, Jr., resided at this address. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. N. Saunders resided at this address. The 1903 city directory indicates that Severine Aaberg was a cook at this address. The 1908 city directory indicates that Edward N. Saunders was the president of the Northwest Fuel Company and resided at this address and that Edward J. Saunders boarded at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. E. N. Saunders resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mary P. Saunders, the widow of Edward N. Saunders, resided at this address. In 1934, Mary Groal Saunders, the widow of Edward N. Saunders, resided at this address and was a member of the Women's City Club of St. Paul, the Century Club, and the Minikahda Country Club. The house subsequently served as a convent for the Cathedral of St. Paul. John W. Roche (1831-1891) was born in Ireland, emigrated to the United States as an infant, settled in St. Paul in 1856, was the St. Paul city comptroller from 1864 to 1891, and died in St. Paul. In 1879, John W. Roche was the city comptroller of St. Paul. John W. Roche (1864-1961) was buried in Empire Township, Dakota County, Minnesota. Mrs. Edward N. Saunders was the author of Memories of a visit to General Jefferson Davis privately published in St. Paul in 1934. Edward N. Saunders was born in Ohio in 1845, was orphaned in 1857, moved to Minnesota in 1870, became the president of the Northwestern Fuel Company, and became the president of the What-Cheer Coal Company of Iowa and of the Spring Valley Coal Company of Illinois. The town of What Cheer, Iowa, was laid out by Englishman Peter Britton in 1865. Postmaster Joseph Andrews named the town when the initial name of Petersburg was rejected and the town residents could not agree on a new name. What Cheer began as a coal mining community that eventually brought in related industries such as railroads and manufacturers of mining tools. By the late 1800's, there were 26 mines in the area and the town's population had reached close to 4,000. In 1879, the Muscatine Western RailRoad laid track to connect to the What-Cheer mines. Saunders married Mary Proal in 1874 and they had four children. The Spring Valley Coal Company was built with the financial aid and cooperation of coal and railroad capitalists, E. N. Saunders of St. Paul, Minnesota, a director of the Chicago and North Western railroad, Mr. Taylor of What Cheer, Iowa, and W. L. Scott of Erie, Pennsylvania. Saunders also built the house at 834 Summit Avenue. Leopoldo Bracony, a French sculptor, sculpted a white marble bust of Edward J. Saunders commemorating his Minnesota Club presidency that is currently in the collection of the Minnesota Historical Society. The Saunders mausoleum and burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of E. N. Nelson, Charles William Stott, Florence Bonnell Saunders (1880-1957,) the wife of Edward N. Saunders, Jr., Charlotte Anglim Saunders (1923-2005,) the wife of Edward N. Saunders III, Mary Stott Richter (1908-1998,) Harold C. Richter (1904-1999,) Harold C. Richter, Jr., (1933-1952,) the son of Mary Stott Richter and Harold C. Richter, Gretchen R. Law ( -1931,) the daughter of Mary Stott Richter and Harold C. Richter, and Caroline Stott Day (1915-2004,) the daughter of Charles Stott and Cornelia Stott. Edward Nelson Saunders ( -1953) died in Ramsey County. John W. Roche ( -1933) died in Rice County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Richard L. Baron. The 1895 city directory indicates that Charles Kent, an actor at the Grand Opera House, boarded at the nearby former 321 Summit Avenue. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Edward Blake Young resided at the former nearby 324 Summit Avenue in 1907. The 1924 city directory indicates that Sidney R. Stronge resided at the former nearby 325 Summit Avenue. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that F. John Ward, who attended the school from 1913 until 1918 and who attended Yale University, resided at the former nearby 327 Summit Avenue. Edward Blake Young (1864- ,) the son of Rev. Edward J. Young and Mary Clapp Blake Young, was born in Newton, Massachusetts, was educated in the public schools of Cambridge, Massachusetts, graduated from Harvard College in 1885, was a lawyer, was admitted to the practice of law in 1887, engaged in general practice, was a member of the American Bar Association, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars in Minnesota, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Town & Country Club, was a member of the Minnesota Boat Club, and officed at the Gilfillan Block in 1907. [See note on Johnston for 476 Summit Avenue.] [See 834 Summit Avenue for a note about Edward N. Saunders.] [See 1740 Summit Avenue for a note about Charles Lyman Greene.]

329 Summit Avenue: Dr. Charles A. Wheaton House Built in 1895 (1893 according to the National Register of Historic Places and according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Romanesque Revival/Queen Anne Rectilinear/Victorian Romanesque in style. The structure is a two story, 4919 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $15,000. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles A. Wheaton resided at this address from 1896 to 1911. The 1909 University of Minnesota Catalogue indicates that Charles A. Wheaton, M.D., an emeritu professor of surgery, resided at this address. John P. Upham resided at this address in 1914. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John P. Upham resided at this address. World War I veteran John P. Upham resided at this address in 1919. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. F. E. Ward resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Christina L. Ward, the widow of Frank E. Ward, resided at this address. In 1934, Christina Lawrence Ward, the widow of Francis E. Ward, Francis Ward, William Ward, and Robert Ward all resided at this address. Charles A. Wheaton, one of the 12 children of Charles Augustus Wheaton (1809–1882) and Ellen Douglas Birdseye Wheaton, was a physician and surgeon who published the paper "The Clinical Recognition of Malignancy in Tumors" in the 1894 Journal of the American Medical Association and who was the president of the American Academy of Railway Surgeons in 1900. Charles A. Wheaton (1853- ) was born in Syracuse, N.Y., moved to Minnesota in 1861, and graduated from Carlton College in 1870. After a stint as an express manager for the Northern Pacific RailRoad, Wheaton went to Harvard Medical School and returned to St. Paul in 1877, where he became a partner of Dr. J. H. Stewart, was Professor of the Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School in 1893, and eventually became the chair of the Surgery Department at the University of Minnesota Medical School. Wheaton married Ursula C. Stewart, the daughter of his medical partner, in 1879 and the couple had three children, Charles A. Wheaton, Katherine Wheaton, and Marion Wheaton. Charles Augustus Wheaton, Sr., was a major figure in the central New York state abolitionist movement and in the Underground Railroad, was a hardware merchant, was a railroad speculator, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives from 1867 until 1868, and was a founder of Carlton College in Northfield, Minnesota. Ellen Douglas Birdseye Wheaton (1816-1858) was the daughter of Victory Birdseye (1782-1853) and Electa Beebe Birdseye (1793-1860,) shared her husband's abolitionist sympathies, and is best-known for a diary she kept from 1850 to 1858, detailing her life. Dr. Jacob Henry Stewart (1829-1884,) the son of Dr. Phylander Stewart, was born in Clermont, New York, graduated from Phillips Academy in Peekskill, New York, attended Yale College, graduated from the University Medical College of New York City in 1851, practiced medicine in Peekskill, New York, moved to St. Paul in 1855, was appointed Ramsey County Physician in 1856, married Catherine/Katherine Jane Sweeny of Philadelphia in 1857, was elected a Minnesota State Senator in 1860, and served as Minnesota Surgeon General from 1858 until 1859. When the Civil War began, Stewart was commissioned as Chief Surgeon of the First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, was taken prisoner at the battle of First Bull Run while tending to the wounded on the battlefield, was held at Libby Prison, and was paroled. Stewart was a four time mayor of St. Paul, was St. Paul postmaster in 1865, and was a Member of Congress from Minnesota as a Republican from 1877 until 1879 before being replaced by William D. Washburn. In 1879, Jacob H. Stewart replaced James H. Baker as surveyor general of Minnesota and continued in that office in 1882. Jacob Henry Stewart and Catherine/Katherine Stewart had three children, Ursula Cochran Stewart (Mrs. Charles A.) Wheaton, Dr. J. H. Stewart, and Robert D. Stewart. The Ward family were members of the University Club, the Minikahda Country Club, the White Bear Yacht Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. Charles Augustus Wheaton was the husband of Ursula Stewart Wheaton ( -1943,) died of interstitial nephritis, and resided at 442 Summit Avenue in 1916 according to Oakland Cemetery records. According to the 1930 city directory, Mrs. Ursula S. Wheaton resided at 1916 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Ursula Wheaton resided at 11 Summit Court. In 1934, Ursula Stewart Wheaton, the widow of Charles A. Wheaton, resided at 1559 Summit Avenue and summered in Brule, Wisconsin. The Women's City Club of St. Paul, located at 305 St. Peter Street, was formed in 1921 and ended business in 1971. The St. Paul Women's City Club grew out of a post World War I American Woman's Club movement which emphasized women's independence and new social roles as workers, volunteers, and persons more fully involved in society. The group met in the Minnesota Club building from 1921 to 1929. The St. Paul Women's City Club/Jemne building is an Art Deco Streamline Moderne-style Mankato limestone structure. The club wanted a building that emulated modernism and functionalism and that was designed by a St. Paul architect. The clubhouse originally had a dining room, assembly rooms, dressing rooms, and bedrooms for members and guests of the club. When the building was built in 1931, the club had over 1000 members and provided a center for organized work and for social and intellectual intercourse. Magnus Jemne (1882-1964) and Elsa Jemne were the architects for the building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. F. Scott Fitzgerald addressed the St. Paul Women's City Club in 1921 on the topic "South America." In 1943, when recruitment into the Women's Corps dropped off, the St. Paul Women's City Club sponsored a rally on behalf of the Women's Corps. Also in 1943, Oveta Culp Hobby (1905-1995), first secretary of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, first commanding officer of the Women's Army Corps, and chairman of the board of the Houston Post, gave a speech to the club. In 1944, the club was led by Adelaide Enright, a prominent St. Paul businesswoman. In 1946, Felix Morley (1894- ) gave a talk to the club on "The New League of Nations." The building was sold to the Minnesota Museum of Art in 1972 and now houses an architectural firm. Adelaide Enright was influential in the founding of the Inter-Club Council of Saint Paul in 1944, which was composed of representatives from the St. Paul chapter of the American Business Women Association, the Business and Professional Women's Association of St. Paul, Church Women United of the St. Paul area, the Degree of Honor Protective Association, the Junior Pioneer Association Auxiliary, the Minnesota Historical Society Women's Organization, the National Association of Railway Business Women, The Saint Paul Winter Carnival Women's Division, the Salvation Army, and the St. Paul Deaneries of the Council of Catholic Women. The Inter-Club Council of Saint Paul provided a nonsectarian, nonpartisan, and noncommercial medium through which organizations could work for civic improvement, held monthly meetings, and participated in many community events, including the St. Paul Winter Carnival, and sponsored an annual "Salute to Youth" program, beginning in 1959. John P. Upham ( -1934) and Ursula Stewart Wheaton both died in Ramsey County. Robert D. Stewart (1873-1964) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Christina L. Ward (1873-1962) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Patterson, and died in Ramsey County. John H. Stewart ( -1939) and Robert D. Stewart ( -1942) both died in Pine County, Minnesota. John Henry Stewart ( -1943) died in Watonwan County, Minnesota. Frank E. Ward ( -1919) died in Mower County, Minnesota. James Hugh Baker ( -1929) died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is Edward M. Conley. Edward M. Conley is a realtor with Discovery Realty who offices at 715 Grand Avenue. [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note on the University Club for 420 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Charles Augustus Wheaton for 1916 Summit Avenue.]

332 Summit Avenue: Edgar C. Long House/Archibald Guthrie House; Built in 1912; Queen Anne/Richardsonian Romanesque Revival in style; Cass Gilbert and John Knox Taylor, architects. The structure is a two story, 7871 square foot, 15 room, nine bedroom, four bathroom, brick house, with a one car tuck under garage, which was last sold in 2002 and the sale price was $1,225,000. The house cost $30,000 to build. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Edgar C. Long resided at this address from 1890 to 1896 and that Archibald Guthrie resided at this address from 1902 to 1928. The 1891, 1893, and 1895 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Edgar C. Long resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. Archibald Guthrie resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Walter Fendry, a chauffeur, boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. Archibald Guthrie resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that William F. Davidson, the secretary-treasurer of the Davidson Company, a real estate company, and his wife, Caroline F. Davidson, resided at this address. In 1934, William F. Davidson, Caroline Farnham Davidson, Kate Davidson, and Cynthia Davidson resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that William F. Davidson, who attended the school from 1909 until 1910, who graduated from Harvard University in 1920, who was a First Class Botswain's Mate with the Naval Reserve Force in Newport, Rhode Island, during World War I, who married Caroline Farnham, who was an amateur playwright, and who officed at the Pioneer Building, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that William F. Davidson, who attended the school from 1909 until 1910, who graduated from Harvard University in 1920, and who officed at the Pioneer Building, resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that William F. Davidson, a member of the Class of 1916, resided at this address. The Davidson family were members of the Minikahda Country Club. Edgar Long was in the lumber business and was the general manager of the Railway Supply Company. Long Siding, Milaca County, Minnesota, four miles North of Princeton, Minnesota, was named for Edgar C. Long. William Fuson Davidson (1897-1982,) the son of Watson Poage Davidson (1871-1953) and Sarah Matilda Davidson (1874-1945,) was born in St. Paul, graduated from Harvard University in 1920, was a successful businessman in St. Paul, founded the Davidson-Baker company with Lee Baker, and began a play writing career as a cure for his insomnia, including the plays "Thru the Keyhole," published by Northwestern Press in 1934, "Room for One More," "Early to Bed--Early to Rise," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1938, "Poor dear Edgar," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1940, "The Lady Elects," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1940, "He Met a Mermaid," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1940, "Brother Goose," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1942, "Act Your Age," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1943, "A Little Honey," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1945, "The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1961, "Bachelor Father," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1962, "Learn Baby Learn," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1969, "Paddle Your Own Canoe," published by The Dramatic Publishing Company in 1980, and "Three to Get Married." William F. Davidson married Caroline Farnham and the couple had four daughters, Cynthia Davidson (1925- ,) Kate Davidson (1928- ,) Patricia Davidson (1939- ,) and Caroline Davidson (Mrs. Dutton) Foster (1942- .) In 1930, the Pullman Company built the sleeping car #1011, a 14 section plain-jane heavyweight sleeper, which was named the "Archibald Guthrie," was rebuilt in 1939 and sold to the Great Northern RailRoad, was rebuilt by the Great Northern RailRoad in 1957 as business car, was transferred to the Burlington Northern RailRoad in 1970, and was ultimately purchased by the Alaska RailRoad in 1971, was renamed the "Denali" and was used a business car, and subsequently was retired in 2001. Archibald Guthrie was the contractor who built the Great Northern RailRoad line in the Bemidji, Minnesota, area in 1893. Archibald Guthrie (1844-1913) was born in Lanark, Ontario, Canada, the son of James Guthrie (1791-1868) and Margaret Reid Guthrie (1806-1873,) moved to St. Paul in 1866, was initially a track layer for the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, then clerked at the St. Cloud, Minnesota, railroad station, worked at a brakeman and a conductor from 1867 to 1877, then became the superintendent of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad from 1877 to 1888, then became a railroad contractor, resided at this address in 1907, officed at the German American National Bank Building in 1907, died in Chicago, and was buried in St. Paul. In 1879, Archie Guthrie was the trainmaster of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba RailRoad and resided at 11 DeBow Street. Archibald Guthrie married Frances Emma Wescott (1851-1928,) a daughter of Guv R. Wescott, M. D., of Norwich, New York, in 1871, and the couple had a daughter, Anne Sabra "Bama" Guthrie (Mrs. Warren) Bicknell (1872-1959.) Anne Bicknell lived in in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, and was an author of Flower Folk, published in New York by G. P. Putnam's Sons in 1936. Warren Moses Bicknell (1868-1941,) the president of the Lake Shore Electric Railway Company, and Anne Sabra Guthrie Bicknell had four children, Frances Louise Bicknell, Warren Bicknell, Jr. (1902-1975,) Elizabeth Bicknell, and Guthrie Bicknell. Archibald/Archibold Guthrie had nine siblings, James Guthrie (1824-1866,) Peter Guthrie (1826-1914,) John Vanderpool Guthrie (1829- ,) Edward Guthrie (1831-1881,) William Reid Guthrie (1836-1909,) Christina Guthrie (1837-1896,) Helen "Ellen" Guthrie (1840- ,) Mary Louise Guthrie (1847-1931,) and Elizabeth Guthrie (1849-1925.) In 1902, A. Guthrie, a contractor for the Great Northern RailRoad, purchased a contolling interest in the Victoria (British Columbia) Terminal RailRoad. Archibald Guthrie is buried in Oakland Cemetery. The abandoned town of Guthrie, North Dakota, five miles north of Drake, North Dakota, in north central North Dakota, was founded in 1910 and was named for Archibald Guthrie, the contractor who plotted the townsite, and the entire town is reportedly available for sale. In 2001, the St. Paul City Council took action on a Property Code Enforcement Appeal relating to this address. The house was last sold in 2006 and the selling price was $1,479,000. The previous owner of record of the property was John F. Klos and the current owner of record is Vern Jacobson. Robert Stuart Clark, a Lieutenant in the USNR, the son of Homer P. Clark, was a World War II casualty and resided at the former nearby 334 Summit Avenue in the early 1940's. John F. Klos has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota, a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Wisconsin and a J.D. from DePaul University College of Law, is a registered patent attorney with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, previously was with the law firm of Fulbright & Jaworski LLP, and currently is a shareholder in the law firm of Briggs & Morgan. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on Taylor for 365 Summit Avenue.] [See note on William F. Davidson for 400 Summit Avenue.]

