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Nasal Tuft Pics at J.P. Isom's

CHINESE NASAL TUFT STANDARD OF PERFECTION

Chinese Nasal Tuft, Lavender Ringbreast
Chinese Nasal Tuft - Lavender Ring Breast
Photo from J. P. Isom
Linked to Isom Lofts


All patterned and self birds other than Spots.

Origin:  China.  – (The Middle Kingdom)

Overview:
Chinese Nasal Tufts are a group of variously patterned and self-colored birds.  The Nasal Tufts are small to medium-sized pigeon and have a long history in China.  All but the Spots have the same body type so are considered here to be one breed with many color patterns.  In China, they are often considered as different breeds.   

Head - Beak:  The skull should be round; and a bird may be medium or short-faced, but never so short it can’t feed its own young.  Long-faced birds occur in China, but are not to be preferred.  The beak is stout.  The wattle is small, smooth and powdery white.  

Beak Crest: Should be large.  The beak crest consists of two series of feathers rising from just behind the cere on the forehead.  Each series of feather twists and overlaps the other.  The left should be growing toward the right and the right toward the left. Like clasping hands, not interlocking fingers. The crest should rise and lean forward and down toward the tip of the  beak.  Patterned birds may or may not carry a beak crest.  All self-colored, including whites, and non-patterned piebald birds must carry a beak crest for show purposes.  Plain-headed birds in these colors should be considered stock birds only.

Beak Cere:  Smooth.  White with a powdery appearance.

Eyes: Dark eyes (bean-eyes) are rare and treasured especially in colored birds. Birds carrying such eyes must never be discriminated against in judging. Orange to orange-red eyes are normal and the eyes must be bright and shiny showing an almost fire-like radiance. Pearl eyes, while not preferred, will be accepted.  On top of the eyelids, there is sometimes a single tiny twisting feather or feathers that look like tiny horns, these are not presently a fault, but are not preferred in any manner.

Eye Cere:  It must be an off-white with a waxy appearance.

Neck: Somewhat long, never thick.  

Tail: Must have 12 tail feathers only.  Tail should be held tightly closed, appearing only one feather wide.

Feathering: Feathers should be tight, not loose.

Legs/Feet:  Coral red and free of any feathering.  Toenails should be colored consistent with the plumage color.  

Size: Both sexes should be approximately 11.5 to 13 ounces. (326.0 g – 368.6 g)

Carriage: The bird should be upright.

Color and Markings: (All presently accepted color patterns are listed below.  If non-listed patterns are imported from China, they will be accepted in the A.O.C. class until such time as a color class description may be written by the club.)
 
TWO PATCHES

Two Patches are piebald birds.  They are presently bred in black, recessive-red, Ash-red, blue, brown and the dilutes of those color.  The normal colored portions of the bird include the head, neck, chest, shoulders, tail, undertail coverts and rump..  All else is a pure white.  Occasionally, the flights are colored as well. This is an accepted variant marking and shall not be discriminated against. (see Wing Markings).  All colors must be rich and full.  See self color descriptions for color information of non-white areas.  Washed out, matt or smutty color is a major fault.


Wing Markings: (Two Patches)
Colored primary flights should start from the outside at the tenth flight and should be equal in number and position in both wings.  Ten by ten colored primary flights is ideal.  If fewer than ten by ten flights are colored, then preference should be given to birds having equal number of colored flights in the same position on each wing over those that do not.  The secondary flights may also be colored.  If so, an equal number on each side is preferred. A difference of one colored flight in either wing is acceptable, i.e., 10 x 9 or 9 x 8.  In all cases, a deep, rich color is desired. See self color descriptions for color information of non-white areas.

Faults: (Two Patches)
Poor or flat color.  White feathers around either the beak or eye ceres.  A dark eye cere. White ventral coverts and rump.  Dull tail color in any color.  A tail color that is other than that of the body marking.  An unequal number of colored flights in both wings, other than as stipulated in Wing Markings.  Solid color flights alternating with white ones.  White feathers in the tail.  A red bird with a black beak.  



RAVEN HEADS

Markings
Raven Heads can almost be considered a variant of Two Patches.  They are identical in all respects except that they are colored only on the head, neck, chest and shoulders.  All the rest, including the tail, is white.  Presently bred in black, recessive-red, Ash-red, blue, brown and the dilutes of those color. See self color descriptions for color information of non-white areas.

