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Thursday Night Hikes: Washburn-Fair Oaks Hike Architecture Notes, Part 2


Observations on Architectural Styles and House Histories

Washburn-Fair Oaks Hike, Part 2

Assembled by

Lawrence A. Martin

St. Paul, Minnesota

Webpage Creation: November 20, 2001

2115 Stevens Avenue South: Edward Chenery Gale House/Minneapolis Branch of the American Association Of University Women Building; Built in 1912 (1911 according to Minneapolis property tax records;) Italian Renaissance Revival in style; Ernest Kennedy, architect. The structure is a three story, 23337 square foot, social club/house. The Gale House has an asymetrical plan and facade and is graced by a columned portico with a balustraded balcony at the Stevens Avenue entrance, a palladian window, small balconies supported with ornamental stone brackets, and a low-hipped roof hidden by a stone balustrade. The buff Bedford limestone facade is detailed with a columned portico, a columned terrace, balustrade balconies, full story arched windows, bay windows, and eight fireplaces. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Gale and Miss Clara Bethune resided at this address. In 1916, Edward Chenery Gale was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1909 city directory indicates that Edward C. Gale, associated with Snyder & Gale, resided at 928 SE Fifth Street. Edward C. Gale was a graduate of Williams College and was one of the "three men with three tomato cans" who gave birth to the Taconic Golf Club in Williamstown, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, in 1896, first as part of Weston Athletic Field. Edward Chenery Gale (1862-1943,) the son of Samuel Chester Gale (1827-1916,) a lawyer who began the first real estate company in Minneapolis, and Susan Damon Gale (1833-1908,) was born in Minneapolis, graduated from Yale University, graduated from the Harvard University Law School, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1888, initially joined the law firm of Shaw & Cray, and subsequently became the partner of Fred B. Snyder in the law firm of Snyder & Gale, enagaged in the general practice of law and managing the J. S. Pillsbury estate. In 1892, Edward Gale married Sara/Sarah "Sadie" Belle Pillsbury, who was a sister of Alfred Pillsbury, whose mansion was across the street, and was a daughter of John S. Pillsbury, the original Pillsbury milling pioneer. Gale practiced law, was the secretary of the York Iron Company, was active in Minneapolis civic affairs, was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society, was a member of the executive committee of the Minnesota Historical Society from 1927 until 1943, was the president of the Minnesota Historical Society from 1936 until 1939, and collected art, much of which is now owned by the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Gale was active in the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, the public library, the city planning commission, and the anti-tuberculosis campaign. Edward C. Gale was a financial supporter of the Polish Relief Committee in 1915. In 1917, Edward C. Gale was the treasurer of the Minnesota State Art Commission in 1917. Edward Chenery Gale compiled Richard Gale, yeoman of Watertown in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1614-1678, published in 1932, and authored Itasca studies, published by the Minnesota Historical Society in 1931. Gale was president of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Edward C. Gale donated the painting "St. Anthony Falls as it Appeared in 1848," by Henry Lewis, to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in 1928. A committee of Minneapolis citizens, chaired by Edward C. Gale, organized to establish a military base hospital (No. 26) at Fort McPherson, Georgia, in 1917-1918. In 1912, the Gales commissioned a "modern" house of classical stature. After the death of Edward C. Gale and that of Sara Belle Gale in 1943, in 1947, their son, Richard Griggs Gale, sold the house to the American Association of University Women. Edward C. Gale was associated with Snyder & Gale and resided at 928 Fifth Street South East according to the 1909 city directory. Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Gale were prominent landowners who operated an extensive farm, Upland Farm, east of St. Bonifacius, Hennepin County, Minnesota. Samuel C. Gale, associated with Gale & Company, real estate loans and insurance, resided at 68 South 11th Street according to the 1909 city directory. Samuel Chester Gale (1827- ,) the son of Isaac Gale and Tamar Goddard Gale, was born in Royalston, Massachusetts, was educated in the Massachusetts public schools and a Massachusetts private academy, graduated from Yale College in 1854, studied law at Harvard College, moved to Minnesota in 1857, practiced law in Minneapolis from 1857 until 1861, entered business after 1861, married Susan A. Damon (1833-1908) in 1861, was engaged in the real estate, insurance, and loan businesses, was a member of the Minneapolis City Council, was a member of the Minneapolis Board of Education for 12 years, was one of the founders of the Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences, was a member of the Minneapolis Library Board, was the president of the Minneapolis Board of Trade, was a president of the Minneapolis Industrial Exposition, and resided at 68 South 11th Street in 1907. Susan Damon Gale, the daughter of Samuel Damon, a woolen manufacturer, descended from John Damon of Reading, England, who settled at Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1633, was born in Holden, Massachusetts, died in Minneapolis. Samuel Chester Gale and Susan Damon Gale had two sons, Edward Chenery Gale and Charles Sunnier Gale, and had three daughters, Alice Gale Jones, Anna Gale (Mrs. Clarkson) Lindley, and Marion Gale. Samuel C. Gale, William H. Hinkle, Albert Loring, Charles M. Loring, Charles J. Martin, and Charles Alfred Pillsbury were the credited donors of the 1887 Animal Locomotion Plate 160 taken by Eadweard Muybridge (1830-1904) at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Samuel Chester Gale ( -1916) died in Hennepin County. Samuel C. Gale was a teacher at the Holden Center School and, with his wife, Susan Damon Gale, donated in 1888 the Gale Free Library at the Damon Memorial building in Holden, Massachusetts. Susan Damon Gale was the daughter of Colonel Samuel Damon. Dr. Samuel C. Damon eventually was a resident of Honolulu, Hawaii. Anna Gale Lindley, Marion Gale, and Alice Gale Jones were siblings of Edward C. Gale. Anna Gale Lindley was a member of the Minnesota branch of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America. Samuel C. Gale (1895-1961) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Corser, and died in Hennepin County. Samuel Chester Gale (1895-1961) was a Former Vice President of Advertising, Home Service and Public Services for General Mills Inc. and was inducted in 1955 to the Advertising Hall of Fame sponsored by the American Advertising Federation. Archie Walker was the son of Harriet Walker, who established the Bethany Home for unwed mothers on the site of the current Walker Methodist Health Center. When Harriet Walker died, her family pledged funds for a new facility and, in 1925, the new Bethany Home at 3701 Bryant Avenue was opened, became the Harriet Walker Maternity Hospital in 1930, became the Walker Methodist Home for the elderly in 1945, became the Walker Methodist Residence and Health Center in 1965, and became the Walker Methodist Health Center and Walker Place in 1983. Rufus Rand, Sr., was the owner of the Minneapolis Gas Light Company in 1884, and was the builder of "Random" mansion in Wright County, Minnesota, for his wife, Susan Mealey Rand, the daughter of Minnesota State Senator Tobias Mealey. "Random" is now a historic bed & breakfast. John Bachop Gilfillan (1835-1924) was born at Barnet, Caledonia County, Vermont, was the son of Robert Gilfillan (1798-1891) and Janet Bachop Gilfillan (1805-1885,) was educated at the Caledonia County, Vermont, Grammar School, and at the Peacham/Caledonia County Academy in Caledonia County, Vermont, was a teacher, moved to Minnesota in 1855 at the invitation of his brother-in-law, Captain John Martin, settled in St. Anthony (Minneapolis,) studied law in the office of Nourse & Winthrop and then in the office of Lawrence & Lochren, organized the Mechanics Institute for Literary Culture in St. Anthony in 1859, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1860, was a First Lieutenant in Company E of the First Minnesota Regiment, was a member of the Minneapolis Board of Education from 1860 to 1868, was a founder and promoter of the grade school system in Minneapolis, was a correspondent with Thaddeus Stevens, a Radical Republican leader from Pennsylvania, was a member, with Judge William Lochren and W. W. McNair ( -1885,) of the law firm of Lochren, McNair & Gilfillan from 1870 to 1884, was a member, with Henry C. Belden and Charles A. Willard, of the law firm of Gilfillan, Belden & Willard from 1884 to 1895, and was a member, with Charles A. Willard and Stephen Willard, of the law firm of Gilfillan, Willard & Willard from 1895 to 1900, was the president, a director, and chairman of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Minneapolis since 1894, was a member of the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota from 1880 until 1888, was a Republican, was the St. Anthony/Minneapolis city attorney from 1861 until 1864, was a Minneapolis alderman from 1865 until 1869, was the Hennepin County attorney from 1863 until 1867 and from 1869 until 1873, won a special election in 1876 to fill the unexpired term of Minnesota State Senator John Sargent Pillsbury, was a member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Anoka County, Hennepin County, and Isanti County (District 25 and District 28) from 1876 to 1882 and from 1883 until 1885, brokered the deal as Chair of the University Lands Committee for the sale of the prior University experimental farm and the purchase of the core portion of the current University (farm) campus in St. Paul, assisted in the recruitment, as University president, Dr. Cyrus Northrop, a professor from Yale University, was a Congressman from Minnesota's Fourth District from 1885 to 1887, was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection to the United States House of Representatives in 1886, attended Queen Victoria's jubilee in London in 1887, attended the funeral service of William I of Germany at Berlin, in 1888, was the master of Cataract Lodge No. 2 of the Free & Accepted Masons, was a Royal Arch Mason, engaged in a solo practice of law after his Congressional service, owned land on the shore of Lake Minnetonka, was the author of the article "History of the University of Minnesota" in a 1908 volume of the Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, died in Minneapolis, and was buried in Lakewood Cemetery. J. B. Gilfillan first married Rebecca Corse Oliphant (1846-1884,) of Sylvan Mills, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Captain James Oliphant and Rebecca Corse Oliphant, in 1870, and the couple had four children, Robert C. Gilfillan, James O. Gilfillan, John B. Gilfillan, Jr., and Rebecca Janet Gilfillan, and then married Hannah Lavinia Coppock of East Palestine, Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1893. Lavinia Gilfillan was a charter member, with Clara Ueland, Alice Winter, and Florence Carpenter, of the Peripatetics Club of Minneapolis, a women's study club formed in 1890, based on a club in Quincy, Illinois. Lavinia (Mrs. J. B.) Gilfillan was the Minnesota representative on the Board of Directors of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage in 1917. The National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage was founded in New York in 1911 to lobby against woman suffrage on the state and federal levels and was led by Josephine (Mrs. Arthur) Dodge, the wife of a leading New York capitalist. In 1917, Alice Hay Wadsworth, wife of Senator James W. Wadsworth and president of the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, sent a letter to Illinois Republican Representative Charles E. Fuller (1849-1926) to appeal for the defeat of the federal suffrage amendment on Constitutional grounds. Franklin Muzzy Crosby resided at 2120 Park Avenue. Bergmann Richards authored In the matter of a memorial to Edward Chenery Gale, deceased: A biographical sketch, published in Minnetonka Beach, Minnesota, by the Hayward Brief Company in 1944. Frederic Beal "Fred" Snyder (1859-1951,) the son of Simon Peter Snyder (1826-1913,) a lawyer with Snyder, McFarland & Cook, and Mary Ramsey Snyder, the grandson of John A. Snyder and Elizabeth Shaffer Snyder and of Alexander Ramsey and Jane Stephenson Ramsey, was born in Minneapolis, was educated in the Minneapolis public schools, enrolled in the University of Minnesota preparatory school in 1875, graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1881, was elected to the honorary society of Phi Beta Kappa, was a member of the Chi Psi fraternity, was initially employed in a book store, read the law in the firm of Lochren, McNair & Gilfillan and in the firm of Koon, Merrill & Keith, was admitted to the practice of law in 1882, married Susan Mary/May Pillsbury (1863-1891,) the daughter of Minnesota governor John Sargent Pillsbury and Mahala Fisk Pillsbury, in 1885, practiced law with Judge Robert Jamison in the firm of Snyder & Jamison in Minneapolis until 1889, was the administrator of estate of Gov. John S. Pillsbury, initially was a member of St. Mark's Episcopal Church, subsequently was a member of the First Congregational Church, was a Republican, was an organizer of the Minnesota Saving Fund & Investment Company, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Six O'Clock Club, was Minneapolis Second Ward alderman from 1892 until 1896, was the Minneapolis City Council President in 1895, was acting mayor of Minneapolis from 1895 until 1896, married to Leonora Stuart Dickson (1865-1946) in 1895/1896, was an organizer of the Civic & Commerce Association of Minneapolis, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 30) from 1897 until 1899, was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Hennepin County (District 39) from 1899 until 1903, was appointed to the University of Minnesota Board of Regents in 1912 and served until 1951, was involved in controversies over athletics at the University of Minnesota, interference of the alumni in the management of the Department of Athletics, and the tenure of athletic directors William H. Spaulding in 1925, Fred Luehring in 1930, and H. O. "Fritz" Crisler in 1932, was a senior member of the law firm Snyder, Gale & Richards (subsequently Richards, Montgomery, Cobb & Bassford, P.A., and Bassford, Heckt, Lockhart & Mullin, P. A.,) was a member of the advisory committee of the Underwriters of Lloyds of Minneapolis in 1914, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, resided at 915 Sixth Street SE in 1907, officed at the Security Bank Building in 1907, died in Hennepin County, and was buried in Lakewood Cemetery. Fred Beal Snyder and Susan May Pillsbury Snyder were the parents of one child, John Pillsbury Snyder (1888-1959,) and Fred Beal Snyder and Leonora Stuart Dickson Snyder were the parents of one child, Mary Stuart Snyder (1897- .) Simon Peter Snyder (1826- ) was born in Somerset, Pennsylvania, moved to Minnesota in 1847, was engaged in the banking and real estate businesses, platted an addition to the City of Minneapolis in 1857, and served in the Dakota Uprising of 1862. John Pillsbury Snyder married Nelle Stevenson, the daughter of Thomas W. Stevenson and Cora Vincent Stevenson and a Titanic survivor. Charles Andrew Willard (1857-1914) was born in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, graduated from Dartmouth College in 1877, graduated from the Boston University Law School in 1879, was in the private practice of law in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, from 1879 to 1882, moved to Minnesota in 1882, was in the private practice of law in St. Paul from 1882 to 1885 and in Minneapolis from 1885 to 1901, was an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippine Islands from 1901 until 1909, was a judge for the federal district court for Minnesota after 1909, resided in Minneapolis, and died in Minneapolis. The property is now owned by the Minneapolis Branch of the American Association Of University Women. The American Association Of University Women was established in 1881 in Boston with a meeting of Marion Talbot, Ellen H. Richards, and 15 like-minded women who had defied society�s standards by earning college degrees, which first became the Association of Collegiate Alumnae. Branches were first created in 1884. The Association of Collegiate Alumnae and the Southern Association of College Women merged in 1921 to become the American Association of University Women. The organization had 36,800 women as members in 521 branches in 1931, had 140,000 members and 1,365 branches in 1957, and had 190,000 members in 1,935 branches in 1981. [See note for John Pillsbury Snyder and Nelle Stevenson Snyder for 2620 Portland Avenue South.]

