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ALIEN GUIDE's Chefs Anonymous page

Sometimes you have to think outside of the box

Lots of links; low fat yet full of that old fashioned taste:

If you like Chinese foods, you really must check out this site.
Sandra's Recipes; general, vegetarian, or for kids>
Our Kosher Korner
Sven and Ole's collection of Swedish and Norwegian Recipes
. COOKING.COM--recipes & advice
. Nice recipe archives--from appetizer to vegetarian
The Joy of Baking--Cool site
a HONEY of a recipe site
epicurious recipes
. Sally's Place--chic cuisine, articles, newsletter, styles
diabetes, healthy eating & cooking--tips, advice--your tax $ at work!!!
Our room for soul-food cooking at it's best
Feeding a large group? Our group-recipes room and a link to quantities needed for serving up to 100
Our sugar-free diabetic recipe collection
. Our baker's anonymous guidecake decorating tips
Pasta! That just about says it all Pasta sauces, &c.

Our room segregated away, for hot sauces, salsa, peppers, pepper products, etc.

Look here for info and recipes for crockpot/slow cookers and pressure cookers

Look here for info, designs and recipes for solar cookers

In this section of the house we have our virtual kitchen; with our counters, cupboards and drawers teeming with information on cookware, techniques, recipes, nutrition, diets, food stuffs, bargains, coupon information, appliances, resources online and a forum for favorite recipes both ours and yours, recommended chat sites for cooking insights and hints, and oodles of other items so come on in. Links will be provided for you to be able to get more info on the items identified. This page will be kept fairly clean so that it will load fast. Please bookmark us and come back often.

Let us know any of your hints, recommended links, etc. Email us at the address at the bottom if you'd be so kind.

In the meantime, check out over 10,000 recipes at this site when you click here
or you can find some fun on personal websites of professional chefs

For all of us who need the help, for our own or for traditional family recipes, you can email those recipes to these folks, they'll trim them up and give 'em back fit as a fiddle.

PLEASE DO NOT FORGET TO CHECK OUT OUR SEARCH ENGINE PAGE IN ALIEN GUIDE'S REFERENCE ROOM.

For those special items you cannot locate elsewhere or that you would like to share with othersyou MUST contact this site.

Here is a dry-rub for BBQ, you can serve the BBQ-sauce at the table if you need it, or you can put it on at the very end. If you've never dry-rub'd BBQ, you should try it...it's low fat, low calorie and you may never go back to wet.DRY RUB FOR BBQ
 Recipe By     : Carol Russo
 Serving Size : 1

    --------  ------------  ---------------------
  1       cup         White sugar
  1       cup         Brown sugar
  1/4   cup         Paprika
  2       tsp         Chili powder
  1/2   tsp         Cayenne pepper (or more, if desired)
  1/2               Salt
  2       tsp         Black pepper
  1       tbsp        Garlic powder
  1       tbsp        Onion powder
     Combine all ingredients.
Once you try this you can adapt it to your own recipe! Happy eating!
.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,,br>

Check our recipe for biscuits, it's a keeper!:

oooweeBobdatsafinebiscuit

INGREDIENTS:4 Tblsp corn starch...4 tsp baking powder...less than 2 Cups Flour...1/2 tsp cream of tartar...1/2 tsp salt...2 Tblsp sugar...1/2 Cup Shortning/Lard...1 egg...2/3 Cup milk/water mix*
poor man's copyright circa 1997 [ga]

*Boil potatoes for meal use during next week. Use the water from boiled potatoes for extending shelf life of baked bread goods. Great hint huh.--alien guide

INSTRUCTIONS:

Place cornstarch in a 2 cup measure, add enough flour to make 2 cups.Put in mixing bowl and add baking powder, cream of tartar, salt and sugar.
Cut in shortening. Stir in egg and milk&poatoe water mix.
On floured board/counter; knead five times. Pat or roll to 3/4 inch thickness. Cut into biscuits.
Place biscuits on lightly greased/cooking spray-ed cookie sheet. Bake in 425 degree oven for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown.

AND NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Old European Casserole
                                                  Makes 8 servings
8 ounces wide egg noodles          
    1 cup cottage cheese
2 Tbsp butter
7 ounces cream cheese,softened
1-1/2 pounds ground chuck        
      3(8-ounce) cans tomato sauce      
1/4 cup sour cream
3/4 cup condensed beef bouillon
          1/2 cup green onions, very finely sliced
1Tbsp minced oregano
1/2 tsp green pepper
1/2 tsp black pepper

   1. Early in the day, cook the noodles as package directs; drain. Meanwhile, melt butter in a skillet and sauté the meat, mashing it with the back of a spoon, until browned. Stir in the tomato sauce, beef bouillon, oregano and black pepper. Remove from heat.
   2. In a mixing bowl, combine cottage cheese, cream cheese, sour cream, green onions and green pepper
   3. In a buttered 3-quart casserole, spread half the noodles. Cover with the cheese mixture, the rest of the noodles, and top with the meat. Chill.
   4. About an hour before serving, preheat oven to 375(F. Bake the casserole for 45 minutes or until bubbly.

