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Understanding, Assessing, & Treating Sexual Offenders: Tools for the Therapist

By Matthew D. Rosenberg, MSW, CSW
Edited by Debra Pawluck, MSW, CSW

Mr. Rosenberg has spent 5 years developing a workbook to assist the therapist in the orientation to sex offender treatment. Moreover, Mr. Rosenberg has developed dozens of assessment tools that assist the therapist in understanding the dynamics of a particular client. He has created numerous treatment tools and exercises that help guide both the therapist and client through the treatment process.

In Section One: Essays and Orientation Tools, Mr. Rosenberg addresses topical areas such as Compassion and Sex Offender Therapy, Fear and Sexual Offending, Fantasies, The Sex Offender Therapist, Sex Offender Group Therapy, Denial and Sexual Offending, The Importance of the Family, and The Use of Metaphors, to name a few. His essays provoke meaningful thought and offer excellent insight into many of the dynamics involved with this population.

The workbook is also intended to assist in orientating the therapist to working with sexual offenders. Therefore, Mr. Rosenberg has included a number of training exercises and other material, such as Methods for Writing a Social History for Sex Offenders, Motivational Factors Associated with Child Molestation, a full Training Outline, Core Phases of Sex Offender Therapy, and a Risk Classification System and Treatment Setting. Included in the appendix are examples of a full psychosocial history report, treatment plan with goals and objectives, a glossary of terms, resource page, full bibliography, and three Training Scenarios for the therapist (Profiles and Modus Operandi, Victimology, and Interviewing and Assessment).

To assist the therapist in assessing his or her client, Mr. Rosenberg has developed dozens of assessment tools. Some of the tools include The Offense and Sexual Development History, 3 Projective Stories (for adolescents and children), The Rosenberg Historical Risk Assessment, The Truth Scale, The Rosenberg Sexual Deviance Assessment, The Rosenberg Deception Assessment, Erotic Sentence Completion, Victimology Scale, and many more.

Finally, in Section Three: Treatment Tools, there are numerous exercises that will assist the client in increasing victim empathy, understanding his or her behaviors, highlighting cognitive distortions, and assisting with relapse prevention. Some of the exercises include Victim Empathy, Precycle Chart of Affect, Cognition, and Behavior, Feelings/Thoughts/Behaviors Exercise, Distortions in Cognitions, Factors that Contribute to Sexual Abuse, Stress/Fantasies/and Masturbation, Triggers, Relapse Prevention Plan Outline, and numerous treatment tests and quizzes.

Contents of Workbook
Example of Clinical Essay
Example of Assessment Tool
Example of Treatment Tool
Example of Training Tool

The workbook is 181 pages in length, and is only available at this time as a PDF file. Those who have purchased the PDF version have related that it is much more practical because they can print out the full version and place in a folder; print out exercises for clients, or simply read and utilize the workbook on their computer. Understanding, Assessing, & Treating the Sexual Offender: Tools for the Therapist, PDF version, is only $9.95.

Comments from professionals who have purchased the workbook

"I have attended your two-day workshop and purchased your workbook. Our agency has purchased additional copies for our clinical staff to utilize and reference. Understanding, Assessing, and Treating Sexual Offenders is written in a clinician-friendly and consumer applicable manner. I have utlized the assessment tools with positive results. Your workbook contains valuable, usable tools for the clinician treating both adolescent and adult sexual offenders. I subscribe to {The Horizon Newsletter} and I look forward to your next trainings. Please be sure to publish the dates with advanced notice, as I want to send my staff. . ."-Jeffrey Fraser, MSW, CSW, NorServ Group, Ltd, Program Director

Understanding, Assessing, and Treating Sexual Offenders: Tools for the Therapist, will also be available online as a downloaded PDF file. You must use Acrobat PDF Reader to open file. To order, use our online secure credit card form below, and include the email address where it should be sent; or complete the form below and mail to the address listed. You will receive the workbook at an email attachment within four hours of purchase.

