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YAMAHA FZ1 
Super Standard

MUSCLE-SPORT MOTORCYCLE
Basic information, specs, opinions from reviews.


A true Muscle Bike right out of the box?

I received my FZ1 in May of 2001 and will in the future have some other FZ1 pages online.  This page is a collection of information gathered while studying the bike as an everyday replacement for the Vmax and Magna, with the intentions of keeping them as classic muscle bikes. Hopefully the FZ1 will fit the bill as a long range, light weight modern muscle tourer, with the idea of replacement.  I suspicion the FZ1 is the bike I have been waiting to come onto the market for quite sometime.  Personal review of the bike will be coming as the summer of 2001 progresses.


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Yamaha FZ1

New in 2001, in relatively short supply with a high demand.
Retail:  $8500, generally  $8300-8400;  with tax and insurance $9500 +/- on the road.
Basic information, specs, opinions from reviews.


The reviewers say:
Enough power to take on the cream of the superbikes.
Bucket-loads of practicality and a price tag less than $8,500. 

An R1 for the Real World" 
Everyday comfort coupled with razor sharp handling and open class power.
Fills a position between sportbikes and standards, a sport-standard, a muscle-sport.
So comfortable, so fast, so little money.
Soft spoken beast with serious steam.
One motorcycle that can to it all.
A big-bore standard-style motorcycle providing vast power reserves.
Just like the R1, the FZ1 will again set another standard for sporting street motorcycles. 
Providing uncompromised performance in a comfortable, all-around package.
It sounds like an impossible dream.
Confidence is inspired.
All out performance. 
One would be hard pressed to find a more balanced motorcycle.

Positives:
Big bang for the buck.
Fantastic power band, top to bottom.
Terrific brakes.
Comfortable ergonomics with an everyday, sensible sit-up riding position.
Dizzying 49 degree lean angle.
Comes on strong about 7k with afterburners at 9k.
R1's EXUP exhaust control for mid-range while allowing ferocious top end thrust.
Same transmission and shifting improvements made the 2000 R1.
Same confidence-inspiring way on the curves as the R1.
The same brilliant stopping ability.
97% of the R1's bodacious power.
One of the fastest out of the box land machines from point A to B.  
Outstanding on the road.
A sporty motorcycle with real handlebars and reasonable seat.
Great engine, brakes, handling, with a very good suspension.
Comfortable and attractive.
Superior balance and suspension.
A centerstand.
Initial Complaints:
Blush initial suspension.
Poor weather protection.
Tank is fat between riders legs.
Transmission is just average, notchy with too long a throw.
Flat spot between 3-4000rpm.

 


 

YZF-R1 Performance:
Measured top speed: 168 mph
Quarter Mile: 10.25 at 136.13 mph
0-60 mph: 2.96 sec
0-100 mph: 5.93 sec.
60-0 mph: 113.9'
Redline:  11,750 rmp
Power to weight ratio: 1:3.49
Horsepower at the crank: 148 at
Peak Horsepower: 130.73 bhp at 10,250 rpm 
Peak Torque: 82 ft-lbs at 8,250 rpm 

 

 

FZ1 Performance:
Measured top speed: 154mph.  
Quarter mile:  10.55sec, @130
0-60mph:  3.01 sec.
0-100mph:   6.48sec.
60-0 mph:  111.1 ft.
Redline: 11,500 rpm
Power to weight ratio:  1 to 4.10
Horsepower at the crank:  141 at 9,.500 rpm
Peak Horsepower:
Peak Torque:  78 ft-lbs at 7500 rpm


Speed at 65 indicated on speedometer was 62.5mph actual.
RPM at 65 is 4600, at redline is 11,500.
Fuel mileage, 44.3 to 28.6, averaging 40.0

Engine Service Interval: Valve adjustment interval is 26,000miles
Warranty: 12 months unlimited miles

Some Performance Data on various bikes:

Top Speeds:
....192mph, Suzuki Hayabusa (Oct 2001 Sport Rider)
....190mph, Kawasaki ZX-12R (Oct 2001 Sport Rider)
....179mph, Suzuki GSX-R1000 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....157mph, Suzuki GSX-R600 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....157mph, Honda CBR600F4i (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....157mph, Yamaha YZF-R6 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....153mph, Yamaha FZ1 (Mag Reviews, Z's Sigma calc.)
....144mph, Yamaha Vmax (introduced 1985, Z's best guess)
....142mph, Honda 1985 V65 Magna (Z's best guess)


Rear Wheel Hp
....159.8hp, Kawasaki ZX-12R (Oct 2001 Sport Rider)
....158.0hp, Suzuki Hayabusa (Oct 2001 Sport Rider)
....143.9hp, Suzuki GSX-R1000 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....129.2hp, Honda CBR929RR (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....128.4hp, Yamaha YZF-R1 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....120+hp, Yamaha FZ1 (Mag Reviews, Z's dyno run)
....108+hp, Yamaha Vmax (introduced 1985, Z's dyno run)
....100.1hp, Suzuki GSX-R600 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
.....98.6hp, Honda 1985 V65 Magna (Z's dyno run)
.....98.4hp, Honda CBR600F4i (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
.....96.9hp, Yamaha YZF-R6 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)

