Sloth fossils and cast replicas

Sloth fossils for sale Sloth casts Sloth replicas



Sloth: Eremotherium laurillardi
Ground Sloth Skeleton

Eremotherium laurillardi

Height 11 feet tall.

Private specimen

Price: Please Inquire

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more photos or information.

Share |

The complete mounted skeleton offered here is the Serbousek specimen, and it is the sister specimen to the skeleton currently on display at the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Daytona Beach, Florida. The Serbousek sloth bones were initially prepared by technicians at the Royal Ontario Museum, and some missing elements were provided by them in the form of casts or real bones from other individuals so that Mr. Serbousek would have a 100% complete skeleton to mount. Unfortunately, making the armature and mounting such a huge skeleton is a very expensive and time-consuming process that Mr. Serbousek was never able to accomplish it in his lifetime. Over 80% of the original bones are present in this specimen, with only the following major elements being casts: pelvis, sternum, and sternal ribs. Minor cast elements include one thoracic vertebra, 5 ribs, several tail vertebrae and chevrons, and some foot and hand bones. The skull is superb and original with all original teeth but has restored zygomatic arches and minor crack repair. The skeleton mount was completed in November, 2010, only three months after Mr. Serbousek's death at the age of 83, and is now ready to be displayed proudly in any museum or private collection in the world.

As mounted, this skeleton measures 15 feet in length from head to tail yet stands 11 feet tall from the floor. It measures 5 feet wide across the hips, with the massive skull measuring 28 inches long by 14 inches wide by 15 inches tall. The natural color of the bone is a gorgeous chocolate brown, making for a truly beautiful and exquisite mount. There are only 3 known complete skeletons of these giant sloths mounted in museums around the world; one in the MOAS at Daytona Beach, Florida; one in the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; and one in the British Museum of Natural History, London. With the preparation and mounting of this sloth now finished, it has become the fourth complete mounted skeleton of Eremotherium laurillardi in the world, making this a scientifically important specimen and a true paleontological treasure.



Sloth: Megalonyx real fossil skeleton

Ground Sloth Skeleton

Megalonyx

The complete mounted skeleton offered here is from a private collection. The skeleton itself is a composite representing nearly 18 years of collecting. All bones were found and collected legally. Some missing elements were provided in the form of casts. Each bone is cradled in it's armature allowing individual pieces to be removed for study.

This beautiful skeleton will make a nice addition to any museum or private collection.

Height 8 feet tall.

Private specimen

Price: $195,000

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more photos or information.

Share |



Sloth: Eremotherium laurillardi
Ground Sloth Skeleton

Eremotherium laurillardi

Location: Volusia County Fl.

Pleistocene

Height 10 feet tall.

Molded from a privately owned specimen

Price: $65,000 assembled mount.

Also available unassembled (please inquire)

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more photos or information.

Share |



Eremotherium Mirabile Giant Ground Sloth Skeleton

Eremotherium eomigrans Giant Ground Sloth Skeleton

Skull Length - 26 inches (66 cm)
Base of the skull to base of the tail, near the pelvis - 140 inches (369 cm)
Tail length - 74 inches (188 cm)
Total length, from nose to tail, about 20 feet (6.2 m). Of course, posed, rearing up the actual "footprint" of the exhibit (floor space required) would be shorter.

Eremotherium eomigrans cast replica skeleton Price: $85,000.00
(please email us for pictures and more info). The skull is also available separately.

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Class: Mammalia, Superorder: Xenarthra, Order: Pilosa, Family: Megatheriidae, Genus: Eremotherium (Spillmann, 1948), Species: Eremotherium laurillardi (Lund 1842) and Eremotherium eomigrans (De Iullis & Cartelle 1999)


Photo is of original skeleton

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more pictures or information.

Share |



Eremotherium Mirabile sloth skeleton cast replica (item #AA101)

Eremotherium Mirabile giant Ground Sloth skeleton cast replica.

