Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!

DAYTONA 500








Sorry, your browser doesn't support Java(tm).





1959
NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1949-64 Born March 14, 1914 Hometown Randleman, N.C. Petty was a hard charger in the NASCAR Winston Cup Series division, claiming 54 wins -- ranking him seventh on NASCAR's all-time wins list. In 1954, Petty won the first of three championships in a Dodge. He won his second championship in 1958, also in a Dodge and his third, in '59, on the strength of 11 wins, powered by a Chrysler. Petty was the first three-time NASCAR Winston Cup Series champion. He won the inaugural Daytona 500, in 1959. He ranked in the top-five in the series' points chase 11 out of 16 seasons. In 1969, Petty was inducted in the National Motorsports Press Association's Hall of Fame at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway. In 1990, Petty was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega, Al


1960
Junior Johnson NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1953-66 Born June 28, 1931 Hometown Ronda, N.C. Johnson was one of the early drivers competing in NASCAR races, who honed his skills on the backroads of rural North Carolina. His aggressive driving style earned him 50 NASCAR Winston Cup Series wins, tying him with Ned Jarrett for eighth on the all-time win list. He is also ranked eighth on NASCAR Winston Cup Series' all-time list of pole positions won with 47. Johnson led the field in 1961 and '65 in both laps led and races led (2,373 laps and 23 races; 3,998 laps and 30 races, respectively). Johnson also found success as a car owner, winning 119 races and six NASCAR Winston Cup Series championships. In 1973, Johnson was inducted in the National Motorsports Press Association's Hall of Fame at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway. In 1990, he was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega, Ala. Johnson was also inducted into Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway's Court of Legends in 1996. The following year, he was inducted into Bristol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway's Heroes of Bristol Hall of Fame


1961
Marvin Panch NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1951, 1953-66 Born May 28, 1926 Hometown Oakland, Calif. Panch's NASCAR Winston Cup Series career spanned two distinct driving eras in the sport's history -- competing against both Lee and Richard Petty in the 1950s and 1960s. Panch's first win came in 1956 from the pole position at a track in Montgomery, Ala. His most successful season was in 1957, winning six races and tallying 27 top-10 finishes through 42 starts. The winner of 17 NASCAR Winston Cup races, one of Panch's most memorable wins came in the 1961 Daytona 500. In 1987, Panch was inducted into the National Motorsports Press Association's Stock Car Hall of Fame at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway


1962
Fireball Roberts NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1950-64 Born January 20, 1929 Died July 2, 1964 Hometown Daytona Beach, Fla. Perhaps the greatest driver never to win a NASCAR Winston Cup title, Roberts accumulated 32 wins, including the 1962 Daytona 500, in a career that spanned 15 seasons before his untimely death in 1964. Roberts finished second to Bill Rexford in his rookie season. He split his time between the NASCAR Winston Cup Series and the NASCAR Featherlite Modified Tour for five years before returning full-time to NASCAR Winston Cup racing. In his first year back, 1956, Roberts won five races and four pole positions to finish sixth in the point standings. He raced only 10 times in 1958 but had six wins, one second and a third, and finished 11th in the point standings despite missing missing almost 80% of the races.


1963
Tiny Lund NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1955-75 Born March 3, 1936 Died August 17, 1975 Hometown Cross, S.C. A big man with an ironic nickname, DeWayne "Tiny" Lund won five NASCAR Winston Cup races through a 21-year career. Lund's career was distinguished by one act of heroism in February, 1963, when he rescued fellow driver Marvin Panch from a burning car during a practice session at Daytona. The injured Panch asked Lund to take his place in the Wood Brothers' Ford. In the crowning achievement of his career, Lund won the Daytona 500. He was a four-time NASCAR Grand American champion. In 1994, Lund was inducted in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega, Ala.


1964
Richard Petty NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1958-92 Born July 2, 1937 Hometown Randleman, N.C. The undisputed "King" of stock car racing with 200 NASCAR Winston Cup Series wins, Petty won seven series championships during his 35-year career. In the most remarkable season in NASCAR history, Petty won 27 of 48 races -- including a record 10 straight -- and finished second seven times in cruising to the 1967 title. Petty led 41 of the 48 races in the 1967 season and of the 12,739 laps he completed, 5,537 were leading the field. Seven of Petty's 200 wins were in the Daytona 500 and notched the final win of his career in the Firecracker 400 at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway on July 4, 1984. Petty ranks first in numerous NASCAR Winston Cup all-time categories: all-time wins (200), races started (1,184), top-five finishes (555), top-10 finishes (712), pole positions (126), laps completed (307,836), laps led (52,194), races led (599) and consecutive races won (10). In 1992, Petty was inducted in Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway's Court of Legends. Five years later, Petty was inducted in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega Ala.