Torque
...100.1ft-lb, Susuke Haybusa (Oct 2001 Sport Rider)
....91.4ft-lb, Kawasaki ZX-12R (Oct 2001 Sport Rider)
....77+ft-lb, Yamaha Vmax (introduced 1985, Z's dyno run)
....75.1ft-lb, Suzuki GSX-R1000 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....70.3ft-lb, Yamaha YZF-R1 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....70+ft-lb, Yamaha FZ1 (Mag Review, Z's dyno run)
....68+ft-lb, Honda V65 1985 Magna (Z's dyno run)
....67.6ft-lb, Honda CBR929RR (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....45.2ft-lb, Suzuki GSX-R600 (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....43.6, Honda CBR600F4i (Nov 2001 Sport Rider)
....42.0, Yamaha YZF-R6

 


 

Development
.... Initially the FZ1 was developed as the Fazer for the European market upon request to satisfy the Euros high-mileage, high performance riders.  Yamaha engineers took the heart of their class-leading liter bike, the R1, and "re-tuned" it for broad band torque and power at all ranges for street and road riding.  

   

....Aggressive modern performance and handling were the center focus, without requiring the uncomfortable contortions to ride a "squid."  Yamaha developed the bike to fit in the current "naked class" with machines like the Suzuki Bandit and Kawasaki ZXR12 .   
....The bike was developed to appeal to young riders unable to afford insurance on the R1, and  for experienced riders who wanted the aggressive performance of the R1 with a more normal sit-up jockey style riding position.  Yamaha christened the American version, the FZ1, "An R1 or the real world."


Everyday Comfort Coupled with Razor Sharp Handling and Open Class Power
....
Introducing the all-new FZ1. A motorcycle that is sure to set the sport motorcycling world on fire.
....Derived from the legendary R1, the FZ1 packs a huge amount of horsepower (140+ at the crank and 120+ rear wheel) and torque into a chassis that handles like a superbike yet is comfortable enough to ride all day long.


....The FZ1 is aimed squarely at the rider who likes sportsbike performance but prefers more comfortable ergonomics. The FZ1 offers a more traditional upright seating position, yet sacrifices nothing in terms of engine and handling performance. The FZ1 is a real-world street motorcycle that has the performance to back up its road racing heritage.

Naked Bike
....The FZ1's styling was also heavily influenced by the R1. The aerodynamic front fairing has been designed for a very low drag coefficient and excellent rider wind protection. Retaining the R1's characteristic twin multi-reflector headlights are dual 12V 60/55W bulbs that project a wide beam light while creating that unmistakable R1 cat-eye profile. Body mounted mirrors are used to provide good rear visibility.
....Most noted in the new FZ1's appearance is the lack of full bodywork, exposing the compact engine for an ageless sporting look. The engine has been finished with a redesigned aluminum cylinder head cover and the cylinders are coated in a striking silver paint.
....The seat has been designed with rider comfort in mind and the tail section was crafted after that of the R1. Up front, a new low-rise handlebar is used for excellent steering input and rider comfort.

 



Yamaha's opinion of their R1:

....The R1 was universally acclaimed by journalists throughout the world as one of the most important bikes of the '90's that broke just about every record in the large-capacity supersport class. The general consensus of opinion was that the R1 didn't merely live up to the claims that had been made by Yamaha, it far exceeded them
....In terms of engine and chassis performance, the R1 raised the stakes in the hard-fought supersport category to a whole new level. Other supersport machines that had previously been considered as state-of-the-art before the R1 arrived suddenly looked well past their prime after the fall of 1997. Delivering awesome levels of power combined with precision handling performance, this high-tech one-liter motorcycle is regarded as one of the most influential sportbike models ever.
....In 2000, the R1 received a total makeover with more than 150 component changes. It was winner of the 2000 Sport Rider open class comparison, scoring perfect 10's in engine power delivery, transmission, chassis and handling, suspension and the fun-to-ride category. 9.5's and 9.0's in all others. It was also Motorcycle On-Line's 2000 Openbike Shootout winner.  Cost: $10,300-10,800.

 


Engine:
998cc, liquid-cooled, transverse, (sitting sideways), inline 5-valve DOHC four, four-stoke.
Bore 74mm, stroke 58mm
Compression ratio:  11.8:1
Four Mikuni BSR37, 37mm sidedraft (side mounted) carburators
A revised cylinder head with 37mm sidedraft carps.
6 speed tranmission
Honest 115+ rear wheel horsepower.
Inside the engine of the FZ1 is a new cylinder head designed to work with the new horizontally mounted carburetors. A new crankshaft, 10% heavier than the R1, increases inertial mass, which improves the around-town ridability. 
Clutch:
An 18mm smaller diameter clutch reduces the weight by about 1# of the entire clutch assembly, even with an added plate over the R1.
The smaller clutch eases shifting shock and the associated drive train lash.
Two extra Clutch places.
Transmission:  
Has a longer main shaft and drive shaft over the R1,  to accommodate the new engine location.
The internal gear ratios of the transmission are the same as the R1.
The rear sprocket has one extra tooth, which increases acceleration off the line and deals with the extra weight over the R1.
The six-speed transmission is outfitted with gear ratios the same as the R1. The clutch is redesigned to reduce weight and provide smooth shifting. Final drive is a 530 O-ring chain.
Cooling System:
A new, more compact radiator (than the R1) is utilized on the new FZ1, although it will use the same diameter fan as the R1. Coolant lines from the radiator to the carburetors  have been added so performance is not affected by weather conditions, providing consistent and predictable throttle response. A steel mesh cover protects the front of the radiator from road debris.