By Norma Brandel Gibbs from Chicken Soup for the Soul Cookbook
Copyright 1996 by Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen & Diana von Welanetz Wentworth
==============================

chili CHILI chili it's great and is low acid, and enhances your immune system!!!
BASIC GREEN CHILE SAUCE-----------YES!
1 tablespoon oil, lard or butter
2 large onions, chopped
4 to 6 cloves garlic, pushed through press
1 14-ounce cans chicken or vegetable broth
24-ounces prepared green chile, chopped
1 teaspoon celery salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon leaf oregano
1 tablespoon cumin
Optional:
1 cup diced tomatoes
2 potatoes, peeled and diced


Sauté onion and garlic in oil, lard or butter until limp and golden. Add broth, seasonings and spices. Simmer over low heat 1 hour. Add green chile and cook { hour more. If a thicker sauce is desired, melt additional tablespoon of oil or butter and stir in one tablespoon flour to make a roux. Stir chile sauce into roux and continue to stir until sauce thickens.
This is a basic, no frills version that can easily be altered.

For a meat version, brown up to 2 pounds of meat (diced pork or ground beef or pork) as a first step and then proceed as directed, sautéing the onions and garlic in the meat drippings. You will probably need to add water or additional broth -- enough to keep the meat covered during the simmering period.
If desired, diced potatoes may be added just before the long simmering period. Diced tomatoes should be added with the green chile before the final cooking stage. Cooked pinto beans may also be added at serving time.

Here's an unusual vegetarian version of enchiladas.


.....GREEN CHILE SPINACH ENCHILADAS


1 1/2 lbs. trimmed spinach (or 2 pkg frozen)
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp butter
1/2 lg. onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
salt to taste
3/4 lbs. Swiss or Monterey Jack cheese, grated
10 fresh corn tortillas

Sauce:
1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp flour
1 cup milk, heated
1 cup low-fat sour cream
3/4 cup chopped green chile
1/4 cup grated Swiss or Jack cheese
For added flavour we recommend adding dried green chili powder, to your taste.

Heat olive oil and butter and sauté onions and garlic until golden. Add spinach, stirring until liquid is evaporated.
Take tortilla and spread a heaping tablespoon of grated cheese in a line down the center. Then add a heaping tablespoon of spinach mixture over the cheese.
Roll up tortilla and place in casserole, seam side down.
Repeat with other tortillas until filling is used up.

Sauce how-to... Melt butter in saucepan. Add flour and stir with a wire wisk to form a roux. Add heated milk slowly, continually stirring with whisk until sauce is creamy and beginning to thicken. Stir in sour cream and green chile and remove from heat. Taste sauce and add salt or other seasoning if desired. Pour sauce over enchiladas and sprinkle with remaining cheese.
Bake covered in preheated oven at 350 degrees for 25-30 minutes. Just before serving place casserole under broiler for a few minutes to brown top. Serves 4 to 5.

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

..........Basic Green Chile Sauce

Good for huevos rancheros, over enchiladas or burritos, or as a burger topping. Adding meat makes this into a green chile stew that can stand on its own. (See below.)

1 Tbsp oil, lard or butter
2 lg onions, chopped
4 to 6 cloves garlic, pushed through press
1 14-ounce can chicken or vegetable broth
24 ounces prepared green-chile, chopped
1 tsp celery salt
1/2 tsp pepper
1 tsp leaf oregano
1 Tbsp cumin

Options--

1 cup diced tomatoes
2 potatoes, peeled and diced

How to ...Sauté onion and garlic in oil, lard or butter until limp and golden. Add broth, seasonings and spices. Simmer over low heat 1 hour. Add green chile and cook 1/2 hour more.
If a thicker sauce is desired, melt additional tablespoon of oil or butter and stir in one tablespoon flour to make a roux. Stir chile sauce into roux and continue to stir until sauce thickens.
This is a basic, no frills version that can easily be altered.

For a meat version, brown up to 2 pounds of meat (diced pork or ground beef or pork) as a first step and then proceed as directed, sautéing the onions and garlic in the meat drippings. You will probably need to add water or additional broth -- enough to keep the meat covered during the simmering period.