2104 Stevens Avenue South: John Crosby House/Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy Building; Built in 1904; Georgian Revival in style; William Channing Whitney, architect. The structure is a three story, 11,624 square foot, building. This brick house has a wooden columned portico and an asymmetrial facade. The 1909 city directory indicates that John Crosby, associated with Kingman, Crosby, & Wallace, resided at this address. John Crosby IV (1867-1962) was the son of a founding partner of the Washburn-Crosby milling company, John Crosby (1829-1887). John Crosby was a Minneapolis lawyer, who held several offices during his 62 years of service in the flour milling firm, Washburn-Crosby Company, including president and board chair. Crosby was also involved in many businesses and civic activities in Minnesota, including directorships at Northwestern National Bank (1914), Northwest Bancorporation (1929) and several grain elevator companies, and served on the Minneapolis City Council (1897-1901). He joined his father's company in 1889 as legal advisor, became president of the company in 1917, and, after the merger ot the company into General Mills, became chairman of the board. His sister, Caroline Crosby, lived across the alley on First Avenue South. The Crosbys were related to the Washburns by marriage, since William Drew Washburn's wife and John Crosby's mother were sisters. Their father owned a foundry in Maine which supplied milling equipment for the Washburn mills. William Drew Washburn (1831-1912) was an American politician who served in both the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate as a Republican from Minnesota, was born in Livermore, Androscoggin County, Maine, the youngest of eleven children, two of whom became governors of states and members of congress, and two others became United States ministers to foreign countries, studied at Gorman Academy and at Farmington Academy, graduated from Bowdoin College, moved to Minneapolis around 1857 to practice law, became an agent for the Minneapolis Mill Company, which owned the waterpower on the west side of St. Anthony falls, was commissioned by President Lincoln, surveyor general of Minnesota in 1861, was one of the one of the originators and stock-holders of the Minneapolis Harvester Works, and died in Minneapolis. With his business associate, Major William D. Hale, under the firm name of W. D. Washburn & Co., he erected a large saw mill at Anoka in 1872. He also built the Lincoln Mill in Anoka, was the founder of the Anoka National Bank, and built an opera house at Anoka, which was destroyed in the fire of 1884. He oversaw the building of the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad and the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie and Atlantic Railroad. He married Lizzie Muzzy, of Bangor, Maine, in 1859, and the couple had eight children. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. John Crosby resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Gale and R. P. Gale resided at this address. The building was last sold in 1985 by the Chrysalis Center For Women to the 100 E. 22nd Associates for $300,000. The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP) attempts to promote resilient family farms, rural communities and ecosystems around the world through research and education, science and technology, and advocacy and to create environmentally and economically sustainable communities and regions through sound agriculture and trade policy. The Environment and Agriculture Program of IATP strives to maximize the productivity of the rural landscape while minimizing environmental damage. The building is shared with the United Nations Association and with the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research.

2100 Stevens Avenue South: Luther Farrington House; Built in 1906; Georgian Revival in style; William Channing Whitney, architect. The structure is a 2.7 story, 8436 square foot, house. This brick house has a fireplace at both ends, in the Southern Colonial tradition. It also features a gambrel roof of the New England type, with pedimented dormers. The 1909 city directory indicates that Luther H. Farrington was the treasurer for Winston, Harper, Fisher & Company, wholesale grocers, and resided at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Luther H. Farrington, their daughters, and Samuel P. Farrington all resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Farrington resided at this address. In 1926, the property was sold by Luther Farrington to the Folwell Coans. Mrs. Coan was a Carpenter by birth, who were lumber barons through the Carpenter-Lamb Lumber Company. Luther Humphrey Farrington (1861- ) married Katherine Shackford French (1866- ,) the daughter of George F. French (1831- ,) in 1890 and the couple had one daughter, Katherine Shackford Farrington (1890- ,) who was born in 1915 in Minneapolis, and who married Robert Hale Noyes (1886- ,) the son of Charles Phelps Noyes (1842-1921) and Emily Hoffman Gilman (1854-1930.) Charles Phelps Noyes (1842-1931,) the son of Daniel Rogers Noyes and Phoebe Griffin Lord Noyes, was born in Lyme, Connecticut, attended Williston Seminary, Easthampton, Massachusetts, from 1858 until 1860, was a bookkeeper with Gilman, Son, & Company in New York, a banking house, in 1860, was a member of the 22nd New York Regiment during the American Civil War, moved to Dubuque, Iowa, and opened a dry goods store in 1863, moved to Saginaw, Michigan, and operated a dry goods store, moved to Port Huron, Michigan, and ran a general merchandise store in 1864, moved to St. Paul to join his brother, Daniel R. Noyes, who had purchased the wholesale drug business of Vawter, Pett & Moulton, and renamed it Noyes, Pett, & Company, in 1868, was a merchant and wholesale druggist in St. Paul in the partnership of Noyes Brothers & Cutler, married Emily Hoffman Gilman, the daughter of Winthrop Sargent Gilman and Abiah Swift Lippincott Gilman, in 1874, was a coin collector, was a member of the Arundel Society, summered at White Bear Lake, Minnesota, resided at 89 Virginia Street after 1887, was an investor in the West Publishing Company in 1887, was the president of the Minnesota chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution in 1893, was a member of the arbitration committee for the 1894 railroad strike, was a founder of the Minnesota Society of the Colonial Wars in 1895, invested in the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company in 1895, became the vice president of the Capital Bank in 1896, was the president of the St. Paul Chamber of Commerce in 1897, was a member of the Minnesota delegation to the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, in 1898, was a member of the executive council of the Minnesota Historical Society, was president of the State Savings Bank in 1904, became a member of the board of directors of the H. L. Collins Company in 1904, became a director of the Merchants National Bank in 1906, was the author of the Noyes-Gilman Ancestry, published by the Gilliss Press of New York in 1907, was the vice president of the Waldorf Box Board Company in 1907, became the vice president of the West Publishing Company in 1908, was the president of the board of trustees of the House of Hope Presbyterian Church in St. Paul in 1910, was an organizer of the St. Paul branch of the Archaeological Society of America in 1911, was the president of the Smith Park Realty Company in 1912, was the president of Noyes Brothers & Cutler, Inc., in 1915, was president of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1915, was the president of the Oakland Cemetery Association in 1918, and died in St. Paul of complications of appendicitis. The officers of Winston, Harper, Fisher & Company according to the 1909 city directory were F. G. Winston, president, E. J. Fisher, first vice-president, J. W. Bragdon, second vice-president, J. L. Harper, secretary, and L. H. Farrington, treasurer. George Franklin French (1837-1897,) the son of John A. French, was born in Dover, New Hampshire, graduated from the Dover, New Hampshire, high school, graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in 1859 and a medical degree in 1862, taught Greek and Latin in the private school of Harvard Professors Lane and Lovering, was a proctor at Harvard University, married Clara A. Hill, the daughter of Dr. Levi G. Hill, in Dover, New Hampshire, in 1862, was a surgeon in the Union Army during the American Civil War on the staff of General U. S. Grant at Vicksburg and then on the staff of General William T. Sherman from 1863 until 1865, was a brevetted Lieutenant Colonel in 1865, was an instructor of physiology, dermatology, and obstetrics at the Portland, Maine, School of Medical Instruction in 1875, then was a member of the Maine General Hospital, moved to Minneapolis in 1879, was a lecturer on obstetrics at the St. Paul Medical College from 1879 until 1882, was lecturer on obstetrics at the Minneapolis College Hospital from 1882 until 1885, was professor of gynaecology at the Minneapolis College Hospital/University of Minnesota Medical School in 1885, was the president of the Minnesota State Medical Examining Board in 1887, was the president of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine in 1890, was a Mason, was a Unitarian, was a member of the Loyal Legion of the United States, was a member of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, contributed to the Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion, was a member of the Maine State Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Society, was a member of the National Medical Association, was a member of the American Public Health Association, was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, was a member of the John A. Rawlins Post, No. 126, Department of Minnesota, Grand Army of the Republic, was a member of the Harvard Club of Minnesota, resided at 1600 Hawthorne Avenue in 1896, died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Minneapolis, and was interred in the Pine Hill Cemetery at Dover, New Hampshire. George Franklin French and Clara A. Hill French had three children, Dr. Leigh H. French, Margaret Leighton French, Catherine/Katherine Shackford French (Mrs. L. H.) Farrington, and Elizabeth Ayers French (Mrs. Charles J.) Dean. Elizabeth French also reportedly was married to Herbert Huxley Fiske (1877- ) in 1903. William Channing Whitney (1851-1945) was born in Worcester County, Massachusetts, received his formal education at Lawrence Academy in Groton, Connecticut, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts Agricultural College, worked in the architectural office of Emerson & Fehmer, Boston, and then moved to Minneapolis in 1877. Whitney married Alma Carter Walker and a daughter, Marion Whitney, was born in 1881 and a second daughter, Katharine Whitney, was born in 1888. From 1879 to 1885, Whitney was in partnership with James C. Plant and the firm of Plant & Whitney designed numerous buildings and residences in Minneapolis, including the E. A. Merrill house (1884) and the W. J. Dyer Music Store (1884.) Beginning in 1885, Whitney practiced alone, designing homes for E. L. Carpenter (1906,) Cavour Langdon (1905,) William Dunwoody (1905,) Rufus Rand (1891,) Frank Heffelfinger (1902,) H. Alden Smith (1887,) and Thomas Irvine and Horace Hills Irvine (1910-1911.) Whitney was a member of the American Institute of Architects and the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts. His office was a training center for many younger architects, including C. B. Chapman, Adam L. Dorr, and Serenus Colburn. William Channing Whitney was a member of the Minneapolis Art Commission, had his architect's office located at the Loan & Trust Building, and resided at 2514 Fourth Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory. Katharine Whitney married Francis Bullard Kingsbury and had four children. The Arundel Society was founded at London in 1849, was named after the Earl of Arundel, the famous collector of the Arundel Marbles and one of the first great English patrons and lovers of the arts, and was discontinued in 1897. The property is owned by Sheridan P. Reilly and the taxpayers of record for the property are Sheridan P. Reilly and Martha Spriggs of 6015 Dupont Avenue South. Martha Spriggs is a Title I Math teacher at the Northeast Middle School, Minneapolis.