335 Summit Avenue: John H. Allen House; Built in 1892 (1891 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Romanesque Revival/Queen Anne in style; J. Walter Stevens, architect. John H. Allen was a partner in Allen, Moon, & Co., wholesale grocers. The structure is now a three story, 8156 square foot, multi-family apartment building. Construction of the house cost $25,000. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. The 1893 and 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Allen, Joseph Allen, and H. C. Allen resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that John H. Allen resided at this address from 1893 to 1918. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier’s Bonus Board (#19066) indicate that John H. Allen and Margaret A. Allen, the parents of World War I veteran John H. Allen, resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. John H. Allen resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Stronge resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Bernard H. Ridder (1883-1975,) the secretary of the Dispatch-Pioneer Press Company, and his wife, Nell Ridder, resided at this address. In 1934, Sidney R. Stronge, Florence James Stronge, Sidney Stronge, Louise Stronge, and James J. Stronge resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Sidney R. Stronge (1893- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1905 until 1908, who graduated from Yale University in 1915, who was a First Lieutenant and Adjutant in the 49th Field Artillery during World War I, and who was employed by the Stronge & Lightner Company in Minneapolis, resided at this address. Printon Garber (1851-1936) moved to Minnesota in 1884 and changed his name to John H. Allen. John H. Allen (1838-1904) was born in Galena, Illinois, moved to Minnesota in 1865, settled in St. Paul, opened a wholesale grocery business, and died in St. Paul. John H. Allen was a partner in Allen, Moon, and Co., wholesale grocers. Sidney R. Stronge was a graduate of Yale University. World War I veteran Sidney R. Stronge resided at 107 Virginia Avenue in 1919. Bernard H. Ridder, Sr., was the son of Herman Ridder. Herman Ridder, founder of the Ridder Group, began his newspaper career in publishing with the Catholic News in New York in 1875, then purchased the Staats-Zeitung in 1892, was a founder and president of the Associated Press, and was an early supporter of the American Newspaper Publishers Association, becoming its president in 1907. His sons, Bernard Ridder, Joseph Ridder, and Victor Ridder, bought the New York Journal of Commerce and the St. Paul Dispatch-Pioneer Press in 1927. Ridder Publications was incorporated in Delaware in 1942 and expanded westward when it purchased the Long Beach Press-Telegram, Long Beach Independent, San Jose Mercury News, the Pasadena Star News, a 65 percent stake in the Seattle Times, the Gary Post Tribune in Indiana, and radio and television station WCCO in Minneapolis. In 1974, the Knight Group and Ridder Publications merge to become Knight-Ridder Newspapers, Inc., with Bernard H. Ridder, Jr., as chair of the executive committee in 1976 and as chief executive officer in 1979. Bernard H. Ridder, Jr. ( -2002,) retired in 1982 but remained a member of the Knight-Ridder board until 1994. Bernard H. Ridder, Jr., was a 1930 graduate of St. Bernard's School in New York, attended Canterbury School, graduated from Princeton University, married Jane Delano, a niece of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1939, joined the Navy in 1942, was advertising director of the Duluth Herald and the Duluth News Tribune after World War II, was one of five original owners of the Minnesota Vikings professional football team, and served on the executive committee of the United States Golf Association. Sidney R. Stronge was the son of Joseph Stronge (1863-1942,) of the Stronge-Warner Company, and Louise Williams Stronge (1868-1965,) who resided at 334 Summit Avenue. The Stronge-Warner Company, wholesale milliners, operated 100 stores in the Northwest in 1920. The Stronge family were members of the Junior League in 1934. Joseph Stronge was born in Ireland and Louise Williams Stronge was born in Canada. Sidney R. Stronge married Florence James in St. Paul in 1925 and the couple had two children, Sidney Louise Stronge (1926- ) and James Jonathan Stronge (1931- .) John H. Allen ( -1936) died in Stearns County, Minnesota. Joseph Stronge ( -1942) died in Ramsey County. Sidney R. Stronge (1893-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Williams, and died in Ramsey County. Florence J. Stronge (1904-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bailey, and died in Ramsey County. Louise Stronge (1869-1965) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Boyd, and died in Ramsey County. The current owner of record of the property is William P. Muldoon. In 2006, William Muldoon, a pharmacist employed by Supervalu Pharmacy, contributed to the Sixth Congressional District Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party candidate Patty Wetterling.

339 Summit Avenue: Crawford Livingston House/Charles H. F. Smith House; Built in 1898 (1899 according to the National Register of Historic Places and 1897 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Medieval-Rectilinear/Romanesque Revival/Italianate/Gothic/Venetian Renaissance villa in style; Cass Gilbert, architect. The building has a recessed loggia, pointed arches, third floor leaded-glass windows, and a front dormer with an Elizabethan character. Unit #1 is a 1615 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium, with the last sale in 2001 for $235,900, which is currently owned by Susan J. Linzmeier and Tom I. Linzmeier, who reside at 332 Brooks Avenue East. Unit #2 is a 1868 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium, which is currently owned by Ardis N. Noonan and James C. Noonan. Unit #3 is a 1428 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium, which was last sold in 2000 for $180,000, which is currently owned by Cheryl A. Armstrong and R. Thomas Armstrong, who reside in Round Rock, Texas. Unit #4 is a 1469 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium, with the last sale in 1997 for a sale price of $122,000, which is currently owned by Gregory A. Bullard. Unit #5 is a 1638 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick condominium, which was last sold in 2002 for $275,000, which is currently owned by Carlos Portenty and Julie A. Brandt Portenty, who are located at 1043 Grand Avenue. The house cost $14,000 to build. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. McQuillan Brothers Plumbing & Heating and architect Thomas Holyoke were involved in the design and installation of the plumbing in the house. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the house was built for Crawford Livingston in 1898 and that Charles H. F. Smith resided at this address from 1899 to 1949. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Charles H. F. Smith resided at this address in 1907. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. H. F. Smith, their daughter, and Wharton Smith all resided at this address. World War I veteran Wharton C. F. Smith (1896- ,) an Ensign, resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles H. F. Smith, a Vice President of the American National Bank, resided at this address and that Ruth Smith, a student, and Wharton C. Smith, a manager at Thomas & McKinnon, both boarded at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Smith resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles H. F. Smith, the vice president of the American National Bank and associated with Charles H. F. Smith & Son, and his wife, Mary Smith, resided at this address and also indicates that Margaret Daniels was a cook employed at this address. In 1934, Charles H. F. Smith and Mary Shawe Smith resided at this address and were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the University Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul. The 1930 city directory indicates that Wharton C. Smith, associated with Charles H. F. Smith & Son, and his wife, Esther Smith, resided at 460 Portland Avenue. Crawford Livingston, Sr. (1811-1848,) the son of Moncrieffe Livingston and Francis Covert Livingston, was born in New York City, married Caroline C. Chapman, the daughter of William Chapman and Elizabeth Cothral Lambert Chapman, in 1833, and died in Livingston, Columbia County, New York. Crawford Livingston, Jr. (1848-1925,) the son of Crawford Livingston, Sr., and Caroline C. Chapman Livingston, was born in New York, attended the Albany Academy, Albany, New York, moved to Minnesota in 1870, settled in St. Paul, inherited a relatively modest share of the Livingston fortune, was the purchasing agent for the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad in St. Paul, built the Little Falls & Dakota RailRoad with Henry Villard, built and was an owner of the James River Valley RailRoad and the Duluth-Manitoba RailRoad, was a partner with A. B. Stickney in building the Minnesota Central RailRoad and the Chicago Great Western RailRoad, was the president of the lighting companies in St. Paul, was a director of the Merchants National Bank, was a director of the St. Paul Gas Company, was a trustee of the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company, was the president of the St. Paul Board of Water Commissioners, was a Democrat, was an Episcopalian, married Mary Steele Potts (1852-1925,) the daughter of Dr. Thomas Reed Potts (1810-1874) and Abbian/Anna Abby Steele Potts (1825- ,) in 1875, was a banker, a stockbroker, and a railroad builder, was one of the foremost regional railroad developers and utility tycoons, invested in several railroads, including the Northern Pacific RailRoad, returned to New York City, was a member of the Union Club, was a member of the Army and Navy Club, was a member of the Strollers' Club, was a member of the Thomasville, Georgia, Country Club, was a member of the Florida Shooting Club, and was a member of the Minnesota Club. In 1880, the Livingston household included Kate Halpin, a servant, William Jones, a gardener, Nora McKillips, a waitress, Josephine Rysk, a laundress, Mary Luysh, a cook, and Mary Anderson, a seamstress. Crawford Livingston, Jr., and Mary Steele Potts Livingston had five children, Crawford Livingston III (1875-1903/1904,) Mary Steele Livingston (1879- ,) Allie/Abbie Frances Livingston (1881- ,) Henry Walter Livingston (1880-1889,) and Gerald Moncrieffe Livingston (1883- .) Crawford Livingston, Jr., was among the initial investors in Livingston, Wells & Co. and in Livingston, Fargo & Company, two of the three firms which joined to form American Express in 1850. After an early career as a banker and broker in New York, Crawford Livingston headed West to St. Paul, where he became one of the foremost regional railroad developers and utility tycoons and was the president of the Saint Paul Gas Light Company. Crawford Livingston was a descendant of Robert Livingston, a Scotsman who came to the United States in the early 17th Century with a large land grant and the title "Lord of the Manor" from the British crown. Four generations later, his family would serve in the Revolution and help draft and sign the Declaration of Independence. In 1879, Crawford Livingston, a partner with William G. Wheeler in Livingston & Wheeler, money brokers located at 29 East Third Street, and an insurance agent, resided at 65 Iglehart Street. Livingston's wife, Mary Steele Potts Livingston, was the daughter of a niece of Henry Hastings Sibley, died in Biddleford, Maine, and was buried in Oakland Cemetery. The Crawford Livingston Theatre in St. Paul is named after him. Crawford Livingston III resided at 432 Summit Avenue in 1904. Mary Steele Livingston married Theodore Wright Griggs ( -1934) in 1915, was one of the founders of the Children's hospital, was associated with the Organization of the St. Paul Women's Work Exchange in 1926, was a member and a past president of the Women's City Club, was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, was a member of the Colonial Dames, was a member of the Colony Club of New York, was a member of the River Club of New York, was a member of the Somerset Country Club, was a member of the Everglades Club of Palm Beach, Florida, and was a member of the Bath and Tennis Club of Palm Beach, Florida. Charles Henry Francis Smith (1857-1937) was born in New York, came to St. Paul in 1883 and established a wholesale grocery business, became the first member of the New York Stock Exchange in the Northwest in 1890, was a founder of the American National Bank, married Mary Rosilla Shawe in 1891, was a director of the St. Paul & Northern Savings Bank, was a partner in Charles H. F. Smith & Son, investment bankers, was a co-receiver of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, served on a number of civic boards, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Town & Country Club, was a member of the University Club, and was chairman of the funding committee to build the Cathedral of St. Paul. Charles Henry Francis Smith and Mary Rosilla Shawe Smith had two children, Wharton C. Smith and Ruth A. Smith. In 1903, Charles H. F. Smith and A. B. Stickney offered to purchase the Kittson Mansion on Saint Anthony Hill, an ornate but neglected Victorian home, for use as the archiepiscopal residence by the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Archbishop John Ireland immediately rejected the offer, citing the frivolity of such an ornate home for a bishop's residence, but in 1904, Archbishop Ireland went back to Smith and H. C. McNair and informed them of his desire to build a great cathedral on the Kittson land. They immediately obtained the Kittson property and deeded it to the church. Mary Rosilla Shawe Smith's family was well-known in local musical circles and Elsie Shawe, a sister of Mary Shawe Smith, was a leader of the Schubert Club. John S. Prince, who was related by marriage to the Shawe family, was a businessman and was the mayor of St. Paul. Wharton C. Smith and F. Scott Fitzgerald reportedly bicycled to Hastings, Minnesota, and back one summer when Wharton Smith resided at this address. In 1919, Wharton C. Smith was the manager of Thomson & McKinnon, a brokerage firm. John Stoughtenburg Prince (1821-1895,) the son of Joseph Prince (1778-1833) and Charlotte Shattuck Osborne Prince and the stepson of Gabriel Franchere (1786-1862,) was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, was an agent of the American Fur Company in 1840, resided in Evansville, Indiana, married Emma Sarah Linck in 1844 in Evansville, Indiana, came to St. Paul in 1854, was an agent of the Pierre Chouteau/Choteau Fur Company of St. Louis, Missouri, built a saw mill in the Lowertown area, then engaged in the insurance, real estate and banking businesses, was a member of the Minnesota Constitutional Convention in 1857, was the mayor of St. Paul from 1860 until 1862 and from 1865 until 1866, was the president of the St. Paul Assessment Commission, was the president of the St. Paul Board of Public Works, was an incorporator of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, was an incorporator and a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad, was first the cashier and, after 1876, was the president of the Savings Bank of St. Paul, was a Roman Catholic, and died in St. Paul. John S. Prince and Emma Sarah Linck Prince were the parents of 12 children, Maria Prince, Francis Prince, John Frederick Prince, Charlotte (Sister Mary Evangelista) Prince, Antoinette Prince Morgan, Mary Prince (Mrs. J. C.) Markoe, Frances Prince, Joseph Prince, Emma Prince (Mrs. Frank) Bingham, Laura Prince, Grace Prince (Mrs. Louis N.) Chemidlin, and John Sibley Prince. John S. Prince resided at 487 East Eighth Street in 1895. Emma Sarah Linck Prince resided at 576 Holly Avenue in __?__. Charles H. F. Smith (1857-1937) was born in New York City, New York, was educated in the New York City, New York, public schools, was engaged in the retail grocery business in 1878, was engaged in the wholesale grocery business in 1882, was a merchandise broker in 1886, was a stocks and bonds broker in 1891, married Mary R. Shawe in 1891, was a member of the New York Stock Exchange in 1895, the first member in the Northwest, was a member of the Chicago Stock Exchange, was a member of the Chicago Board of Trade, was a member of the board of directors of the American National Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Northern Savings Bank, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town and Country Club, was a member of the American Bankers Association, was a member of the Minnesota Bankers Association, and officed at the Pioneer Press Building in 1907. Charles H. F. Smith ( -1937) and Mary S. Smith ( -1950) both died in Ramsey County. Wharton C. Smith (1896-1982) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Shawl, and died in Ramsey County. James Noonan is an arbitration, mediation, elder law, and estate planning lawyer. Jim Noonan and Ardis Noonan were members of the Cass Gilbert Society in 2006. [See note on Gilbert for 318 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See the note for the St. Paul & Sioux City RailRoad.] [See note on Alpheus B. Stickney for 846 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 297 Bates Avenue.] [See note on the St. Paul Gas Light Company for 761 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on the Schubert Club for 374-376-378 Maria Avenue.] [See the note for the Chicago & Northwestern RailRoad.] [See the note for the Little Falls & Dakota RailRoad.] [See the note for the Winona & St. Peter RailRoad.] [See the note for the Minnesota Central RailRoad.] [See the note for the Chicago Great Western RailRoad.] [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.]

340 Summit Avenue: Thomas B. Scott and Clare Scott House/George Thompson House/Margaret Forside and Ole Forside Residence: Built in 1894 (1895 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Beaux Arts/Italianate/Renaissance Revival in style; Allen Stem of Reed & Stem, architect. The structure is a two story, 9022 square foot, 17 room, 11 bedroom, five bathroom, stone house, with a detached garage. The house was built for $40,000. Italian Renaissance style elements are the window trim, the porch columns, the profile of the eaves and its general massing. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Scott resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Thomas B. Scott resided at this address from 1895 to 1899. Mrs. M. J. Barnum resided at the house in 1900. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that George Thompson resided at this address from 1900 to 1924. The 1910 city directory indicates that Abigail I. Thompson, vice president of the Pioneer Press and Dispatch Printing Company, and George Thompson, president of the Pioneer Press and Dispatch Printing Company, resided at this address. George Thompson (1840-1917) resided at this address in 1914. Joseph Stronge, of the Stronge-Warner Company, and Bernard H. Ridder (1883-1975), president of the St. Paul Dispatch and Pioneer Press, also lived at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mrs. Abigail I. Thompson resided at this address in 1917. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mrs. George Thompson and Mrs. Harry W. Fagley resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Abigail I. Thompson (1847-1923,) the widowed mother of Mrs. A. C. Jefferson, who was born in Vermont to parents who were born in the United States and who died of a carcinoma of the uterus, resided at this address in 1923. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. George Thompson resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Samuel Shepard resided at this address from 1925 to 1946. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel M. Shepard, with the W. A. Frost Mystic Company, and his wife, Charlotte H. Shepard, resided at this address. Samuel M. Shepard was a World War I veteran who resided at 421 Summit Avenue in 1919. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Ole Forside resided at this address from 1961 to 1983. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Gordon Shepard (1914- ,) who attended the school from 1925 until 1931, who graduated from Williams College in 1935, and who attended the Harvard Graduate Business School and the Yale University Law School, and MacMillan Shepard, who attended the school in 1928 and who attended Yale University, both resided at this address. Thomas Blythe Scott, Jr. (1863-1901,) the son of Thomas Blythe Scott and Ann Eliza Scott, was born at Grand Rapids, Wisconsin, was raised in Evanston, Illinois, attended the preparatory school of the Northwestern University, went to the Pennsylvania Military Academy, at Chester, Pennsylvania, in 1880, went to Boston in 1881 and attended Harvard University, but left in his Junior year in 1886, went to Iowa and ran a farming and cattle ranch in Franklin County, Iowa, until 1889, moved to Minnesota in 1889, was a delegate from Ramsey County to the National Republican League convention at Cleveland in 1895, married Mary Lee Clare, the daughter of William Clare and Mary H. Clare, at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1889, came to Minnesota in 1889 and began to deal in investment securities, was the president of the Northern Exchange Bank, was a director of the Merchants' National Bank, was a director of the Life Insurance Clearing Society, was a director of the Edison Electric Light & Power Company, was a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church, was a member of the Harvard Club of New York City, was a member of the Reform Club of New York City, was a Republican, and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Ramsey County (District 27) from 1897 until 1899. He also was a member of the Minnesota Club, the Commercial Club, the Town and Country Club, and the Nushka Club. Thomas Scott was president of the Life Insurance Clearing Company of St. Paul in 1896. Thomas Blythe Scott, Sr. (1828-1886,) was born in Scotland, came to the United States in 1836, spent his boyhood in New York state, in the early 1850's moved to the state of Wisconsin, assisted in building the Wisconsin Valley RailRoad, eventually a part of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad system, married Ann Eliza Scott, was president of the First National Bank, of Grand Rapids, Wisconsin, was a Wisconsin state senator for twelve years, moved to Merril, Wisconsin, in 1880, founded the T. B. Scott Lumber Company, and founded the First National Bank of Merril, Wisconsin. Joseph Stronge (1863- ,) the son of Samuel Stronge, a farmer residing near Dublin, Ireland, and Charlotte Sexton Stronge, was born in County Kildare, Ireland, was educated in the national schools of Ireland, came to America in 1882, first worked in Albany, New York, was employed in the milling business in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in 1883, was employed in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, in 1886, came to St. Paul in 1887, married Louise Williams of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in 1891, was a traveling salesman for the Oppenheimer Millinery Company until 1893, was engaged in wholesale millinery, established a millinery business in Rochester, Minnesota, established the Stronge Millinery Company in 1891, became a manufacturer of children's headware in St. Paul in 1892, was associated with the successor of the Stronge Millinery Company, the Stronge & Warner Company, resided at 502 Grand Avenue in 1907, and officed at the corner of Seventh Street and Minnesota Street in 1907. The Stronge family includes a number of prominent officers in the British army, some of whom served at the Battle of Waterloo, under Wellington, and the Sexton family included a leader of the Irish Parliamentary party in the British parliament. Joseph Stronge and Louise Williams Stronge had one son, Sidney Raymond Stronge. The Minnesota Pioneer was Minnesota's first newspaper, founded in 1849, and was a forerunner of the St. Paul Pioneer Press. Augustus J. Goodrich was the proprietor of the old St. Paul Pioneer, prior to its consolidation with the Press. Subsequently, Augustus Goodrich became secretary and treasurer of the St. Paul Gas Light Company. George Thompson (1840- ) was born in Devonshire, England, married Abigail __?__, dabbled in banking back in London, England, before migrating to the United States, moved to St. Paul in 1883, was the publisher of the St. Paul Dispatch, owned a 1914 Patek Philippe double dialed watch (No. 174,480) that was auctioned by Sotheby's in 2008, is credited with coming up with the idea in 1903 of a midwinter event, the St. Paul Winter Carnival, to refute the tag that St. Paul was "America's Siberia," and was the president of the Pioneer Press Company after 1909. The St. Paul Dispatch began in 1868. The Dispatch Printing Company was formed in 1885, when George Thompson purchased the St. Paul Dispatch. The Dispatch Printing Company bought the Pioneer Press in 1909, and continued to run the two newspapers separately. Charles K. Blandin (1872-1958) was hired as business manager for the Dispatch Printing Company just prior to World War I. In 1916, the Dispatch Printing Company bought the Itasca Paper Company to secure the newspapers' source of newsprint. Blandin bought a controlling interest in the Dispatch Printing Company in 1917 from George Thompson's widow, Abigail Thompson. Blandin acquired Abigail Thompson's remaining shares in the Dispatch Printing Company in 1923, upon her death, reorganized the Dispatch Printing Company into the Dispatch and Pioneer Press Company, and shifted incorporation from Minnesota to Delaware. Ridder Publications acquired the Pioneer Press and the Dispatch from Blandin in 1927 and the Dispatch and Pioneer Press Company became the Blandin Development Company, the parent corporation of the Blandin Paper Company, and the owner of its stock. The Pioneer Press and Dispatch newspapers merged in 1985 and became a morning-only daily in 1990. Charlotte Hardenbergh Shepard was a member of the Minnesota branch of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America by virtue of ancestor Joseph Stone. Joseph Stronge ( -1942) died in Ramsey County. Sidney R. Stronge (1893-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Williams, and died in Ramsey County. Florence J. Stronge (1904-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bailey, and died in Ramsey County. Louise Stronge (1869-1965) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Boyd, and died in Ramsey County. Abigail Ione Thompson ( -1923) and Samuel McMillan Shepard ( -1945) both died in Ramsey County. Charlotte Hardenbergh Shepard (1887-1971) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stone, and died in Ramsey County. Charles A. Reed (1858-1911) and Allen H. Stem (1856-1931) both came to St. Paul after beginning their careers further east. Through a connection with the New York Central Railroad, they received the commission for the Grand Central Station in New York City. They were also responsible for the designs of various depots, for the former West Publishing Company building, the St. Paul Civic Auditorium, Hotel St. Paul, the St. Paul Athletic Club, and the Reed and Stem double residence, all in St. Paul; Wulling Hall, University of Minnesota (Minneapolis;) and the White Bear Lake Yacht Club (1913,) White Bear Lake, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Robert V. Miller, who resides in River Falls, Wisconsin. [See note on the St. Paul Gas Light Company for 761 West Linwood Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See the note for the St. Paul Academy.] [See the note for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.]