Edentate of the Late Pleistocene Gulf of Mexico littoral.

Measures: 13-ft/4m

Mounted/crated $38,690.00 assembled

$24,830.00 unassembled

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more photos or information.

Share |



Eremotherium sloth claw cast replica (item #KO 157)
In 1948 Spillmann provided the genus name Eremotherium. The species eomigrans was given by De Iullis and Cartelle in 1999.

Giant Sloths, which weighed up to 6,000 pounds, had very large, dangerous-looking claws. Despite their size, they were probably only used to strip leaves or bark from plants. The teeth of the Giant Sloths were small and blunt, in keeping with their herbivore diet. Examination of their hip bones suggests that they could stand on their hind legs to extend their grazing as high as twenty feet.

This record size claw, available without the stand, was discovered in 1991 by Frank Garcia in the now protected site called Leisley Shell Pit in Ruskin, Florida.

Cast claw measures: 23 Inches on the curve

Giant Ground Sloth Claw on Display Stand (item #KO-157-S) $215.00 (plus shipping)

Qty

____________

The claw is also available without the stand.

Giant Ground Sloth Claw (item #KO-157) $185.00 (plus shipping)

Qty

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more photos or information.

Share |



Eremotherium Mirabile Giant Ground Sloth Skull

Measures 30x15x18in.

$690.00 (plus shipping)

Qty

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more pictures or information.

Share |

Eremotherium Mirabile Giant Ground Sloth Skull

Eremotherium: Giant Ground Sloth.Edentate of the late Pleistocene.

The original bones were found in Florida, Segment of AA101.

Polyurathane cast of an original from Royal Ontario Museum.

Eremotherium is an extinct genus of ground sloth. The species, E. laurillardi, had a wide distribution spanning both South and North America and is often referred to as the Panamerican Ground Sloth.

Superorder: Xenarthra, Order: Pilosa, Family: Megatheriidae, Genus: Eremotherium



"Glossotherium" chapadmalensis (Ground Sloth / Mylodon) Skeleton

"Glossotherium" chapadmalensis Ground Sloth (Mylodon?) Skeleton Adult skeleton,

Miocene, Florida USA

Specimen molded from a private collection.

The "Glossotherium" chapadmalensis Ground Sloth (Mylodon) can be mounted in several ways. On all four feet the skeleton would be 9ft long, 4 1/2ft tall, and approx 3 1/2ft wide.

Mounted in an upright position the skeleton is approx 7ft tall, 9ft long 3 1/2ft wide.

Resin cast: $17,995

Unassembled: $10,995

Skull only: $375 (plus shipping)

Qty

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more pictures or information.

Share |



Catonyx Sloth skull

Catonyx Sloth Skull

Scientific name: Catonyx tarijensis

Pleistocene, Discovered in Bolivia

Skull cast with base measures 18"

Resin cast: $395 Sale: $385 (plus shipping)

Qty

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more pictures or information.

Share |

Catonyx is an extinct genus of actively mobile ground sloth of the family Mylodontidae, endemic to South America during the Late Pleistocene epochs. Catonyx is an extinct genus of ground sloths.

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Class: Mammalia, Order: Xenarthra, Family: Mylodontidae, Subfamily: Scelidotherinae, Genus: Catonyx



Glossotherium chapadmalensis / Glossotherium chapalmalania Sloth Skull cast
Sloth Skull, Glossotherium chapadmalensis
Discovered in Florida, USA
Mid Pliocene

This skull replica measures 17"
Resin cast: $375
Sale: $365 (plus shipping)

Qty

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more pictures or information.

Share |

Glossotherium (literally "Tongue Beast") was a genus of ground sloth. It was a heavily built animal with a length of about 4 metres (13 ft) snout to tail-tip, and could potentially assume a slight bipedal stance.