1925 Second Avenue South/200-208-212 Franklin Avenue East: Built in 1913. The structure is a three story, 14524 square foot, 13 unit (11 one bedroom units and two two bedroom units) apartment building. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Merrill and Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Nelson all resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Trykman and Mr. and Mrs. Leo Wimsey all resided at this address. Lawrence H. Merrill, a special agent for the Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company, resided at 1404 Spruce Place according to the 1909 city directory. The officers of the Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company in 1909 were C. E. Yost, president, C. P. Wainman, vice president, C. M. Mauseau, general manager, M. L. Lane, assistant general manager, J. W. Christie, treasurer, W. R. Overmire, auditor, R. F. Landis, general contracting agent, T. G. Seymour, manager, E. A. Patrick, superintendent of long distance service, and R. F. Estabrook, superintendent of traffic. The Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company was established in 1878 with 53 subscribers, began operations in 1879, and strung a telephone line to St. Paul in 1879. The main exchange of the Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company opened in Minneapolis in 1898. There were at least four competing telephone companies in the Twin Cities at the turn of the 20th Century, the Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company of Minneapolis, the Twin City Telephone Company of Minneapolis, the Mississippi Valley Telephone Company of Saint Paul, and the Tri-State Telephone & Telegraph Company of Saint Paul. Eder H. Moulton was the president of Twin City Telephone Company and resided at 24th Street and Third Avenue South, the current site of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts according to the 1909 city directory. The four telephone companies eventually were suceeded by the Northwestern Bell Telephone Company. Charles P. Wainman resided at 2714 Park Avenue, Carroll M. Mauseau resided at 1680 Hennepin Avenue, Morgan L. Lane resided at 3117 Fifth Avenue South, James W. Christie resided at 3210 Second Avenue South, William R. Overmire resided at 1714 West Lake Street, Ray F. Landis resided at 3119 Clinton Avenue South, and Robert F. Estabrook roomed at 224 South Tenth Street according to the 1909 city directory. Charles P. Wainman (1846- ,) the son of A. J. T. Wainman and Elizabeth Paul Wainman, was born in Utica, New York, served for two years in the Second New York Heavy Artillery Regiment during the American Civil War, was wounded at the battle of Cold Harbor in 1864, was initially employed as telegraph operator, was a telephone official, was the manager of the American District Telegraph Company, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1875, was the electrician for the Cleveland Telephone Company from 1877 until 1880, was the manager and superintendent of the Cleveland Telephone Company from 1880 until 1886, was the general superintendent of the North West Telephone Exchange Company in Minneapolis from 1886 until 1891, was the general manager of the North West Telephone Exchange Company in Minneapolis after 1894, was the vice president and general manager the North West Telephone Exchange Company after 1904, was the vice president and general manager of the Duluth, Minnesota, Telephone Company, was the vice president and general manager of the Mesaba Telephone Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Central Telephone Company, was the vice president of the Albert Lea Telephone Company, was a member of the board of directors of the Litchfield Telephone Company, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Long Meadow Gun Club, was a member of the St. Paul Town & Country Club, was a member of the Kitchi Gammi Club of Duluth, Minnesota, was a member of the Rawlins Post of the Grand Army of the Republic in Minneapolis, resided at 3325 Park Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Telephone Building in 1907. Charles Pontes Wainman ( -1912) died in Otter Tail County, Minnesota. William R. Overmire (1868-1959) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Raymond F. Landis ( -1953) died in Hennepin County. The current owner of record of the property is Stevens Community Associates and the taxpayer of record is Greystone Servicing Corporation, Inc., of Warrentown, Virginia. [See note on Northwestern Telephone Exchange Company/Northwestern Bell Telephone Company for 562 Lincoln Avenue.] [See note on Town & Country Club for 952 Wakefield Avenue.]

201 Franklin Avenue East: Built in 1900. The structure is a three story, 4924 square foot, six unit (two efficiency units and four one bedroom units,) apartment building. The current owner of record is Carla C. Rohwedder, who is located at 1521 West 27th Street.

2005 Second Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 3480 square foot, 12 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, triplex. The property was last sold in 1987 by M. M. Mullin to M D M Properties for $57,500, in 1988 by M.D.M. Properties to Jeffrey Nelson for $99,900, and in 1998 by Jeffrey M. Nelson to David J. Kortz for $146,500. The current owner of record is David J. Kortz.

2006 Second Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2 1/2 story duplex. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Cones and Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Wyman all resided at this address. Arnold D. Wyman was the son of Adelbert Ames Wyman (1864- ) and Josie Finnigan Wyman and was born in Minneapolis. Adelbert Ames Wyman (1864- ) was born in Millbridge, Washington, Maine, was employed in a lobster factory in 1880, married Josie Finnigan in 1884, and the couple had two children, Vincent Wyman (1889- ,) and Arnold D. Wyman (1895- ,) both born in Minneapolis. Adelbert A. Wyman was the vice president of Smith & Wyman Company and resided at 416 Eighth Avenue South East according to the 1909 city directory. James T. Wyman was the president of the Smith & Wyman Company and resided at 1029 South East Fourth Street according to the 1909 city directory. James Thomas Wyman (1849-1918,) the son of John Wyman (1813-1898) and Clarinda Tolman Wyman (1819-1898,) was born in Millbridge, Washington County, Maine, was educated in Maine public schools, came to Minnesota in 1868, established a mill in Northfield, Minnesota, which subsequently burned without insurance coverage, attended Carleton College, Northfield, Minnesota, in 1870, moved to Minneapolis in 1871, was the superintendent of the Jonathan G. Smith & L. D. Parker sash and door mill in 1873, first married Rosetta Lamberson ( -1899,) the daughter of a Methodist minister, in Northfield, Minnesota, in 1873, became a partner of Smith, Parker & Company in 1874, was a manufacturer, was an interior finisher, was the president of its successor, Smith & Wyman, a manufacturer of sash, doors and blinds, in 1880, was the president of the Minneapolis Board of Trade in 1888 and 1889, was an organizer of the Minneapolis Business Union in 1889, assisted in the organization of the Metropolitan Bank in Minneapolis in 1889, was the president of the Board of Trade of Minneapolis from 1888 until 1889, was an organizer of the Minneapolis Business Union in 1889, was the president of the Metropolitan Bank of Minneapolis after 1890, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 30) from 1893 until 1895, was a member of the Minnesota State Senate representing Hennepin County (District 30) from 1895 until 1899, was the president of the Minneapolis Clearing House Association in 1897, was a Methodist Episcopalian, was the president of the Clearing House Association in 1894, married Anna G. Shotwell in 1901, merged the Metropolitan Bank into the Northwestern National Bank and became a member of the board of directors of the Northwestern National Bank in 1902, was a member of the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota from 1901 to 1904, was the president of the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota from 1904 to 1908, was the vice president of the Board of Trustees of Hamline University, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Loan & Trust Company, was a Methodist Episcopalian, was a member of the Hennepin Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the St. Anthony Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Automobile Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Board of Trade, was a member of the Lafayette Club, and was the vice president of the Minneapolis Associated Charities, resided at 1029 S. E. Fourth Street in 1907, resided at 1315 Mount Curve Avenue in 1916, and officed at the corner of Second Avenue and S. E. Eighth Street in 1916. James Thomas Wyman first married Rosetta/Rosa Lamberson (1853- ,) a clergyman's daughter, in Northfield, Minnesota, in 1873 and the couple had five children, Roy L. Wyman (1875- ,) Guy Wyman (1877- ,) Grace Alice Wyman (1878- ,) James O. Wyman (1880- ,) and Ethelwynne Wyman, and subsequently married Mrs. Grace Shotwell. James Thomas Wyman was a Republican and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 30) from 1893 until 1895 and was a member of the Minnesota Senate representing Hennepin County (District 30) from 1895 until 1899. Guy A. Wyman was the treasurer of Smith & Wyman Company and Harold C. Wyman was a student and both boarded at 26 West Grant Street. Vincent E. Wyman was a clerk at the Smith & Wyman Company and boarded at 416 Eighth Avenue South East according to the 1909 city directory. Smith & Wyman Company was a manufacturer of sash doors and blinds. Charles B. Cones ( -1938,) Harold Crittenden Wyman ( -1945,) Guy Addison Wyman ( -1947,) and Adelbert A. Wyman ( -1948) all died in Hennepin County. Arnold D. Wyman (1895-1961) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Finnegan, and died in Hennepin County. The Northern Pacific RailRoad added a spur line to the Smith & Wyman Company factory in Minneapolis between 1910 and 1912. The property is currently owned by Kevin S. D. O'Bryan.