Chassis:
Front tire: 120/70-ZR 17 Bridgestone BT-020; low profile radial
Rear tire:  180/550ZR 17 Bridgestone BT-020; low profile radial
Rake, 26 degrees; tail, 4.1 inch (104mm)
Wheelbase:  57.1 inch (1450mm)
Ground clearance, 5.5 inches
Fuel Capacity:  5.5 US gallons (20.8L)
Weight: 459lb dry (208kg), 509 wet.
Gross vehicle total weight, 927 lb.
Carrying capacity of 415 lb.
48.9% weight on front wheel (51.0% for R1)

Driveline
Changed from the R1 with different main shaft, countershaft, and shift linkage.

Frame
The cost savings has been realized in the chassis area.
To hold cost down and since it was not needed for street/road demands, the R1's big twin-spar aluminum frame was replaced with a chrome-moly steel frame.
The frame is a double-cradle frame type, well suited to street demands.  
The upper frame tubes are large 48.6mm members supporting the twin cradles.  
Since the engine is no longer a stressed member of the frame, rubber mounts can be used to reduce engine vibration transmitted to the rider.
A boss (mounting tabs) was added to the engine case to facilitate mounting to the frame.
The chassis is very stout  Cradling that horsepower factory is perimeter-style steel tube frame mated to a box section aluminum swingarm that adds up to incredible rigidity and confidence inspiring handling. The swingarm encompasses a new cross-sectional construction that reduces weight and keeps the swingarm flex-free for precise handling.

 

Steering Geometry 
The rake of the front fork was increased out to 26 degrees, which produces more steering stability for street use over the R1.
The trail was increased 2mm to 104mm, which also increases street stability.  
Short trailing geometry and tucked under forks produce very quick steering and handling, but can be much less stable during normal aggressive everyday riding.

Suspension
Both front and rear are fully adjustable components produced by Yamaha owned, SOQI suspension company.
Taking care of the suspension duties are 43mm conventional Kayaba forks and a Kayaba rear shock. Mated to a progressive linkage to provide 65mm of travel in the back, the piggy-back style rear shock is fully adjustable for preload, compression and rebound dampening to help fine tune the ride. The front forks provide 140mm of wheel travel and also adjust for preload, compression and rebound dampening. Beefy aluminum triple clamps keeps the front end in line while returning a stable feel to the rider.

Fork
Conventional telescopic fork,  but fully adjustable for compression, rebound, preload, 5.5 inches of travel.
The fork tubes are a beefy 43mm.
Dual rate springs are contained within the fork tubes, with the first 2.5 inches of travel being on a softer rate spring, for a more "plush" street ride.
The heavier spring of the dual rate set comes into play near the end of the initial fork travel.
The forks are adjustable, so have the benefit for preload of compression and rebound. 

Wheels
Newly designed 17" three-spoke wheels are fitted to the FZ1 front and back. Equipped with a 120/70 ZR17 tire up front and a 180/55ZR17 tire in back, the FZ1's rubber has been designed for adaptability to a variety of situations, from city riding to carving canyon back roads.

Tires
Rear wheel width is 5.5 inches from an OEM Bridgestone BT-020 with is a 180/55-ZR 17.
While the R1 is 6.0 from a 190/50-ZR 17.

Front Brakes
Are the same 298mm diameter rotors and four piston Sumintomo monobloc (milled from one solid piece of aluminum thus eliminating expansion flex of two piece calibers) calipers as the R1.
Pad compound is different, being a new sintered material, supposedly to cut down on braking noise and to produce a slightly softer bite.
Adjustable front brake lever.

 

Rear Brake
Moved up to 267mm, with a new larger diameter twin  piston caliper designed to give more power and better feel while braking.
It is usefully strong without being too sensitive.
The rear uses the same pad compound as the front.

Exhaust:
EPA restrictions keep the sound relatively mute.
Full 4 into 1 header system.

Protection:
Wind protection on the legs is surprisingly good, given no lowers on the fairing.
Windscreen does not offer good protection and needs to be larger.

Instrument cluster:
Complete set, speedo, odometer, continuous clock, dual tripmeter, fuel level.
indicators for hi-beam, t/s, neutral, oil, low fuel, coolant temp.
Wide high-mounted mirrors.

Electrical:
Stronger alternaor.
12 amp/hour battery.

 

Handlebars
Sit relatively high and side.
Offer good leverage for street riding.
Are rubber mounted and dull steering precision.

Ergonomics and extras
3.7" taller overall than the R1
Sit-up jockey style riding position.
No forward foot placement.
Footpegs rubber mounted.
Vibration between 5-6k noticeable but not uncomfortable.
External helmet lock.

Passenger Compartment
Seat is considered plush, but tall at 32.3 to 31.75 inches.
Rear seat is quite functional, with rear grab rails convenient and attactive.
Passenger footrests are fitted with lead weights on the bottom to dampen vibration.

Riding Thoughts
A sit-up, jockey style riding position.
Superbike sytle handlebars.
Plush/soft initial suspension travel.
Amiable bottom end (low rpms) power, with a complete broad powerband.
Midrange oomph coming out of corners, light-to-light, during roll-ons.



R1 riders with experience and on the track would notice the lack of top end rush, but that is not where the action is at on the street.
Shifting much better than the clunky R1 transmission.
Generally vibration/buzz-free on the rider at normal speeds, except between 5-6000rpms.
Soft/plush feel probably intentionally designed for the bumpy surfaces of today's bad roads.