1965
Fred Lorenzen NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1956, 1960-67, 1970-72 Born December 30, 1934 Hometown Elmhurst, Ill. Equally adept at racing on short tracks and superspeedways, Lorenzen was one of the most capable drivers in NASCAR history. An example of Lorenzen's driving skills came in 1964 when he won eight of the 16 races he entered and finished 13th in NASCAR Winston Cup points despite not competing in 45 of the 61 races held that year. Lorenzen scored wins in seven of the 12 years he competed in NASCAR Winston Cup competition. Lorenzen was the first driver in NASCAR history to earn more than $100,000 in one season ($122,588 in 1963). In 1978, he was inducted into the National Motorsports Press Association's Hall of Fame at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway. In 1991, Lorenzen was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega, Ala.


1966
NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1949-64 Born March 14, 1914 Hometown Randleman, N.C. Petty was a hard charger in the NASCAR Winston Cup Series division, claiming 54 wins -- ranking him seventh on NASCAR's all-time wins list. In 1954, Petty won the first of three championships in a Dodge. He won his second championship in 1958, also in a Dodge and his third, in '59, on the strength of 11 wins, powered by a Chrysler. Petty was the first three-time NASCAR Winston Cup Series champion. He won the inaugural Daytona 500, in 1959. He ranked in the top-five in the series' points chase 11 out of 16 seasons. In 1969, Petty was inducted in the National Motorsports Press Association's Hall of Fame at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway. In 1990, Petty was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega, Al



Mario Andretti
No Photo
1967




1968
Cale Yarborough NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1957, 1959-88 Born March 27, 1939 Hometown Timmonsville, S.C. Residence Olanta, S.C. The only NASCAR Winston Cup driver to win three consecutive championships (1976, '77 and '78), Cale Yarborough earned 83 NASCAR Winston Cup victories and 70 pole positions in a career that spanned four decades. His win total places him fifth on the all-time list, and his pole position total is the third-most in NASCAR Winston Cup history. Yarborough is second on the list of most laps led (31,776), fifth in most races led (340) and 10th for most miles run (171,927) in NASCAR Winston Cup history. He is a four-time winner of the Daytona 500 and a five-time winner of the Southern 500 at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway. In 1984, he became the first driver to qualify for the Daytona 500 at more than 200 mph. His 14 pole positions in 1980 and five consecutive victories in 1976 still stand as a single-season records. Yarborough was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1993, the National Motorsports Press Association Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Court of Legends at Charlotte Motor Speedway in 1996.


1969
Lee Roy Yarbrough NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1960, 1962-72 Born September 17, 1938 Died December 7, 1984 Hometown Jacksonville, Fla. Yarbrough is perhaps best known for the confusion his name caused -- although the spelling differed from that of the other Yarborough, Cale. The confusion was compounded in 1968 when both "Yarbs" drove dominant Fords on NASCAR's Winston Cup circuit, tallying a combined eight victories (two for Lee Roy, six for Cale). Yarbrough's most successful season was in 1969 when he won seven races, tallied 21 top-10 finishes and earned $193,211. Had the Winston Million program been in place that year, Yarbrough would have won it with victories at the Daytona 500, the Coca-Cola 600 and the Southern 500. In 1990, Yarbrough was inducted into the National Motorsports Press Association's Hall of Fame at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway.



Pete Hamilton
No Photo
1970




1971
Richard Petty NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1958-92 Born July 2, 1937 Hometown Randleman, N.C. The undisputed "King" of stock car racing with 200 NASCAR Winston Cup Series wins, Petty won seven series championships during his 35-year career. In the most remarkable season in NASCAR history, Petty won 27 of 48 races -- including a record 10 straight -- and finished second seven times in cruising to the 1967 title. Petty led 41 of the 48 races in the 1967 season and of the 12,739 laps he completed, 5,537 were leading the field. Seven of Petty's 200 wins were in the Daytona 500 and notched the final win of his career in the Firecracker 400 at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway on July 4, 1984. Petty ranks first in numerous NASCAR Winston Cup all-time categories: all-time wins (200), races started (1,184), top-five finishes (555), top-10 finishes (712), pole positions (126), laps completed (307,836), laps led (52,194), races led (599) and consecutive races won (10). In 1992, Petty was inducted in Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway's Court of Legends. Five years later, Petty was inducted in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega Ala.


1972
A.J. Foyt NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1963-90, 1992-94 Born January 16, 1935 Hometown Houston, Texas Better known for his four victories in the Indianapolis 500, Foyt didn't restrict himself to open-wheeled machines. He was just as adept at driving a stock car as he proved by winning seven times in NASCAR Winston Cup Series competition. His first victory came at the 1964 Firecracker 400 at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway in his 10th start. Foyt repeated the win in 1965 and went on to win the prestigious Daytona 500 in 1972, joining Mario Andretti as a winner of that race and the Indianapolis 500. Although Foyt competed on a limited schedule, one of his best seasons was in 1971, when he claimed four pole positions, two wins and four top-five finishes through seven starts. He backed that up in 1972, claiming three poles, two wins and five top-five finishes through six starts.