2008 Second Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 4634 square foot, four unit (two one bedroom units, one two bedroom unit, and one three bedroom unit,) apartment building. The 1909 city directory indicates that Harry W. Rubins moved to New York City. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Rubins and Mrs. M. S. Hawkins all resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Clifford and Mr. Terrance Fiske all resided at this address. Harry Winfield Rubins ( -1934) died in Hennepin County. Harry Winfield Rubins (1865-1934) was born in Buffalo, New York, a son of Edward J. Rubins (1839-1872) and Barbara Elizabeth Curtis Rubins (1840-1929,) had two brothers, Charles Curtis Rubins (1863-1943) and Willis Freeland Rubins (1867-1945,) married Florence Hawkins, and the couple had three children, Marian Rubins (1898- ,) Ralph Edward Rubins (1900- ,) and David Kresz Rubins (1902-1985.) Harry W. Rubins, who once resided at 224 Ridgewood, did elaborate wood carvings for St. Marks Episcopal Church. Harry Rubins also was the interior designer used by Purcell & Elmslie for the 1907 Catherine Gray house/W. G. Purcell residence and did the murals fot the 1928 Northwestern National Life Insurance Building. Mildred S. Hawkins (1886-1972) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Mattey, and died in Hennepin County. Marian Rubins married Horace Bancroft Davis ( -1960) and the couple had five children, H. Chandler Davis, a mathematician, fiction writer, and professor emeritus at the University of Toronto, Terry Davis, Barbara Davis, Wilhelmina Davis Caulfield, and Quentin Brown Davis. Marian Rubins Davis, an economist, and Horace Bancroft Davis authored Liberalism is Not Enough, published by Orca Press, in Berkeley, California, the memoirs of two radicals, including their years in the Communist Party. David Kresz Rubins, a sculptor and lithographer, was an instructor from 1935 to 1970 at the Herron Art Institute, which merged with Indiana University in 1967 and became the Herron School of Art, and following retirement, became artist-in-residence at Herron, was the author of the textbook The Human Figure, an Anatomy for Artists, and sculpted the statue of Young Lincoln which stands in the plaza at the east entrance of the State Office Building in Indianapolis, Indiana. While an instructor at the University of Michigan in 1954, after publishing the pamphlet "Operation Mind," attacking the unconstitutional activities of the House Committee on Un-American Activities, Chandler Davis tested the constitutionality of the proceedings of the House Un-American Activities Committee by refusing to testify before the Committee without invoking protection from self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment, was suspended and subsequently dismissed by the University of Michigan, was cited for contempt of Congress, was indicted in 1954, was convicted in 1957, exhausted his federal court appeals in 1959, served a sentence in federal prison in 1960, and emigrated to Canada in 1962. H. Chandler Davis married Natalie Zemon Davis, the Henry Charles Lea Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton University, in 1948. The property was last sold in 1992 by Dennis and Dana M. Murray to Mark and Monica L. Parsons for $92,000, in 1998 by M. G. and M. L. Parsons to S. F. and M. Frenzel for $125,000, and in 2000 by Scott F. Frenzel to Alex Smith for $185,000. It is currently owned by Alex Smith.

2011 Second Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.2 story, 4777 square foot, five unit (two efficiency units, two one bedroom units, and one three bedroom unit,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 2001 by David P. Dobosenski to James R. Rubin for $165,000. The current owner of record is James R. Rubin and the taxpayer of record are James and Laura Rubin, who reside in Edina, Minnesota.

2014 Second Avenue South: Built in 1929. The structure is three story, 9480 square foot, nine unit (four efficiency units and five one bedroom units,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 1986 by A. and A. Nygaard to Michael Oreck for $200,000. It is owned by Ray Brothers, Inc.

2015 Second Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.2 story, 3515 square foot, four unit (three one bedroom units and one two bedroom unit,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 1983 by R. and M. Jones to A. P. Scholl for $80,000, in 1993 by R. E. and M. E. Jones to P. E. and K. A. Jones for $90,000, and in 2002 by Robert A. Kappers to Edward E. Nafzger for $269,900. The current owner of record is Edward E. Nafzger.

2017 Second Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.7 story, 4014 square foot, five unit (four one bedroom units and one two bedroom unit,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 1983 by Robert and Muriel Jones to A. P. Scholl for $125,000, in 1996 by Jones Family Trust to Mark J. Sykora for $107,000, and in 2001 by Mark J Sykora to Malinda K. Launert for $296,000. The current owner of record is Malinda K. Launert.

2018-2020 Second Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 4760 square foot, 11 room, five bedroom, three bathroom, duplex. The 1909 city directory indicates that William Peet, a lawyer who officed at the Boston Block, resided in Deephaven, Minnesota. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. William Peet resided at this address. William Peet, Jr., was the son of William Peet, Sr., and Martha I. Homans Peet, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., graduated from Adelphi Academy, Brooklyn, N. Y., Amherst College in 1878, and Columbia University Law School in 1880, worked in the office of Peet & Fuller in New York City from 1881 to 1884, moved to Minnesota in 1884, and was a lawyer and real estate investor in Minneapolis. In 1896, William Peet, Jr., was a member of the Minnetonka Yacht Club and joined William H. Dunwoody and Thomas B. Janney in a syndicate to acquire a boat to defeat the White Bear Yacht Club for the Minnetonka Cup, leading to the building of the "Tartar," by Andy Peterson, an Excelsior, Minnesota, boat builder, which went on to win five of six races and the cup. Peet also owned the sloop "Nimbus," the "Kite," and the "Hector." William Hood Dunwoody (1841-1914,) of Gold Medal Flour and General Mills fame, the son of James Dunwoody (1812-1883) and Hannah Hood Dunwoody (1813-1863,) a native Philadelphian who was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, grew up in the Hood Fawkes House, built about 1770, a Revolutionary period fieldstone house in Newton Square, Pennsylvania, was raised on a farm, attended the Dunwoody Octagonal Schoolhouse in Newton Square, Pennsylvania, a fieldstone building erected in 1798 by Joseph Hood, his maternal great-grandfather, grew up as a Quaker, served in an apprenticeship while among Quaker families and relatives, was educated in Philadelphia, was a clerk in his uncle's grain and feed store, was the senior partner in Dunwoody & Robertson of Philadelphia, a grain company, from 1860 until 1869, married Catherine "Kate" L. Patten/Patton, the daughter of John W. Patten, a leather merchant, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, came to and settled in Minneapolis in 1869 as a flour buyer for Eastern houses, became the owner of the Arctic Grain Mill as part of Tiffany, Dunwoody & Company in 1871, and became the owner of the Union Grain Mill as part of H. Darrow & Company in 1871, organized the Millers' Association and became its manager and general agent, was the first miller to introduce a new process for milling wheat, was the first miller to engage in exportation of Minneapolis flour direct to Europe, was employed by Governor C. C. Washburn to open new markets for Minnesota flour, was an organizer and a partner in Washburn, Crosby & Company in 1879, was the president of the St. Anthony Elevator Company, was the vice president of the Royal Milling Company, was the president of the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator Company, was a banker and flour manufacturer, was the president of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis from 1901 until 1911, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Trust Company, was the chairman of the board of the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis for 38 years, was a member of the board of directors of the Great Northern RailRoad, was a grain miller and banker, was the president of the Barnum Grain Company, was the vice president of the St. Anthony Elevator Company, was a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society since 1897, held interests in the Barnum Grain Company of Duluth, held interests in the Duluth Elevator Company, held interests in the Dunwoody Grain Company, invested in the Seattle Gas and Electric Company, was a trustee of the Westminister Presbyterian Church, donated to Minneapolis the land on which Hopewell Hospital was built, was a substantial financial supporter of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, was a Republican, was a Presbyterian, donated his former home as the Minneapolis Women's Boarding Home, was a member of the executive committee of the Minnesota Historical Society from 1900 until 1914, was a member of the Committee of 100 to meet Prince Henry of Prussia in 1902, introduced the roller system of crushing wheat, collected books and coins, owned a stock farm at Long Lake, Minnesota, and bequeathed $4.6 million to public and charitable institutions and $2 million to establish an industrial trade school, Dunwoody Institute, to prepare young people for skilled trades, was a member of the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the New York Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Metropolitan Club of New York, was a member of the Minnesota Club, officed at the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce in 1907, resided at 52 South Tenth Street in Minneapolis in 1907, and was buried at Lakewood Cemetery. Dunwoody was a Minneapolis businessman who was active in the wheat trade, grain elevators (the Duluth Elevator Company in Duluth, Minnesota, and the St. Anthony and Dakota Elevator Company,) flour mills (the Washburn-Crosby Co. in Minneapolis, the Royal Milling Company in Great Falls, Montana, the Barnum Grain Company in Duluth, Minnesota, and the Dunwoody Grain Company in Minneapolis,) and banking (the Northwestern National Bank in Minneapolis) in the 1870's, invested in the Seattle Gas and Electric Company in the 1890's, founded the Dunwoody Institute in Minneapolis in 1914, had a stock farm at Long Lake, Minnesota, and was involved in George A. Brackett's search for gold in Alaska in the 1890's. Dunwoody and his wife, Catherine "Kate" Lane Patten Dunwoody (1845/1846-1915,) the daughter of John Williams Patten (1802-1871) and his second wife, Catherine Lane Kellum (1814-1891,) built a cabin on Barnum Island, Michigan, now part of Isle Royale National Park, in 1900, where they vacationed when away from their mansion atop Lowry Hill. The 1909 city directory indicates that William H. Dunwoody, president of the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator Company, president of the Northwestern National Bank, and vice president of the Washburn-Crosby Company, resided at 104 Groveland Terrace. In 1910, following his wife�s successful surgery at Abbott Hospital at 10 East 17th Street, William Dunwoody, through the Trustees of Westminster Presbyterian Church, built Dr. Amos Wilson Abbott a 35-bed hospital at 1818 First Avenue South, which became Abbott Northwestern Hospital, and later bequeathed Abbott Hospital to Westminster Presbyterian Church in 1914, and the church ran it until 1963. Dunwoody was the president of the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts in 1911, when Clinton Morrison offered the family residence for the construction of an art museum. William Hood Dunwoody left nearly $3 million in his will to establish the Dunwoody Industrial Institution in Minneapolis, a technical institution of higher education teaching men and women through hands-on learning. William Hood Dunwoody is buried in Lakewood Cemetery (Section 10.) The name "Dunwoody" or "Dinwoodie" was derived from Dinwoodie Hill in the parish of Applegarth, Dumfries, Scotland, at 871 feet above sea-level, the site of ancient fortifications. George Augustus Brackett (1836-1891) was born in Calais, Maine, moved to Minnesota in 1857, married Anna M. Hoit, the daughter of William Hoit, in 1858, initially drove a meat wagon for Stimson & Hayes in St. Anthony, Minnesota, then worked on a dam for the Minneapolis Mill Company, then was an Army contractor in the 1860's, operated the Cataract Flour Mill as a partner with W. S. Judd in Judd & Brackett, was elected a Minneapolis alderman in 1867, was an incorporator, with Dorilus Morrison, William Washburn, and William King, of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1869, was the chief engineer of the Minneapolis Fire Department in 1869, was a partner in 1873 with Anthony Kelly in a real estate development, was the surveyor general of logs and lumber for the State of Minnesota, was a Minneapolis Park Board commissioner, was a founder of the Minneapolis Free Dispensary, subsequently the University of Minnesota Medical School, became the mayor of Minneapolis in 1873, developed a peninsula on Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, known as Brackett's Point, was the president of the Minneapolis Stock Yard & Packing Company in 1890, liquidated his property during the Panic of 1893, prospected for gold in the Klondike Gold Rush, and is buried at Lakewood Cemetery (Section 6.) Annie Brackett, George Brackett's daughter, and her African-American nurse and nanny, Millie Bronson, are also buried at Lakewood Cemetery. Thomas Benton Janney (1838-1924,) the son of Phineas Moore Janney (1810-1896) and Frances Smith Janney (1814-1854,) arrived in Minneapolis in 1866 to join his brother, Edwin McBeth Janney (1814-1929,) and his brother-in-law, Samuel T. Moles (1840-1915; husband of Emily Florence Janney Moles (1844- ),) in the retail hardware and stove business and they built a store building on a rented lot on Washington Avenue between Nicollet and Minnetonka Ave. In 1875, Thomas B. Janney and his partners, Samuel T. Moles, Fred W. Brooks, and George H. Eastman, began a business partnership to do wholesale and retail hardware business under the name of Janney, Moles, Brooks & Co., taking possession of the hardware establishment of John S. Pillsbury & Co. at 109 Nicollet Avenue and the firm became known as Janney, Brooks, and Eastman in 1877, as Janney, Brooks & Co. in 1883, and as Janney, Semple & Co. in 1884. Thomas Janney was a member of the Westminster Church, had built a private children�s hospital next to Abbott Hospital, and gave the hospital to the Westminster Presbyterian Church in 1921 in his will. Janney came from a prominent Quaker family in Ohio and was also an Elder of the Westminster Church. Thomas Benton Janney married Mary Elizabeth Wheaton (1846-1929) in 1869 and the couple had two daughters, Frances Wheaton Janney (Mrs. Charles) Case (1869-1960) and Helen Mary Janney (Mrs. Charles Merritt) Case (1878-1960.) Helen Mary Janney Case was a member of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Minnesota through her father's family, including Thomas Janney (1633-1696,) who was a friend of William Penn. Charles Merritt Case (1870- ,) the son of C. W. Case and Julia Pratt Case, was born in Minneapolis, graduated from the Shattuck Military Academy, Faribault, Minnesota, in 1888, graduated from Lehigh University in 1892, received a masters degree from Lehigh University in 1893, was the treasurer of the Atlantic Elevator Company, of the Homestead Elevator Company, of the Royal Elevator Company, and of the George C. Bagley Company, was a member of Whallon, Case & Company, stock and grain brokers after 1900, married Helen Janney in 1902, resided at 2118 Pillsbury Avenue in 1907, officed at the Chamber of Commerce Building in 1907, was a member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers, was a member of the Loyal Legion, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, and was a member of the Minneapolis Lafayette Club. Charles Merritt Case, Jr. ( -1996,) prepared at Lawrenceville, graduated from Princeton University in 1928, married Margaret S. Williams ( -1994) in 1932, was the vice president of the Kellogg Commission Company in Minneapolis, was also a director of the Atlantic Elevator Company, was also a director of the Janney Semple Hill Company, enlisted with the Air Force during World War II, was an intelligence officer with the Ninth Air Force in the European theater, and was active in the Minneapolis Community Chest, the Pillsbury House, and the Citizens Club Settlement House. James F. Whallon (1858- ,) the son of George W. Whallon and Helen Pratt Whallon, was born in Mayville, Chautauqua County, New York, was educated in the public schools of Blue Earth, Minnesota, until 1874, was educated at the Shattuck Military School at Faribault, Minnesota, from 1874 until 1876, was a clerk in a post office and store at Faribault, Minnesota, from 1876 until 1880, was an elevator agent from 1880 until 1881, was a clerk in a railroad office from 1881 until 1882, was a railroad agent from 1882 until 1884, was a travel auditor employed by an elevator company from 1884 until 1888, was an operator of grain elevators, was a stock broker, was a member of the firm of Pratt, Porter & Company, a grain firm, from 1888 until 1890, was a member of the firm of Whallon & Company, grain elevator operators, from 1894 until 1902, was a member of the firm of Whallon, Case & Company, grain and stock brokers, after 1901, was the vice president and manager of the Columbia Elevator Company after 1902, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Minnesota Club, resided at 2507 Blaisdell Avenue in 1907, and officed at the Chamber of Commerce Building in 1907. George A. Brackett (1836-1921) was born in Orono, Washington County, Maine, arrived at St. Anthony in 1857, initially worked driving a meat wagon for Stimson & Hayes and worked for the Minneapolis Mill Company, married Anna M. Hoit, the daughter of William Hoit, in 1858, contracted to supply beef to the troops of General Sully during the punitive expeditions that followed the Dakota Conflict of 1862, operated the Cataract Flour Mill in partnership with W. S. Judd as Judd & Brackett, was a Minneapolis alderman in 1867, was purchasing agent for the Northern Pacific Railway Company from 1870 to 1875, was instrumental in organizing the Minneapolis fire department, was the chief engineer of the Minneapolis fire department from 1869 to 1872, was the Surveyor General of Logs and Lumber for Minnesota from 1874 to 1882, was the mayor of Minneapolis from 1873 to 1874 as a Republican, was in the pork packing business in partnership with with Anthony Kelly in 1873, was a member of the first Minneapolis Board of Park Commissioners from 1883 to 1887, and was president of the Minneapolis Stock Yards & Packing Company in 1890, but faced bankruptcy in the stockyard business during the Panic on 1893. Brackett purchased "Starvation Point" on Lake Minnetonka from Nathan Stubbs in 1880 and renamed it "Orono Point" for his birthplace, leading to the naming of the city of Orono, Minnesota. George A. Brackett also was an engineer, was approached by a coalition of Skagway, Alaska, boosters to help build a wagon road from the city over the White Pass summit, began work on the road in 1897, with the group failing to provide any promised advance funding and leaving him to pay the startup costs himself, and built eight miles of toll road before he became broke. In 1893, the city hospital moved to George Brackett's farm, located on the block bounded by Portland Avenue, Park Avenue, Fifth Street, and Sixth Street, and the city purchased the farm for $100,000. Thomas Benton Janney ( -1924) and Mary E. Janney ( -1929) both died in Hennepin County. Frances W. Janney (1869-1963) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Wheaton, and died in Hennepin County. This structure is currently owned by C. Whittlef and M. McPartland of 3512 46th Avenue South and the taxpayer of record is Donna McPartland.