344 Summit Avenue: Watson P. Davidson and Sarah Davidson House; Built in 1915 (Built in 1912 according to Tom Blanck and Charles Locks;) Gothic/Beaux Arts/Tudor Revival/Tudor Manor in style; Thomas Holyoke, architect. The three story, 18568 square foot, house was built for a cost of $40,000. The house has multi-pane windows, window hoods, a grand entrance arch, and typical Tudor chimneys. The front door and its molded arch, casement windows, and shingling are Gothic in styling. The proportion and shaping of the house are Beaux Arts in style. The trusses on the porte-cochere are Tudor in styling. The original house at this address was built for Samuel M. Magoffin, a lawyer, and was razed in 1914. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Watson P. Davidson resided at this address from 1916 to 1954. The 1900 federal census indicates that Watson P. Davidson (1872- ,) the son of Thomas Davidson and Cynthia Davidson and the head of household, who was born in Ohio to parents who were born in Ohio, his wife, Sarah Matilda Davidson (1875- ,) the daughter of William Fuson Davidson and Sarah Ann Johnston Davidson, who was born in Missouri to parents who were born in Ohio, his son, William F. Davidson (1897- ,) who was born in Minnesota, all resided in the Seventh Ward of St. Paul. The 1910 federal census indicates that Watson P. Davidson (1871- ,) the head of household, who was born in Ohio to parents who were born in Ohio, his wife, Sarah M. Davidson (1865- ,) who was born in Missouri to parents who were born in Ohio, his son, William P. Davidson (1900- ,) who was born in Minnesota, Cynthia Davidson (1905- ,) who was born in Minnesota, his daughter, K. Ann Davidson (1908- ,) who was born in Minnesota, his daughter, his son, Watson P. Davidson (1909- ,) who was born in Minnesota, Patrick H. Essert (1875- ,) a servant who was born in Indiana to parents born in Germany, Alice Fitzgerald (1892- ,) a servant who was born in Minnesota to parents born in Ireland, Ida Kranof (1886- ,) a servant who was born in Minnesota to a father born in Germany and a mother born in Austria, and William A. Woolson (1850- ,) a lodger who was born in Canada to a father born in Massachusetts and a mother born in Canada, all resided or boarded in the Seventh Ward of St. Paul. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Davidson and W. F. Davidson all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Watson P. Davidson, who officed at the Pioneer Building, resided at this address and that William F. Davidson, a student, boarded at this address. The 1920 federal census indicates that Watson P. Davidson (1872- ,) the head of household, who was born in Ohio to parents who were born in Ohio, his wife, Sarah M. Davidson (1875- ,) who was born in Missouri to parents who were born in Ohio, his son, William F. Davidson (1897- ,) who was born in Minnesota, his daughter, Sarah A. Davidson (1909- ,) who was born in Minnesota, his son, Watson P. Davidson (1910- ,) who was born in Minnesota, his son, Robert J. Davidson (1913- ,) who was born in Minnesota, Sophie Johnson (1860- ,) a servant who was born in Sweden to parents born in Sweden, and Anna Hoffman, a servant who was born in Minnesota to parents born in Luxemburg, all resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Davidson resided at this address. In 1934, Watson P. Davidson and Sarah Davidson resided at this address and were members of the Junior League. Watson Davidson was the president of Davidson Company, a real estate firm. Watson Pogue Davidson, Sr. (1870-1953,) was associated with the Davidson Company (1928-1976) and its predecessors (1890's-1920's,) which engaged largely in the rental of commercial office space, primarily in St. Paul, the Oregon & Western Colonization Company and its predecessors (1871-1977,) and the Manitoba Dairy Farms, Ltd. Ernest H. Davidson was W. P. Davidson's brother and William F. Davidson was W. P. Davidson's son. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Cynthia Davidson (1894-1918,) the daughter of Watson P. Davidson, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in the United States and who died of broncho pneumonia, resided at this address in 1918. World War I veteran William F. Davidson resided at this address in 1919. The 1930 city directory indicates that Watson P. Davidson, the president of the Davidson Company, a real estate company, resided at this address. Watson P. Davidson was the son-in-law of "Commodore" William Fuson "Fuse" Davidson, a steamboat captain and entrepreneur. Watson Pogue Davidson was the subject of the book authored by Cynthia J. Faryon ...The Dream: W. P. Davidson & The Davidson Era, La Broquerie, Manitoba, Prairie Gold Publishing, 2008, dealing with the settlement of Marchland, Manitoba. In 1910, the Rural Municipality of La Broquerie, Manitoba, was authorized by the Manitoba Legislative Assembly to enter into an agreement with Watson Pogue Davidson. The first Canadian Wildlife Management Area was named after Watson P. Davidson and was established in southeastern Manitoba in 1961. The Watson P. Davidson summer cottage on Isle Royale, Michigan, was designed by the architectural firm of Holyoke, Jemne & Davis in 1922. In 1961, the house became the School of the Associated Arts/College of Visual Arts. Founded in 1924, the College of Visual Arts is a private, four-year college of art and design, with an enrollment of approximately 260 students and a faculty of 54. Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., designed a retaining wall for this site in 1925 which was subsequently razed. William F. Davidson ( -1954) died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is the School of the Associated Arts. [See note for Samuel M. Magoffin for 345 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Commodore W. F. "Fuse" Davidson for 908 Mound Street.] [See note on Johnston for 476 Summit Avenue.]

345 Summit Avenue: Augustus K. Barnum House/Albert W. Lindeke House; Built in 1919 (1909 according to Sandeen and Larson;) Elizabethan/Tudor Villa in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., original architect, garage architect, and addition architect. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Unit #1 is a 3000 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, brick condominium, with the last sale in 2003 for $615,000, which is currently owned by Eric M. Kustritz. Unit #2 is a 1450 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, brick condominium, which was last sold in 1991 for $105,000, which is currently owned by Thomas R. Blanck and Linda M. Bjorkland. The construction cost of the house was $25,000 (Sandeen; $22,000 according to Larson.) Johnston designed a garage for this structure in 1913, at a cost of $5,000. Johnston additionally was retained to design an addition to the house, in 1916, at a cost of $14,000. The house replaced a prior residence at this address, the Augustus K. Barnum house, a Tuscan style villa that was moved to Irvine Park and ultimately razed in 1974. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Augustus K. Barnum resided at this address from 1880 to 1892. The 1885, 1887, 1889 and 1891 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Barnum resided at this address. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Barnum and Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Morton all resided at this address. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mrs. Josephine Barnum, Mr. and Mrs. N. Jungeblut, David Wallace, and Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Ovitt all resided at this address. The 1895 city directory also indicates that Bernard F. Kennedy, a clerk with the U. S. Engineers Office, boarded at this address. The 1897 Catalogue of the Legal Fraternity of Phi Delta Phi, edited by George Anthony Katzenberger and published by the Inland Press of Ann Arbor, Michigan, indicates that David Wallace, an 1896 graduate of Purdue University, a proconsul from 1895 until 1897, and associated with Hadley & Armstrong, resided at this address as well as 21 Floral Street. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Justus B. Rice (1831-1898,) who died on pneumonia, and Eliza G. Rice, husband and wife, resided at this address in 1898. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Caroline Gotzian resided at this address from 1902 to 1904, that the initial house at this address was moved from this location in 1904, and that Albert W. Lindeke was the resident of the second house at this address from 1909 to 1971. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Albert William Lindeke resided at this address. The 1918 and 1924 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. Lindeke resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Albert W. Lindeke, the manager of Scott, Burrows & Christie, and his wife, Caroline Lindeke, resided at this address. In 1934, Albert W. Lindeke, Caroline Saunders Lindeke, Mary Lindeke, and Albert Lindeke all resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Albert W. Lindeke, Jr. (1914- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1925 until 1932, who was a 1936 graduate of Yale University, and who was employed by the Weyerhaeuser Timber Company, resided at this address. Albert W. Lindeke (1873- ,) was the son of A. H. Lindeke, was educated in the St. Paul public schools, graduated from high school in 1890, graduated from Yale College in 1894, graduated from the St. Paul Law School in 1900, was admitted to the practice of law in 1900, but never practiced law, was a merchant, engaged with the firm of Lindeke, Warner & Sons, a wholesale dry goods firm, in 1894, became a member of Lindeke, Warner & Sons in 1898, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Roosevelt Club, was a member of the Amateur Athletic Association, resided at 295 Summit Avenue in 1907, and officed at Fourth Street and Sibley Street in 1907. Augustus Kirby Barnum (1848-1923) was the youngest son of Dr. Augustus Barnum (1801-1843/1807-1853) and Allie Miller Barnum (1826-1898,) was born in Alabama, moved with his mother from Greene County, Alabama, to St. Paul before 1861, married Josephine Thompson (c.1851-c.1922) of Georgia, and went into real estate. Augustus Kirby Barnum and Josephine Thompson Barnum were the parents of two children, Edith J. Barnum (Mrs. Henry) Meyers (1879-after 1923) and Edmund Kirby Barnum (1881-after 1923.) In 1892, Augustus K. Barnum initiated a lawsuit in state court to quiet title for a portion of St. Paul originally dedicated by Congress as school land and eventually conveyed to private parties under subsequent Congressional legislation, which was resolved by the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals in Dunn v. Barnum, 51 F1 355, unfavorably to Barnum because the title, initially invalid but validated by subsequent legislation, was later conveyed in the prior chain on a fraudulent basis as evidenced by grossly insufficient consideration. David Barnum (1843- ,) the oldest son of Dr. Augustus Barnum and Allie Miller Barnum, was appointed to the Naval Academy at Anapolis, Maryland, in 1858, dropped out of the U. S. Naval Academy in 1861 after the American Civil War began, joined Company I of the Fifth Alabama Infantry, the Greensboro Guards, was wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines, was captured by the U. S. Army in 1862 at the battle of South Mountain, was paroled, served as acting master and then master in the Confederate States Navy at Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, in 1862 and 1863, returned to the Fifth Alabama Infantry in 1864, and swore the Oath of Allegiance to the U. S. goverment in Chattanooga, Tennessee, at the conclusion of the Civil War in 1865. David Barnum was the author of Augustus McLaughlin, vs. David Barnum and Augustus K. Barnum, an infant, by Girart Hewitt, his next friend, published in 1869. Albert William Lindeke was the son of Albert H. Lindeke, was an 1898 University of Minnesota Law School graduate, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the University Club, was a partner in Lindekes, Warner & Schurmeier, a wholesale dry goods firm, and officed at Fourth Street and Broadway Street in 1916. N. B. Jungeblut resided at 712 West Osceola Avenue in 1897. Albert W. Lindeke was a graduate of Yale University and Caroline Saunders Lindeke was a graduate of Smith College. The Lindeke family were members of the Somerset Club, the Minneapolis Club, the Minikahda Club, the Yale Club, the Century Club, and the Women's City Club of St. Paul in 1934. In 1908-1909, Caroline Saunders Lindeke, Class of 1901, was the vice president of the St. Paul and Minneapolis Club of Smith College alumnae. Albert B. Ovitt was a lawyer in Ramsey County before 1899. A. B. Ovitt officed at Brackett's Block in Minneapolis in 1879. In 1887, A. B. Ovitt was the treasurer of the Hennepin County Junior Bar Association. Albert B. Ovitt (1855-1916) was born in Fairfield, Vermont, studied law at the University of Minnesota, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota, was a lawyer practicing in St. Paul, was the legal counsel for the Minnesota Accident Insurance Company in 1897, was the chief counsel of the Minnesota Division of the League of American Wheelman in 1897, was a member of the governing board of the Minnesota School for the Feeble-minded and Colony for Epileptics in Faribault, Rice County, Minnesota, in 1898, moved to New York, was a Deputy Assistant Corporation Counsel in New York City, New York, was the receiver for the bankrupt Security Trust and Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1903, was the receiver for the bankrupt American Union Life Insurance Company of New York, New York, in 1908, was a member of the board of governors of the Hamilton Grange Lawn Tennis Club in 1909, died in New York City, New York, and left a widow and two children. Louise Yates (Mrs. Albert B.) Ovitt, the step-daughter of Col. __?__ Waring, sued for divorce from Albert B. Ovitt in 1900 based on desertion, since A. B. Ovitt moved to New York City, New York, leaving her and her mother in St. Paul. Caroline Gotzian ( -1913,) Eliza Garland Rice ( -1919,) Augustus K. Barnum ( -1923,) Albert H. Lindeke ( -1925,) Josephine Barnum ( -1935,) and David Wallace ( -1941) all died in Ramsey County. Albert W. Lindeke (1873-1961) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Caroline Saunders Lindeke (1879-1973) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Proal, and died in Ramsey County. W. S. Morton ( -1923) died in Swift County, Minnesota. Bernard Kennedy ( -1920) died in Cass County, Minnesota. Thomas R. Blanck, RA, is an architect, is a founder of the Cass Gilbert Society, is an architectural consultant for St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Virginia, Minnesota, and is an advisor to the Capitol Area Architectural and Planning Board. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Samuel M. Magoffin resided at the former nearby 350 Summit Avenue from 1887 to 1896. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles Wesley Hackett (1832-1903,) the husband of Mira Holt Hackett, who was born in the United States of parents also born in the United States and who died of cancer of the rectum, resided at the former nearby 350 Summit Avenue in 1903. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mira Holt Hackett (1829-1910,) the widowed mother of Mrs. Horace B. Gates, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of a fatty degeneration of the heart, resided at the nearby former 350 Summit Avenue in 1910. Mira Holt Hackett was the wife of Charles W. Hackett (1831- ,) who was born in New Hampshire, came to Minnesota in 1856, settled in Lake City, Minnesota, and engaged in general merchandising, was register of deeds of Wabasha County, Minnesota, from 1860 to 1864, was Captain of Company C of the Tenth Minnesota Infantry, organized the Lake City, Minnesota, Bank in 1867, moved to St. Paul in 1872 and engaged in the hardware business, was a member of the State Board of Equalization from 1895 to 1897, was a member of the Jobbers' Union, and has been vice president of the St. Paul National Bank. Samuel M. Magoffin (1859- ) was the son of Beriah Magoffin (1815-1885,) a former Governor of Kentucky, and Anne N. Shelby Magoffin, graduated from Centre College in 1878, and moved to St. Paul. Samuel M. Magoffin resided at 344 Summit Avenue before 1914. The 1930 city directory indicates that Samuel M. Magoffin resided at 540 Summit Avenue. Horace B. Gates resided at 659 Summit Avenue from 1887 to 1893. Horace B. Gates ( -1940) died in Ramsey County. [See note on Johnston for 476 Summit Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.]