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Class: Mammalia, Order: Xenarthra, Family: Mylodontidae, Subfamily: Mylodontinae, Genus: Glossotherium



Megalonyx jeffersoni ground sloth skull cast

Megalonyx jeffersoni ground sloth skull cast replica.

Megalonyx skull measures: 11"L 9"H 6.5"W

$250.00 (plus shipping)

Qty

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more pictures or information.

Share |

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Class: Mammalia, Superorder: Xenarthra, Order: Pilosa, Family: Megalonychidae (Gervais, 1855), Subfamily: Megalonychinae, Genus: Megalonyx (Jefferson, 1799), Species: Megalonyx matthisi (Hirschfeld & Webb, 1963) Megalonyx wheatleyi (Cope, 1871) Megalonyx leptostomus (Cope, 1893) Megalonyx jeffersonii (Desmarest, 1822)

The generic name Megalonyx was proposed by future U.S. President Thomas Jefferson in 1797, based on fossil specimens of what later came to be called Megalonyx jeffersonii that he had received from western Virginia. His presentation to the American Philosophical Society that year is often credited as the beginning of vertebrate paleontology in North America.



Megalonyx skeleton cast
Megalonyx jeffersoni ground sloth skeleton cast replica.

Megalonyx skeleton cast measures: 8 ft tall

$20,000 (plus shipping)

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more pictures or information.

Share |

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Class: Mammalia, Superorder: Xenarthra, Order: Pilosa, Family: Megalonychidae (Gervais, 1855), Subfamily: Megalonychinae, Genus: Megalonyx (Jefferson, 1799), Species: Megalonyx matthisi (Hirschfeld & Webb, 1963) Megalonyx wheatleyi (Cope, 1871) Megalonyx leptostomus (Cope, 1893) Megalonyx jeffersonii (Desmarest, 1822)

Megalonyx skeleton cast replica.



Sloth (Megalonyx sp) Claw

Sloth Claw, Megalonyx sp.

Discovered in Florida, USA

Pleistocene

Customer review: "The sloth claw is very nice, thank you"

Claw measures 7.5"

Resin cast $22 plus shipping.

Qty

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more pictures or information.

Share |



Sloth: Paramylodon harlai Harlan's Ground Sloth Skeleton cast replica

Harlan's Ground Sloth Skeleton

Paramylodon harlai Harlan's Ground Sloth Skeleton cast replica.

Paramylodon is an extinct genus of ground sloth known from North America deposits in Mexico and the United States. Currently there is just one recognized species, P. harlani, that is commonly referred to as Harlan's ground sloth in honor of American paleontologist Dr. Richard Harlan who first discovered and described a lower jaw in 1835. Paramylodon exhibits an interesting character of having had dermal ossicles, small bones embedded in the skin. This would have provided an interesting degree of protection to the animal, and this character is also shared by the South American Mylodon.

Sloth skeleton cast replica skeleton. Cast in Polyurathane from an original fossil,from Late Pleistocene Rancho La Brea LACMNH license.

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Class: Mammalia, Superorder: Xenarthra, Order: Pilosa, Family: Mylodontidae, Subfamily: Mylodontinae, Genus: Paramylodon, (Brown, 1903)

Species: P. harlani

Estimated weight: 760 lbs Measures: 7ft / 2.1m

$17,325.00 (mounted and crated). Shipping not included.

Please call (314) 503-9750 or email us for more pictures or information.

Share |



Taylor Made Fossils

For ordering information please contact:

Taylor Made Fossils
1550 Irving Ave
Saint Louis, Missouri 63133 USA
(314) 503-9750
We are open 24 hours. Call anytime day or night

or

If you have questions or would like to be added to our mailing list, please Email us.