2019 1/2 Second Avenue South: Built in 1954. The structure is a two story, 1039 square foot, five unit (four one bedroom units and one two bedroom unit,) apartment building. The current owner of record is Malinda K. Launert, who resides at 2017 Second Avenue South.

2022 Second Avenue South: J. S. Kingman House; Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.7 story, 3068 square foot, ten room, five bedroom, three bathroom, triplex. The 1909 city directory indicates that James T. Gerould, the librarian at the University of Minnesota, resided at 137 East Grant Street. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Gerould resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Sikes and their daughters all resided at this address. James Thayer Gerould (1872-1951,) the son of Samuel Lankton Gerould (1834-1906) and his second wife, Laura Etta Thayer Gerould, was born in Goffstown, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, graduated from Dartmouth College in 1895, was employed as a librarian by several universities, was the librarian at the University of Minnesota from 1906 until 1920, was the president of the Minnesota Library Association from 1912 untli 1913, became a member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1915, was the librarian of the Princeton University Library from 1920 until 1938, was president of the New Jersey Library Association from 1923 until 1924, was the author, in 1921, of Sources of English History of the Seventeenth Century, 1603-1689, published by the University of Minnesota, in 1928, with Laura S. Turnbull, of Selected Articles on Interallied Debts and Revision of the Debt Settlements, published by The H. W. Wilson Company, in 1929, of Selected Articles on the Pact of Paris, Officially the General Pact for the Renunciation of War, published by The H. W. Wilson Company, and, with Winifred Gregory/Gerald Gerould, in 1948, of A Guide to Trollope: An Index to the Characters and Places, & Digests of the Plots in All of Trollope's Works , published by the Princeton University Press, and died at Pollard Park, Williamsburg, Virginia, after a lengthy illness. James Thayer Gerould was employed by the University of Missouri, as its first professionally trained librarian, from 1900 to 1907, having previously been the assistant librarian at Columbia University in New York, was a librarian at the University of British Columbia, Canada, in 1914 while on a leave from the University of Minnesota, was arrested and jailed in Germany on spying charges while on a book acquisition trip for the University of British Columbia, Canada, before being deported to Switzerland in 1914, was the librarian at the University of Minnesota from 1906 to 1920, was the librarian at Princeton University from 1920 to 1940, and retired to Williamsburg, Virginia, where he died. Gerould went on a collection trip to Europe on behalf of the University of Minnesota in 1914 and spent $25,000 on books, but lost most of the books when he was imprisoned briefly in Germany on suspicion of being a British spy. James T. Gerould was a primary force in organizing the Association of Research Libraries in 1932 and was the founder of the Association of Research Libraries statistics. Winifred Gregory Gerould (1885- ) edited List of the Serial Publications of Foreign Governments, 1815-1931, published by the American Council of Learned Societies, and authored, with Avis Gertrude Clarke, in 1937, American Newspapers, 1821-1936; a Union List of Files Available in the United States and Canada , published by The H. W. Wilson Company. Simeon R. Sikes (1849- ) was born in Erie County, New York, married Ella M. Lathrop of St. Louis, Missouri, moved to Minnesota in 1882, settled in Minneapolis, and was a leather belting manufacturer and merchant. In 1909, according to the city directory, Simeon R. Sikes was the president of the S. R. Sikes Company, a manufacturer of leather belting for sawmills and flour mills, and resided at 317 Clifton Avenue. From 1876 to 1882, Simeon R. Sikes was the partner of Felix Raniville in a leather belt manufacturing enterprise in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and then Sikes moved to Minneapolis and founded a similar firm. The S. R. Sikes Company still is in existence, at 3715 Oregon Avenue South, and still makes belting for mills and machinery. The property was last sold in 1992 by Georgia E. Eward to Nancy B. Herman for $70,000, in 1993 by the Nancy Herman Estate to William J. Book for $7,000, in 1993 by W. J. and M. S. Book to Terry F. Erickson for $105,000, and in 2005 by Terry Erickson to Daniel D. Hoyt for $353,000. The current owner of record is Daniel D. Hoyt and the taxpayers of record are Daniel D. Hoyt and Marcena Hansen-Hoyt.

2023-2025 Second Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 4540 square foot, 15 room, five bedroom, four batroom, duplex. The property was last sold in 2000 by the Mary K. Daniels Estate to Darrin and Monica R. Hahn for $239,500 and in 2002 by Darrin Hahn to Rajesh S. Dash for $280,000. The current owner of record is Rajesh S. Dash and the current taxpayers of record are Rajesh S. Dash and Kelly L. Dash.

2103 Second Avenue South: Built in 1912. The structure is a 2.7 story, 4164 square foot, eight unit (five efficiency units and three one bedroom units,) apartment building. The current owner of record is Alliance Housing Inc., located at 118 26th Street East.

2106 Second Avenue South: Chateau Healthcare Center; Built in 1964. The structure is a four story nursing home. It is currently owned by Beverly Enterprises of Winter Park, Florida.

2111 Second Avenue South: Built in 1951. The structure is a three story, ten unit, apartment building. It is currently owned by 2111 Second Avenue South LLC.

2115 Second Avenue South: Built in 1901. The strucuture is a 2 1/2 story, three bedroom, three bath residence. The building is currently owned by L. M. Schultz and K. K. Cooper.