353 Summit Avenue: William B. Dean and Mary Dean House; Built in 1882; Altered Queen Anne in style. The house was constructed for $15,000. It was remodelled around 1900. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that William B. Dean resided at this address from 1881 to 1923. The 1885, 1887, and 1889 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. William B. Dean and their daughters all resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Dean, their daughters, and William J. Dean all resided at this address. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Dean, their daughter, and W. J. Dean all resided at this address. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Dean and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that William B. Dean and Mary C. (Mrs. W. B.) Dean, members of the church since 1864, Helen Dean, a member since 1901, and William J. Dean, a member since 1887, all resided at this address. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that William B. Dean resided at this address. In 1916, William Blake Dean was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William B. Dean resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Loella Dean de Forest (1864-1920,) the wife of Stephen H. de Forest, who was born in Pennsylvania to parents born in the United States and who died of acute pericarditis, resided at this address in 1920. The 1920 city directory indicates that William B. Dean resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that William Blake Dean (1838-1922,) the widower father of William J. Dean, who was born in Pennsylvania to parents who were born in the United States and who died of senile broncho pneumonia, resided at this address in 1922. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Archibald MacLaren (1858-1924,) the husband of Katherine D. MacLaren, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in the United States and who died of femoral bi-lateral embolism, resided at this address in 1924. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mrs. S. B. Dean resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Mrs. Katherine MacLaren, the widow of Arch MacLaren, resided at this address. William Blake Dean (1838-1922) was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the son of Captain William Dean and Aurelia Butler Dean, received his education in the Pittsburgh public schools, at Bolman's Academy/Bolmar's Boarding School for Boys in West Chester, Pennsylvania, and at Washington and Jefferson College, Washington, Pennsylvania, arrived in St. Paul in 1855 or 1856 and became a bookkeeper for the wholesale iron and hardware firm of Nicols & Berkey, was a merchant, succeeded Berkey in the partnership and the firm became Nicols & Dean (later Nicols, Dean & Gregg) in 1860, was a member of the board of directors of Nicols, Dean & Gregg, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie (Soo Line) Railway Company from 1895 until 1901, was a member of the board of directors of the Great Northern Railway Company from 1901 until 1922, was a member of the board of directors of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Oakland Cemetery Association, was a member of the board of directors of the McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago, was a member of the board of directors of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, was a member of the board of directors of the Second National Bank of St. Paul, was a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern Trust Company, was president of the Second National Bank of St. Paul from 1912 until 1913, was president of the St. Paul Plow Works, was a trustee of the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls RailRoad Company from 1878 until 1885, was a federal government inspector of the Northern Pacific Railroad in 1883, was involved in the Rochester & St. Paul Railway Company incorporation in 1886, was a member of the National Monetary Commission at Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1897, served in the Minnesota State Senate from 1891 until 1895 representing Ramsey County (District 27) as a Citizen's Party member-Republican, where he authored legislation for construction of a new capitol building in 1893, served as presidential elector on the Blaine & Logan ticket in 1884, was a member of the St. Paul city charter commission in 1897, was also a captain in the 31st Regiment of Minnesota state militia, was a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church from 1864 until 1922, and was elected as a trustee in 1863, was ordained as an elder in 1874, was the St. Paul Presbytery's commissioner to the Presbyterian General Assembly and a delegate to the Pan-Presbyterian Council in Scotland in 1913, served on an advisory committee to aid Archbishop John Ireland with his real estate holdings in 1896, was also a member and officer of the St. Paul School Board, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was president of the Ramsey County Pioneers in 1885, was a member of the St. Paul Library Board, was a member of the St. Paul Board of Fire Commissioners, was a member of the St. Paul Water Board, was a member of the St. Paul Board of Education, was a member of the St. Paul Public Library Board, was a member of the St. Paul Institute of Arts, was a member of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the St. Paul Jobbers Union, was a member of the Ramsey County Pioneers, was a member of the St. Paul Businessmen's Association, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, officed at the building on the corners of Eighth Street, Sibley Street and Temperance Street, and died in St. Paul. William Blake Dean married Mary Katherine/Catherine Nicols, the daughter of his partner, John Nicols, in St. Paul in 1860 and the couple had eight children, Caroline Nicols Dean (Mrs. Charles Edgar) Haupt (1861-1930,) Aurelia Butler Dean (Mrs. Stephen H.) de Forest (1863-1920,) Alice Meeker Dean (Mrs. John N.) Jackson (1866- ,) Mary Katherine Dean (Mrs. A.) McLaren (1867- ,) William John Winter Dean (1869- ; wife Laura C. Dean,) Georgia Dean (Mrs. Charles C.) Clark (1873- ,) Sidney Butler/Butiel Dean (1879- ; wife Marjorie Dean,) and Helen Dean (Mrs. Frank) Lightner (1881- .) William Blake Dean, the son of William Dean and Aurelia Butler Dean and grandson of John Dean and Elizabeth Duck Dean, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great grandfather Philip Duck, a Corporal in the Fifth Pennsylvania Battalion during the Revolutionary War. William John Dean, the son of William Blake Dean and Mary Katharine Nicols Dean, the grandson of John Nicols and Caroline Meeker Nicols, the grandson of William Dean and Aurelia Butler Dean, and the great grandson of Obadiah Meeker and Jerusha Cook Harrison Meeker, was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of great great grandfathers Obadiah Meeker, a Cornet in New Jersey Troops, and Philip Duck, a Corporal in the Lancaster County Pennsylvania Militia, during the Revolutionary War. William John Dean (1869/1870-1941,) the son of William Blake Dean and Mary Katharine Nicols Dean, was born in St. Paul, attended the St. Paul public schools until 1885, attended the Hill School at Pottstown, Pennsylvania, from 1885 until 1887, was an office boy employed by Nicols, Dean & Gregg, whole sale heavy hardware, in 1887, married Laura Cannon Winter (1870-1968,) the daughter of Edwin Wheeler Winter, in St. Paul in 1894, was a hardware merchant, became a partner of Nicols, Dean & Gregg in 1894, was the secretary-treasurer of Nicols, Dean & Gregg when it incorporated in 1906, was the vice president of the Faith/Faeth Iron Company of Kansas City, Missouri, in 1903, was the manager of the Pocahontas Binding Works of Pocahontas, Arkansas, a subsidiary of Nicols, Dean & Gregg, was a Republican, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Nushka Club, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Sons of the Revolution, officed at the corners of Eighth Street, Sibley Street, and Temperance Street in 1907, and resided at 514 Grand Avenue/Grand Hill in 1907. Laura Dean Kaltenbach was the author of Here we are: The descendants of William John Dean and Laura Winter Dean. Charles W. Hackett (1831- ) was born in New Hampshire, came to Minnesota in 1856, settled in Lake City, Wabasha County, Minnesota, and engaged in general merchandising, was the postmaster of Central Point, Goodhue County, Minnesota, in 1856, was register of deeds of Wabasha County, Minnesota, from 1860 to 1864, enlisted in the Tenth Minnesota Infantry Regiment in 1862 and became captain of Company C, was mustered out in 1864, moved to St. Paul in 1872 and engaged in the hardware business in one of the largest wholesale houses in the Nothwest, the Hackett, Gates, Hurty Company, organized the Lake City, Minnesota, Bank in 1867, married Miss Mira Holt in 1853 and the couple had two daughters, was a member of the State Board of Equalization from 1895 to 1897, also was a member of the Jobbers' Union, and was the vice president of the St. Paul National Bank for many years. Dr. Archibald MacLaren graduated from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1883, served as an intern at the Woman's Hospital from 1883 until 1885, settled in St. Paul in 1885, became the chief of staff of St. Luke's Hospital and associate attending surgeon of the University of Minnesota Hospital, was a partner in the medical practice of MacLaren, Ritchie & Daugherty, and was professor of surgery of the University of Minnesota Medical School. In 1904, MacLaren published a paper entitled "Inflamation of the Gall Bladder and the Billary Passages" in the Transactions of the Minnesota State Medical Association. Mary Katherine Dean McLaren (1868- ) was born in St. Paul, the daughter of William B. Dean and Mary K. Nicols Dean, graduated from Miss Anable's School of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1888, married Archibald MacLaren in 1889, was a trustee of the Associated Charities of St. Paul, was the president of the King Daughter's Aid Society, was the superintendent of the Primary Department of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church Sunday School, was a member of the St. Paul Young Women's Christian Association, was a member of the Women's Welfare League, was a member of the Civic League, was a member of the Century Club, and was a member of the City Club of St. Paul, was a Presbyterian, favored woman's suffrage in 1915, and was listed in the 1915 Woman's Who's who of America assembled by John William Leonard. Archibald MacLaren and Mary Katherine Dean McLaren had three children, Margaret MacLaren, Katherine Dean MacLaren, and Archibald Dean MacLaren. In 1915, Mary Katherine Dean McLaren resided at 412 Holly Avenue. Sidney Butler Dean (1879- ) was born in St. Paul, prepared for college at the Hill School, Pottstown, Pennsylvania, was an 1899 or 1900 graduate of Yale University, was the business manager for the Yale Courant in 1900, was employed by Nelson, Dean & Gregg, iron merchants, was indicted in 1917 with 37 other manufacturers and jobbers of automobile supplies by a federal grand jury under the Sherman Anti-Trust Act for restraining trade, was a World War I veteran who resided at 514 Grand Avenue in 1919, resided at 29 Summit Court in 1920, and resided at 1815 Portland Avenue in 1930. Miss Anable's School For Young Ladies was located at the corner of Broad Street and Pine Street in Philadelphia, was established by Miss A. M. Anable in 1848, was originally named Miss Anable's English, French, and German Boarding and Day School for Young Ladies, was Philadelphia's oldest school for girls, offered a college preparatory course of study with advance courses in history, literature, and and general culture, was operated by Isabelle Anble in 1899, and cost $500-$600 for books and tuition in 1899. Aurelia Dean ( -1913,) Mary Catherine Dean ( -1920,) Loela De Forest ( -1920,) William B. Dean ( -1922,) Archibald MacLaren ( -1924,) Frank Waterman Lightner ( -1928,) William J. Dean ( -1941,) Charles Edgar Haupt ( -1942,) Alice Dean Jackson ( -1954,) and Alice M. Jackson ( -1954,) all died in Ramsey County. Georgia Dean Clark (1873-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Clar, and died in Ramsey County. William J. Dean ( -1910) and Charles C. Clark ( -1954) both died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is EMK Development Company LLC, located at 500 Grand Hill. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Mary W. Otis resided at the nearby former 354 Summit Avenue from 1886 to 1916. In 1894, Caroline Otis Wallace, the widow of U. S. Cavalry Lieutenant George Wallace, lived at the former nearby 354 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Charles Wesley Hackett and Mira Holt Hackett resided at the former nearby 350 Summit Avenue in 1903. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Mary J. Monfort (1833-1905,) the widowed mother of Frederick D. Monfort, who was born in the United States to parents also born in the United States and who died of arteriosclerosis, resided at the former 354 Summit Avenue in 1905. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Frederick D. Monfort, a member of the church since 1900, resided at the nearby former 354 Summit Avenue. Little Sketches of Big Folks indicates that Frederick D. Monfort resided at the former nearby 354 summit Avenue. The 1915 Woman's Who's who of America, compiled by John William Leonard and published by The American Commonwealth Company of New York, indicates that Adele Harwood Bloss (Mrs. Frederick Delos) Monfort resided at the former nearby 354 Summit Avenue. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Monfort resided at the former nearby 354 Summit Avenue. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Ford resided at the former nearby 354 Summit Avenue. Adele Harwood Bloss Monfort (1884- ) was born in New York City, New York, the daughter of Adelbert Clinton Bloss, a manager of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and Julia Clarissa Shea Bloss, was educated by a governess until 1896, attended Mrs. Leslie Morgan's School for Girls in New York City from 1896 until 1901, married Frederick Delos Monfort, the vice president of the Second National Bank, in New York City in 1906, supported woman's suffrage, was a Protestant Episcopalian, supported the Progressive Party in 1912, was the assistant secretary of the Board of Lady Managers of the St. Paul Free Medical Dispensary, was a genealogist, was a member of the Women's Welfare League of St. Paul, was a member of the St. Paul Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, was a member of the St. Paul Colony of New England Women, was a member of the Ely Club of Ely School, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, and was a member of the Minnesota Federation of Women's Clubs, and pursued the hobbies of golfing, singing, dancing, and fencing. Frederick Delos Monfort (1878-1932) was born in St. Paul, the son of Delos A. Monfort and Mary J. Edgerton Monfort and the grandson of Erastus Monfort and Sophronia Willis Edgerton, attended the St. Paul High School, was an 1892 graduate of Cornell University, resided at 282 Dayton Avenue in 1898, married Adele Harwood Bloss of Bloss, New York, in 1906, was a banker, was employed as a clerk by the Second National Bank of St. Paul from 1892 until 1894, was employed as the cashier by the Second National Bank of St. Paul from 1894 until 1900, was the vice president of the Second National Bank of St. Paul from 1900 until 1910, was a member of the board of directors of the Lumbermen's National Bank of Stillwater, Minnesota, inherited a fortune, purchased the commercial paper brokerage business of F. W. Dean, was a Republican, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the Beta Theta Pi college fraternity, was a member of the St. Paul Creditmen's Club, was a member of the Northwest Cornell Club, was a Mason, was a Knight Templar, was a Shriner, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Roosevelt Republican Club of St. Paul, was a member of the Minnesota Boat Club, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of his maternal grandfather, Captain William Douglas, who fought at the Battle of Bennington, Vermont, and his maternal greatgrandfather, Colonel Solomon Willis, who fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill, officed at the New York Life Building in 1907, officed at the Security Bank Building in Minneapolis in 1911, was a commercial paper broker in 1916, officed at the Germania Life Building in 1916, moved to New York City, New York, in 1917, separated from Adele Harwood Bloss Monfort in 1922, resided in Rome, Italy, after 1927, had the hobbies of fencing, driving, and walking, and died in Rome, Italy. Frederick Delos Monfort and Adele Harwood Bloss Monfort had one child, Claire Edgerton Monfort (1908- .) Delos Abram Monfort (1835-1899) was born in Hamden, Delaware County, New York, moved to St. Paul in 1857, was elected a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1858, was cashier of E. S. Edgerton's old People's Bank, was the cashier of the Edgerton & Mackubin bank until 1860, married Mary Jane Edgerton (1834-1905,) the daughter of Erastus Edgerton (1783-1837) and Sophronia Willis Edgerton (1794-1869,) in 1860, was cashier of the Second National Bank, the successor to the People's Bank, in 1865, was the attorney for the Northern Pacific RailRoad, moved to Bismarck, Dakota Territory, and practiced law there, moved to Havre, Montana, in 1890 and practiced law there, returned to St. Paul again as cashier of the Second National Bank, and died in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Delos A. Monfort became the Commander of the Sir Knights of Damascus in St. Paul in 1876. In 1886, Colonel Delos Monfort was the first Fire King Coal, the opponent of King Boreas during the Saint Paul Winter Carnival. Delos Abram Monfort and Mary Jane Edgerton had two children, Florence Monfort (1863- ) and Frederick Delos Monfort (1868- .) Claire Edgerton Monfort Giorgi was a granddaughter of Delos A. Monfort and married an Italian citizen, Ottavio Giorgi. Erastus Smith Edgerton (1816-1893) was born in Franklin, New York, married Eliza Cannon (1822-1895,) the daughter of Benjamin Cannon and Persis Cannon, in 1844, was a deputy sheriff of Delaware County, New York, moved to St. Paul in 1853, opened a bank in partnership with the late Charles N. Mackubin in 1854, owned the People's Bank, invested in several other banks, organized in 1865 and was the president of the Second National Bank of St. Paul, died in Franklin, New York, and is buried at Ouleout Valley Cemetery, Franklin, Delaware County, New York. [See note on Lieutenant George Wallace for 226 Summit Avenue.] [See note for Charles Edgar Haupt for 2647 East Lake of the Isles Parkway.] [See note for Sidney Butler Dean for 29 Summit Court.] [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the St. Paul, Stillwater & Taylors Falls RailRoad.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note for the Hackett, Gates, Hurty Company for 454 North Smith Avenue.] [See note for the Nushka Club for 400 Summit Avenue.] [See the note the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) for 198 Western Avenue North.] [See note on the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 297 Bates Avenue.]

360 Summit Avenue: Former Edward H. Cutler House and Carriage Barn; Built in 1915 according to the Ramsey County property tax records; 1969 conversion by Walter Fricke of an 1875 carriage barn; Joseph Michaels, architect. The house and carriage barn were built in 1875 and remodeled following a design prepared by Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., in 1886. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Edward H. Cutler resided at this address from 1875 to 1968. The 1885, 1887, 1889, 1891, and 1893 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Cutler and Miss A. H. Dunbar all resided at this address. The 1891 city directory also indicates that Annie Hurley was a domestic who was employed at this residence. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Cutler resided at this address. The 1910 city directory indicates that Bertha Ruesch was a cook employed at this residence. In 1916, Edward Hutchins Cutler was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Lucy Dunbar Cutler (1849-1918,) the wife of Edward H. Cutler, who was born in Massachusetts to parents born in the United States and who died of breast cancer, resided at this address in 1918. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Cutler and their daughters resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Edward H. Cutler resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that E. H. Cutler and his daughter resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Edward H. Cutler resided at this address. In 1972-1973, Leonard Fricke, a Sophomore at Macalester College, resided at this address. The house was razed in 1968, but parts of the former house were used in the one story, 1127 square foot, five room, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, carriage barn renovation. Edward H. Cutler was a partner with Daniel Rogers Noyes and Charles P. Noyes in a wholesale drug house, Noyes Brothers & Cutler. Edward Hutchins Cutler (1848- ,) the son of William Jonathan Cutler and Lucia Washburn Cutler, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, attended Boston Phillips, Boston Latin, and Brookline High Schools, moved to Minnesota with his ill brother in 1863, resided on a farm a few miles from St. Paul until 1867, studied under private tutors, made extended trip to Europe, moved to St. Paul in 1870, was a wholesale druggist, joined the Noyes Brothers wholesale drug company, became a partner in the firm in 1871 with Charles P. Noyes, Winthrop G. Noyes, C. Reinold Noyes, William W. Cutler, and Thomas E. Ludington in the renamed Noyes Brothers & Cutler, wholesale jobbing and manufacturing druggists, married Lucy Carter Dunbar, the daughter of William Harrison Dunbar and Amelia Hobart Dunbar, in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1872, was a director of the First National Bank of St. Paul, was a member of the Minnesota National Guard for three years, resided at the former 209 Summit Avenue in 1880, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was an original member of the Minnesota Boat Club, was a member of the New Jerusalem (Swedenborgian) Church, was the treasurer of the St. Paul Society of the New Jerusalem Church, and officed at 396-408 Sibley Street in 1907. Lucy Carter Dunbar Cutler, the daughter of William Harrison Dunbar and Amelia Hobart Dunbar, was born in Boston, Massachusetts. Edward H. Cutler and Lucy Carter Dunbar Cutler had six children, William Washburn Cutler (1873- ,) Amelia Dunbar Cutler (1875- ,) Emily Wooldridge Cutler (1876- ,) Mary Hale Cutler (Mrs. Howard H.) Sargent, Elinor H. Cutler, Ruth Cutler, and Lucia Washburn Cutler (1879- .) William Washburn Cutler (1873-1948,) the son of Edward Hutchins Cutler and Lucy Carter Dunbar, was born in St. Paul, was educated in the public schools of St. Paul, attended Brown & Nichol's School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, graduated from Harvard College in 1894 and from the Harvard Law School in 1897, was employed on a survey crew in Montana by the Great Northern RailRoad, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1898, initially practiced law, married Martha Carter (1876-1923) of Newtonville, Massachusetts in 1900, traveled in California and Colorado from 1900 until 1901, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Roosevelt Club, resided at this address in 1903, resided at 993 Goodrich Avenue in 1907, officed at the Pioneer Press Building in 1907, discontinued the practice of law on account of ill health, joined Noyes Brothers & Cutler, wholesale druggists, in 1911, was the secretary and treasurer of Noyes Brothers & Cutler in 1915, was a member of the executive council of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1916, resided at 91 Crocus Place in 1919, officed at 396 Sibley Street in 1919, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the Harvard Club of St. Paul, was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, was a member of the Harvard Union Club of Cambridge, Massachusetts, and died in St. Paul. William Washburn Cutler and Martha Carter Cutler were the parents of four children, Edward Hutchins Cutler (1903-1989,) Lydia Augusta Cutler (Mrs. Ernst Joseph) Schrader (1905-1995,) Henry Harrington Cutler (1908-1995,) and Lucy Cutler (1912-1912.) The Cutler burial plot at Oakland Cemetery includes the graves of Edward Hutchins Cutler (1848-1955) and his wife, Lucy Carter Dunbar Cutler (1848-1918.) Winthrop G. Noyes graduated from Yale University in 1891, was a merchant, and became a member of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church in 1883. Walter Wesley Fricke was a 1907 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. Walter Fricke was an alternate from St. Paul to the 1960 Republican National Convention. Walter Wesley Fricke, Jr., was the author of A climbers guide to the Rocky Mountain National Park area, published in Boulder, Colorado, in 1971. Lucy Carter Cutler ( -1918) and Edward Hutchins Cutler ( -1935) both died in Ramsey County. Walter Wesley Fricke (1912-1991) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Kepner, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are the trustees Leonard S. Fricke and Lucy S. Fricke, located at 200 Mississippi River Boulevard. [See note on the Great Northern RailRoad.] [See note on the St. Paul Commercial Club for 505 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.]