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

DINOSAURS Plateosaurus Plateosaurus upright Coelophysis Allosaurus Allosaurus baby Ceratosaurus Diplodocus Diplodocus upright Diplodocus baby Apatosaurus Apatosaurus baby Stegosaurus Stegosaurus baby Kentrosaurus Compsognathus Plesiosaurus Tylosaurus Seismosaurus Brachiosaurus Archaeopteryx plaque Pachycephalosaurus Anatosaurus Iguanodon baby Iguanodon Ankylosaurus Hypsilophodon T-Rex T-Rex baby Leptoceratops Psittacosaurus Protoceratops Velociraptor Deinonychus Polacanthus Ornithomimus Ankylosaur Triceratops baby Triceratops Styracosaurus Centrosaurus Maiasaura Maiasaura baby Segnosaurus Torosaurus Iguanodon Suchomimus Pteranodon EARLY VERTEBRATES Eusteopterum Ichtyostega Meganeura Ophiderpeton Crassygirinus Grerepeton Hylonomus Edaphosaurus Eryops Diplocaulus Dimetrodeon Dicynydon Protosaurus Thrinixadon Cynognatus Euparkerie Kuehnosaurus Ornitosuchus Tanystropheus Mastodonsaurus CENOZOIC ANIMALS Ursus spelaeus Smilidon Megaloceros Mammuthus primigenius Coelodonta Elasmotherium Megatherium Deinotherium Carcharhodon megalodon Platybelodon Phorusrhacus Syndyoceras Indricotherum Archaeotherium Brontotherium Arsinoitherium Andrewsarchus Eobasileus Diatryma Hyracotherium

SUPERB GIANT GROUND SLOTH SKELETON Eremotherium laurillardi Late Pleistocene - 180,000 to 550,000 years old Fort Thompson Formation Daytona Bone Bed, Daytona Beach, Florida

In the Late Pleistocene Epoch of Florida, there existed a diverse mammalian fauna which included some of the largest mammals to ever exist on our planet. Among these giants were huge mastodons and woolly mammoths, semi-aquatic gomphothere elephants, bison with 8 foot horn spreads, huge camels, giant armadillos the size of Volkswagen Bugs, and huge ground sloths; the largest of which was Eremotherium.

Eremotherium is the largest sloth to have ever existed and is believed to have migrated from South American to North America during the Middle Pleistocene, over the then newly-formed Panamanian land bridge. It was the largest mammal in the western hemisphere aside from the giant Woolly Mammoth and weighed approximately 5 tons at full maturity and stood up to 15 feet tall. The Eremotheres possessed huge foot-long claws on their hands which may have looked fearsome and deadly but were likely only used to denude tree limbs of their tender shoots and leaves. A powerful but stubby tail functioned as a third leg to form a tripod with the legs and massive hips, providing great stability when the animal was leaning back and stretching upward to reach the highest tree branches in order to consume the most succulent foliage. The massive arms and wide hips would allow this sloth to pull down huge branches and even whole trees if desired, and this likely led to total devastation of the forest in areas where these giant sloths were feeding. Eremotherium was a nearly perfectly designed tree destroyer and thrived in the lush tropical rainforest environments of the Florida Pleistocene. It had no natural enemies because of its size; and even the huge bears and saber-toothed tigers that coexisted with this sloth could not challenge an adult. It is possible the juveniles would have been vulnerable to attack from the largest and most powerful carnivores, but it is also quite likely these sloths possessed a strong maternal instinct that would've made a mother sloth a very aggressive and dangerous opponent in the event of an attack on its offspring.

The Discovery Over 180,000 years ago, near where the Daytona International Speedway is today, a herd of giant sloths were peacefully feeding on lush vegetation amid a grove of trees, when a catastrophic flash flood swept them into an estuary and out to sea where they drowned. Their carcasses soon sank and collected in a channel-lag, an area where the current suddenly decreases on the edges of an underwater channel. Sharks, crabs, and other organisms scavenged on some of the carcasses, but luckily silt and sand quickly covered the sloths and preserved them largely intact up until modern times. Over tens of thousands of years, the sloth graveyard was covered by 30 feet of silt, sand, shells, corals and other marine remains.