2116 Second Avenue South: John S. Bradstreet/Eugene A. Merrill House; Built in 1984; French Renaissance/Chateauesque in style; William Channing Whitney, architect. This is a two-and-a-half-story red sandstone mansion, featuring a three-story polygonal tower and heavy rustication. The house was built for, but never occupied by, Minneapolis interior designer John Scott Bradstreet (1845-1914), who had a store (John S. Bradstreet & Company) on Park Street and at 327 South Seventh Street. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Eugene A. Merrill resided at this address from 1890 to 1922. It was purchased in 1887 by lawyer and banker Eugene A. Merrill, whose family split their time between this house and residences on Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, and in Pasadena, California. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Eugene A. Merrill and Keith Merrill all resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Merrill resided at this address. Merrill organized the Minnesota Loan and Trust Company with Edmund Joseph Phelps in 1883, was its president, and was instrumental in the founding of Vergas, Minnesota, in 1903 and in the founding of Mahnomen, Minnesota, in 1904. John S. Bradstreet was the oldest son of Moses Bradford Bradstreet (1816-1899), of Rowley, Massachusetts, and Susan M. Scott Bradstreet ( -1904), of Newbury, Massachusetts, was educated at Putnam Academy in Newburyport, Massachusetts, worked as an engine turner, salary clerk, and then supply clerk at Gorham Manufacturing, an important producer of high-end silver wares located in Providence, Rhode Island, from 1863 to 1872, and moved to Minnesota in 1873, initially working as a salesman for the furniture firm Barnard, Clark, & Cope. When the firm of Barnard, Clark, & Cope was taken over by Edward C. Clarke in 1874, Bradstreet continued as an employee of Mr. Clarke until the firm closed in 1875 and Bradstreet opened his first fine furniture shop. John S. Bradstreet was trained in part by Josiah Conder (1852-1920) and designed furniture and interior house elements frequently in the Arts and Crafts style. Bradstreet partnered with Edmund Joseph Phelps as Phelps & Bradstreet, a furniture company, in 1878, after Phelps moved to Minneapolis and the Phelps & Bradstreet firm was so large that it occupied six floors of the Syndicate Block on Nicollet Avenue. Phelps sold his interest in 1884 in order to pursue banking and other business ventures and his shares were purchased by the Thurber family, the owners of Gorham Manufacturing, and the firm became Bradstreet, Thurber, & Co. Bradstreet was known as Minneapolis' leading interior decorator, furniture designer, and arbiter of good taste. Bradstreet assiduously cultivated a public persona of a man of breeding and intelligence and was often seen driving about town in a phaeton pulled by a bob-tailed horse. Bradstreet cultivated business and personal relationships with the burgeoning middle and upper classes in Minneapolis and was involved in the city's emerging cultural scene. In the 1870's, Bradstreet initially was interested in the modern Gothic style popularized by English Arts and Crafts designers, and by the beginning of the 1880's, Bradstreet had also enthusiastically embraced the ideals of Whistler and the Aesthetic movement, had fully immersed himself in the contemporary Moorish craze, and had become increasingly interested in the art of Japan and Japanese art in decoration. His Minneapolis shop employed 80 men, including some brought from Japan. Bradstreet also founded the Bachelors' Club of Minneapolis, a men's social and study club that was organized in 1877, with Dr. A. W. Abbott and Willard Cray, and the Minneapolis Skylight Club. In 1884, Bradstreet resided at a boarding house owned by William Sheldon Judd that was located across from the Minneapolis City Hall, the most fashionable boarding house of the time. Bradstreet was a member of the National Art Cub of New York, the Ends of the Earth Club of New York, and London, and the Royal Asiatic Society of London. In 1893, the Bradstreet-Thurber building and its stock was severely damaged by a fire set by a Bradstreet employee, John Singleton, and the partnership with the Thurbers ended, with Bradstreet operating a design firm on his own until 1901, when, with Frank Waterman and Fannie M. Jaquess, he incorporated John S. Bradstreet and Co. He collaborated with the American decorative arts firms Tiffany and Company, Rookwood Pottery, and the Grueby Faience Company, and had a nationwide clientele. John S. Bradstreet, with architect Louis Long, designed the interior furnishings for the Minneapolis city council chambers in 1902-1904 and led the 1923 redesign of the chambers. Bradstreet also designed the library for the Minneapolis Women's Club, built in 1927-1928. Bradstreet also was associated with the architectural detail firm of Bradstreet-Thurber Company, John S. Bradstreet & Company, and the Minneapolis Craftshouse, located at 327 South Seventh Street. The Minneapolis Crafthouse opened in 1904. He traveled widely, including trips to the eastern Atlantic Coast, Florida, California, Nassau, the islands of the Pacific, England, Germany, Spain, Italy, Sicily, India, China, Japan, Korea, Canada, the Suez Canal, Siam, Singapore, Java, Hong Kong, and Shanghai. John S. Bradstreet was the president of John S. Bradstreet & Company, interior decorators, with F. H. Waterman, vice president and treasurer, and F. M. Jaquees, secretary, and resided at The Plaza according to the 1909 city directory. Bradstreet died in Minneapolis from injuries sustained in a traffic accident and was buried in the Rowley, Massachusetts, Cemetery. John Scott Bradstreet is memorialized at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts with a tablet created by artist Paul Fjelde (1892-1987.) The Minneapolis Institute of Arts also has a portrait of John Scott Bradstreet, painted in 1906, by Douglas Volk. John Scott Bradstreet ( -1914) died in Hennepin County. Architect Edwin H. Hewitt wrote a tribute to Bradstreet entitled "John S. Bradstreet�Citizen of Minneapolis: An Appreciation of his Life and Work" in the in 1916. Samuel/Samual Trubshaw was a furniture and art collector in Asia for John S. Bradstreet & Company. William Sheldon Judd (1823-1902) was born in Elizabethtown, New York, moved to Minnesota in 1857, engaged in banking in Faribault, Minnesota, moved to Minneapolis in 1864, was a partner with Frederick A. Gilson, Godfrey Sheitlin, B. S. Bull, and Dorilus Morrison in the first street railroad franchise granted by the City of Minneapolis, engaged in lumber milling and flour milling, and died in Minneapolis. Josiah Conder was a British architect who was invited to Japan by the Meiji government in 1877 and designed stately residences of wealthy people and politicians there. Frank H. Waterman, the vice president of the J. S. Bradstreet Company, boarded at The Hampshire Arms according to the 1909 city directory. Fanny M. Jaquess boarded at 1616 West 28th Street according to the 1909 city directory. Edmund Joseph Phelps (1845- ,) the son of Joseph E. Phelps and Ursula Wright Phelps, was born in Brecksville, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, attended the preparatory program of Baldwin University, Berea, Ohio, and attended Oberlin College, was a teacher at the Northwestern Business College at Aurora, Illinois, then was the penmanship teacher in the Aurora, Illinois, public schools, then was a clerk employed by the Volintine & Williams banking house, formed E. J. Phelps & Company, a furniture retailer, in 1870, married Louisa A. Richardson, the daughter of Charles R. Richardson and Ruth Shepard Richardson of Salem, Massachussetts, in 1874 in Aurora, Illinois, moved to Minneapolis in 1878, purchased J. B. Hanson Company, a furniture trader, in 1878, partnered with J. S. Bradstreet in Phelps & Bradstreet, was a member of the Minneapolis Board of Trade in 1879, organized the Minnesota Loan & Trust Company with Eugene A. Merrill in 1883, was the president of the Minneapolis Board of Trade in 1884 and 1885, also established the Minneapolis Business Union and helped form the Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company, the Brown & Haywood Glass Company, the Northwestern Elevator Company, the National Bank of Commerce, and the Moore Carving Machine Company, was the president of the Belt Line Elevator Company, associated with the Peavey Company, was a member of the Minneapolis Park Board, was the president of the Minneapolis Business Union, was a director of the National Bank of Commerce, was a moving force behind securing the 1892 Republican Party National Convention for Minneapolis, and was a trustee of the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts. E. J. Phelps and Louisa A. Richardson Phelps had five children, including Ruth Phelps, Richardson Phelps, and Edmund J. Phelps, Jr. Eugene Adelbert Merrill (1847- ,) the son of Daniel P. Merrill and Jeanette Pollay Merrill, was born in Byron, Genessee County, New York, was educated in the common schools of Geneseo, Illinois, graduated from Hillsdale College, Michigan, in 1872, toured Europe, read the law at the law offices of E. L. Koon and M. B. Koon at Hillsdale, Michigan, was admitted to the practice of law in Michigan in 1874, settled in Minneapolis in 1875, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1875, married Adelaide "Addie" M. Keith in 1876 in Minneapolis, practiced law for eight years, received a masters degree from Hillsdale College, Michigan, in 1880, was a law partner of Judge Charles H. Woods as Woods & Merrill from 1875 until 1878, then formed the law firm, with Judge M. B. Koon, of Koon & Merrill, reorganized, with A. M. Keith, as Koon, Merrill & Keith, practiced law from 1878 until 1883, was a trust official, was the president of the Minnesota Loan and Trust Company since its organization, with Edmund Joseph Phelps, in 1883, was a trustee of Hillsdale College, was a trustee of Parker College, Winnebago City, Minnesota, was a Free Baptist, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, and officed at 313 Nicollet Avenue in 1907. Eugene A. Merrill and Adelaide M. Keith Merrill had four children, Burdett Merrill (1879- ,) May Merrill (Mrs. Clarence Day) Shepard (1882- ,) Keith Merrill (1888- ,) and Eleanor Merrill (1892- .) Eugene A. Merrill, with John M. Sraw, Frank W. Forman, Henry Wioecke, H. N. Peck, Arthur M. Keith, F. A. Chamberlain, Mart B. Koon, Stanley R. Kitchel, Charles M. Loring, Joseph W. Mauck, Charies C. Leland, Putnam D. McMillan, Joseph U. Barnes, Daniel Fish, George Huhn, Austin F. Kelley, and Charles H. Woods, was a member of the board of directors of the Minnesota Title Insurance & Trust Company in Minneapolis. Keith Merrill (1887- ) was born in Minneapolis, graduated from Yale University in 1911, received a law degree from Harvard University in 1914, married Mary Katherine Ayer in 1917, served in the United States Foreign Service from 1917 until 1937, was in the U.S. Naval Reserve, and served as an assistant to Captain W. D. Puleston, Navy liaison officer to the Board of Economic Warfare, from 1942 to 1946. Clarence Day Shepard (1872-1949,) the son of Ashbel King Shepard and Clare R. Smith Shepard, was born at Ripon, Wisconsin, was educated at the Milwaukee Academy, commenced a career as a bank clerk in 1886, later was assistant cashier at the First National Bank of Duluth, Minnesota, married May Merrill in 1902, came to Winnipeg in 1903, formed a partnership in a real estate firm with Charles H. Enderton, was a founding member of the St. Charles Country Club, was a member of the Manitoba Club, was a member of the Carleton Club, was a member of the Pine Ridge Club, was a member of the Canadian Club, was a member of the Motor Country Club, and was a charter member of the Duluth Rowing Club, served as a vestryman and a warden of St. Luke�s Anglican Church, was the president of the Winnipeg Real Estate Exchange, was a member of the executive of the National Association of Real Estate Boards, and died at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. This building was the first of several homes in the district that were designed by William Channing Whitney, who was a Massachusetts native and a Massachusetts Institute of Technology alumnus. The structure is a three story office building which houses the Mill City Music Festival. The building was owned by The Merrill Partnership. The lawyers at McSweeney & Fay purchased the mansion in 2004 and reportedly began extensive renovations to restore much of the original woodwork and flooring. The Merrill Mansion is currently used for scrapbooking gatherings and retreats held by Scrapmania. McSweeney & Fay, PLLP and Groshek (Christa Groshek) Law are also located at this address. [See note for Dorilus Morrison for 2400 Third Avenue South.]