361 Summit Avenue: Donald S. Culver House; Built in 1912 (1911 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Elizabethan/Tudor Revival in style; Peter J. Linhoff, architect. The structure is a two story, 5479 square foot, 15 room, seven bedroom, five bathroom, brick house, with a detached garage. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles S. Bunker resided at this address from 1882 to 1896. The first house built on this lot was moved to 506 Summit Avenue in 1912. The present house at this address was constructed for $12,000. The 1885, 1887, and 1889 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Bunker and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1891 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Bunker, their daughter, Charles M. Bunker, and C. G. Bunker all resided at this address. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Bunker, their daughter, Charles M. Bunker, C. G. Bunker, and Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Powers all resided at this address. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Bunker, Charles M. Bunker, and C. G. Bunker all resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Culver resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Donald S. Culver resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Culver resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Donald S. Culver and his wife, Bertha C. M. Culver, resided at this address. In 1934, Donald S. Culver and Merriam-Bertha Constans Culver resided at this address. Merriam-Bertha Constans Culver was a member of the daughter of the American Revolution. The Constans burial plot at Oakland Cemetery included the graves of William Constans (1829-1915,) Bertha V. F. Constans (1841-1928,) Edmund H. Constans (1873-1929,) W. F. Constans (1870-1913,) Bernard M. Culver (1873-1951,) Erne Constans Culver (1878-1965,) Otto E. Constans (1882-1958,) Gladys Kincaid Constans (1888-1918,) Ellen G. Johnson (1847-1929,) and Gilbert Johnson (1845-1933.) In 1876, C. S. Bunker was the general agent of the Miller's Association of Minneapolis. In 1880, Charles S. Bunker, who had been a member of the National Guard in New York before moving to St. Paul, formed the "St. Paul Guards" with William B. Bend, Thomas Cochran, W. H. Oxley, John P. Larkin, and E. S. Chittenden, and was the first Captain of Company A. The St. Paul Guards became the First Regiment of the Minnesota National Guard. In 1889, Lieutenant Colonel C. S. Bunker was an Assistant Adjutant General for the State of Minnesota under Brigadier General John H. Mullen. In 1894, General Charles Bunker of St. Paul was a member, along with E. A. Hough, J. H. Burwell, D. H. Moon, P. H. Kelly, G. R. Finch, and L. F. Stone, of a committee formed to take charge of relief work for the victims of the Hinckley, Mission Creek, and Pokegama, Pine County, Minnesota, forest fire. In 1900, Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Bunker, C. M. Bunker, and C. G. Bunker resided at 776 Fairmount Avenue. Charles Max Bunker (1878-1958) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Harris, and died in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. Donald S. Culver (1967-1961) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Bertha C. Culver (1877-1960) had a mother with a maiden name of von Frankenberg and died in Ramsey County. Gladys Kincaid Constans ( -1918) and Edmund H. Constans ( -1928) died in Ramsey County. Otto E. Constans (1882-1958) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Von Frakenberg, and died in Ramsey County. Peter J. Linhoff (1877-1954) was born in Shakopee, Minnesota, moved to St. Paul in about 1903 and practiced there until 1940. During his architectural practice, Linhoff designed many fine residences in the Crocus Hill area of St. Paul. Linhoff was in practice alone with the exception of a brief partnership with Louis Lockwood in 1908. Linhoff died in St. Paul. The current owners of record of the property are Eric M. Lien and Laurel H. Lien. [See note for William Constans and the Constans family for 465 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Peter J. Linhoff.]

362-364 Summit Avenue: Built in 1977; Contemporary condominium in style; Design Consultants, builder and architect. Unit #1-East is a 1900 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, stucco condominium, which was last sold in 1996 for $190,000, which is currently owned by Robert K. Grennier and Dan C. Hanson. Unit #2-East is a 1669 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, stucco condominium, which was last sold in 1992 for $183,200, which is currently owned by Jane C. Tschida and Paul J. Tschida. Unit #1-West is a 2222 square foot, two bedroom, three bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco condominium, which is currently owned by Mary S. Wilson and Perry M. Wilson III. Unit #2-West is a 1748 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, stucco condominium, which was last sold in 2001 for $300,000, which is currently owned by Audrey I. Schweitzer and Phillip J. Schweitzer. Paul J. Tschida is an Assistant Vice President in the Department of Health and Safety at the University of Minnesota, was a 1951 graduate of Cretin High School, was formerly the Minnesota Commissioner of Public Safety, and is the Vice Chair of the Minnesota Council on Crime and Justice.

365 Summit Avenue: Mrs. J. W. Bass House/Frank B. Bass House/Griggs House; Built in 1885 (1890 according to the National Register of Historic Places; 1891 according to Tom Blanck, Charles Locks, and Jennifer Kirby; and 1894 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) originally Queen Anne Victorian in style and subsequently Classical Revival/Colonial Revival in style; Cass Gilbert and James Knox Taylor, architects. The structure is a two story, 7576 square foot, 15 room, seven bedroom, four bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a detached garage. In addition to the bay windows, four panel double hung windows, and double doors from its original style, Chauncey Griggs changed the roof from gables to front facing and added the full-height full front Ionic columns. Chauncey Griggs also is believed to have added the porch after 1903. The house was built for $20,000. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Mrs. Jacob Bass resided at this address from 1891 to 1902. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Bass, their daughter, and Mrs. J. W. Bass all resided at this address. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Bass and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that Stephen C. Appleby, a 1900 Law School graduate and a banker, resided at this address. In 1903, the Bass family exchanged houses with Chauncey W. Griggs. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Chauncey Milton Griggs resided at this address from 1903 to 1949. In 1916, Chauncey Milton Griggs was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Griggs, their daughter, Everett Gallup Griggs, and Calvin Wells Griggs all resided at this address. In 1920, the United States Adjutant-General's Office U. S. Army Register, Volume VIII, indicates that Everett Griggs (1894- ,) a Captain in the Field Artillery Section, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Griggs resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Chauncey Milton Griggs, chairman of the board of Griggs Cooper & Company, a manufacturing and wholesale grocery business, and his wife, Mary W. Griggs, resided at this address. In 1934, Mary Wells Griggs, the widow of Chauncey W. Griggs, resided at this address. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Calvin Wells Griggs (1886- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1900 until 1906, who was a reporter employed by the St. Paul Dispatch from 1907 until 1910, who pursued the hobby of photography, who was employed as a claim clerk by the Griggs-Cooper Company, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Calvin Wells Griggs (1886- ,) who was born in St. Paul, who attended the school from 1900 until 1906, who was a reporter employed by the St. Paul Dispatch from 1907 until 1910, who was employed by Griggs, Cooper & Company from 1907 until 1950, who was a member of the St. Paul Athletic Club, who was a member of the White Bear Yacht Club, who was a member of the St. Paul Camera Club, and who pursued the hobby of photography, resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Franciscan House of Studies was located at this address from 1950 to 1966 and that Earl C. Joseph resided at this address at and after 1967. In 1879, C. W. Griggs represented St. Paul's Fourth Ward on the city's board of aldermen. Mary Wells Griggs was a member of the Somerset Club, the White Bear Yacht Club, the Womens Club of St. Paul, and the Colonial Dames. Martha (Mrs. Jacob Wales) Bass lived at this address with her family until 1903, when the Bass family exchanged houses with Chauncey Milton Griggs. Griggs added the Ionic portico to the house. Jacob Wales Bass (1815-1889) was born in Braintree, Vermont, the seventh of nine children of Isaac Bass and Polly Wales Bass, married Martha D. Brunson (1827-1913,) of Pennsylvania, in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, owned and operated several sawmills in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin (1845-1847,) moved to McGregor, Iowa, moved to Minnesota in 1847, served as St. Paul's postmaster from 1849 to 1853, managed the St. Paul House, one the city's earliest hotels, then was engaged in a commission and forwarding business, had two sons, Edgar Wales Bass (1843-1918) and Franklin (Frank) Burr Bass (1848-1906), and died in St. Paul. The City of St. Paul, in the County of St. Croix, State of Wisconsin, was platted in 1849, immediately prior to Minnesota becoming a territory, by a group that included J. W. Bass and also included Louis Robert (1811-1874,) Henry Jackson (1811-1857,) Charles Cavalier (1818- ,) Henry H. Sibley (1811- ,) Vital Guerin (1812- ,) August/Auguste L. Larpenteur (1823- ,) William Henry Forbes (1815-1875,) James W. Simpson (1818- ,) A. C. Rhodes, L. H. La Roche, and John B. Coty (1819- .) Mrs. Bass was the daughter of Reverend Alfred Brunson (1793-1882,) who was an early Methodist minister to the Fort Snelling area at the Red Rock Methodist Mission. Mrs. Bass' brothers were Benjamin Brunson and Ira B. Brunson and they were the surveyors of a portion of the City of St. Paul in 1849. Benjamin Wetherill Brunson (1823-1898) served as a Major in the Eighth Minnesota Infantry, Company K, served at Fort Ripley, served on Sully's 1864 expedition during the Dakota Conflict, surveyed St. Anthony, Minnesota, and Austin, Minnesota, both in 1848, and was a state legislator. Ira B. Brunson resided in the Chippewa River Valley in Wisconsin and became a judge. Simeon Folsom substantially enlarged the St. Paul House, originally constructed in 1845 by Leonard La Rouche, then leased it to Jacob Bass, who opened it as a hotel. In 1849, the St. Paul House was the site of the organization of the Territory. For a few years, it held the post office. Bass operated the hotel, which contained a tavern, until 1852. He then opened a commission and forwarding warehouse on the St. Paul levee which was a prominent business house for some years. He later moved to Watonwan County, Minnesota, to farm. Edgar Wales Bass (1843-1918) was born in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, in 1862, entered the military service as a Private in Company K, Eighth Minnesota Regiment, U.S. Volunteers, graduated from the U. S. Military Academy (West Point) and was appointed Brevet Second Lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers in 1868, from 1869 to 1898, served as Assistant Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy, U. S. Military Academy, as Assistant Astronomer of U. S. Expedition to New Zealand to observe the transit of Venus, as Assistant Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy, U. S. Military Academy, as Professor of Mathematics and Head of Mathematics Department, U. S. Military Academy, was promoted to the rank of Colonel, retired due to a loss of eyesight, moved to Bar Harbor, Maine, and died in New York City from pneumonia. Frank Burr Bass (1848-1906) was educated in Racine, Wisconsin, studied art in Paris, France, became a St. Paul businessman, and died in St. Paul. Griggs was of the proprietors of the Griggs & Cooper Company, a wholesale grocery firm that was established in 1882. Chauncey Wright Griggs (1832-1910) was born in Tolland, Connecticut, the son of Chauncey Griggs and Heartie Dimock Griggs, moved to Ohio in 1849, attended and graduated from Monson Academy in Massachusetts, taught school, moved to Detroit, Michigan, in 1851 to start a bank, then moved to Ohio to operate a mercantile company, then moved to Iowa, then moved to Detroit to operate a furniture business, the moved to St. Paul in 1856 to operate a supply store, contracting, and speculating in real estate, organized a company for the Third Minnesota Infantry in 1861, moved to Chaska, Minnesota, in 1863 to operate a brickmaking business, dealing in wood, and contracting for the government and railroads, returned to St. Paul in 1869 as a prominent coal and wood merchant, formed a partnership with others as Glidden, Griggs & Co. in 1883, was a Congregationalist, was a Democrat, was a stockholder and director of three banks and vice-president of one bank, was president of the Lehigh Coal & Iron Company until 1887, became an investor in Yanz, Griggs & Howes, one of the largest wholesale grocery firms in the Northwest, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Carver County, Minnesota (Districts 6 and 21) and subsequently Ramsey County (District 24) for three terms (1866 and from 1881 until 1883) and was a member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Carver County, Minnesota, (District 21) and subsequently Ramsey County (District 27) for three terms (from 1867 until 1869 and from 1883 until 1887,) was a St. Paul city alderman for seven terms, and shifted to the lumber business in 1888, moving to Tacoma, Washington. Chauncey Wright Griggs married Martha Ann Gallup of Ledyard, Connecticut, and the couple had six children, Chauncey Milton Griggs (1860-1931,) Herbert Stanton Griggs (1861- ,) Heartie Dimock Griggs (1866- ,) Everett Gallup Griggs (1868- ,) Theodore Wright Griggs (1872- ,) and Anna Billings Griggs (1874- .) In 1879, Mrs. C. W. Griggs was the secretary of the Protestant Orphan Asylum. Milton Wright Griggs (1888-1965) was born in Minnesota and died in Saint Paul. Milton Wright Griggs married Arline Whittlesey Bayliss (1888-1960,) the daughter of Charles Edward Bayliss and Eunice C. Bayliss, in 1910 in Belleterre, Long Island, New York and the couple had four children, Arline Bayliss Griggs (Mrs. Norton Murdock) Cross (Mrs. George Partridge) Mills (1911-1997,) Chauncey Milton Griggs (1913-1993,) Theodore Wright Griggs (1914-2002,) and Charles Edward Bayliss Griggs (1917- .) Chauncey Milton Griggs (1860-1931,) the son of Col. C. W. Griggs and Martha A. Gallup Griggs, was born in St. Paul, was educated in the St. Paul public schools, graduated from Yale College in 1883, was a member of the grocery firm of Griggs, Cooper & Company, officed at 242 East Third Street in 1907, was a member of the State Agricultural Society, married Mary Chafee/Chafey/Chaffey Wells (1863-1944,) the daughter of Calvin Wells and Mary Clyde Wells, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1885, and the couple had eight children, Calvin Wells Griggs (1886- ,) Milton Wright Griggs (1888- ,) Katherine Glyde Griggs (1890- ,) Mary Glyde S. Griggs (1893- ,) Everett/Everitt Gallup Griggs (1894- ,) Benjamin Glyde Griggs (1898- ,) Elizabeth Taggart Griggs (1901- ,) and Chauncey Wright Griggs (1902- .) Chauncey W. Griggs (1902-1954) was born in Minnesota, married Anne Gill Freeman Griggs (1910- ,) a daughter of Clarence K. Freeman, in 1935, and the couple had three children. Martha Ann Griggs was involved in church and charitable work and was president of the Protestant Orphan Asylum Board. Benjamin Glyde Griggs married Martha Dodgson Baker (1898-1994,) the daughter of Louis Carter Baker and Sarah A. Hoopes Baker, in Bala-Cynwyd, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, in 1922 and the couple had five children, Elizabeth Griggs (1923- ,) Martha Baker Griggs (1925- ,) Benjamin Glyde Griggs, Jr. (1928- ,) __?__ Griggs ( - ,) and __?__ Griggs ( - .) Everett Gallup Griggs (1868-1938,) the son of Chauncey Wright Griggs and Martha Ann Gallup Griggs, was born in Chaska, Minnesota, was educated at St. Paul's Academy, Concord, New Hampshire, graduated from Yale University in 1890, took additional course work at the Yale University Sheffield Scientific School, entered the St. Paul & Tacoma Lumber Company in 1892 initially as a timekeeper, married Grace I. __?__ (1872- ) in 1895, became a mill superintendent for the St. Paul & Tacoma Lumber Company, was the president of the Pacific Coast Lumber Manufacturers Association from 1903 until 1913, was the president of the St. Paul & Tacoma Lumber Company from 1908 until 1933, was a leader in the West Coast Lumberman's Association, was a member of the Western Forestry & Conservation Association in 1909, was the president of the National Lumber Manufacturers Association from 1911 until 1912, was a supporter of the Loyal Legion of Loggers and Lumberman, an organization intended to combat the Industrial Workers of the World (Wobblies,) was an incorporator of the Rainier National Park Company in 1916, was an officer in the Army Signal Corps during World War I, was the president of the Douglas Fir Export Company from 1923 until 1935, married Mary Lea Fisken (1901-1981) in Seattle, Washington, in 1923, and was the chairman of the board of directors of the St. Paul & Tacoma Lumber Company in 1933. The St. Paul & Tacoma Lumber Company was established in 1888 by Chauncey W. Griggs, Henry Hewitt and associates, was preceded by Griggs & Johnson, and Griggs & Foster, both of St. Paul, and had as subsidiaries the Cascade Timber Company, the Chehalis & Pacific Land Company, the Consolidated Lumber Company of Los Angeles, Griggs & Company of St. Paul, the Griggs & Foster investment firm of St. Paul, the Griggs & Johnson real estate and loans company of St. Paul, the Interlaken Water Company, the Natches Pass Railway Company of Tacoma, Washington, the Pacific Meat Companyof Tacoma, Washington, the Puget Sound Dry Dock and Machinery Company, the Riverside Land Company of Tacoma, Washington, the Tacoma Bitouminous Paving Company, the Tacoma Land & Improvement Company, the Union Stockyards Company of Tacoma, Washington, and the Wilkerson Coal & Coke Company of Pierce County, Washington. "Red Rock" is the English rendering of the Dakota designation "eyah-shaw" or "Inyanso," referring to a granite boulder about five feet long that was daubed with vermilion (i. e. red pigment,) that was venerated by Native Americans, and that marked the passage from one geological region to another. Red Rock, now Woodbury, Minnesota, was the northernmost of two steamboat landing sites that was used by early settlers and missionaries in the portion of Wisconsin Territory that became Minnesota. The Red Rock settlement was founded by the Methodists in 1837 as a mission serving the Dakota or "Sioux" Tribe. The granite boulder originally lay on the bank of the Mississippi and now resides at a Methodist Church in Newport, Minnesota. Apparently, the last time the Red Rock was regularly painted by the local Dakota was just before the 1862 Dakota Conflict in Minnesota. Simeon Pearl Folsom (1819- ,) the son of Jeremiah Folsom and Octavia Howe Folsom, was born in Lower Canada, was a lawyer and a civil engineer, moved to Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, in 1839, worked for Henry M. Rice, was a soldier during the Mexican War in 1846, moved to St. Paul in 1847, was a clerk with the Territorial Legislature from 1852 until 1853, was the St. Paul City Surveyor in 1854, was a member of the St. Paul School Board from 1858 until 1860, served in Company H of the Seventh Minnesota Regiment during the American Civil War, was an employee of the St. Paul & Pacific RailRoad, and was a member of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution by virtue of grandfathers Tilly Howe, a Sergeant in the New Hampshire Troops, and Levi Folsom, a Private in the New Hampshire Mounted Infantry, and great grandfather Jeremiah Folsom, Lieutenant Colonel in the Fourth New Hampshire Militia, during the Revolutionary War. Simeon P. Folsom resided at 2154 Summit Avenue in 1908. Julia A. Barnum (1826- ) was the second wife of Simeon P. Folsom, marrying him in 1851 after his first wife, Emeline Curts Folsom (1830-1849) died. Benjamin G. Griggs and Everett G. Griggs were World War I veterans who resided at this address in 1919. Benjamin Griggs was the son of a wealthy St. Paul wholesaler, first part of Yanz, Griggs & Howes, then part of Hill, Griggs & Company, and then part of the Griggs Cooper wholesale house, attended the St Paul Academy together with F. Scott Fitzgerald, and became an airline executive. Everett Griggs, Sr., (1869- ) was son of Chauncey W. Griggs (1832-1910) and Martha Ann Gallup (1843-1913) and was the president of the St. Paul & Tacoma Lumber Company in 1920. The 1917 Catalogue of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity, published by James T. Brown of New York, indicated that Everett Griggs was a member of the Class of 1918 at Yale University and resided at this address. The first postmasters of St. Paul and their commissioning year were Henry Jackson in 1846, Jacob W. Bass in 1849, William H. Forbes in 1853, Charles S. Cave in 1856, William M. Corcoran in 1860, Charles Nichols in 1861, Jacob H. Stewart in 1865, Joseph A. Wheelock in 1870, and David Day in 1875. In 1911, Stephen C. Appleby was the cashier of the Pacific National Bank in Seattle, Washington. Benjamin Glyde Griggs (1898-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Griggs, and died in Ramsey County. Chauncey Milton Griggs ( -1931,) Theodore Wright Griggs ( -1934,) and Mary Wells Griggs ( -1944) all died in Ramsey County. Milton W. Griggs (1888-1965) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Benjamin Glyde Griggs (1898-1992) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Griggs, and died in Ramsey County. Frank Bass (1848-1906) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. Calvin Wells Griggs (1886-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wells, and died in Ramsey County. Arline B. Griggs (1888-1960) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Bayliss, and died in Ramsey County. The current owners of record of the property are Earl C. Joseph II and Holly J. Joseph. Earl C. Joseph, Sr. (1927-2007,) was a futurist and was the founder of the Minnesota Futurists, the first chapter of the World Future Society. Earl C. Joseph, Jr., of St. Paul, Vincent Joseph of Newport News, Virginia, Rebecca Joseph Sabino of Smithfield, Virginia, and Rene Joseph Leer of Minneapolis were children of Earl Joseph, Sr. Earl C. Joseph, Jr., has a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, was previously employed by SGI and Cray Research, and is Program Vice President of High-Performance Computing of IDC. [See note on Cass Gilbert.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.] [See the note for the Griggs, Cooper & Company for 901 Euclid Street.]