Click below for the link to order
To purchase the book using check or money order, please send check payable to Mr. Matthew Rosenberg, MSW, CSW, along with the following form:

Name:_______________________________________
Address:_____________________________________
City/State/Zip:_________________________________
Amount enclosed:$____________
Email address:___________________________________

Send to Rosenberg & Associates, 31201 Chicago Road, Suite A102, Warren, Michigan 48093

Examples from workbook below

Contents

Section One: Essays & Orientation Tools

Compassion and sex offender therapy....................................................3
Dynamics of child molestation as viewed by child molesters.................5
Fear and sexual offending........................................................................8
Fantasy......................................................................................................10
Sex and sexual behavior in the U.S..........................................................12
The sex offender therapist........................................................................15
Sex offender therapy: The therapeutic relationship................................17
Sex offender specific group therapy.........................................................20
Denial and sexual offending......................................................................22
The use of metaphors in sex offender therapy.........................................24
Etiology of deviant and aggressive male behavior...................................26
The importance of the family.....................................................................31
Methods for writing a social history for sex offenders.............................33
Motivational factors associated with child molestation............................35
Training outline...........................................................................................37
Core phases of sex offender therapy.........................................................48
Risk classification and treatment setting...................................................49

Section Two: Assessment Tools

Offense and sexual development history................................................52
Projective story: The boy that?...............................................................58
Projective story: Why me?.......................................................................59
Projective story: I can’t believe my eyes................................................60
Word match...............................................................................................62
The Rosenberg historical risk assessment.............................................64
The truth scale..........................................................................................68
Pyramid of importance..............................................................................69
The Rosenberg sexual deviance assessment..........................................71
The Rosenberg sexual deception assessment part I..............................77
The Rosenberg sexual deception assessment part II............................78
The Rosenberg erotic sentence completion............................................81
Incomplete sentences-delinquency..........................................................82
Treatment evaluation scale.....................................................................83
Progress and evaluation scale.................................................................84
Low, moderate, and high-risk victims......................................................85
Victimology scale......................................................................................86

Section Three: Treatment Tools

Sex offender treatment...........................................................................90
Victim empathy........................................................................................94
Feelings, thoughts, & behaviors.............................................................97
Precycle chart of affect, cognition, & behavior......................................98
Feelings, thoughts, & behaviors exercise..............................................99
Feelings, thoughts, & behaviors exercise II.........................................102
Feeling, thinking, & behavior log..........................................................104
Risk assessment scale for clients.........................................................105
Distortions in cognitions........................................................................107
Factors that contribute to sexual abuse................................................108
Self esteem and self perception............................................................110
Stress, fantasies, & masturbation.........................................................113
Triggers...................................................................................................118
Relapse prevention plan.........................................................................120
Letter to yourself....................................................................................129
Autobiography.........................................................................................131
Quiz on fantasies and stress..................................................................134
Quiz on cycle of sexual abuse.................................................................136
Quiz on sexual offense chain..................................................................138
Sex offender treatment test....................................................................140
Sex education quiz..................................................................................145
Sex education quiz II..............................................................................147

Section Four: Terminology, Resources, & References

Terminology/glossary.............................................................................154
Training scenario (profiles & modus operandi)....................................159
Training scenario (victimology).............................................................161
Training scenario (interview & assessment).........................................164
Resources................................................................................................169
Example of social history........................................................................172
Example of treatment plan......................................................................174
References/literature review...................................................................175

Motivational Factors Associated with Child Molestation

Critical review of the case of John, a 25 year old child molester convicted of Criminal Sexual Conduct II

Brief case history
John is a 25 year old Caucasian male who has always resided with his biological parents. He is a socially awkward young man and is very self critical. He denies ever engaging in sexual intercourse thus far in his life, and states that he is sexually immature. He appears to have the countenance and mannerisms of a 15 year old boy.

John admits to fondling an 8 year old girl on one occasion. The victim was the daughter of a close friend of John. Upon reviewing the victim characteristics, I determined that she would be classified as a moderate to high risk victim. She is much closer with her father than her mother, but the father spends very little time with her. She is left alone much of the time, even though her father may be in the home with her. Her father is a habitual cannabis user, and cannabis appears to be a major focus of his life. The victim appeared to yearn for the attention of her father and other adult figures in her life. She has a 14 year old sister who is much closer to their mother.

Why John crossed the line, and how?

Two motivational clusters: Cluster One
Cluster one includes all of the interpsychic and interpersonal dynamics which set up the tone for dysfunctional behavior and possibly sexual offending.