2117 Second Avenue South: Sabaka Design architectural firm; Built in 1901. David Sabaka was the restoration architect for the George W. Van Dusen mansion. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Andrews resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Eastman resided at this address. Sewall D. Andrews, treasurer of the Minneapolis Drug Company, resided at 15 24th Street according to the 1909 city directory. William Wallace Eastman (1827- ) was born at Conway, New Hampshire, educated at the North Conway Academy and the South Conway Seminary, worked in his father's paper mill, went to California in 1850, came to St. Anthony, in 1854, and became a partner in the Minnesota Flouring Mill with his brother, sold out in 1858, and formed a partnership with Paris Gibson, and built the Cataract Mills, then built the North Star Woolen Mills on the west side, built a paper mill in partnership with Charles C. Secombe, built the Anchor Flouring Mill with Gibson and G. H. Eastman, traded it to ex-Governor John S. Pillsbury for his wholesale hardware stock and business, was engaged in the lumber business as Eastman, Bovey & Co., in partnership with his brother-in-law, Mr. John DeLaittre, and H. D. Eastman, purchased Nicollet Island, was part of the construction company that built the first section of the Northern Pacific RailRoad in 1872, purchased the Consolidated Breweries of Minneapolis, erected a large, magnificent hotel at Hot Springs, Arkansas, was engaged in sheep raising in Montana, operated the wholesale grocery house of Dunham & Eastman, and managed the Island Power Company. W. W. Eastman married, in 1855, Susan Randall Lovejoy, and they had three children, Fred W. Eastman, Ida May Eastman and Josie Belle Eastman. In 1868-1869, W. W. Eastman was in charge of a project to tunnel under Hennepin Island and Nicollet Island to redirect a portion of the Mississippi River from St. Anthony Falls as a tailrace for milling operations on the river bank, but the tunnel collapsed, formed a huge whirlpool, and only a concerted effort over the next eight years by the Army Corps of Engineers saved the Falls, including several tunnel bulkheads, an interchannel dike, two spill dams, and an apron. In 1874, W. W. Eastman, Paris Gibson, and G. H. Eastman built the Anchor Mill, a block off the water powercanal, and powered by a line shaft from a turbine under the North Star Woolen Mill, burned in late 1878, was rebuilt in 1879, ceased production in 1928 and became a warehouse, and was torn down in 1937. W. W. Eastman was an incorporator, in 1883, of the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic (Soo Line) Railway with W. D. Washburn, H. T. Welles, John Martin, Thomas Lowry, George R. Newell, Anthony Kelly, C. M. Loring, Clinton Morrison, J. K. Sidle, William D. Hale, Charles A. Pillsbury, and Charles J. Martin. Charlotte A. Eastman, the sister of W. W. Eastman, was born in Conway, New Hampshire, moved to Minnesota in 1854, arriving at St. Paul from Galena, Illinois, on the steamer "War Eagle," and married David Adams Secombe, a resident of Nicollet Island, in 1855, at the home of another brother, John W. Eastman, by Judge Lardner Bostwick. John Whittemore Eastman (1820-1899) was born in Conway, New Hampshire, the son of William K. Eastman, was educated at the Fryeburg, Maine, Academy and the academy at Plymouth, Massachusetts, was employed from 1840 to 1847 by wholesale houses in either Boston or Buenos Aires, Argentina, as accountant or supercargo, mined in California, was involved in the carrying trade between Mexico and California ports, went into the cattle business and the fruit business in Southern California, married Susan Maria Farrington in 1854, settled in St. Anthony, established the town of Merrimac, some miles below St. Paul, which was abandoned when the Mississippi River changed course, and erected a large flour mill at St. Anthony Falls with John Rollins, W. W. Eastman, and R. P. Upton. In 1858, the firm became Eastman & Cahill and the mill name changed to "Island Mills." In 1869, John W. Eastman, in company with Elijah Moulton, built a large planing and re-sawing mill on Hennepin Island. John Whittemore Eastman and Susan Maria Farrington Eastman had two sons, Dr. Arthur M. Eastman of St. Paul, and Alfred F. Eastman of Skaguay, Alaska. David Adams Secombe (1827-1892,) the son of David Secombe and his second wife, Lydia Adams Secombe, was born in Amherst/Milford, New Hampshire, attended Pembroke Academy, attended Hancock Academy, attended Dartmouth College, read the law with former U. S. Senator Daniel Clark in Manchester, New Hampshire, moved to Minnesota in 1851, settled in St. Anthony, Minnesota, was a Congregationalist, was admitted to the practice of law in Minnesota in 1852, was a lawyer, married Charlotte Augusta Eastman in 1855 in St. Anthony, Minnesota, moved to Minneapolis, was Mayor Pro-Temp. of Minneapolis from 1856 until 1857, was a law partner of John Wesley North for three years, was removed from the practice of law for disrespect of the court by order of the Minnesota Territorial Court in 1856, with the question unsuccessfully appealed to the U. S. Supreme Court in Ex Parte in the Matter of David A. Secombe, 60 U.S. 9 (1856,) was reinstated to the practice of law in the State of Minnesota in 1857, was involved in a land dispute that was resolved by the U. S. Supreme Court in David A. Secombe et al. v. Franklin Steele, 61 U.S. 94 (1857,) was a member of the Hennepin County Bar Association, was a Republican, assisted in the drafting of the Minnesota Constitution as a member of the Minnesota Constitutional Convention representing Hennepin County (District 3) in 1857, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 23) from 1859 until 1861, was a delegate to the Republican National Convention that nominated Abraham Lincoln in 1860, was a law partner of Byron W. Sutherlands, and was Hennepin County attorney from 1871 until 1872. David Adams Secombe and Charlotte Augusta Eastman Secombe were the parents of three children, Carrie Eastman Secombe (Mrs. Edward/Edwin C.) Chatfield (1857- ,) David Willis Secombe (1860- ,) and Frank Adams Secombe (1875- .) John DeLaittre (1832- ) married Clara Towle Eastman, moved to Minneapolis in 1865, owned the Bovey-DeLaittre Lumber Co., owned a large sawmill in Cloquet, Minnesota, was the president of the Nicollet National Bank, was the vice president of the Farmers' & Mechanics' Savings Bank, was elected Mayor of Minneapolis in 1877, was the State Prison Inspector from 1877 to 1887, was a commissioner for the construction of the Minneapolis city hall and city court house in Minneapolis, and was a commissioner for the construction of the State Capitol building at St Paul in 1900. Susan Maria Farrington Eastman (1827-1900) was born in Conway, New Hampshire, the daughter of Jeremiah Farrington and Rachel Horne Farrington, was educated at the South Conway Seminary and at the Fryeburg, Maine, Academy, taught at the South Conway Seminary for ten years, married John W. Eastman in 1854, moved with him to St. Anthony, and was a member of the Andrew Presbyterian Church. Lardner Bostwick, Jr. (1815-1897,) the son of Lardner Bostwick, Sr., (1774-1834) and Sarah Bradshaw Bostwick (1789-1867) and the grandson of John Bostwick and Mary Lardner Bostwick, was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, married Eliza Kennedy in 1843, emigrated to the United States in 1843, moved to Chicago in 1843, moved to St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota, in 1850, was a lawyer, was a justice of the peace in 1852, was admitted to the practice of law in Hennepin County in 1856, was a judge of probate in Hennepin County, was a court commissioner, and was assessor of internal revenue from 1862 to 1866. Lardner Bostwick, Jr., and Eliza Kennedy Bostwick had four daughters, Elizabeth D. Bostwick (Mrs. Frank G.) O'Brien (1845- ,) Louise I. Bostwick (Mrs. Henry A.) Knott (1847- ,) Lilla Bostwick (1851-1852,) and Lilla Bostwick (1852-1854.) Charles Jairus Martin (1842-1910,) the son of Dan Martin, was born in Clarendon, New York, graduated from the Brockport Collegiate Institute in New York, moved to Wisconsin in 1863, was employed in the administration of Wisconsin Governor James T. Lewis, served in the 40th Wisconsin Regiment, commanded by Major General Cadwallader C. Washburn, from 1864 until 1865 during the American Civil War, returned to Wisconsin and was employed by Wisconsin Treasurers William E. Smith and Henry Baetz, then was employed as secretary and aide-de-camp by Wisconsin Governor Cadwallader C. Washburn in 1872, came to Minnesota in 1874, settled in Minneapolis, was a partner of C. C. Washburn in flour milling, and was the secretary and treasurer of the Washburn-Crosby Company from its incorporation in 1888, married Ella F. Sage, the daughter of E. C. Sage, in Wisconsin in 1876, was elected to a life membership in the Minnesota Historical Society in 1900, was an executor of Governor Washburn's will and estate, was a trustee of the Washburn Memorial Orphans Asylum, was the secretary and treasurer of the Royal Milling Company, was the secretary and treasurer of the St. Anthony Elevator Company, is a director of the National Bank of Commerce, was a member of the Minneapolis Business Men's Union, and was a charter member of the Minneapolis Club. There is a Charles Jairus Martin memorial collection of tapestries at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. The Charles Jairus Martin house, designed by William Channing Whitney in the Renaissance Revival style and was built in 1903, is located at 1300 Mount Curve Avenue. Sewall D. Andrews (1874- ,) the son of Lorin Andrews and Fidelia Hall Munson Andrews, was born in Owatonna, Minnesota, moved with his family to Minneapolis in 1882, was educated in Minneapolis, attended the Minneapolis Academy, graduated with a L.L.B. from Cornell University in 1895, graduated from the University of Minnesota with a L.L.M. degree in 1896, was admitted to the practice of law in 1896, entered upon the active practice of law until 1903, officed at the New York Life Building in 1896, married Lilla Shepherd Finch (1879- ,) a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dudley B. Finch, in St. Paul in 1903, resided at 1700 Portland Avenue in 1903, was the treasurer of the Kennedy Andrews Drug Company, wholesale dealers, from 1903 until 1907, was the treasurer of the Minneapolis Drug Company after 1907, was a Republican, was chair of the wholesalers and jobbers section of the Minneapolis Civic & Commerce Association from 1919 to 1921, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis Civic & Commerce Association from 1921 until 1922, was a Republican, was president of the National Wholesale Druggists' Association, was the president of the Minneapolis Club in 1922, was vice president of the Minneapolis Aero Club, was a member of the Chi Psi fraternity, a member of St. Marks Episcopal church, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Automobile Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Rotary Club, and was a member of the Woodhill Country Club. Sewall D. Andrews and Lilla S. Finch Andrews were the parents of three children, Mary Finch Andrews, Sewall D. Andrews, Jr., and Dexter Lorin Andrews. Dudley B. Finch (1852/1853-1909,) the son of Sherman Finch, was born in Delaware, Ohio, was educated in Ohio grammar schools, graduated from the Mount Vernon, Ohio, High School, moved to St. Paul in 1861, engaged in the dry goods business with his brother, married Mary Eliza Dexter (1856- ) in Hudson, Wisconsin, in 1878, was a partner with Ernest Albrecht and Obed P. Lanpher in the firm of Albrecht, Lanpher & Finch, which became Lanpher, Finch & Skinner in 1901, was the president of French, Finch, & Henry Manufacturing Company, wholesale dealers in boots, rubbers and shoes, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the St. Paul Commercial Club, resided at 172 Summit Avenue in 1878, resided at 579 Summit Avenue in 1907, and officed at 225 East Fourth Street in 1907. Lilla Shepherd Finch (Mrs. Sewall) Andrews (1879- ) and Florence Dudley Finch (Mrs. Edward B.) Holbert (1881- ) were the daughters of Mary Eliza Dexter Finch and Dudley B. Finch. The Minneapolis Drug Company was the successor of the Lyma-Eliel Drug Company. The firm began in 1869 under the name of Lyman & Tucker, was the first wholesale drug house in the city, consolidated as the Minneapolis Drug Company in 1907, and was the largest company in its line in the NorthWest. The Minneapolis Drug Company had a factory located at North Third Street and First Avenue North. Eliza Bostwick (1815-1907) was born in Ireland and died in Hennepin County. William Wallace Eastman ( -1934) died in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. Charlotte A. Secombe ( -1912,) Susan R. Eastman ( -1912,) George Henry Eastman ( -1920,) Arthur Maynard Eastman ( -1923,) and George Henry Eastman ( -1928) all died in Hennepin County. Louise Knott ( -1937) died in Carver County, Minnesota. Elizabeth O'Brien ( -1913) died in Rice County, Minnesota.