366 Summit Avenue: Egil Boeckmann and Rachel Hill Boeckmann House, Built in 1928 (1899 according to the National Register of Historic Places and 1929 according to Ramsey County property tax records;) Georgian Revival in style; David Adler and Robert Work, architects (George Grant, architect, according to the National Register of Historic Places.) The structure is a three story, 19158 square foot, multi-family apartment building. The house was constructed for $120,000. David Adler had designed the Boeckmann summer house at Dellwood, Minnesota, on White Bear Lake, in the early 1920's and, in the mid 1920's, he was retained to build their Summit Avenue house. The site for the house apparently was smaller than the usual site for an Adler house, and Adler designed a relatively compact house with a carefully structured series of back terraces for gardens and private outdoor space. According to Martha Thorne, the house was modeled on Cliveden House in Germantown, Pennsylvania, built between 1763 and 1767 for judge Benjamin Chew, which in turn was modeled after Kew Palace in England, built for Frederick, Prince of Wales. The greatest similarities between this house and Cliveden House is in the facade, with a five bay front, pedimented pavilion, a pedimented doorway flanked by columns, a horizontal belt course between the first and second floors, modillions on the main cornice, and paired dormers. The Art Institute of Chicago has over 500 pages of documentation on this house, although few other Adler projects have any similar quantity of documentation. Eugene A. La Violette, a civil engineer, was the "architect's superintendent" for the construction of this project, corresponding regularly with Adler, who only visited the site three or four times, although __?__ Reeves, an associate of Adler's, was closely involved in the project and visited the site several times. Rachel Hill Boeckmann, rather than her husband, Egil Boeckmann, reportedly was the driving force behind the project. This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Daniel R. Noyes resided at this address from 1884 to 1927. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Noyes and their daughter all resided at this address. The 1887 and 1889 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Noyes, their daughter, and W. S. G. Noyes all resided at this address. The 1891, 1893, and 1895 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Noyes, their daughters, and W. S. G. Noyes all resided at this address. The 1906 Jubilee Manual of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church indicates that Daniel R. Noyes and Helen A. (Mrs. D. R.) Noyes, members of the church since 1868, Winthrop G. Noyes, a member of the church since 1883, and D. Raymond Noyes, a member of the church since 1898, all resided at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Daniel Rogers Noyes (1837-1908,) the husband of Helen A. Noyes, who was born in Connecticut to parents born in the United States and who died of uremia, resided at this address in 1908. The 1918 city directory indicates that W. S. G. Noyes resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Charles Colberg was a chauffeur at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Egil Boeckmann resided at this address from 1930. The 1930 city directory indicates that Egil Boeckmann, a physician who officed at 350 St. Peter Street, and his wife, Rachel Boeckmann, resided at this address. Egil Boeckmann was a prominent local ophthalmologist and Rachel Hill Boeckmann was the daughter of railroad magnate James J. Hill. Egil Boeckmann's father was Eduard Boeckmann (1849-1927), a Norwegian-born St. Paul physician. The house replaced the David P. Noyes house, which was built in 1884. The 1920 city directory indicates that Egil Boeckmann, a physician who officed at the Lowery Building, resided at the former residence located at 404 Summit Avenue. Daniel Rogers Noyes (1836-1908,) the son of Daniel Rogers Noyes and Phoebe Griffin Lord Noyes, was born in Lyme, New London County, Connecticut, was educated in public and private schools of Massachusetts and Connecticut, volunteered during the American Civil War and served in the 1863 New York draft riots, married Helen Abia Gilman (1843-1917), the sister of Mrs. Charles Phelps Noyes, moved to St Paul, founded the wholesale drug and manufacturing chemist business, Noyes Brothers & Cutler in 1868, was a member of the board of directors of the Merchants National Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of New York, was the president of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce, was the president of the St. Paul Jobbers Union, was the president of the Minnesota Society for the Prevention of Cruelty, was the founder and the president of the St. Paul Society for Relief of Poor, was the vice president of the American Sunday School Union, was a member of the board of trustees of Carleton College, was a member of the board of regents of the University of Minnesota, was the vice moderator of the Presbyterian General Assembly in 1902, was an organizer Minnesota Red Cross Society, was the president of the Sons of American Revolution, was a member of the Minnesota Society of Colonial Wars, was a member of the Natural History Society, was a member of the Geographical Society, was an elder at the House of Hope Presbyterian Church in St. Paul, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Century Association of New York, and officed at the corner of Sixth Street and Sibley Street in 1907. Daniel Noyes and Helen Noyes had six children, Helen Gilman Noyes Brown (1867- ,) Winthrop Sargent Gilman Noyes (1869-1931,) Evelyn McCurdy Noyes Saltus (1871- ,) Caroline Lord Noyes Brown (1876-1947,) Josephine Lord Noyes (1876-1876,) and Daniel Raymond Noyes (1883- .) Helen Gilman Noyes Brown was born in New York City and was the tenth in descent from Richard Warren, twelfth signer of the Mayflower Compact, seventh in descent from William Coddington, first governor of Rhode Island, eighth in descent from Anne Hutchinson, pioneer in the movement for the intellectual freedom of women, who came to Boston with Governor Winthrop and is commemorated by a statue in the Boston Public Library, and was the great grandniece of Edward Dorr Griffin, a president of Williams College, and through her mother, she descended from Governor Thomas Mayhew, lord of the manor of Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard and the Elizabeth Islands, from the Reverend Chanler Robbins of Plymouth, and from George Bethune, who arrived in Boston in 1710. Helen Brown married William Adams Brown (1865- ) in 1892. Winthrop Sargent Gilman Noyes was born in St. Paul, graduated from Yale University in 1891, and graduated from the Harvard University Law School in 1893. Winthrop Noyes was the Chairman of the Building Fund of the St. Paul YMCA in 1907. Evelyn Saltus was born in St. Paul and married Rollin Sanford Saltus (1869-1934) in 1895. Rollin Saltus was a student in 1902 at the Biltmore Forest School, the first forestry school in the United States, located at the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, North Carolina, and after working with Frederick Law Olmsted in Massachusetts in 1903, opened an office of Landscape Architecture and Forestry in New York City in 1904. Caroline Brown was born in St. Paul and, in 1904, married Thatcher Magoun Brown (1876-1954,) one of the Brown Brothers in Brown Brothers, Harriman & Company, the banking house. Daniel Raymond Noyes was born in St. Paul, graduated from Yale University in 1905, and married Helen Dorothy Moran (1889- ) in 1929. William Adams Brown and Thatcher Magoun Brown were brothers. Egil Boeckmann was a member of the University of Minnesota football team in 1901 (record 9-1,) 1902(record 9-2,) and 1903 (record 13-0-1.) There are at least three sets of Boeckmann graves at Oakland Cemetery, with two burial sites containing the graves of Eduard Boeckmann (1849-1927,) Sophie Gill Boeckmann (1852-1943,) Caroline Knagenhjelm Gill (1822-1909,) Christian O. Gill (1850-1928,) Sigrid Boeckmann Freeman (1880-1966,) Eilert P. H. Boeckmann (1884-1973,) and Eline L. Boeckmann (1903-2002.) Egil Boeckmann (1887-1955,) Rachel Hill Boeckmann (1881-1967,) and Mary H. Boeckmann (1914-2004,) the daughter of Egil Boeckmann and Rachel Hill Boeckmann, all are buried at Resurrection Cemetery, Mendota Heights, Minnesota. Daniel R. Noyes ( -1908,) Helen A. Noyes ( -1917,) Charles P. Colberg ( -1936,) and Sophie G. Boeckmann ( -1943) all died in Ramsey County. Egil Boeckmann (1887-1955) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gill, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. Edward Boeckmann ( -1927) died in Washington County, Minnesota. Rachel Hill Boeckmann (1881-1967) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Meehagen, and died in Ramsey County. Eilert P. H. Boeckmann (1884-1973) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Caroline Knagenhjelm Gill was the wife of John Gill (1821- ) and once resided in Stavanger, Norway. The current owner of record of the property is Commonwealth Properties, located at 340 Cedar Street. [See note on David Adler.]

369 Summit Avenue: Cochran Park, Built in 1923; park is Period Revival in style and shelter building is Beaux Arts in style; Thomas Holyoke, architect; Paul Manship, sculptor. The park was an unoffical playground for children since the late 19th Century. The triangle of land park was given to the City of St. Paul in 1923 by Emilie B. Cochran, in memory of her husband, Thomas Cochran, who lived in St. Paul from 1869 until his death in 1906. Thomas Cochran and Emilie Cochran lived in houses at 229 Summit (now the parking lot for the Cathedral) and at 59 North Western Avenue, near the park. Thomas Cochran, Jr. (1843- ) was born in Brooklyn, New York, the fourth of seven children of James Blair Cochran (1799-1858,) who immigrated in 1819 from Kirkcudbright, Scotland, and Catherine Baylis/Bayless Cochran (1816-1849,) attended the City Academy of Brooklyn and graduated from the Brooklyn Polytechnic School in 1859, entered the City University of New York and was awarded a degree in 1863, joined the Seventh Regiment of New York Volunteers, the so-called "Kid Glove" regiment comprised of young men from prominent New York City families, during the American Civil War, but never left New York because he suffered from tuberculosis, attended Columbia Law School from 1863 until graduation in 1865 and was admitted to the New York bar, joined the New York law office of Man & Parsons in 1866, apprenticed with Elihu Root (the future Secretary of State under President Theodore Roosevelt,) married Emilie Belden Walsh (1844-1924,) in 1867, moved to St. Paul because of his health in 1868/1869, established himself in the real estate business with his college friend (and brother of Emilie Cochran,) James R. Walsh, in the form of Cochran & Walsh, and joined in the insurance business with Henry H. Sibley (1811-1891), the first governor of the state of Minnesota. Cochran helped organize the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company, formed other real estate firms (Cochran, Rice & Walsh (S. B.,) Cochran & Walsh from 1871 until 1878 and 1883 until 1896, Thomas B. Cochran from 1878 until 1881, and Cochran & Newport from 1881 until 1883) organized the Northwestern Investment Company in 1896 and served as its president in 1898, was a member of the board of directors of the Dakotah Manufacturing Company, was a first lieutenant of Independent Company A of the Minnesota National Guard, veterans of the BlueBerry War, was a first sergeant of Company A of the First Minnesota National Guard, assisted in the building of the first bridge to Fort Snelling, assisted in determining the location for Macalester College, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, and was a member of the St. Paul Roosevelt Club. Emilie Belden Walsh Cochran's family had long-since established itself in the hardware business in New York City. The Cochran family joined the House of Hope Presbyterian Church and Cochran was active as an elder and teacher. In 1870, Cochran was elected a life-member of the Minnesota Historical Society, and in the 1880's and 1890's, he served as a trustee of Macalester College. Cochran was very active in the early international YMCA movement, joining in 1863, and attending its international convention in Philadelphia in 1889. Cochran had a reputation as a strong and effective public speaker who, in July 1891, spoke out against a prize fight scheduled to take place in St. Paul. Cochran was so effective in organizing opposition that Governor William R. Merriam was forced to cancel the event. Cochran was also instrumental in the progressive development of St. Paul's Summit Avenue and Midway district, and actively supported the St. Paul City Railway in establishing the first electrified rail transportation system from Victoria Street to Cretin Avenue. Cochran's businesses survived the economic panic of 1893-1898, and around 1899, he created the Northwestern Investment Company, Inc. In 1906, his company was involved in a loan of $500,000 to George Draper Dayton (1857-1938,) a Worthington Minnesota banker and the founder of the Dayton Department Store chain. Thomas Cochran and Emilie Cochran raised six children, Alexander Robertson Cochran (1869-1893,) Thomas Cochran III (1871-1936,) who was a partner in the investment banking firms of J. P. Morgan & Co. and Drexel & Co. and who married Martha Andrews Griffin (1871-1914,) Emily Cochran (1872-1924,) who remained unmarried throughout her life and who, despite her family's wishes, converted to Catholicism with the support of Archbishop John Ireland (1838-1918) and was a friend of American writer Henry James, Williams Cochran (1876- ,) who joined the 13th Minnesota Regiment and fought under General Arthur MacArthur (1845-1913) in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War, and who later married Theodora von Duhn (1898- ,) Moncrieff Mitchell Cochran (1879-1931,) who married Margaret Turner Davis (1881- ,) and Louise Cochran (1881-1968,) who married Arthur Harold Savage (1872- .) In 1879, Thomas Cochran, Jr., was the president of the St. Paul Bethel Association/The Western Seaman's Friend Society/Bethel Mission, founded in 1873 and located at 53 Robert Street in 1879 and on Wabasha Street near Fourth Street in 1912. In 1926, Thomas Cochran's son, Thomas Cochran III, a Yale University graduate and a member of the Skull and Bones Society, commissioned the sculpture, " Indian Hunter and His Dog " to honor his father. The sculpture stands in a pool surrounded by four bronze geese. In the 1960's, the sculpture was vandalized and the city of St. Paul decided to move the sculpture to a safer spot near the Como Park Conservatory. A fiberglass copy of the sculpture was made for Cochran Park. A few years ago, neighbors petitioned the City to move the original bronze sculpture back in the park, so the two sculptures were switched. A native of Minnesota, Paul Howard Manship (1885-1966) was one of the outstanding American sculptors of the early part of the 20th Century. Paul H. Manship, the son of Mary Etta Friend (1844-1907) and Charles H. Manship (1843-1911) and the youngest of seven children, attended the former Mechanics Arts High School in St. Paul and studied at both the Art Students League in New York, under Herman Atkins MacNeil (1866-1947,) and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, under Charles Grafly (1862-1929.) Initially, to make a living, Manship opened his own illustration and design business in St. Paul, where he produced commercial sign painting and lettering, relegating his sculpture-making to the side. Manship also worked for a short time with the Bureau of Engraving in Minneapolis. In 1905, Manship entered the Art Students League of New York as a pupil of George Bridgman, a specialist in artistic anatomy, and of Jo Davidson, a revered portrait sculptor. Manship spent time with sculptors Solon Borglum (1868-1922,) Gutzon Borglum, and Isidore Konti. After studying in Rome, Manship's first professional exhibition was held in 1913, in New York City, by the Architectural League and all 96 of Manship's bronzes sold. Manship moved to Paris in 1921 and received two big commissions while living overseas, both for fountain-pieces. The first commission came in 1924 from the Philips Academy in Massachusetts, and for it Manship created the Venus Anadyomere Fountain. The second commission, in 1925, was from Thomas Cochrane, who wanted Manship to design and sculpt a fountain, "Indian Hunter and His Dog". Manship's work bridged the traditional and the modern. Manship used archaism as a link to the new, making elegant sculptures clearly divorced from the increasing conventionalism of other figurative sculpture of the period. With its characteristic polish and streamlined stylization, Manship's work is often linked to the development of Art Deco, a dominant style in 1920's American architecture and design. He became a sculptor after discovering that he was color blind. Instead of a sketchbook, Manship carried a cigar box filled with toothpicks and paraffin wax wherever he went and used these portable tools to try new ideas and work out problems in tiny, three-dimensional scale. Manship also liked to decorate the family birthday cakes. Among his works are "Prometheus" (Rockefeller Center, New York City;) "Centaur and Dryad," "Little Brother," and "Pauline" (Metropolitan Museum;) and "Indian and Pronghorn Antelope" and "Dancer and Gazelles" (1917) (Art Institute, Chicago.) "Centaur and Dryad" (1913) won the National Academy's Helen Foster Barnett Prize. Paul Manship said many times that "Indian Hunter and His Dog" was his favorite sculpture because it reminded him of his childhood spent in St. Paul. He died in New York City. In his will, he donated one-half of the works of art that were still in his possession (over 125 sculptures) to the Minnesota Museum of American Art in St. Paul and one-half to the National Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C., part of the Smithsonian Institution. Manship was awarded the Prix de Rome in 1909, was bestowed a corresponding membership in the Academia Nacional de las Bellas Artes in Argentina in 1944, the Academie des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1946, and l'Accademia di San Luca in Rome in 1952, was elected to membership in the French Legion of Honor, was awarded the gold medal for sculpture by the National Institute of Arts and Letters in 1945, was elected the president of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1948, received the Widener gold medal from the Pennsylvania Academy, was a member of the Smithsonian Art Commission for over 25 years, and was elected president of the Century Club in 1950. Manship's grandfather, Charles Manship, was an ornamental painter of prominence in Jackson, Mississippi. Manship's brother, Luther Manship (1879-1931,) was an academic impressionist painter who taught art in public school systems and who earned his living as an engraver. John Paul Manship (1827- ) was the son of Paul Manship and Isabel McIlwaine Manship, was born in New York, where the family moved prior to his birth to avoid any possible later conscription in the French army, and was a painter. John Paul Manship was named after the painter John Singer Sargent, who had become a good friend of Manship's. Isabel McIlwaine Manship and Paul Manship also were the parents of three daughters, Pauline Frances Manship, Elizabeth Robinson Manship Solomon, and Sarah Janet Manship. Isabel McIlwaine (1883-1974) was a student of William Merritt Chase (1849-1916) and was a teacher of art at the Hannah Moore School in Baltimore, Maryland. [See the note for the BlueBerry War of 1872 for 95 Wilkin Street.]