Faults (Raven Heads)

Poor or flat color.  White feathers around either the beak or eye ceres.  A dark eye cere. Any dark feathers in areas supposed to be white.   Dark beak in reds, light beak in blues and blacks.   Toenail color other than white.  Any white feathers in areas supposed to be colored or colored feathers in areas supposed to be white.


RING BREAST

Markings & Colors
A white bird with a colored breast, the color extending up and around the neck.  Presently bred in black, recessive red, Ash-red, blue, brown and their dilutes.  See self color descriptions for color information of non-white areas.

Eyes & eye cere: Orange to red-orange.  Bull eyes accepted but not preferred.  White cere.

Faults (Ring Breast)

 Poor or flat color.  A dark eye cere.  Any white feathers in areas supposed to be colored or colored feathers in areas supposed to be white. Minor trimming for show is permissible so long as no bare spots can be seen.  
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SELFS
All selfs must have a beak crest to be shown.  Any plain-headed bird must be considered a stock bird only.

Black:  
Plumage: Jet black throughout. Free from rustiness or apparent check or barring and covered with a rich beetle-green luster especially on the neck.  The black should be even throughout and should extend down into the under plumage
Eyes: Bean-eyed, red, red-orange eyes. Bean-eyed (dark-eyed) birds are always to be given preference if all else is equal.
Eye Cere: Waxy white cere.
Beak: Black.
Toenails: Black.

Dun:
Plumage: A soft even shade of dull brown with no tendency toward a purple or bluish tint. The color should extend down into the under plumage. The feathers of the neck and throat shall be covered with an iridescent metallic sheen.
Eyes & eye cere:  Orange to orange-red, bean, with bean preferred.  Cere is waxy white
Beak: Horn colored.
Toenails: Horn colored.

Recessive Red:
Plumage: Even shade throughout of clear, rich, bright, chestnut free from sootiness or any tendency toward bluish or plum tints. The feathers on the neck and throat shall be covered with an iridescent metallic sheen with red/purple predominating over green.
Eyes & eye cere:  Bean colored or orange to red-orange eyes with waxy white colored ceres.  Bean eyes always preferred if all other is equal.   
Beak: Flesh colored.
Toenails: Flesh colored.

Recessive Yellow:
Plumage  Even shade throughout of rich, bright, golden-buff with no tendency to run light on the rump. he feathers on the neck and throat shall be covered with an iridescent metallic sheen with a pinkish red predominating over a paler green.
Eyes & eye cere:  Bean colored or orange to red-orange eyes with waxy white colored ceres.  Bean eyes always preferred if all other is equal.   
Beak: Flesh colored.
Toenails: Flesh colored.

Brown
Spread:  A uniform rich shade of chocolate throughout.
T-Pattern Check:  Rich chocolate shade on head, neck and body lightening some underneath. Wing shields – dark chocolate with feathers edged in fawn producing the dark checker appearance. Tail – dark fawn with rich chocolate terminal bar.
Check:  Same as T-Pattern Check, but with more fawn on the wing shield producing clear, definite chocolate checkering.
Bar:  Same as above, but with even fawn throughout the wing shield except for two distinct chocolate bars. Tail – fawn with rich chocolate terminal bar.
Barless:  Same as brown bar without the wing bars.
Eyes: False pearl  which is a function of the genetics of brown itself. Eye color should be as intense as possible. If at some future date, pigeon geneticists or nasal tuft breeders show that bean eyes may be bred into brown series birds and express themselves, then bean eyes will be preferred.
Eye cere: Waxy white.
Beak: dark horn.   Toenails: Dark horn.

Khaki (dilute brown)
Similar to the above brown series, but lighter, like butterscotch rather than chocolate.
Eyes: False pearl  which is a function of the genetics of brown itself. Eye color should be as intense as possible. If at some future date, pigeon geneticists or nasal tuft breeders show that bean eyes may be bred into brown series birds and express themselves, then bean eyes will be preferred.
Eye cere: Waxy white.
Beak: light horn to flesh.
.