 


R1-Based Engine
....The new FZ1 has been fitted with an engine based on the R1. With redesigned cylinder head, the compact 998cc liquid-cooled beast is fed by four side-draft 37mm carbs (with Throttle Position Sensor) that shoot straight into the five-valve-per-cylinder inline four-cylinder engine. This produces outstanding horsepower along with a big, fat torque curve.
....Handling the exhaust chores is a 4-into-1 system controlled by Yamaha's Exhaust Ultimate Powervalve (EXUP) that precisely matches the exhaust backpressure with engine RPM to create maximum power. A large superbike-style stainless steel muffler provides a mellow yet throaty tone, and it's tucked in to provide good ground clearance
....A new, more compact radiator (than the R1) is utilized on the new FZ1, although it will use the same diameter fan as the R1. Coolant lines from the radiator to the carburetors have been added so performance is not affected by weather conditions, providing consistent and predictable throttle response. A steel mesh cover protects the front of the radiator from road debris.
....Inside the engine of the FZ1 is a new cylinder head designed to work with the new horizontally mounted carburetors. A new crankshaft, 10% heavier than the R1, increases inertial mass, which improves the around-town ridability. The six-speed transmission is outfitted with gear ratios the same as the R1. The clutch is redesigned to reduce weight and provide smooth shifting. Final drive is chain.

 

The FZ1 Engine:  
Peak horsepower at the crank (not rear wheel) is listed as 141hp at 9500, which is only 7hp lower than the R1.  
Torque peaks 4ft-lb lower and 750rpms sooner, with 78ft-lb at 7500rmp.  
Reline is reduced 250rpm to 11,500
The changes in the R1 engine to become the FZ1 were directed toward broadening the usable horsepower and torque on the street, and not just have a "peaky" curve at the high rpm end as required for true racing machines.
Crankshaft weight was increased 10% to smooth out acceleration and deceleration.
Connected to the new crank are R1 connecting rods and pistons.
Instead of the downdraft 40mm carbs for peaky hp/torque on the R1, 37mm sidedraft carbs are used.
Compression ratio is still a stout 11.8:1.
The torque enhancing EXUP valve remains.
Sidedrafts also allow for an increase in fuel tank capacity, up to 5.5 gallons.
 
The 37mm carbs and a one liter smaller airbox help direct power to the midrange, where most street/road action occurs.
The engine head was redesigned to fit the side mounted carbs.
The combustions chambers remained the R1 design, with the result being an oval interface (space) between the manifolds and the head.
Mounted inside the heads are R1 cams, springs and valves.
The cam lobe timing was changed to enhance everyday power deliver.
At the top is an aluminum cylinder head cover with a coat of silver paint.  The R1 uses a lighter magnesium head cover.
The engine sits in full view on the FZ1
The oil drain plug has been moved to the side.
To meet European standards a new air-induction system was designed to meet European standards. Generally proper air/fuel mixture not only produces less pollutants, but runs better.
Coolant warmed carbs.
The fuel mixture is preheated around the idle jets by coolant, to aid in quicker warm up, which improves idle stability and throttle response.
12% smaller airbox.


 

Stout Chassis
....Cradling that horsepower factory is perimeter-style steel tube frame mated to a box section aluminum swingarm that adds up to incredible rigidity and confidence inspiring handling. The swingarm encompasses a new cross-sectional construction that reduces weight and keeps the swingarm flex-free for precise handling.
....Taking care of the suspension duties are 43mm conventional Kayaba forks and a Kayaba rear shock. Mated to a progressive linkage to provide 65mm of travel in the back, the piggy-back style rear shock is fully adjustable for preload, compression and rebound dampening to help fine tune the ride. The front forks provide 140mm of wheel travel and also adjust for preload, compression and rebound dampening. Beefy aluminum triple clamps keeps the front end in line while returning a stable feel to the rider.
....Newly designed 17" three-spoke wheels are fitted to the FZ1 front and back. Equipped with a 120/70 ZR17 tire up front and a 180/55ZR17 tire in back, the FZ1's rubber has been designed for adaptability to a variety of situations, from city riding to carving canyon back roads.

Rear Suspension:
Adjustable for compression, rebound, preload, with 5.1 inches of travel.
There is one piggyback-style 3-way adjustable shock, which operates through a newly designed aluminum link-type swingarm. 
Has a ramped-collar for simple preload adjustments andan 11-step range.
There is no bracing on the rear swingarm, and an internal cross member is relied on to keep the rear wheel in line.

Final Drive:
No. 50 O-ring chain

 


 

Stopping Power
....Mated to all that power and handling prowess are brakes designed to bring this machine to a screeching halt. Borrowed from the R1 are the FZ1s front brakes four piston one-piece calipers clamping to dual 298mm vented disc rotors, with only the brake pads being slightly different. The front brake lever has five position adjustment that allows the amount of brake feel to be dialed in according to rider preference. A single piston rear caliper squeezes a 267mm vented rotor in the back helping provide serious stopping power.