1973
Richard Petty NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1958-92 Born July 2, 1937 Hometown Randleman, N.C. The undisputed "King" of stock car racing with 200 NASCAR Winston Cup Series wins, Petty won seven series championships during his 35-year career. In the most remarkable season in NASCAR history, Petty won 27 of 48 races -- including a record 10 straight -- and finished second seven times in cruising to the 1967 title. Petty led 41 of the 48 races in the 1967 season and of the 12,739 laps he completed, 5,537 were leading the field. Seven of Petty's 200 wins were in the Daytona 500 and notched the final win of his career in the Firecracker 400 at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway on July 4, 1984. Petty ranks first in numerous NASCAR Winston Cup all-time categories: all-time wins (200), races started (1,184), top-five finishes (555), top-10 finishes (712), pole positions (126), laps completed (307,836), laps led (52,194), races led (599) and consecutive races won (10). In 1992, Petty was inducted in Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway's Court of Legends. Five years later, Petty was inducted in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega Ala.


1974
Richard Petty NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1958-92 Born July 2, 1937 Hometown Randleman, N.C. The undisputed "King" of stock car racing with 200 NASCAR Winston Cup Series wins, Petty won seven series championships during his 35-year career. In the most remarkable season in NASCAR history, Petty won 27 of 48 races -- including a record 10 straight -- and finished second seven times in cruising to the 1967 title. Petty led 41 of the 48 races in the 1967 season and of the 12,739 laps he completed, 5,537 were leading the field. Seven of Petty's 200 wins were in the Daytona 500 and notched the final win of his career in the Firecracker 400 at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway on July 4, 1984. Petty ranks first in numerous NASCAR Winston Cup all-time categories: all-time wins (200), races started (1,184), top-five finishes (555), top-10 finishes (712), pole positions (126), laps completed (307,836), laps led (52,194), races led (599) and consecutive races won (10). In 1992, Petty was inducted in Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway's Court of Legends. Five years later, Petty was inducted in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega Ala.


1975
Benny Parsons NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1964, 1969-88 Born July 12, 1941 Hometown Charlotte, N.C. The former taxi cab driver was the NASCAR Winston Cup Series champion in 1973. He earned 21 NASCAR Winston Cup wins and 20 pole positions. His championship season was one of endurance in that he won only one race (second-place finisher Cale Yarborough won four times in the 28-race season and David Pearson won 11 times but ran only 18 events) but drove the most miles. Two of his biggest wins came at the 1975 Daytona 500 and the 1980 Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway. Parsons was the first NASCAR Winston Cup competitor to qualify for a race faster than 200 mph, which he did for the 1982 Winston 500 at Talladega (Ala.) Superspeedway with a speed of 200.176 mph. After retiring from competition after the 1988 season, Parsons went on to become a highly respected analyst on ESPN racing telecasts, winning an ESPN Emmy in 1996. He also hosts a nationally syndicated radio program on Performance Racing Network . Parsons was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame and the Court of Legends at Charlotte Motor Speedway in 1994.


1976
David Pearson NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1960-86 Born December 22, 1934 Hometown Spartanburg, S.C. Pearson, a three-time NASCAR Winston Cup champion, is second on NASCAR Winston Cup's all-time win list with 105, second only to Richard Petty. Pearson, or the "Silver Fox" as he became known, set an unprecedented superspeedway qualifying record by winning 11 straight pole positions at Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway form 1973-78. He won the 1976 Daytona 500. Pearson ranks second on NASCAR's all-time pole positions earned with 113, fourth in laps led with 25,425 and sixth overall in races led with 329 races. He won 11 of the 18 NASCAR Winston Cup events he entered in 1973. Pearson won 43 races from 1972-79 while driving for the famous Wood Brothers. For his efforts, Pearson has been inducted into the National Motor Sports Press Association's Hall of Fame at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway in 1991. Two years later, in 1993, Pearson was inducted in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega Ala. Then in 1995, Pearson was inducted into Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway's Court of Legends and in 1998, Pearson was also inducted in the Bristol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway's Heroes of Bristol


1977
Cale Yarborough NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1957, 1959-88 Born March 27, 1939 Hometown Timmonsville, S.C. Residence Olanta, S.C. The only NASCAR Winston Cup driver to win three consecutive championships (1976, '77 and '78), Cale Yarborough earned 83 NASCAR Winston Cup victories and 70 pole positions in a career that spanned four decades. His win total places him fifth on the all-time list, and his pole position total is the third-most in NASCAR Winston Cup history. Yarborough is second on the list of most laps led (31,776), fifth in most races led (340) and 10th for most miles run (171,927) in NASCAR Winston Cup history. He is a four-time winner of the Daytona 500 and a five-time winner of the Southern 500 at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway. In 1984, he became the first driver to qualify for the Daytona 500 at more than 200 mph. His 14 pole positions in 1980 and five consecutive victories in 1976 still stand as a single-season records. Yarborough was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1993, the National Motorsports Press Association Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Court of Legends at Charlotte Motor Speedway in 1996.