370 Summit Avenue: John R. Mitchell House; Built in 1909 (Sandeen; 1889 according to the National Register of Historic Places; 1910 according to Ramsey County property tax records; 1909-1910 according to Larson); Federal/Georgian/Colonial Revival in style; Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., architect. Unit #1 is a 4400 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, brick condominium, which is currently owned by the trustees of Leaetta M. Hough Dunette and Marvin D. Dunette. Unit #2 is a 1450 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, brick condominium, which last sold in 1991 for $105,000, which is currently owned by Harrison Randolph, Jr., and Mary N. Randolph. Unit #3 is a 2300 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, brick condominium, which last sold in 2004 for $419,900, which is currently owned by Jennifer Durst. Unit #4 is a 750 square foot detached garage, which is currently owned by John R. Rupp, who is located at 340 Cedar Street. The house was constructed for $15,000 (Sandeen; $40,000 according to Larson). This structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the historic Hill District. In 1909, Johnston also was retained to design a garage and stable for the house, at a cost of $2,000. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Charles McIlrath resided at this address. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that John R. Mitchell resided at this address from 1910 to 1924. The 1918 city directory indicates that J. R. Mitchell, his daughter, and J. L. B. Mitchell all resided at this address. The 1920 city directory indicates that Margaret Doyle, a nurse, resided at this address. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Mitchell resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that John P. Upham, the resident partner of Harris Upham & Company, and his wife, Dorothy Upham, resided at this address. The 1950 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Patrick Butler, Jr. (1930- ,) who attended the school from 1941 until 1948 and who attended Yale University, and Peter M. Butler (1931- ,) who attended the school from 1942 until 1949 and who attended Yale University, both resided at this address. John R. Mitchell was president of the Capital National Bank of St. Paul and of banks in Duluth, Minnesota, and Winona, Minnesota. In 1912, John R. Mitchell was the president of the Capital National Bank of St. Paul and James L. Mitchell was the cashier of the Capital National Bank of St. Paul. In 1917, J. R. Mitchell of the Capital National Bank of St. Paul was a member of a 12 member Advisory Council of bankers established by the Federal Reserve Board. In 1920, John Raymond Mitchell, an investment banker, James Lynn Mitchell, an investment banker, and Jerome Winthrop Wheeler, an investment banker, were permitted, by a private Saskatchewan General Assembly enactment, to establish the Capital Securities Company, Limited. The enactment was repealed in 2000 as obsolete. From 1921 until 1923, John R. Mitchell, president of the Capital National Bank of St. Paul, was a member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. The St. Paul National Bank was consolidated with the Capital National Bank of St. Paul in 1906. The Capital National Bank of St. Paul was the successor to the business of the Capital Bank, organized in 1880, and the St. Paul National Bank, organized in 1883. John R. Mitchell was the president of the bank in 1908. John Raymond Mitchell (1869- ,) the son of John Lamb Mitchell (1826-1868,) an oil man, and Harriet Raymond Mitchell, was born in Franklin, Pennsylvania, attended Franklin, Pennsylvania, schools, graduated from Yale University in 1889, moved to Winona, Minnesota, in 1897 and was associated with the Winona Deposit Bank, purchased the Capital Bank of St. Paul in 1906, moved to St. Paul in 1906, also became the president of the Duluth Savings Bank, was president of the St. Paul Clearing House Association, was a member of the Executive Council of the American Bankers' Association, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the University Club, was a member of the Town and Country Club, and was a member of the University Club Club of Chicago. John Raymond Mitchell married Mary Eleanor Lamberton Mitchell, the daughter of Hon. Henry W. Lamberton, in Winona, Minnesota, in 1896 and the couple had three children, John Lamberton Mitchell, Mary Eleanor Mitchell, and Raymond Otis Mitchell. Mary E. Mitchell ( -1918,) John R. Mitchell ( -1933,) and John L. Mitchell ( -1952) all died in Hennepin County. John R. Mitchell ( -1936) died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Henry W. Lamberton ( -1905) died in Winona County, Minnesota. [See note on Johnston for 476 Summit Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.]

372 Summit Avenue: Built in 1915. The building is a 999 square foot, two bedroom, one bathroom, brick rambler. The current owner of record of the property is Gayle A. Winegar. Gayle A. Winegar is a 1975 graduate of Macalester College and is a member of the Macalester College 2006-2007 Alumni Board. Gayle Winegar is the founder of Sweatshop Fitness, established in 1982 and located at 167 Snelling Avenue North. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mrs. H. E. Cornwall resided at the former nearby __?__ Summit Avenue. [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.]

375 Summit Avenue: The structure is a tax exempt building that is owned by the City of St. Paul.

376 Summit Avenue: Summit Bluff Townhomes; Built in 1982; Bream Built Inc., builder. Unit A is a two story, 2337 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, frame house, with a tuck-under two car garage, which is currently owned by B. John Barry, who resides in Newport, Minnesota. Unit B is a two story, 2297 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a tuck-under two car garage, that was sold in 1998 for $320,000, which is currently owned by Mary A. Ackerman and James W. Reents. Unit C is a two story, 2490 square foot, three bedroom, one bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a tuck-under two car garage, that was last sold in 1991 for $280,000, which is currently owned by C. Louis Frey and Patricia J. Frey. Unit D is a two story, 3251 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a tuck-under two car garage, which is currently owned by John S. Connolly and Phebe L. Connolly. Mary A. Ackerman is a member of the Macalester College Class of 1970, worked for Macalester College nine years in Admissions, was Dean of Students for Macalester College for 11 years, was a divorce/custody and family mediator, worked at Shattuck-St. Mary's School, has been Director of External Relations with Search Institute since 1998, and was appointed in 2001 and in 2003 to the Ramsey County Community Health Services Citizens Advisory Committee from Ramsey County District 5. James Reents, AIA, and Mary A. Ackerman were financial supporters of Ballet of the Dolls in 2008, of the Life Raft Group in 2004 and 2005, and of Minnesota Public Radio in 2006 and 2007. James Reents, a self-employed architectural project manager, donated to the Obama Presidential Campaign in 2008. John S. Connolly is a Minnesota Alternative Dispute Resolution neutral arbitrator. Phebe Connolly, a self-employed psychologist, was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. [See note for the fifth entry after the entry for 1605 Summit Avenue for information on Macalester College.]

378 Summit Avenue: J. P. Gribben House; Built in 1986. Unit A is a two story, 2410 square foot, four bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a tuck-under two car garage, that was last sold in 1997 for $269,000, which is currently owned by Louise Ellen French and William George French. Unit B is a two story, 2248 square foot, three bedroom, two bathroom, one half-bathroom, frame house, with a tuck-under two car garage, that was last sold in 2002 for $350,000, which is currently owned by Ryan D. Ashley and Carol A. Kluznik. Unit C is a two story, 2260 square foot, two bedroom, two bathroom, two half-bathroom, frame house, with a tuck-under two car garage, that was last sold in 1995 for $320,000, which is currently owned by David W. Thompson. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Charles Emerson resided at this address from 1863 to 1957 and that James P. Gribben resided at this address from 1884 to 1892. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Charles McIlrath resided at this address. The 1887, 1889, and 1891 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Gribben and W. C. Gribben all resided at this address. The 1892 city directory indicates that William C. Gribben, a bookkeeper, boarded at this address. The 1893 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Richards Gordon, their daughter, and C. W. Gordon all resided at this address. The 1895 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. Gordon, their daughter, and C. W. Gordon all resided at this address. In 1905, Richards Gordon was a warden of the Episcopal Church of St. John the Evangelist and resided at this address. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Maurice Auerbach, Charles W. Gordon, and Richards Gordon all resided at this address in 1907. In 1916, Charles W. Gordon was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1918 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Gordon resided at this address. World War I veteran Nels C. Westman resided at this address in 1919. The 1920 city directory indicates that Agnes Dwyer, a cook, and Louise Enger, a nurse, both were employed at this address. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Virginia Gordon (1908-1923,) the unmarried daughter of Charles Gordon, who was born in Minnesota to parents born in the United States and who died of an accidental electrocution while in the bath, resided at this address in 1923. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Gordon resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Charles W. Gordon, the president of Gordon & Ferguson, Inc., manufacturers and wholesalers of various items of clothing, and his wife, Charlotte Gordon, resided at this address. In 1934, Charles W. Gordon, Charlotte Bishop Gordon, and Charles R. Gordon all resided at this address. The Gordon family were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the St. Paul Athletic Club, the Somerset Club, and the Womens Club of St. Paul in 1934. The 1939 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that C. Richards Gordon (1911- ,) who attended the school from 1921 until 1929, who was a 1933 graduate of Princeton University, who was a ports reporter with the St. Paul Pioneer Press, and was a reporter with the Chicago Daily News in 1939,resided at this address. Previously, on this site, were the Richards Gordon house, remodeled under the supervision of Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., in 1892 and again in 1906, and razed in 1957, and the Charles W. Gordon stable, designed by Johnston in 1909, the Gordon garage, designed by Johnston in 1912, and the Gordon house, remodeled by Johnston in 1926, and all razed in 1957. Charles McIlrath (1829-1910) was the Minnesota State Auditor from 1861 to 1873 and was a staunch political supporter of Alexander Ramsey. Charles McIlrath was married to Lucretia Spalding. Charles McIlrath also served on a special three person board, with Matthew Donohue and Clinton Reynolds, that was established by the Legislature to settle claims of private persons for compensation for services rendered during the Dakota War in 1862. J. P. McIlrath, the brother of Charles McIlrath, was the chief of police for St. Paul in 1868 and used the police to aid the Ramsey-W. D. Washburn faction of the Republican Party against the Ignatius Donnelly faction during the 1868 Congressional nominating convention, attempting to deny Donnelly a fourth Congressional term that Ramsey felt could provide Donnelly a basis for challenging his Senate seat. In 1875, there was a special Senate Committee that was appointed to investigate the management of the Office of State Auditor before January, 1873. In 1874, Charles McIlrath was indicted 26 times by a Ramsey County Grand Jury for a felonious entry upon the duties of office before giving the required bonds and sureties and for malfeasance in office. In 1877, Charles McIlrath was the receiver of the Southern Minnesota Railroad Company and was involved in federal litigation, with Henry J. Horn (1821-1902) and George L. Otis (1829-1883) as his solicitors. James P. Gribben was a St. Paul lumber merchant. In 1885, James P. Gribben was the administrator de bonis non of the estate of Lydia M. Emerson. In 1886, James P. Gribben was an incorporator, with John J. Watson, Albert Scheffer, Kimble P. Cullen, and William Dawson, Jr., of the St. Paul, Fort Snelling & Minneapolis RailRoad. In 1906, James P. Gribben was the secretary of the Minnesota Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, which had a membership of 496. James P. Gribben arranged to purchase the Oakland Cemetery plot that had previously been purchased by Walter J. S. Traill. James P. Gribben and Jennie Dean Gribben (1855-1900,) his wife who died of typhoid fever, resided at 1373 Summit Avenue in 1900. James P. Gribben continued to reside at 1373 Summit Avenue in 1912 and 1918. In 1930, Mrs. Jean P. Gribben, the widow of James P. Gribben, resided at 709 Portland Avenue. In 1889 and 1891, Richards Gordon resided at 245 Summit Avenue. In 1870, the Southern Minnesota RailRoad completed its route from Wells, Minnesota, to the Mississippi River, connecting La Crosse, Wisconsin, with the west. The Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company was chartered in 1855 to construct a railroad from Hokah, Minnesota, west to Missouri River and construction began in Hokah in 1865, with completion of a 162 mile line at the "Grand Crossing" which ended at the Mississippi River opposite La Crosse, Wisconsin. The Southern Minnesota RailRoad declared bankruptcy in 1871 and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul RailRoad purchased the Southern Minnesota RailRoad Company in 1880. Richards Gordon (1829-1911) was born in Wexford, Ireland, emigrated to the United States with his family while still an infant, was reared and educated in New York City, New York, moved to St. Paul in 1854, was a wholesale hat merchant, and died in New Rochelle, New York was engaged in banking and wholesale grocery business until 1866, was engaged in the wholesale and retail drug business until 1870, began in wholesale hat business as Richards Gordon in 1871, was a member of Gordon & Ferguson after 1873, was the president of the St. Paul Musical Society, was the leader of the choir of St. Paul's Episcopal Church for for 25 years, and officed at the SouthWest corner of Lower Fourth Street and Broadway Street in 1907. Richards Gordon was associated with the Borup & Champlin Company and signed a guarantee for the firm's furnishing supplies to the Ojibwe Indians with Clement H. Beaulieu, a Minnesota and Wisconsin fur trader. Richards Gordon also was a member of the early St. Paul Fire Department. Charles William Wulff Borup (1806-1859) was a fur trader, banker, lumberman, wilderness physician, and Minnesota's first Danish consul. Charles William Gordon (1830-1891) was a vice president of Gordon & Ferguson, manufacturers of hats, caps, gloves and furs, was a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank, was a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern Trust Company, was a member of the St. Paul Board of School Inspectors, and officed at the corner of Fourth Street and Broadway Street in 1907. William Campbell Gribben ( -1910,) Charles W. Borup ( -1921,) Virginia Gordon ( -1923,) Charles William Gordon ( -1939,) Charles R. Emerson ( -1944,) and Charles Edgar Emerson ( -1950) all died in Ramsey County. Charles John Emerson (1878-1961) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Johnson, and died in Ramsey County. Agnes Dwyer (1886-1986) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Quilan, and died in Ramsey County. Louise O. Enger (1890-1958) was born in Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Louise R. Enger (1889-1970) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Ramsey County. Charles Emerson (1876-1964) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Olson, and died in Hennepin County. Clement H. Beaulieu ( -1926,) Charles Emerson ( -1928) and Charles Allen Emerson ( -1953) all died in Hennepin County. Charlotte H. Gordon (1884-1965) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Britius, and died in Hennepin County. Agnes Marie Dwyer (1893-1962) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Commerford, and died in Hennepin County. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Maurice Auerbach resided at the nearby former 388 Summit Avenue from 1882 to 1903. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. M. Auerbach and their daughter all resided at the former nearby 388 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Maurice N. Auerbach (1883-1891,) of German heritage who died of scarlet fever, resided at the former nearby 388 Summit Avenue in 1891. Maurice N. Auerbach was the son of Maurice Auerbach. [See note for the Southern Minnesota RailRoad.] [See note for the St. Paul, Fort Snelling & Minneapolis RailRoad.]