If desired, diced potatoes may be added just before the long simmering period.
Diced tomatoes should be added with the green chile before the final cooking stage. Cooked pinto beans may also be added at serving time.

Most New Mexicans opt for the easiest storage method, freezing, so here are some basic instructions to get you through preparing your first batch -- with, no doubt, many more to come. And a recipe to give you something to do with all those neat little bags of green you'll have lined up in the freezer, waiting for delicious things to happen.

 Congratulations. You are now an official New Mexican-style chef
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

BUYING: Green chile is available, most commonly in 35-pound sacks, from roadside stands, produce markets and grocery stores. Choose chile that is mature, full-sized, heavy for its size, smooth, crisp and bright green in color.

  Make sure you know what type and intensity you want -- from mild to super hot. Big Jim (medium to hot) and New Mexico 6-4 (mild to medium) are two popular area chiles.
Most sellers will allow you to taste a slice of the raw chile to determine its degree of heat. Remember that the heat can increase with freezing and cooking.

ROASTING:
In order to be edible, the tough outer skin of the chile must be removed. Heat blistering, commonly done by roasting, is the easiest way to perform the deed.
GA - note: some folks take the roasted pepper and seal in a ziplock bag for about 10 minutes... it'll be quicker than freezing.)

  Personally, why anyone would take on this job at home when it is usually offered by the seller for $3 to $5 a sack is beyond me. (But you might want to provide your own sack; garbage bags often contain deodorants and chemicals that could affect the chile -- an old pillowcase brought from home is a safer bet.) If you insist on going the whole way yourself, or if you want to roast a much smaller amount of chile, here are your options.

 Oven: Place chiles in a hot oven or broiler, 400° to 450° for six to eight minutes until skin begins to blister. Turn until the blistering evenly covers the surface of the chile.   Range top: Cover gas or electric burner with a layer of heavy wire mesh. Place chiles on mesh, turning frequently, until entire surface is blistered.   Outdoor grill: Place chiles on a charcoal grill about 5 to 6 inches above glowing coals and turn often for even blistering. Wood chips can be used to impart a smoky flavor to the chile.

After heating, spritz chile with water and cover with paper towels or place inside a brown paper or plastic bag to "sweat" until cool enough to handle. This makes skins easier to slip off.   You have approximately two hours to "put up" your chile after commercial roasting before bad things might begin to happen in the bacteria department. Go to it.

PEELING: There are two schools of thought here: one, that you peel before freezing; two, that you peel after freezing. The "after" proponents say the skin comes off easier after freezing and defrosting. The "befores" (that's me) want a product that's recipe-ready straight from the freezer. It will take you about two hours to peel and bag a bushel, so plan accordingly. Either way, here's what you need to do. Before you start: Take out your contacts. Keep a clean damp towel close by. Wear rubber gloves (if you can stand them). Ventilate the fumes. Kick the kids out unless you want to listen to, "P.U. What stinks?" for two hours.   If you have roasted and "sweated" your chile properly, the outer skin should peel off fairly easily in large pieces -- which are likely to clog your disposal if fed down en masse, so gather and put them in the compost pile or garbage instead. Once peeled, slit the chile down one side and remove seeds and any inner strings. Remove stem (unless you're freezing chiles whole for rellenos) and chop, if desired, on cutting board.

  You can rinse the chiles with water to assist in the cleaning, but don't let an expert catch you doing so. They say it robs the chile of its essential oils, heat and flavor.

FREEZING:
Load in portions adequate for your recipes or the size of your family in heavy-duty zip-lock freezer bags. Once unfrozen, chile will keep in the refrigerator for only two to three days, so don't put too much in each bag.

  Freeze at 0° F or below and put no more chile into the freezer than will freeze within 24 hours.
  Now wash your hands with a copious amount of salt and water or a good strong handyman soap to absorb any oil remaining on your hands. If you don't, you'll regret it when you go to put your contacts back in.

Chile myths

  People swear that the seeds contain the chile's greatest heat, but in truth, the fire comes from an oil in the chile's veins called capsaicin. This oil is released when the chile is cut, which is why preparing and freezing makes the chile seem hotter. As for longer cooking increasing the chile's heat, that's because prolonged heat causes the oil to permeate an entire dish, making the heat more pronounced in each bite.

Also, don't believe those who would tell you that chile is a high-acid food. In reality, it is classified as a low-acid vegetable; if you're stomach doesn't like it, it's probably due to the heat, not the acidity.

Email: The Andersons