1978
Bobby Allison NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1961, 1965-88 Born Dec. 3, 1937 Hometown Hueytown, Ala. Residence Hueytown, Ala. One of the founding members of the Alabama Gang, Bobby Allisonís 25-year NASCAR Winston Cup career was crowned by the series championship in 1983. He also was the series runner-up five different times. A winner of 84 NASCAR Winston Cup races and 57 NASCAR Winston Cup pole positions, Allison won the Daytona 500 in 1978, 1982, and 1988 - his son, Davey Allison, finished second in the í88 event. He is tied with Darrell Waltrip for series victories (third all-time) and pole positions (fourth all-time). Allison trails only Richard Petty for most races led (414) and is fourth all-time for most career starts (718). He was named NASCARís Most Popular Driver in 1971, 1972, 1973, 1981, 1982, and 1983. His career was cut short by a racing accident in 1988. Allison was inducted into International Motorsports Hall of Fame and National Motorsports Press Associationís Hall of Fame in 1993 and the Eastern Motorsports Press Association Hall of Fame in 1994.


1979
Richard Petty NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1958-92 Born July 2, 1937 Hometown Randleman, N.C. The undisputed "King" of stock car racing with 200 NASCAR Winston Cup Series wins, Petty won seven series championships during his 35-year career. In the most remarkable season in NASCAR history, Petty won 27 of 48 races -- including a record 10 straight -- and finished second seven times in cruising to the 1967 title. Petty led 41 of the 48 races in the 1967 season and of the 12,739 laps he completed, 5,537 were leading the field. Seven of Petty's 200 wins were in the Daytona 500 and notched the final win of his career in the Firecracker 400 at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway on July 4, 1984. Petty ranks first in numerous NASCAR Winston Cup all-time categories: all-time wins (200), races started (1,184), top-five finishes (555), top-10 finishes (712), pole positions (126), laps completed (307,836), laps led (52,194), races led (599) and consecutive races won (10). In 1992, Petty was inducted in Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway's Court of Legends. Five years later, Petty was inducted in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega Ala.


1980
Buddy Baker NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1949-1973, 1976 Born January 25, 1941 Hometown Charlotte, N.C. The son of two-time NASCAR Winston Cup Series champion Buck Baker, Buddy stepped out of his father's shadow and made a name for himself among NASCAR's elite. Baker won 19 races on NASCAR's circuit including the 1980 Daytona 500, as well as back-to-back Coca-Cola 600s at Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway (1972, '73). On March 24, 1970, Baker became the first driver to break the 200 mph barrier at Talladega (Ala.) Superspeedway. Baker ranks ninth on NASCAR's all-time list for top-five finishes with 202 and top-10 finishes with 311. He is ranked 10th, behind his father, on the all-time list for pole positions with 40 (Buck earned 44). After retiring from competition, Baker has made a second career as a television commentator for TNN Motorsports. In 1995, Baker was inducted into Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway Court of Legends. In 1997, he was inducted in the National Motorsports Press Association's Hall of Fame at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway as well as the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega, Ala.


1981
Richard Petty NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1958-92 Born July 2, 1937 Hometown Randleman, N.C. The undisputed "King" of stock car racing with 200 NASCAR Winston Cup Series wins, Petty won seven series championships during his 35-year career. In the most remarkable season in NASCAR history, Petty won 27 of 48 races -- including a record 10 straight -- and finished second seven times in cruising to the 1967 title. Petty led 41 of the 48 races in the 1967 season and of the 12,739 laps he completed, 5,537 were leading the field. Seven of Petty's 200 wins were in the Daytona 500 and notched the final win of his career in the Firecracker 400 at Daytona (Fla.) International Speedway on July 4, 1984. Petty ranks first in numerous NASCAR Winston Cup all-time categories: all-time wins (200), races started (1,184), top-five finishes (555), top-10 finishes (712), pole positions (126), laps completed (307,836), laps led (52,194), races led (599) and consecutive races won (10). In 1992, Petty was inducted in Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway's Court of Legends. Five years later, Petty was inducted in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega Ala.