Ash-red Bar/Check/T-pattern:
Plumage: The body and wing color shall be either a clear lavender-gray shading to a rich claret red on head and hackle or they may exhibit the clear lavender gray throughout the head and neck and  show an almost metallic silver coloration.   Either coloration is acceptable.  The bars shall be a rich claret-red. If checks are shown, the checking shall also be a deep claret red and distinct.  In t-patterns, there should be little or no lavender gray showing on the wing shield.  The tail is an even shade of lavender-gray with albescent strips somewhat visible on each of the other tail feathers.  If there is black flecking in cock birds heterozygous for wild-type, such flecking shall be intense black and as even as possible on both sides of the bird.   Any brown flecking which show in the hens, shall also be as even as possible.
Eyes & eye cere: Orange to orange-red or bean, which is preferred, with waxy white ceres.
Beak: Horn colored.
Toenails: Horn colored.

Ash-red Spread
Plumage: The whole bird shall be a clear lavender-gray with the neck and head also exhibiting the same color.  If there is black flecking in cock birds heterozygous for wild-type, such flecking shall be intense black and as even as possible on both sides of the bird.   Any brown flecking which show in the hens, shall also be as even as possible.
Eyes & eye cere: Orange to orange-red or bean, with bean preferred, with waxy white ceres.
Beak: Horn colored.
Toenails: Horn colored


Ash-red (Dilute)
Yellow Bar (Cream) & Yellow Check
Cream bar: The body and wing color a soft cream gray shading to a rich golden cream on the head and neck. Wing bars to be rich golden cream. Tail a pale cream gray.  Any flecking shown in cocks heterozygous for blue shall be a pale dun color and as even as possible.
Eyes & eye cere: Orange to orange-red or bean, with bean preferred, with waxy white ceres.
Beak & Toenails: Light horn colored.

Yellow checked: The body color a soft cream gray shading to a rich golden cream on the head and neck. Body color a bit darker than on the creams. Checking on the wings to be open and carried evenly to the wing butts. Tail a pale cream gray.   Any flecking shown in cocks heterozygous for blue shall be a pale dun color and as even as possible.  
Eyes & eye cere: Orange to orange-red or bean, with bean preferred, with waxy white ceres.
Beak & Toenails: Light horn colored


Ash-Yellow Spread
Plumage: The whole bird shall be a clear pastel soft cream graycolor with the neck and head also exhibiting the same color.  If there is flecking in cock birds heterozygous for wild-type, such flecking shall be a soft dun and as even as possible on both sides of the bird.   Any khaki flecking which show in the hens, shall also be as even as possible.
Eyes & eye cere: Orange to orange-red or bean, with bean preferred, with waxy white ceres.
Beak: Light Horn colored.
Toenails: Light Horn colored

GRIZZLE
Plumage: A peppery combination of color and white. The grizzling effect is most
noticeable on the body, shoulder, neck and head while nearly absent on the wing
and tail bars. Grizzle can be bred in all colors, patterns and markings as well as
in conjunction with many other pigment affecting factors (dilute, milky, etc.).
The classical “dragoon grizzle” is the expression of grizzle on a blue bar. Tortoiseshell
effects are produced when grizzle is in conjunction with checker. Pure grizzle
produces stork-mark. Grizzle in combination with spread or recessive red can
produce an evenly grizzled bird but often produces black or red splashed
appearing birds.
Eyes & eye cere: Same as that of its basic color.
Beak: Same as that of its basic color.
TOENAILS: Same as that of its basic color.

BLUE:
Barred:
Plumage: Clear, sound, blue on body, wings and tail. Free from sootiness or smoky.
Both clean, light blue with a whitish rump and clear, dark blue with a dark rump will be accepted.  However, the blue in both cases must be as even as possible and the tail and wing bars as dark and distinct as possible.  Both color forms shall show a distinct albescent strip on each of the other tail feathers.  Smoky factor birds are not to be preferred.  . The feathers on the neck and throat shall be darker than the body and covered with an iridescent metallic sheen of green and purple.  The feathers of the tail shall be edged beyond the terminal bar with the same color as the shield area.
Eyes: Bean, orange, orange-red, with bean preferred.  
Eye cere: Waxy-white flat ceres.
Beak: Black.
Toenails: Black.

Checked: The head and body similar to the blue bar.. The check marks on the wings to be open and carried evenly to the wing butts. Tail to be a darker shade of blue-gray.