 



YAMAHA FACTORY ADVERTISEMENT LISTED FEATURES & BENEFITS

Exclusive FZ1 Features:
....Compact, ultra-lightweight 998cc, DOHC, 20-valve, liquid-cooled in-line four-cylinder engine tuned for outstanding mid-range punch and more than 140 horsepower.
....Redesigned R1-spec crankshaft with increased inertial mass for wider powerband.
....All-new cylinder head design with trick-looking silver coating and aluminum cover.
....Four 37mm Mikuni CV sidedraft carburetors provide precise fuel/air mixture for superb power delivery across the entire rev range.
....Large-capacity radiator features all-new coolant lines routed to carburetors to ensure maximum carburetion and engine efficiency.
....All-new clutch features compact, lightweight design and 17-plate assembly for consistent, positive engagement.
....All-new shift linkage ensures silky-smooth shift feeling.
....All-new 4-into-1 exhaust features stainless steel muffler for outstanding power delivery throughout the rev range.
....All-new, ultra-rigid mild steel double-cradle frame uses a link-type engine mounting scheme for reduced vibration and superb maneuverability.
....New cross-sectional design swingarm is lightweight and extremely rigid for superb stability at speed and razor-sharp cornering.
....All-new fairing features a half-cowl design with R1-style headlight layout that creates super-aggressive naked bike profile.
....All-new handlebar designed with slightly more upright positioning for quick steering and maximum everyday comfort.
....All-new fuel tank features sleek, streamlined design and large, 5.6-gallon capacity.
....All-new, single-piece double seat offers exceptional solo or two-up comfort.
....All-new passenger grabrails.

Engine: 
....R1-spec one-piece cylinder and crankcase assembly provides tremendous engine rigidity that's lighter and stiffer than two-piece designs.
....Compact slant-block engine design uses stacked gearbox shafts to create a low center of gravity and balanced weight distribution.
....Lightweight forged pistons feature carburized connecting rods for superb strength and reduced reciprocating mass.
....Throttle position sensor monitors throttle position and adjusts ignition timing to ensure maximum muscle across the powerband.
....Yamaha's patented Exhaust Ultimate Powervalve (EXUP) monitors engine rpm and adjusts exhaust flow for maximum acceleration.
....Specially designed camshaft lubrication system reduces tappet clearances and valvetrain mechanical noise.
....Patented electroplated cylinder bores ensure greater heat dissipation for consistent power delivery and reduced friction.
....R1-spec 6-speed transmission delivers seamless power transfer between gears for maximum acceleration.
....Special 3-axis gearbox design stacks input/output shafts to keep overall engine size to super-compact dimensions.

Chassis/Suspension:
....All-new mild steel chassis design features ultra-compact wheelbase and 49 maximum lean angle for outstanding supersport handling.
....43mm conventional front fork is fully adjustable (preload, compression and rebound damping) with 5.6" of travel.
....Fully adjustable (preload, compression and rebound damping) piggyback-type rear shock."
....Dual 298mm front disc brakes with one-piece 4-piston calipers and 267mm rear disc brake with dual-piston caliper provide outstanding stopping power.
....Cast-aluminum 3-spoke wheels wear competition-spec 120/70-ZR17 front and 180-55-ZR17 rear Metzeler radials perfectly suited to both city and high-speed riding.
....Adjustable, 5-position front brake lever.
....Adjustable, R1-type clutch lever.
....Durable #530 O-ring-sealed drive chain.

Additional Features:
....High-tech instrument display features analog tachometer, speedometer and fuel gauge, digital odometer and clock, and lights for neutral, high beam, low fuel, turn signals, low oil and coolant temperature.
....Dual 12V 60/55-watt multi-reflector headlight features a sleek, R1-type profile for superb aerodynamics and visibility.
....Dual-bulb, R1-style taillight design reduces both weight and size while providing excellent visibility.
....Anti-theft wiring harness provides easy-access terminals to simplify alarm installation.
....Standard toolkit located in convenient storage compartment under passenger seat


 

Notes from a British bike mags exerienced sportbike rider thus a different viewpoint from that of an old muscle bike rider:)