In October of 1975, what was once an undersea channel was now a dry land borrow pit quarry for road bed material. Amateur paleontologist and full-time TV repairman Don Serbousek and his friend, Roger Alexon, were out hunting fossils in the borrow pit when they made the discovery of a lifetime. In the quarry wall they saw dozens of chocolate-brown fossil bones exposed in a peaty clay layer 12 feet below the ground level. In this bone bed, they found the remains of the giant ground sloth, Eremotherium, and in great quantity. Most of the sloth bones they collected belonged to just one individual, but there were isolated bones of many different individuals found indicating that the site could be prolific. Realizing the scientific importance of his find, Serbousek contacted world-renowned sloth expert Dr. Gordon Edmund, then Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto.

Dr. Edmund proclaimed upon visiting the site and seeing the nearly complete skeleton, "From my research, I'd say this is by far the best Eremotherium, or giant sloth, skeleton discovered in North America."

With Dr. Edmund's imprimatur, plans were made for a complete and thorough scientific excavation of the site. The Volusia County government authorized public funds to expose the bone layer by stripping off the top layers of the shell beds, draining the groundwater from the pit, and using high pressure hoses to help clear matrix from around the bones. Over the next two years a team of scientists and volunteers, along with Serbousek and his friends, toiled long days in the pit using the water hoses to extract the bones while other volunteers worked to clean and conserve the bones in a preparation lab. Tens of thousands of man hours were invested in collecting and preserving the incredible giant sloth fossils found in the "Daytona Bone Bed", as it was named by Dr. Edmund in the scientific paper he published about the site. After the excavation work was completed, over 1,300 giant sloth bones had been collected from 11 different individuals in the herd; however, there were only two complete skeletons found. All of the specimens were initially taken to the Royal Ontario Museum for study and publication, with one skeleton to be mounted and returned to the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Daytona. The other unmounted skeleton was given to Don Serbousek in grateful appreciation for him selflessly bringing the most important giant sloth site ever found to the attention of science, and for his tireless efforts managing and excavating the site over the course of two years. The rest of the 1,300+ bones found during the dig were accessioned into the permanent collection of the Royal Ontario Museum where they reside to this day.

The Present Specimen The complete mounted skeleton offered here is the Serbousek specimen, and it is the sister specimen to the skeleton currently on display at the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Daytona Beach, Florida. The Serbousek sloth bones were initially prepared by technicians at the Royal Ontario Museum, and some missing elements were provided by them in the form of casts or real bones from other individuals so that Mr. Serbousek would have a 100% complete skeleton to mount. Unfortunately, making the armature and mounting such a huge skeleton is a very expensive and time-consuming process that Mr. Serbousek was never able to accomplish it in his lifetime. Over 80% of the original bones are present in this specimen, with only the following major elements being casts: pelvis, sternum, and sternal ribs. Minor cast elements include one thoracic vertebra, 5 ribs, several tail vertebrae and chevrons, and some foot and hand bones. The skull is superb and original with all original teeth but has restored zygomatic arches and minor crack repair. The skeleton mount was completed in November, 2010, only three months after Mr. Serbousek's death at the age of 83, and is now ready to be displayed proudly in any museum or private collection in the world. As mounted, this skeleton measures 15 feet in length from head to tail yet stands 11 feet tall from the floor. It measures 5 feet wide across the hips, with the massive skull measuring 28 inches long by 14 inches wide by 15 inches tall. The natural color of the bone is a gorgeous chocolate brown, making for a truly beautiful and exquisite mount. There are only 3 known complete skeletons of these giant sloths mounted in museums around the world; one in the MOAS at Daytona Beach, Florida; one in the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; and one in the British Museum of Natural History, London. With the preparation and mounting of this sloth now finished, it has become the fourth complete mounted skeleton of Eremotherium laurillardi in the world, making this a scientifically important specimen and a true paleontological treasure.

Taylor Made Fossils main page