1982
Bobby Allison NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1961, 1965-88 Born Dec. 3, 1937 Hometown Hueytown, Ala. Residence Hueytown, Ala. One of the founding members of the Alabama Gang, Bobby Allisonís 25-year NASCAR Winston Cup career was crowned by the series championship in 1983. He also was the series runner-up five different times. A winner of 84 NASCAR Winston Cup races and 57 NASCAR Winston Cup pole positions, Allison won the Daytona 500 in 1978, 1982, and 1988 - his son, Davey Allison, finished second in the í88 event. He is tied with Darrell Waltrip for series victories (third all-time) and pole positions (fourth all-time). Allison trails only Richard Petty for most races led (414) and is fourth all-time for most career starts (718). He was named NASCARís Most Popular Driver in 1971, 1972, 1973, 1981, 1982, and 1983. His career was cut short by a racing accident in 1988. Allison was inducted into International Motorsports Hall of Fame and National Motorsports Press Associationís Hall of Fame in 1993 and the Eastern Motorsports Press Association Hall of Fame in 1994.


1983
Cale Yarborough NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1957, 1959-88 Born March 27, 1939 Hometown Timmonsville, S.C. Residence Olanta, S.C. The only NASCAR Winston Cup driver to win three consecutive championships (1976, '77 and '78), Cale Yarborough earned 83 NASCAR Winston Cup victories and 70 pole positions in a career that spanned four decades. His win total places him fifth on the all-time list, and his pole position total is the third-most in NASCAR Winston Cup history. Yarborough is second on the list of most laps led (31,776), fifth in most races led (340) and 10th for most miles run (171,927) in NASCAR Winston Cup history. He is a four-time winner of the Daytona 500 and a five-time winner of the Southern 500 at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway. In 1984, he became the first driver to qualify for the Daytona 500 at more than 200 mph. His 14 pole positions in 1980 and five consecutive victories in 1976 still stand as a single-season records. Yarborough was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1993, the National Motorsports Press Association Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Court of Legends at Charlotte Motor Speedway in 1996.


1984
Cale Yarborough NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1957, 1959-88 Born March 27, 1939 Hometown Timmonsville, S.C. Residence Olanta, S.C. The only NASCAR Winston Cup driver to win three consecutive championships (1976, '77 and '78), Cale Yarborough earned 83 NASCAR Winston Cup victories and 70 pole positions in a career that spanned four decades. His win total places him fifth on the all-time list, and his pole position total is the third-most in NASCAR Winston Cup history. Yarborough is second on the list of most laps led (31,776), fifth in most races led (340) and 10th for most miles run (171,927) in NASCAR Winston Cup history. He is a four-time winner of the Daytona 500 and a five-time winner of the Southern 500 at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway. In 1984, he became the first driver to qualify for the Daytona 500 at more than 200 mph. His 14 pole positions in 1980 and five consecutive victories in 1976 still stand as a single-season records. Yarborough was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 1993, the National Motorsports Press Association Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Court of Legends at Charlotte Motor Speedway in 1996.


1985
Bill Elliott NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1976-Present Born Oct. 8, 1955 Hometown Cumming, Ga. Residence Blairsville, Ga. "Awesome Bill from Dawsonville" is one of the most popular drivers on the circuit as well as one of the most accomplished. The NASCAR Winston Cup Series champion in 1988, Elliott has 40 NASCAR Winston Cup Series victories and 49 NASCAR Winston Cup pole positions in a 22-year career. He was the first driver to win the "Winston Million," in 1985, which earned him another nickname, "Million Dollar Bill." Elliott can count two Daytona 500 victories (winning from the pole position in 1985 and '87), four consecutive victories in 1992 and a single-season record 11 superspeedway races in 1985 to his credit. His total of 49 pole positions is seventh all-time in NASCAR Winston Cup Series history. Elliott won the Most Popular driver Award for a record 12th time in 1997, an award he has not won only twice (1989, '90) since 1984. He was named the Georgia Athlete of the Year in 1985 and 1988 and was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in Jan., 1998. Elliott was also named to the American Auto Writers and Broadcasters Association All America Team in 1985, 1987, 1988 and 1992.


1986
Geoff Bodine NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1979, 1981-present Born April 18, 1949 Hometown Chemung, N.Y. After a storied NASCAR Featherlite Modified career in the Northeast, Bodine began competing on the NASCAR Winston Cup Series circuit on a limited schedule in 1979. In 1981, he made a significant contribution to NASCAR by helping introduce the modern-day power steering system. Bodine began his full-time NASCAR Winston Cup Series career in 1982 and won Rookie of the Year honors. He qualified second for and won the 1986 Daytona 500. After driving for car owners such as Junior Johnson, Rick Hendrick and Bud Moore, Bodine purchased the late Alan Kulwicki's racing team to form his own team in 1993. Bodine won three races the following season and has claimed a total of four wins as an owner/driver.