....The FZ1  promised to be the most in your face, madcap machine of 2001. A bike for riders who are after the outstanding performance of the latest big capacity sports machines, but who don't want those bikes' single-minded focus on speed.  Naked street motorcycles are much more capable of being relaxed and easy when the rider feels in the mood. However, with an R1's huge power and a top quality chassis, the Fazer was looking as if it could equally transform itself into the hooligan bike from hell.
....For the first hour or so aboard the bike I was disappointed; yet there was nothing wrong with the bike at all, so let's shed those preconceptions and go back to the start.
....Despite its huge power output, at 143bhp (only slightly down on the R1 due to changes in the intake and exhaust systems), this bike actually turns out to be a gentle giant with soft edges. As a consequence it's much less intimidating and far easier to ride than it might have been, which for a mass-market bike is as it should be - it's much better for it, even if the journalists might not like the approach.
....The Fazer's weight is mostly responsible for calming it down. At 208kg (459lb) it's the lightest bike in the class and just 19kg (42lb) heavier than the Fazer 600, but alongside the R1's 175kg (386lb) still looks on the bulky side. The dramatic punch of the R1 motor has been diluted by the additional mass, but the throttle response is softer too, thanks partly to a substantially heavier crankshaft and partly to ignition and fuelling changes. The result is that twisting the grip has you being scooped along benignly, rather than being fired forward explosively. But don't mistake this for meaning slow: the Fazer is an immensely rapid machine with a top speed approaching 160mph.
....With the four-cylinder motor spinning above 5000rpm the thrust is outstanding, and even below this there's little else on the roads that can keep you in sight. The red line is drawn up at 11,500rpm, so there's a broad range of accessible power which, when the numbers are high, is exhilarating and enough to at least give a taste of what an R1 is like.
....Cruise the bike along a motorway and there's plenty of torque in reserve for overtaking, even in top gear, although there are small patches of tingling vibration typical of many Yamaha fours, which come through the bars and footrests. But really these are barely noticeable and certainly aren't enough to put you off long journeys, and neither is the upright riding position, which without the small fairing would sit the rider in the brunt of the wind blast. As it is, the wind is deflected sufficiently to maintain speeds much higher than  laws allow without you feeling like your arms are being stretched out of their sockets. The footrests are set higher than some riders might like, a consequence of the Fazer's considerable ground clearance, but with its plush and comfortable seat plus the generous 5.5 gallon) fuel tank, here is a bike with touring potential - now there's a surprise considering what we were expecting.
....What makes this a side of the machine to relish is the high specification of the suspension, which delivers an outstanding ride quality, something tested severely on some dreadfully surfaced  roads on the bike's presentation. It was the suspension which impressed again on rough backroads which snaked up and down hills and mountains, bringing out the sporting aspect of the Fazer - while its weight prevented the bike being flicked around with the abandon of a 600, still it proved a willing partner in these circumstances.
....The steering is pleasantly neutral and obedient while front-end stability is fine - drive the bike out of a bumpy turn and, while the bars go light, they don't flap or threaten to take the bike somewhere you don't want to go. Learn to blend corners with a fluid, easy input through the Fazer's bars, as opposed to the staccato brake-flick-accelerate of a supersports bike, and it becomes hugely enjoyable without losing out much in terms of sheer pace.
....Like the engine, the brakes are based on those of the R1, and even with more work to do still they perform superbly. There's immense power available, which is so easily modulated it's no more threatening than any other aspect of the bike - instead, it's comforting knowing you can haul the bike up so fast and confidently.
....The styling doesn't break any new ground but it does seem to polarize opinions. Some dislike the angularity of the bodywork and find the tubular steel frame old-fashioned, while others, including myself, love the triangular splashes of color  which appear to be draped across the top of the overtly metallic, mechanical shape beneath. The frame might be lower tech than the twin spar aluminum items of sports bikes, but it does show off the engine a treat, a trait many riders miss in typical modern bikes.
....But the Fazer's ace is how well it works as an all-rounder - top gear acceleration is outstanding, good for both relaxed touring and rapid sports riding, while comfort, control and handling all work together in a variety of roles. Bikes such as the Honda VFR800 or Triumph Sprint ST might have thought they were safe from the Fazer 1000, but it's as much in competition with them as it is with more obvious rivals such as the Suzuki Bandit 1200. Far from being mad it's rather a sensible choice for many different riders. 


 

Review Notes from Motorcyclenews.com:
....Big-bore Fazer gives you R1 power.  Enough power to take on the cream of the superbikes, bucket-loads of practicality and a price tag below $8,5000. It sounds like an impossible dream.  But that's exactly what Yamaha is offering with its new R1-engined FZS1000 Fazer.  
....The bike's power output is the biggest step forward. While the Bandit 1200 manages just 99bhp from its ageing GSX-R1100-based motor, the new Yamaha makes a claimed 143bhp from its retuned R1 powerplant.
  The R1's 998cc four-cylinder motor has been given a thorough going over to make it more suitable for a relatively practical streetbike. A new, heavier crankshaft is fitted - giving the bike more low-down and mid-range tractability in exchange for the loss of some of the R1's free-revving feel and top-end power.  Yamaha has also ditched the R1's down-draught carbs in favor of side-draught units - another move to boost torque.  The motor keeps its exhaust-mounted EXUP valve - which constantly alters the route the exhaust gasses have to take to give the ideal combination of bottom-end pull and top-end power. The R1's free-breathing five-valves-per-cylinder head is also kept for the new bike. Expect a top speed nudging 160mph, and true superbike acceleration, with a standing quarter-mile time of less than 11 seconds. 
....The R1 engine means the new Fazer also gets the R1's stacked gearbox. The design is shorter than traditional gearboxes - allowing Yamaha to use a longer swingarm for better stability without increasing the wheelbase and sacrificing maneuverability.  However, the 1450mm wheelbase is still significantly longer than the R1's 1385mm. It should make the new Fazer rock solid on the road at the expense of a few tenths of a second on the track. Stability should also be helped by the relatively lazy steering head angle of 26 degrees.
....For the new bike's chassis, Yamaha has opted for the simplest design possible to keep costs down. Like the smaller Fazer, it features a steel double-cradle frame - though the frame doesn't actually share any parts with the 600cc bike. Yamaha claims the large-diameter 48.6mm tubes and widely spaced main frame rails make the new bike's chassis one of the stiffest of its type - it will have to be to cope with the engine's massive power output. The frame design also makes maintenance tasks easier - the right-hand downtube can be unbolted to provide easy access to the engine.
....Despite the Fazer's minimal bodywork, it tips the scales at 208kg (457lb) without any fluids - that's 33kg (76lb) more than the R1, which uses weight-saving alloy for its frame. However, it's only 19kg (42lb) heavier than the Fazer 600 - and the power-to-weight ratio is still impressive. At 0.69bhp/kg the Fazer 1000 can't match the R1's 0.85bhp/kg, but it beats exotica like the Ducati 996SPS which can "only" muster 0.64bhp/kg.
....While most budget bikes make do with just pre-load adjustment, Yamaha has given the Fazer fully adjustable suspension. So you'll be able to tweak the compression and rebound damping settings at both ends to set it up for sharp handling.
....And superbike-sized tyres - a 120/70 x 17 front and 180/55 x 17 rear - mean you'll be able to fit the stickiest rubber on the market to make the most of the machine's cornering capabilities.  Yamaha claims the bike can manage a lean angle of 49 degrees from vertical before the footpegs or exhaust touch down - that's almost as much as an R1.
....With such impressive performance, the Fazer 1000 will need some serious brakes. But since it borrows its one-piece four-pot calipers from the R1 - which is acknowledged as having some of the best stoppers on the market - that shouldn't be a problem.  The R1 has also donated its styling cues. The Fazer's headlights borrow the R1 look, as does the sharply pointed tail unit with its R1-style lights.
....While the bike's power should make it faster than the competition, Yamaha hasn't forgotten that practicality is important. The Fazer 1000 comes complete with chunky pillion grab-rails, a centrestand and space for a U-lock under the seat. The Fazer even has hazard warning lights. A fuel gauge tells you just how much is left in the massive 5.5 gal tank and the wide, deeply padded seat looks comfortable - so you should be able to travel as far between stops as the bike can.
....Yamaha is promising to offer a huge range of optional extras which you can use to boost the bike's touring or sporting capabilities. Yamaha is also offering an optional factory-fitted alarm and a U-lock to fill that space under the seat. No prices are yet available.