400 Summit Avenue: Maurice Auerbach and Matilda Rice Auerbach House/Ordway House, Built in 1882/1883 (1900 according to Ramsey County property tax records) and remodeled extensively in the 1920's; originally French Second Empire/Queen Anne/Altered Victorian in style; George Wirth, architect. The structure is a story, 6410 square foot, seven bedroom, five bathroom, one half-bathroom, stucco house, with a detached garage. The once ornate mansion was originally owned by Maurice Auerbach and Matilda Rice Auerbach. The house was altered in 1891 and was further altered in the 1920's. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Lucius P. Ordway resided at this address from 1918 to 1948 and that Richard Ordway resided at this address from 1949 to 1970. W. P. Davidson owned the house from 1913 to 1920. The 1924 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Ordway resided at this address. In 1934, Lucius Pond Ordway and Jessie Gilman Ordway resided at this address. The 1930 city directory indicates that Lucius P. Ordway, the vice president-treasurer of the Crane Company, and his wife, Jessie G. Ordway, resided at this address. The 1964 St. Paul Academy Alumni Directory indicates that Richard Ordway, a member of the Class of 1921, resided at this address. Maurice Auerbach (1833/1835-1915) was born in Salzkotten, Prussia, learned the dry goods business in Prussia, came to the United States in 1857, moved to St. Paul, was employed by D. J. Justice, organized the dry goods firm of J. L. Forepaugh & Company, opened a dry goods store, converted the business to a wholesale house, was a member of the St. Paul dry goods firm of Auerbach, Finch, & Van Slyke, which became Finch, Van Slyke & McConville, was the president of the Union Bank, was an investor in the St. Paul Boom Company, was an investor in the St. Paul Gas Light Company, was an investor in the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, was the president of the St. Paul Title & Trust Company, was the president of the Union Bank of St. Paul, was president of the Merchants National Bank, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, was a member of the Minnesota Club, resided at 388 Summit Avenue in 1907, and officed at the New York Life Building in 1907. Maurice Auerbach also was a bondsman, with Horace Thompson, the president of the First National Bank of St. Paul, and Charles Scheffer of St. Paul, the president of the First National Bank of Stillwater, guaranteeing the debts of Emil Munch, the Minnesota state treasurer for two terms, and his successor (and his father-in-law,) William Seeger, after Mr. Munch purchased various timberlands and saw-mill operations in 1873 with an undisclosed $180,000 loan from the State treasury, ultimately costing Auerbach $100,000. During the course of his impeachment trial before the Minnesota Senate, Seeger resigned his office. Emil Munch's investments never ultimately prospered. Matilda W. Rice Auerbach was the daughter of an early St. Paul politician, Henry M. Rice. The Auerbach burial plot at Oakland Cemetery contains the graves of Maurice Auerbach (1835-1915,) A. Farnsworth Auerbach (1845-1878,) Maurice Newberry Auerbach (1883-1891,) Matilda Rice Auerbach (1855-1945,) Car Auerbach Rice (1888-1946,) Maurice Auerbach (1873-1878,) Bert Auerbach Rice (1881-1954,) Virginia Rice (1881-1972,) and Philip Rice (1906-1959.) Philip Rice was an RT3 in the United States Naval Reserve during World War II. Watson Pogue Davidson (1870-1953) organized the Davidson Company, which engaged largely in the rental of commercial office space, primarily in St. Paul, and was involved with the Oregon and Western Colonization Company and the Manitoba Dairy Farms, Ltd. Watson Pogue Davidson built the house at 344 Summit Avenue. In 1967, Watson Davidson helped save the New York Life Building eagle, sculpted by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, an internationally renowned sculptor most famous for his Civil War monuments and bas-relief portraits, and his brother, Louis Saint-Gaudens, by installing it outside of the Pioneer Building parking ramp. Davidson's son, William F. Davidson ( -1982), was a highly successful real estate entrepreneur and owned and managed a number of downtown St. Paul buildings, including the Pioneer, Endicott, Midwest, and Griggs-Midway buildings. Caroline F. "Torry" Davidson (1904-1999), William Davidson's wife, was the daughter of Charles W. Farnham/Farnum and Kate Humbird Farnham/Farnum, helped found the American Field Service program, a foreign exchange student program, in St. Paul in the 1950's, and was active in the Audubon Society and the Nature Conservancy. Torry Davidson's maternal grandfather, John A. Humbird, a banker and lumberman, and her great-grandfather, Jacob Humbird, who built railroads in Brazil, were both instrumental in constructing and developing the West Wisconsin RailRoad that reached Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1871. John Humbird was also associated with the timber baron, Frederick Weyerhaeuser. A later owner of this home was Lucius Pond Ordway (1862-1948), who built the St. Paul Hotel, was a partner with Richard Teller Crane in the Crane & Ordway Company, and was an early financier of the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company (3M.) Lucius Pond Ordway (1862- ,) the son of Aaron L. Ordway and Frances Ellen Hanson/Hunson Ordway, was born in Brooklyn, New York, graduated from Brown University in 1883, engaged in business immediately after graduating, was a manufacturer, married Jessie Cornwell Gilman ( -1944,) the daughter of John Melvin Gilman, in 1885, was the vice president, treasurer and manager of the Crane & Ordway Company, manufacturers and jobbers of elevators, machinery and plumbing, was a member of the board of directors of the Merchants National Bank, resided at 523 Portland Avenue in 1907, and officed at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Rosabel Street. Lucius Ordway and Jessie Ordway had five children, John Gilman Ordway (1886- ,) Samuel Gilman Ordway (1887- ,) Lucius Pond Ordway, Jr. (1890- ,) Katharine Ordway (1899- ,) and Richard Ordway (1903- .) John Gilman Ordway married Charlotte Wyman Partridge Ordway (1887- ) and the couple had one child, Sarah Prudence Ordway. The Ordway family were members of the Minikahda Country Club, the Somerset Club, and the White Bear Yacht Club in 1934. The Ordway family summered on White Bear Lake in 1934, in their summer house in Dellwood, Minnesota, built in the 1890's. Katharine Ordway attended the University of Minnesota, and graduated cum laude with degrees in Botany and Art, briefly attended Yale Medical School, then went to Columbia University to study biology and land-use planning and, with access to one fifth of an $18 million inheritance, eventually became one of the greatest private contributors to natural area conservation in American history. Richard Ordway attended St. Paul Academy and then attended Yale University, was a major stockholder in the 3M Corporation, and served as a trustee of Macalester College. Jessie Cornwell Gilman Ordway belonged to the Victoria Street Swedenborgian Church. Lucius Ordway graduated from Brown University in 1883 and moved to St. Paul and was a collector for Wilson & Rogers, a plumbing establishment. In 1884, Ordway was a salesman for Wilson & Rogers and boarded at a rooming house where William H. Lightner and James P. Elmer were also boarders, and became a partner in Wilson & Rogers, renamed Rogers & Ordway, then bought out Charles Rogers in 1892, and then became the partner of Richard Teller Crane (1832- ) of Chicago, and the firm was named Crane & Ordway. Ordway was a founder of Town and Country Club in 1887, helped reorganize the Minnesota Club in 1883, was a founding member of the University Club, was a member of the Minnesota Boat Club, was a founder of the Nushka Club in 1886, was a member of the St. Paul Curling Club, helped organize the St. Paul Institute of Science and Letters in 1907, helped reorganize the Barnard School (the predecessor of St. Paul Academy,) was a director of the Merchants National Bank from 1902 to 1929 and of the First National Bank from 1929 to 1932, and was associated with the Citizen's Association during the 1903 St. Paul journeyman plumbers' strike. Jessie Cornwell Gilman Ordway's sister, Katharine Gilman, married James Elmer (1857-,) Lucius Ordway's business friend. James P. Elmer was born in New Jersey, came to Minnesota in 1880, entered business as a manufacturer's agent and as a railway supply dealer, then worked for the Chicago Great Western Railway as a city passenger agent and as a general agent, was a member of the Minnesota Legislature, then worked as a general agent for the Equitable Life Assurance Company, and became manager of the Moore Patent Car Company. James Elmer and Katharine Elmer were childless until they adopted a nine year old girl, Agnes Dagmar Maas (1887- ,) the daughter of Hermann A. J. Maas, a driver for George Benz & Sons, and Catherina Moeller Maas ( -1893.) Agnes Dagmar Maas became Agnes Katharine Elmer upon her adoption, studied nursing at Presbyterian Hospital in New York City, and married Edgar B. Ober (1866- ) in 1910. Lucius Pond Ordway rescued the insolvent Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company in 1905 at the request of Edgar Ober, an early investor in the company, and Ordway moved the company to St. Paul to keep a better eye on it. In 1944, Richard Ordway, associated with Crane & Ordway since 1925, moved to this address from the prior Ordway family home at 523 Portland Avenue. The presidents of the Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company in the formative days of the company were Henry S. Bryan, 1902-1905, Edgar B. Ober, 1905-1906, Lucius P. Ordway, 1906-1909, Edgar B. Ober, 1909-1929, and William L. McKnight, 1929-1949. Henry S. Bryan (1836-1910) was born at Cazenovia, Madison County, New York, the son of Luther S. and Caroline Bryan, was educated at the O. C. Seminary, at Cazenovia, New York, entered the railroad service in 1859 as machinist on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad, worked in that capacity at various times for the Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul RailRoad, the Chicago & North Western RailRoad, the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad, the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago RailRoad, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern RailRoad, worked as a foreman-round house and as a foreman-machine shop at Chicago, and as master mechanic of the Chicago & Iowa Railway, the Chicago & Paducah Railway, the Chicago, Pekin & Southwestern Railway and the Chicago, Burlington & Northern Railway, married Millicent Wilson in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1890, was engaged in the mercantile business in St. Paul in 1890 as a member of the firms of Bryan, Elmer & Sloan and Bryan & Elmer, dealers in railway supplies, became the master mechanic of the Duluth & Iron Range Railway, was a resident of Two Harbors, Minnesota, was chief of motive power at the Duluth & Iron Range RailRoad, was a Mason, was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and died in Rochester, Minnesota, from colon cancer. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Carpenter Lookout is located at this address. The Carpenter Lookout was named for the Carpenter House hotel that once was located at this address. The Carpenter House was built by Warren Carpenter to take advantage of an anticipated surge in tourists to the area, which did not occur because of the Panic of 1857 and the American Civil War. Mr. Carpenter lost ownership of the hotel in the 1860's and the hotel burned to the ground in 1879. The Nushka Club was established in 1885, was intended to promote and participate in the St. Paul Winter Carnival, established in 1886 to disabuse the rest of the country that Minnesota was unfit for human habitation during the Winter, and was comprised of the "who's who" in St. Paul. The club's name apparently was derived from an Ojibway expression that meant "look." It utilized a polar bear as its mascot and had "red and black" blanket uniforms. The Chauncey Griggs house at 476 Summit Avenue was the initial Nushka Club clubhouse in 1890 and "Carpenter's Lookout," near this address, was a club rendevous. When an established clubhouse and its indoor activities began to supplant the outdoor activities of the thoroughly Victorian club, it began to decline. Horace E. Thompson ( -1919,) Emil Munch ( -1925,) Charles W. Farnham ( -1931,) Charles Finch Scheffer ( -1936,) William J. Seeger ( -1939,) Jessie Gilman Ordway ( -1944) and Matilda Rice Auerbach ( -1945) all died in Ramsey County. Richard None Ordway (1903-1976) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gilman, and died in Ramsey County. Kate H. Farnham (1872-1969) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Stalnaker, and died in Ramsey County. John M. Gilman (1824-1906) was born in the United States and died in Ramsey County. Charlotte P. Ordway (1887-1974) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wyman, and died in Ramsey County. Agnes Elmer Ober (1887-1969) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gilman, and died in Ramsey County. Philip Rice ( -1959) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Rugg, and died in Hennepin County. Watson F. Davidson ( -1954) died in Hennepin County. Caroline Farnham Davidson (1904-1999) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Humbird, and died in Washington County, Minnesota. Henry M. Rice ( -1913) died in Nicollet County, Minnesota. Edgar Buchanan Ober ( -1937) and Katharine Gilman Elmer ( -1940) died in Washington County, Minnesota. Henry Smith Bryan ( -1910) died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. The current owner of record of the property is Robert Rulon Miller, Jr. Robert Rulon-Miller, a bookseller with Rulon-Miller Books, Inc., was a contributor to the John Kerry for President campaign in 2004. The 1895 city directory indicates that Christine Better was a domestic at the nearby former 403 Summit Avenue. [See note on the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company for 297 Bates Avenue.] [See the note for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy RailRoad.] [See note on the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific RailRoad.] [See note on the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range RailRoad.] [See note on the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks for 334 Cherokee Avenue.] [See note on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul RailRoad.] [See note for the Chicago & NorthWestern RailRoad.] [See note on the 3M/Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company for 682 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.] [See note on the White Bear Yacht Club for 18 Kenwood Parkway.]

Corner of Summit and Portland Avenues: Statue of Nathan Hale, Built in 1907; Beaux Arts in style; William Partridge, sculptor. The statue was erected by the Nathan Hale Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in 1907. The land was acquired by the St. Paul Park Board before 1900. The property previously had been owned by Warren Carpenter and the Carpenter family, which had operated the five story Carpenter Hotel, with a Mansard roof and a ballustraded observation deck, on the corner of Ramsey and Summit Avenue, the site of the current Summit Overlook Park, from 1858 until 1879, when the hotel burned down. Subsequently, the Carpenter family operated a hotel on this site, 403 Summit Avenue, until it was razed and the parcel acquired by the City of St. Paul in 1887, after Warren Carpenter (1817-1886) and Maria Carpenter died. In James P. Pond v. Maria E. Carpenter and Warren Carpenter et al., 12 Minn. 430 (1867,) the Supreme Court of Minnesota reiterated the then common law rule that a married woman cannot, either at law or in equity, bind her person or her property generally by contract, held that the act of 1851, Comp. Stat., Ch. 61, sec. 106, did not remove the general disability to contract imposed by coverture, nor allow a wife living with her husband to make herself personally liable on her contracts, but found that Maria/Marie Carpenter had an estate separate from her husband, that she owned a hotel in her own name, on her own account, for her own exclusive use and benefit, and that she purchased from James Pond goods to be used in the hotel, and held that her separate estate will, in equity, be held liable for all the debts, charges, incumbrances and other engagements which she does, expressly or by implication, charge thereon, in any manner not inconsistent with the instrument by which she acquires her title to the property. Erastus Payson Carpenter (1822- ,) a straw-hat manufacturer and the developer of Edgartown/Cottage City/Oak Bluffs, Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, was a friend and partner of Warren Carpenter. Warren Carpenter, the son of James Carpenter (1785-1865) and Nancy Day Carpenter (1788-1868,) was born in Foxboro, Massachusetts, originally was a merchant and a manufacturer, initially married Susan R. Briggs ( -1845) in 1842, then married Maria/Marie __?__, and the couple had four children, Charlotte Carpenter (1860-1883,) Edna Carpenter (1849- ,) Warren Carpenter (1852- ,) and Charles Carpenter ( -1883.) William Ordway Partridge (1861-1930) was born in Paris, France, of American parents, attended Columbia University, went abroad to study sculpture, published articles on esthetics and verse novels, Angel of Clay, and The Czar's Gift, lectured at Stanford University, and was a professor at George Washington University (formerly Columbian University), Washington, D.C. He received his training as a sculptor in Florence (under Galli,) in Rome (under Welonski,) and in Paris. Partridge was a member of the Sons of the Revolution, Veteran Corps of Artillery, and the Architectural League and was an honorary member of the American Institute of Architects and of the Royal Society of Arts, London. His works include, in New York, the statue of Samuel J. Tilden, the Class of 1885 sundial (1910-1914,) the sculptures of Thomas Jefferson (1914,) Alexander Hamilton (1908,) and Dean John Howard Van Amringe (1920) at Columbia University, a Pieta, the equestrian statue of General Ulysses Simpson Grant (1896,) a bust of Theodore Roosevelt, and the Joseph Pulitzer Memorial (1913,) at Washington, D. C., a bust of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1899,) a bust of Supreme Court Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller (1888-1910,) the statue "Nearing Home," and the Samuel H. Kauffman/Seven Ages of Memory Monument (1906,) at Chicago, a statue of William Shakespeare (1893,) at Evanston, Illinois, a bust of Thomas Carlyle, at Jamestown, Virginia, a statue of Pocahontas (1922,) at Roxbury, Massachussetts, the John Reece Monument (1896,) at the 1893 World Columbian Exposition, Portrait Bust of a Lady (Marble), Bust of J. R. Lowell (Plaster,) Shakespeare (Plaster,) Nearing Home (Marble,) Madonna (Plaster,) Head of Christ (Marble,) Milton (Bronze,) Night (Marble,) A Dream (Marble,) at Great Falls, Montana, a statue of Maine legislator and U. S. Senator from Montana, Paris Gibson (1830-1920,) and at Rochester, New York, a statue of James G. Averell and the statue "Memory" (1914.) He published Art for America (1894,) The Song Life of a Sculptor (1894,) The Technique of Sculpture (1895,) The Angel of Clay (1900,) a novel, and Nathan Hale, the Ideal Patriot (1902,) a patriotic poem. Partridge was the son of George Sidney Partridge, Jr. and Helen Derby Carlin Partridge and the grandson of George Sidney Partridge and Mary Tew Partridge. His great grandfather was William Tew, a Revolutionary War soldier. His brother was Sidney Carlin Partridge, who was the first Episcopal Bishop in Kyoto, Japan. He died in New York City. The 1885 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Warren Carpenter resided at the former nearby 403 Summit Avenue. Oakland Cemetery Association records indicate that Sidney Allen Johnson and his wife, Eva Johnson (1878-1900,) of English and Canadian extraction who died of a heart clot, resided at the former nearby 403 Summit Avenue in 1900. The 1920 city directory indicates that Egel Boeckmann, a physician who officed at the Lowry Building, resided at the former nearby 404 Summit Avenue. James P. Pond (1822-1891) was born in Vermont, was educated in Vermont and in Troy, New York, initially was married to __?__ __?__, was engaged in the hardware trade in Troy, New York, New York, New York, Buffalo, New York, Detroit, Michigan, and Cincinnati, Ohio, was a member of the partnership of Halstead & Dash, was a member of the partnership of Young, Nurse & Pond, was a major in New York City's Fourth Regiment, settled in St. Paul in 1854, was a hardware merchant from 1854 until 1874, was associated with J. L. Farwell & Company from 1858 until 1860, moved to New Orleans in 1860, returned to St. Paul in 1861, was employed by the Minnesota Adjutant General's Office from 1861 until 1863, was a partner with C. D. Strong in a hardware business in 1866, was a partner in C. E. Mayo & Company from 1868 until 1874, then was involved in real estate, married __?__ Stultz ( -1883) in 1878, was an incorporator and the president of the Mercantile Library Association, and died in St. Paul. Sidney A. Johnson ( -1941) died in Ramsey County. Egil Boeckmann (1887-1955) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Gill, and died in Washington County, Minnesota.

Summit Avenue Hike 2 Architectural Notes

Description of Housing Styles

Summit Avenue Hikes - Architectural Style Notes

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