-John admits to being very lonely prior to the offense. He states he had not had an intimate female relationship prior to his assault.
-John states that he experienced a number of symptoms of depression prior to offending.
-John states that he felt very comfortable interacting with the victim. More comfortable at that time than with any adult female.
-The victim was therefore in John’s “comfort zone”.
-John states that he liked the attention he received from the victim prior to his offense. He states that he felt special when she spoke to him.
-John states that he felt more secure of himself, and was not self critical, when in the presence of the victim.

It must be noted that many adults experience many of the same symptoms as in cluster one, and do not sexually offend against a child. It is therefore, cluster one coupled with cluster two that may have pushed John into his sexual deviance.

Rosenberg Sexual Deviance Assessment

Please read each scenario very carefully. Once you have read the scenario, please complete the questions that follow. Complete each sentence with whatever you think fits best. If you have any questions, please ask your therapist.

1. Joy, a 6 year old brown hair girl, is playing by herself in her room. Tom, her 15 year old cousin, is downstairs watching sex movies by himself. A few minutes later Tom goes upstairs to Joy’s room and begins to play with her. He then asks her to touch his penis, and she does not say or do anything. Tom then tells her that if she touches his penis he will let her play his video game. Joy then walks over to Tom and begins to touch his penis.

a. The person most responsible for the sexual contact is __________________________________.
b. In the story, Tom is trying to _______________________________________________________.
c. Joy probably ____________________________________________________________________.
d. When Tom watched the sex movies he _______________________________________________.
e. When Joy saw Tom’s penis she probably _____________________________________________.
f. The reason Tom wanted to be sexual with Joy is _______________________________________.
g. When Joy gets older she will probably think of Tom as ___________________________________.

Stress, Fantasies, and Masturbation

Stress is tension or pressure on the body and mind that is caused by a wide variety of things. Some of the common things that cause stress are—divorce, parent’s fighting, poor grades, peer pressure, moving, sexual offending, and so forth.

People handle stress a number of ways. Please list some of the ways you think people (or yourself) handle stress (BOTH GOOD AND BAD WAYS).

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Stress comes in two forms: positive and negative. Positive stress is stress created by things that are positive, and negative stress is stress that is created by things that are negative. Please list some sources of positive and negative stress:

POSITIVE

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NEGATIVE

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Our body and mind like to maintain a “relaxed” feeling. Stress and tension do not make us feel relaxed, but instead make us feel frustrated, tired, angry, and so forth. When we have too much stress and tension, our body will try to make us feel relaxed. One way our body does this is through doing things that make us feel good. Name some of the things that our body can do that will make us feel good:

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One of the major ways our body tries to make us feel better and take away that stress is through fantasies. A fantasy is a dream or made up event that is not real, and the likelihood of it coming true is very small. It takes us out of our world (which is full of stress) and puts us into fantasy land. For example, a boy who is starving to death (which creates a lot of stress) may fantasize about eating the best food in the world. Moreover, a girl who has been raped by her brother may fantasize about killing him. Most people realize that fantasies are just that, fantasies, and will not try and live them out. However, we fantasize about things we really would like to happen, and if given the opportunity and the circumstances are right, we may try and act a fantasy out.

Training Scenarios(Profiles & M.O.'s)

#1

John is a 17 year old male who has been sent to a forensic specialist to determine his intensity and type of sexual deviancy. John admits that he has fondled his 6 year old niece on approximately 3 occasions around the vaginal region, but denies penetration (there is no evidence to suggest penetration). When asked why he did it, John states that he was “curious” about sex, and that she wanted him to do it to her. He admits to having an erection during each offense, but states that he did not expose himself nor masturbate in her presence (he states that he masturbated following the offense). John scored very high on the Beck Depression Inventory, and admits that he has been teased at school for most of his life. He states that he feels much more comfortable with younger children because they are not "cruel”.

a. What DSM-IV diagnosis might John exhibit the symptoms of?____________________________
b. Does John exhibit any symptoms of a rape profile?______________
c. What adolescent typology would John best fall into?________________________
d. Is there any evidence to suggest a secondary paraphilia? ____________________________
e. Does John’s sexual deviancy appear to be goal-oriented or exploratory?_____________________

#2

Which rapist profile harbors a generalized anger towards a specific gender, and will inflict great physical damage on the victim?
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#3

Where might you most likely expect to find a frotteur?
a) in the woods
b) in a topless bar
c) on a bus
d) in a park

(Copyrighted Material 2000)