From Sports Rider, summer 2001
Super Standards
.The modern Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM)
.Have the ability to perform a variety of riding tasks because they lack the specialization of other classes.
.Super standards offer the traditional riding position of the old standards.
..The 998cc, retuned YZF-R! engine in the FZ1 delivers a punch that easily can level any playing field with the twist of the throttle. It is hard to argue with the R1-based engine and light weight for a street bike.
.SS's live for the city where they leap off the line with authority. They excel at the rolling it off and back-on world which is more important in everyday riding than snapping off the line. The FZ launches quickly, brake with authority and is very maneuverable, all very important street riding traits.
.The FZ's powerful, smooth four-piston caliper, race proven on the R1, brakes generate the braking force to stay out of trouble in traffic or coming into corners.
.As a street bike the FZ excels on the highway and twisty roads, with adequate ground clearance, neutral steering, powerful engine and brakes. The FZ is very responsive and snappy on the highway.
.Confidence is inspired by the steering feel and lithe handling. All out performance. One would be hard pressed to find a more balanced motorcycle.


MD Ride Review 
....You have heard it before from middle aged guys that remember the Japanese performance bikes from the late 70s and early 80s. "Just give me a modern, standard style motorcycle . . . something with modern suspension, a modern, liquid cooled motor, a stiff chassis and great brakes."
....Yes, standard bikes are finally making a comeback here in the U.S.
....Yamaha has made more bold moves in the marketplace than any other manufacturer in the last several years. Yamaha seems willing to lead the market in a new direction, rather than follow. The 2001 FZ1 takes standards to a new level in terms of modern chassis and suspension design, handling and braking.
....We raved about Kawasaki's new ZRX1200R in our review of that machine. We still think the big ZRX has the best in-line, four-cylinder street bike motor we have ever tested. The ZRX motor is awesome. The Yamaha FZ1, however, is functionally superior to the ZRX in many respects.
....The FZ1 doesn't quite have the low-down, stump pulling torque of the ZRX, but it has an excellent motor. Derived from Yamaha's already legendary R1 sportbike, the FZ1 mill is a modern, five valve per cylinder, liquid cooled engine with high peak horsepower and a relatively broad torque curve. Roughly ten horsepower down on the R1, the FZ1 will put out approximately 120 horsepower to the rear wheel, and a broad band of torque peaking in the low seventies. In the real world, the FZ1 pulls hard above 4,000 rpm and, while lacking the ZRX's off-idle power, has an extremely broad and usable powerband.
.....So, the FZ1 has an excellent motor, but perhaps not quite the "best in class" in our opinion (we will reserve that for the ZRX). The handling of the FZ1 is even better than that of the ZRX, however. The FZ1 definitely changes directions easier and feels more nimble. Stability remains good, but not quite as good as the ZRX.
.....Suspension tuning was fine for the street duty we gave the FZ1. Reasonably compliant, but stiff enough to be sporting. Should you want to fiddle with the FZ1's suspension, you will be happy to see it is fully adjustable front and rear (rebound, compression and preload). Quality stuff.
....Braking is another area that sets the FZ1 apart from the competition. Taking its brakes directly from the R1, the FZ1 hauls you to a stop as quickly as you dare. Indeed, the front brake on the FZ1 felt stronger than the front brake on the last R1 I rode. Definitely a high water mark in the naked class.
.....Wind protection from the bikini fairing is surprisingly good. The small, stylish fairing cuts a big enough hole in the wind to make freeway cruising comfortable and, for my 5 foot 11 inch frame, without annoying buffeting at the helmet level.
......Instrumentation is up to today's standards with tach, speedometer, twin trip meters, fuel meter, and clock. The R1-style headlights are bright with a well-located band of light.
.....The seating position is relatively upright and comfortable compared to sportbikes, but a bit more aggressive than a traditional sport tourer. The seat was quite comfortable -- even on extended trips.
.....Riding the FZ1 is a blast. When pushed hard through corners, you do notice the FZ1 lacks the rigidity of a pure sportbike, but otherwise the handling is hard to fault. In the real world, the FZ1 has all the chassis rigidity you need, and the added comfort of the upright seating position is much appreciated
.....The wide handlebars allow the bike to change direction quickly and decisively, yet the bike does hold a line well in corners.
.....Basically, the FZ1 is a fun do-it-all motorcycle with loads of power, very competent handling and great brakes. It is the standard those middle age guys have been asking for all these years.
....Is it better than the ZRX? That's a tough call, and to a large extent a matter of taste. The ZRX is an excellent motorcycle with the King Kong motor. The ZRX handles competently, as well, but not quite at the level of the FZ1. Styling of the FZ1 is more controversial and modern, while the ZRX has a decidedly retro look and appeal. Both bikes will burn through the quarter mile in less than 11 seconds -- something standards never did before. The FZ1 also offers slightly better wind protection for the rider than the ZRX.
....The bottom line is that Yamaha's FZ1 sets new standards in several performance categories for the naked motorcycle. With this bike, Yamaha is really the first manufacturer to answer the call for a thoroughly modern, standard style motorcycle with open class engine performance. If the styling appeals to you, you cannot go wrong with this bike. The U.S. MSRP of the 2001 Yamaha FZ1 is $8,499.00, and the FZ1 is available in both blue and black. Visit Yamaha's FZ1 page for more detailed information and specifications.