T-Pattern: Head and neck to be an even shade of dark blue-gray, approaching black. The wing feathers to be dark blackish gray showing occasional small lighter gray areas. Tail to be dark gray with a black band.
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Toy stencil:  The white bars shall be thin, long, and free of rust; spangled (white checkered) birds in black may be with or without finch markings.  If black, the black shall be as listed above under black.  If blue, the blue shall be as listed above under blue.  

Ice: Unusual in the U.S., but fairly common in parts of China.  An icy blue on outer surface and a sooty black color underneath the surface. The outer color to be as light a blue as possible even to a near milk white powdered blue or frosty blue. Head, neck, shoulders, body, rump, and tail of same shade throughout. Wings to have two broad jet black bars on each wing and tail to have one very wide jet black bar at its tip. Flight feathers to be as dark black as possible. Rump to be free from white. No dark crescent or dark coloring on breast.

Silver – Silver Check – Silver T-pattern (dilute blue)
PLUMAGE Head color a rich shade of light gray shading to fawn. Neck feathers a little darker shade of the same color. The wing feathers should be a light shade of gray-fawn with color carried well out through the primary and secondary feathers blending in with the dun-colored tips. The tail a somewhat darker shade of gray-fawn. The feathers on the neck and throat shall be covered with an iridescent metallic sheen. The wing and tail bars shall be dun and well defined. The tail feathers shall be edged all around with the same shade as the shield area, the outer two tail feathers should show a distinct albescent strip.
Eyes:  Bean-eyed, orange, orange-red,  with bean preferred.
Eye ceres: Waxy-white colored eye cere
BEAK: Horn colored.
TOENAILS: Horn colored.
Checked silver: The head, neck, and body a medium shade of fawn-gray – a little darker than for the barred silver. The check marks on the wing to be open and carried evenly to the wing butts. The tail a dark shade of fawn-gray.  Eyes, eye ceres, beak, and toenails as above.
T-pattern silver: The head, neck, and body to be a deep dun. Wing color dun, with occasional lighter fawn areas. Tail to be dun with a dark dun bar.  Eyes, eye ceres, beak, and toenails as above.

WHITE  Plumage: Pure white. Since both bull-eyed and colored-eyed whites are acceptable, colored-eyed whites which show one or two minor stains of color on the feather shall not be penalized for this staining.    Pure white plumage, even with colored-eyed whites is always to be preferred, however.
Eyes Orange, orange-red, bean, or bull.
Eye cere: Waxy white ceres.
Beak: Flesh colored.
Toenails: Flesh colored.

PIED PLUMAGE:  - Non-patterned
A colored bird with up to 75% of its plumage randomly dispersed white.
A white bird with less than 25% of its plumage colored.
Note: A pied bird is one whose odd feathers are too numerous to pluck.
Eyes & eye cere: Same as that of its basic color or marking.
Beak: Same as that of its basic color or marking.
Toenails: Same as that of its basic color or marking.


NCC (Non Classified Color)
This classification is to be used for those colors that
Have not as yet been recognized. It is also to be used for marked birds of a color that
has not as yet been recognized as well as for any new marking that has not as yet
been recognized. There will be no allowance for color and/or marking points for
birds competing in this classification.

DISQUALIFICATIONS – All classes
1. Any sign of sickness: Coughing, sneezing, canker, diarrhea, or going light.
2. Deformities: Webbed feet, crooked mandibles, or pox disfigurations.
3. External parasites: Lice or mite infestation – at judge’s discretion.
4. Any self-colored bird with no beak crest.
5. Any non-patterned pied bird with no beak crest.
6. Any attempt at faking, including but not limited to: dyeing feathers, nails, or beak.   (Normal show preparation shall not fall under this classification.)

J. P. Isom asked me to work on this with him about a year or two ago for the Chinese Nasal Tuft Club. This standard is still somewhat provisional, but it is basically complete as it stands. We know there are shortbeaked Nasal Tufts in China, but none here. We are not allowing them in the U.S. standard presently since the breed is so rare here that to further handicap it by needing feeders would be an unnecessary burden on it. If at some future date, Nasal Tufts become more common, the club can consider whether they wish to allow the shrotface types. F. Mosca

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