1987
Bill Elliott NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1976-Present Born Oct. 8, 1955 Hometown Cumming, Ga. Residence Blairsville, Ga. "Awesome Bill from Dawsonville" is one of the most popular drivers on the circuit as well as one of the most accomplished. The NASCAR Winston Cup Series champion in 1988, Elliott has 40 NASCAR Winston Cup Series victories and 49 NASCAR Winston Cup pole positions in a 22-year career. He was the first driver to win the "Winston Million," in 1985, which earned him another nickname, "Million Dollar Bill." Elliott can count two Daytona 500 victories (winning from the pole position in 1985 and '87), four consecutive victories in 1992 and a single-season record 11 superspeedway races in 1985 to his credit. His total of 49 pole positions is seventh all-time in NASCAR Winston Cup Series history. Elliott won the Most Popular driver Award for a record 12th time in 1997, an award he has not won only twice (1989, '90) since 1984. He was named the Georgia Athlete of the Year in 1985 and 1988 and was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in Jan., 1998. Elliott was also named to the American Auto Writers and Broadcasters Association All America Team in 1985, 1987, 1988 and 1992.


1988
Bobby Allison NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1961, 1965-88 Born Dec. 3, 1937 Hometown Hueytown, Ala. Residence Hueytown, Ala. One of the founding members of the Alabama Gang, Bobby Allisonís 25-year NASCAR Winston Cup career was crowned by the series championship in 1983. He also was the series runner-up five different times. A winner of 84 NASCAR Winston Cup races and 57 NASCAR Winston Cup pole positions, Allison won the Daytona 500 in 1978, 1982, and 1988 - his son, Davey Allison, finished second in the í88 event. He is tied with Darrell Waltrip for series victories (third all-time) and pole positions (fourth all-time). Allison trails only Richard Petty for most races led (414) and is fourth all-time for most career starts (718). He was named NASCARís Most Popular Driver in 1971, 1972, 1973, 1981, 1982, and 1983. His career was cut short by a racing accident in 1988. Allison was inducted into International Motorsports Hall of Fame and National Motorsports Press Associationís Hall of Fame in 1993 and the Eastern Motorsports Press Association Hall of Fame in 1994.


1989
Darrell Waltrip NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1972-Present Born Feb. 5, 1947 Hometown Owensboro, Ky. Residence Franklin, Tenn. One of the enduring figures on the NASCAR Winston Cup circuit and a three-time series champion (1981, '82, '85), Darrell Waltrip has become the elder spokesman for the sport. His 720 starts is third-best, his 84 victories ties him for third (with Bobby Allison) on the all-time list, and his 59 pole positions are fourth best in NASCAR Winston Cup history. Waltrip won the (1989) Daytona 500 in his 17th attempt. He is the only five-time winner of the Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte (N.C.) Motor Speedway and won the inaugural The Winston in 1985. Waltrip holds the modern-era record for wins from the pole position with eight in 1981. He was the first NASCAR Winston Cup driver to earn $6 million, $7 million, $8 million, $9 million, and $10 million in prize money and was third driver in NASCAR Winston Cup history to surpass the $15 million. Waltrip was the winner of the NASCAR Most Popular Driver award in 1989 and 1990 and the National Motorsports Press Association Driver of the year in 1977, 1981, and 1982. Though still competitive in NASCAR Winston Cup competition on a fulltime basis, he has already gained respect as a motor sports broadcast analyst. He was inducted into the Charlotte Motor Speedway Court of Legends and Bristol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway's Heroes of Bristol Hall of Fame in 1997.



Derrike Cope
No Photo
1990




1991
Ernie Irvan NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1987-present Born January 13, 1959 Hometown Salinas, Calif. Irvan began his full-time career in the NASCAR Winston Cup Series in 1989 and won the first of his 15 series events just one year later. The winner of the 1991 Daytona 500, Irvan finished a career-best fifth in the series points race. Three years later, he suffered life-threatening injuries from a crash during practice in August at Michigan Speedway. Despite missing the last 11 races of the 1994, Irvan still won the True Value Hard Charger Award for most laps led in a season. Irvan returned to the cockpit in 1995, just 37 races later, finishing sixth in the October race at North Wilkesboro (N.C.) Speedway. Irvan won the 1993 Super Ford Magazine Driver of the Year award (voted by its readers), and in 1994 and 1995 won the Maxwell House Spirit Award (voted by the National Motorsports Press Association).


1992
Davey Allison NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1985-93 Born February 25, 1961 Died July 13, 1993 Hometown Hueytown, Ala. In 1987, Allison became the first NASCAR Winston Cup Series rookie to ever qualify on the front row for a Daytona 500. Although he didn't win that race, he won two others that year and won the Rookie of the Year honors. Allison topped the field in races led (23) in 1991 and in laps led (1,377) the following year. In both of those seasons, Allison won a career-best five races. His life was tragically cut short in a 1993 helicopter accident. In 1996, Allison was inducted into the National Motorsports Press Association's Stock Car Hall of Fame at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway. Allison was also inducted into Bristol (Tenn.) Motor Speedway's Heroes of Bristol Hall of Fame the following year. In 1998, Allison was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in Talladega, Ala.