 


FEATURES & BENEFITS

   Exclusive FZ1 Features:

        Compact, ultra-lightweight 998cc, DOHC, 20-valve, liquid-cooled in-line
        four-cylinder engine tuned for outstanding mid-range punch and more than 140
        horsepower.
        Redesigned R1-spec crankshaft with increased inertial mass for wider powerband.
        All-new cylinder head design with trick-looking silver coating and aluminum cover.
        Four 37mm Mikuni CV sidedraft carburetors provide precise fuel/air mixture for
        superb power delivery across the entire rev range.
        Large-capacity radiator features all-new coolant lines routed to carburetors to
        ensure maximum carburetion and engine efficiency.
        All-new clutch features compact, lightweight design and 17-plate assembly for
        consistent, positive engagement.
        All-new shift linkage ensures silky-smooth shift feeling.
        All-new 4-into-1 exhaust features stainless steel muffler for outstanding power
        delivery throughout the rev range.
        All-new, ultra-rigid mild steel double-cradle frame uses a link-type engine
        mounting scheme for reduced vibration and superb maneuverability.
        All-new cross-sectional design swingarm is lightweight and extremely rigid for
        superb stability at speed and razor-sharp cornering.
        All-new fairing features a half-cowl design with R1-style headlight layout that
        creates super-aggressive naked bike profile.
        All-new handlebar designed with slightly more upright positioning for quick
        steering and maximum everyday comfort.
        All-new fuel tank features sleek, streamlined design and large, 5.6-gallon
        capacity.
        All-new, single-piece double seat offers exceptional solo or two-up comfort.
        All-new passenger grabrails.

   Engine:

        R1-spec one-piece cylinder and crankcase assembly provides tremendous engine
        rigidity that's lighter and stiffer than two-piece designs.
        Compact slant-block engine design uses stacked gearbox shafts to create a low
        center of gravity and balanced weight distribution.
        Lightweight forged pistons feature carburized connecting rods for superb strength
        and reduced reciprocating mass.
        Throttle position sensor monitors throttle position and adjusts ignition timing to
        ensure maximum muscle across the powerband.
        Yamaha's patented Exhaust Ultimate Powervalve (EXUP) monitors engine rpm
        and adjusts exhaust flow for maximum acceleration.
        Specially designed camshaft lubrication system reduces tappet clearances and
        valvetrain mechanical noise.
        Patented electroplated cylinder bores ensure greater heat dissipation for
        consistent power delivery and reduced friction.
        R1-spec 6-speed transmission delivers seamless power transfer between gears for
        maximum acceleration.
        Special 3-axis gearbox design stacks input/output shafts to keep overall engine
        size to super-compact dimensions.

   Chassis/Suspension:

        All-new mild steel chassis design features ultra-compact wheelbase and 49
        maximum lean angle for outstanding supersport handling.
        43mm conventional front fork is fully adjustable (preload, compression and
        rebound damping) with 5.6" of travel.
        Fully adjustable (preload, compression and rebound damping) piggyback-type rear
        shock.
        Dual 298mm front disc brakes with one-piece 4-piston calipers and 267mm rear
        disc brake with dual-piston caliper provide outstanding stopping power.
        Cast-aluminum 3-spoke wheels wear competition-spec 120/70-ZR17 front and
        180-55-ZR17 rear Metzeler radials perfectly suited to both city and high-speed
        riding.
        Adjustable, 5-position front brake lever.
        Adjustable, R1-type clutch lever.
        Durable #530 O-ring-sealed drive chain.

   Additional Features:

        High-tech instrument display features analog tachometer, speedometer and fuel
        gauge, digital odometer and clock, and lights for neutral, high beam, low fuel, turn
        signals, low oil and coolant temperature.
        Dual 12V 60/55-watt multi-reflector headlight features a sleek, R1-type profile for
        superb aerodynamics and visibility.
        Dual-bulb, R1-style taillight design reduces both weight and size while providing
        excellent visibility.
        Anti-theft wiring harness provides easy-access terminals to simplify alarm
        installation.
        Standard toolkit located in convenient storage compartment under passenger
        seat.

 

                                    

                                 


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