1993
Dale Jarrett NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1984, 1986-Present Born November 26, 1956 Hometown Hickory, N.C. Residence Hickory, N.C. A driver whose career has sky-rocketed since joining Robert Yates Racing in 1995, Jarrett is the only driver to win both the Daytona 500 and the Brickyard 400 in the same year (1996). He also won the 1993 Daytona 500. A veteran of 13 NASCAR Winston Cup seasons, Jarrett's most successful season came in 1997, when finished a career-high second in the series championship points race, won a career-best six victories and won the prestigious National Motorsports Press Association's Driver of the Year award.



Sterlin Marlin
No Photo
1994-1995




1996
Dale Jarrett NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1984, 1986-Present Born November 26, 1956 Hometown Hickory, N.C. Residence Hickory, N.C. A driver whose career has sky-rocketed since joining Robert Yates Racing in 1995, Jarrett is the only driver to win both the Daytona 500 and the Brickyard 400 in the same year (1996). He also won the 1993 Daytona 500. A veteran of 13 NASCAR Winston Cup seasons, Jarrett's most successful season came in 1997, when finished a career-high second in the series championship points race, won a career-best six victories and won the prestigious National Motorsports Press Association's Driver of the Year award.


1997
Jeff Gordon, is one of the hottest drivers in the Nascar circuit today. He is the second youngest driver in history to win the Nascar Winston Cup Series Championship. He is also the youngest to win 3 Championships. 1993 Rookie of the year. 1994 Inaugural Brickyard 400 winner. 1995 Nascar Winston Cup Series Champion. 1996 Came in second in Winston Cup points. Only losing by a mere 37 points of defending his championship. His team mate Terry Labonte won. Jeff is the 1997 Nascar Winston Cup Series Champion. He won by only 14 points! After a little bad luck in qualifying for the last race, he had to start 37th and finished 17th. Barely enough to win! Also won the Winston Million. Only the second driver to ever accomplish this feat and will be the last. He finished the season with 10 wins and 23 top 10's. He also won the Winston Select, which is a non-point event. 1998 Winston Cup Series Champion! Won the Championship with one race left. 13 wins, 28 top 10's, 26 top 5's, and 24 top 3's! 17 consecutive top 5's. Ties record for consecutive wins (4). Ties record for most wins in a single season (13). At the age of 28 he has 48 Winston Cup Series wins and 30 poles in 217 starts. Very impressive! This young man in his short career has already earned over $30,000,000 !!!!!!! His win at the 1998 Brickyard 400 put him 2nd on the all time money winners list. He done this in only 5 1/2 years!


1998
Dale Earnhardt Birthdate: April 29, 1951 Residence: Mooresville, NC Over the past 20-plus years, Dale Earnhardt captured nearly every NASCAR Winston Cup race except the one he wanted the most -- the Daytona 500. Earnhardt finally put that to rest February 15, 1998 driving the Richard Childress Racing #3 GM Goodwrench Chevy to an emotional win in the event. The win, Earnhardt's only triumph of the '98 season, was the 71st of his career and came in his 575th Winston Cup start, placing him sixth on the all-time wins list. The rest of the 1998 campaign proved to be an up and down season for the seven-time Winston Cup champion. In all, Earnhardt scored five Top 5 and 13 Top 10 finishes in what proved to be an inconsistent campaign. In an effort to turn the team around, Childress stepped in and made a bold personnel move -- Earnhardt and his teammate, Mike Skinner, changed crewchiefs -- swapping Larry McReynolds for Kevin Hamlin. The result proved inconclusive as Earnhardt soldiered on to an un-Earnhardt like eighth place finish in the final point standings. There was never any doubt in Earnhardt's mind about what he wanted to be in life. As a young boy watching his father Ralph race -- and win -- in Stock car events throughout the Southeast, Dale developed a love for the sport that would ultimately fuel one of the most successful careers in the history of motorsports. In his late teens, Dale began racing Hobby-class cars in and around his native Kannapolis, NC, working full-time by day, welding and mounting tires, and either racing or working on his cars by night. He financed his own effort, often times having to borrow money to buy parts and pieces to run on the weekends, hoping to win enough to pay back the bank on Monday. In 1973, Ralph Earnhardt died of heart failure while working on his race car. Crushed by the loss, Dale eventually learned to cope by becoming more determined than ever to be successful as a driver. He continued to compete on the Sportsman circuit, racing at speedways near his home such as Hickory, Concord, and Metrolina Fairgrounds. Dale made his Winston Cup debut in 1975, finishing 22nd while driving Ed Negre's Dodge in the World 600 at Charlotte in a deal put together by CMS President Richard Howard. Over the next three years, he made a total of eight more starts, the last of which was the 1978 Dixie 500 at Atlanta, when he drove a second car for Rod Osterlund. Earnhardt finished fourth in the race, one spot behind Osterlund's regular driver, Dave Marcis. Marcis left after the 1978 season to start his own team, leaving Osterlund with a list of candidates to fill the seat in his Chevrolet. He decided to take a chance on the young driver and offered Dale his first full-time Winston Cup ride for the 1979 season. Earnhardt considers the offer the biggest break of his career. In his first full season of competition, Dale scored his initial Winston Cup win at Bristol in just his 16th career start. Eight races later, he notched his first career pole at Riverside. By the end of the season, he had driven to 11 Top 5 finishes and beat Harry Gant, Terry Labonte and Joe Millikan for the rookie title in one of the most competitive rookie battles ever. In 1980, with a young, yet solid team, good equipment and the determination to prove he belonged at racing's highest level, Earnhardt beat tough veteran Cale Yarborough for the NASCAR Winston Cup Series title. In doing so. Earnhardt became the only driver ever to win the rookie crown and the series' championship in consecutive seasons. Midway through the 1981 season, Osterlund sold his team to Jim Stacy. Earnhardt, disenchanted with the performance of the new team, left after only four races, deciding to finish the season driving for Richard Childress. By the end of the year, Childress realized that his cars were not performing at a level that justified a talent like Earnhardt's, so he urged Dale to accept an opportunity to drive for the well-established team of Bud Moore and big-dollar sponsor, Wrangler. Earnhardt accepted the ride in the #15 Fords, in which he competed for two seasons, winning three races and finishing 12th; then 8th in the points. Meanwhile, Childress, with driver Ricky Rudd, was building his team into a championship contender. In the off-season between 1983 and 1984, Earnhardt made the decision to rejoin Childress. Driver and owner immediately began a program to achieve the level of performance both believed would take them to a NASCAR Winston Cup championship. Neither could have envisioned the success they would achieve together. In 1986, the duo captured their first championship beginning a reign that would bring them six titles over the next nine seasons, accumulating records that attest to the talent and ability of one of the greatest drivers ever to have raced the short tracks and superspeedways of NASCAR. Earnhardt's career highlights include:  Seven NASCAR Winston Cup championships ('80, '86, '87, '90, '91, '93, '94)  Two-time American Driver of the Year ('87, '94)  Five-time NMPA Driver of the Year ('80, '86, '87, '90, '94)  Only three-time winner of "The Winston" ('87, '90, '93)  Only six-time Busch Clash winner ('80, '86, '88, '91, '93, '95)  Two-time IROC champion ('90, '95)  Career winnings in excess of $30 million. Earnhardt will return for his 25th season of Winston Cup competition in 1999 in the familiar black and silver #3 Richard Childress Chevy.


1999
Jeff Gordon, is one of the hottest drivers in the Nascar circuit today. He is the second youngest driver in history to win the Nascar Winston Cup Series Championship. He is also the youngest to win 3 Championships. 1993 Rookie of the year. 1994 Inaugural Brickyard 400 winner. 1995 Nascar Winston Cup Series Champion. 1996 Came in second in Winston Cup points. Only losing by a mere 37 points of defending his championship. His team mate Terry Labonte won. Jeff is the 1997 Nascar Winston Cup Series Champion. He won by only 14 points! After a little bad luck in qualifying for the last race, he had to start 37th and finished 17th. Barely enough to win! Also won the Winston Million. Only the second driver to ever accomplish this feat and will be the last. He finished the season with 10 wins and 23 top 10's. He also won the Winston Select, which is a non-point event. 1998 Winston Cup Series Champion! Won the Championship with one race left. 13 wins, 28 top 10's, 26 top 5's, and 24 top 3's! 17 consecutive top 5's. Ties record for consecutive wins (4). Ties record for most wins in a single season (13). At the age of 28 he has 48 Winston Cup Series wins and 30 poles in 217 starts. Very impressive! This young man in his short career has already earned over $30,000,000 !!!!!!! His win at the 1998 Brickyard 400 put him 2nd on the all time money winners list. He done this in only 5 1/2 years!


2000
Dale Jarrett NASCAR Winston Cup Career: 1984, 1986-Present Born November 26, 1956 Hometown Hickory, N.C. Residence Hickory, N.C. A driver whose career has sky-rocketed since joining Robert Yates Racing in 1995, Jarrett is the only driver to win both the Daytona 500 and the Brickyard 400 in the same year (1996). He also won the 1993 Daytona 500. A veteran of 13 NASCAR Winston Cup seasons, Jarrett's most successful season came in 1997, when finished a career-high second in the series championship points race, won a career-best six victories and won the prestigious National Motorsports Press Association's Driver of the Year award.




E-MAIL





Click for Knoxville, Tennessee Forecast




~~~"Arnie"~~~
7-29-2000



modified
12-2-2001

updates comming soon

My Favorite Links

CJ'S LINKS
CJ'S LINKS PAGE 2