2120 Third Avenue South: Built in 1972. The structure is a two story, 28240 square foot, telephone exchange. The current owner of record is Qwest Communications Inc.

2121 Third Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 804 square foot, three room, one bedroom, one bathroom, house. The property was last sold in 1984 by W.F. Abramovich to P. B. Porter for $85,500, in 1994 by P. B. Porter Lober to Harold Ray Larson for $178,000, and in 2003 by Harold R. Larson to Christopher Rooney for $395,000. The current owner of record is Christopher Rooney.

310 22nd Street East: Built in 1910. The structure is a 1.7 story, 1209 square foot, six room, two bedroom, two bathroom, house. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah Callahan resided at this address. Jeremiah Callahan, a manager for the Singer Sewing Machine Company, resided at 329 Franklin Avenue East according to the 1909 city directory. The house is currently owned by Nancy M. Meyer and the taxpayers for the property are Nancy M. and Ronald D. Stevens. The property was sold twice in recent years, in 1995 when Douglas M. Clow sold the property to Richard F. Bumgarner for $62,500 and in 1998 when Richard F. Bumgarner sold the property to Nancy M. Meyer for $114,900.

2201 Clinton Avenue South: St. Stephen's Catholic Church; Built in 1889. Rev. Patrick Griffin, Pastor. Over the century, a variety of factors, including the freeway's physical division of the neighborhood and the razing of hundreds of homes in the 1960's led to the once prosperous neighborhood becoming one of the poorest and most crime-ridden in the city. Businesses moved out and drug dealers moved in. The owners of the mansions left and the new owners, most not living in the neighborhood themselves, divided the once regal homes into multiple rental units. St. Stephen's Church, in the 1960's, began a concentrated effort to serve the poor and disadvantaged in the immediate neighborhood. It opened the Free Store and Kateri Residence, transitional living facility for chemically dependent Native American Women, and it instituted programs for the large number of developmentally disabled people living in group-homes in the area. In 1981, in response to the number of homeless people sleeping on the steps of the church, it opened an emergency shelter. The church was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places in 1991. Rudolph C. Thielke, a painter employed Heaton & Ellison, resided at the former nearby 2222 Clinton Avenue South and Edward J. Thielke boarded at the former nearby 2222 Clinton Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory.

; 2120 Clinton Avenue South: Built in 1923. The structure is a 3.2 story, 14728 square foot, 21 room, rehabilitation center. The current owner of record is Wayside House Inc., located in St. Louis Park, Minnesota.

2123 Clinton Avenue South: St Stephen's Church/Southside Family Alternative School. Built in 1914. The structure is a two story, 50595 square foot, school. Southside Family School is a small K-8 program dedicated to academic excellence, innovation in curriculum, parental empowerment and community involvement. The school's small classes are intended to offer individualized instruction and a warm, safe learning environment. For over two decades, the school has pioneered in areas of multicultural education, teacher-parent communications and volunteer involvement.

2108-2110 Clinton Avenue South: Built in 1907. The structure is a 2.5 story, 2912 square foot, fourplex (one efficiency unit and three one bedroom units.) The current owners of record are Leigh M. and Doris A. Rolfshus.

2106 Clinton Avenue South: Built in 1909. The structure is a 1.7 story, 1108 square foot, five room, two bedroom, one bathroom, house. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Stratton resided at this address. The current owner of record of the rental property is Helen W. Goodell and the taxpayer of record is Blackwood Investments, Inc., of Minneapolis.

2100-2102 Clinton Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1696 square foot, two unit, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, apartment building. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#20013) indicate that William E. McGilligan (1891- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Corporal in Company F of the 54th Pioneer Infantry, who was born in Dodgeville, Wisconsin, moved to Minnesota in 1913, had gray eyes, brown hair, and a light complexion, was 5 9 1/4" tall, was a gas fitter at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including Meuse-Argonne, was unemployed after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Nellie Mcgilligan, at 2102 Clinton Avenue South. The property is currently owned by Chad R. Dykoski. The property has been sold three times in recent years, in 1984 by T. L. and L. M. Davis to John and Vivian Everson for $53,000, in 1990 by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development to Marguerite L. Lee for $28,500, and in 1997 by the Bankers Trust Company Asset Trust to Fred W. Zellinger for $36,500.

2030 Clinton Avenue South: Built in 1863. The structure is a two story, 2004 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, duplex. The property was last sold in 1985 by Teresa Ann Miezwa to K. A. O'Connor for $54,000 and in 1991 by Kathleen A. O'Connor to Michael J. Labriola for $49,000. The current owner of record is Michael J. Labriola, who resides at 3851 Thomas Avenue North.

2024 Clinton Avenue South: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is Greystone Servicing Corp Inc. of Warrenton, Virginia.

2015 Clinton Avenue South: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is Allan F. Elias who resides in St. Louis Park, Minnesota.

323-325-329 Franklin Avenue East: Built in 1904. The structure is a one story, 7000 square foot, commercial building. The 1909 city directory indicates that Mrs. Mary S. Byrnes, the widow of William J. Byrnes, boarded at 325 Franklin Avenue East and that Gustavus F. Sunwall, a salesman for The John Miller Company, resided at 325 Franklin Avenue East. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mrs. M. S. Byrnes, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sunwall and their daughter, and J. O. Sunwall resided at 325 Franklin Avenue East. G. F. Sunwell resided at this address in 1917. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier�s Bonus Board indicate that James Oscar Sunwall (1887- ,) a 1917 draftee and a Private First Class at Base Hospital No. 26, who was born in Minneapolis, had gray eyes, bown hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 8.5" tall, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, received the Bronze Victory Button, was a clerk employed by the Chamber of Commerce after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his father, G. F. Sunwall, at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mrs. M. S. Byrnes, Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Sunwall and their daughter, and Emmett Sunwall resided at 325 Franklin Avenue East. The building formerly housed a custom catering business and a bakery. The property is currently owned by Allan F. Elias of St. Louis Park, Minnesota.

1922 Clinton Avenue South: Built in 1969. The structure is a one story, 8640 square foot, commercial building. The property was last sold in 1996 by Kenneth Youngberg to Selwin S. Ortega for $250,000. The property is currently owned by Clinton Laundry Partners LLC, located in St Paul.

1920 Fourth Avenue South: Built in 1966. The structure is a 15 story, 72339 square foot, 110 one bedroom unit, apartment building. The property is currently owned by Minneapolis Public Housing Authority.

1929 Third Avenue South: Built in 1913. The structure is a four story, 17600 square foot, 24 one bedroom unit, apartment building. The property is currently owned by Arts Avenue Properties Inc.

1926 Third Avenue South: Built in 1915. The structure is a three story, 18000 square foot, 19 one bedroom unit, apartment building. The property was last sold in 1995 by the Minnesota State Housing Finance Agency to P A K Enterprises Inc. for $115,000, in 2002 by Christopher D. Johnson to Uptown Classic Prop. Inc. for $1,634,000, and in 2005 by R110 Inc. to 1920-1926 3rd Avenue LLC for $1,007,000. The property is currently owned by 1920-1926 3rd Avenue LLC, located at 430 Oak Grove Street, Suite #130.

2000-2010 Third Avenue South: Built in 1986. The structure is a one story, 836 square foot, service station. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that a Standard Oil Filling Station was located at this address from 1932. The property is currently owned by BP America Inc and the taxpayer of record is Amoco Oil Company.

2001 Third Avenue South: Built in 1923. The structure is a four story, 125041 square foot, 109 unit (30 efficiency units, 52 one bedroom units, 26 two bedroom units, and one three bedroom unit,) apartment building. The property is currently owned by Stevens Com Assoc LP and the taxpayer of record is the Greystone Servicing Corp Inc. of Warrenton, Virginia.

2014 Third Avenue South: Built in 1966. The structure is a two story, 11512 square foot, 16 unit (13 one bedroom units and three two bedroom units,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 1988 by Michael O'Brian to Gregory Ostrovsky for $370,000, in 1989 by M. F. and G. L. O'Brian to Frank Dosse for $238,000, and in 1995 by J. C. and C. M. Houston to R. A. Martinez for $263,000. The current owner of record is the 2014 3rd Ave South LLC.

2021 Third Avenue South: Built in 1923. The structure is a fiveplex. The property is currently owned by Stevens Com Assoc LP and the taxpayer of record is the Greystone Servicing Corp Inc. of Warrenton, Virginia.

2101 Third Avenue South: Built in 1957. The structure is a two story, 13284 square foot, 23 unit (23 one bedroom units,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 1983 by M.C. Greyerson to A. J. and J. A. Ouelette for $455,000 and in 1986 by Jean Ouellette to M. M. Chottepanda for $430,000. The property is currently owned by R110 Inc. and the taxpayers of record are Noel Skelton and Patrick Skelton, who reside in Prior Lake, Minnesota.

2115 Third Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 5860 square foot, rooming house. The property was last sold in 1984 by Harold M. Battig to A. J. Ouelette for $120,000 and in 1991 by A. and J. Ouellette to W. McCusker and J. Hynnek for $135,000. The current owner of record is Kirby Ventures LLC.

2119 Third Avenue South: John D. Hutchins House; Built 1884; Queen Anne in style; Kees and Fisk, architects. John D. Hutchins was a foreman at one of William Washburn's sawmills. The house includes unusual decorative shingles on the gables. The 1923 city directory indicates that Miss Christine Ween resided at this address. Christine Ween was a dressmaker and resided at 328 South Tenth Street according to the 1909 city directory. John D. Hutchins (1869-1936), the son of Hampton Hutchins and Mary Norman Hutchins, married Jane Holder (1868-1908,) the daughter of William Carlos Holder and Nancy Shelton. By the mid-1860's, sawmill construction in Minneapolis at St. Anthony Falls had reached its peak. The arrival of railroads and efficient steam engines made non-waterpowered sawmilling practical and the congestion of the mill district at the Falls made a different location desirable. In 1866, with the construction of the Pacific Mill at the foot of 1st Avenue North, the migration of the sawmilling industry to north Minneapolis began in earnest. During the next fifty years, both banks of the Mississippi River from just below Bassett's Creek to just above Shingle Creek became almost the exclusive domain of sawmilling. William Drew Washburn (1831-1912,) the son of Israel Washburn and Martha Benjamin Washburn, was born in Livermore, Androscoggin County, Maine, was educated in Livermore, Maine, district and high schools, attended the Gorham Academy in 1845, attended the South Paris Academy in 1847, attended the Farmington Academy in 1850, graduated from Bowdoin College in 1854, was a clerk employed by the United States House of Representatives during the 1850's, studied law in the offices of Honorable John A. Peters in Bangor, Maine, was admitted to the practice of law in Maine in 1857, moved to Minnesota in 1857, practiced law, engaged in lumbering, saw milling, and flour milling, engaged in the newspaper, railway, and waterpower businesses, was a Republican, was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 5) in 1858, but was never seated due to the protracted 1857-1858 legislative session and reapportionment, and again from 1871 until 1873, married Elizabeth Little Muzzy (1836- ) in 1859, was the U. S. surveyor general for Minnesota from 1861 until 1865, was an unsuccessful candidate to the United States House of Representatives in 1864, was a member of the Minneapolis School Board from 1866 until 1870, built and operated the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad between 1877 and 1883, belonged to the radical wing of the Republican party, was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives from 1879 until 1885, built a mansion designed by E. Townsend Mix known as "Fair Oaks" in 1883 (demolished in 1924 for construction of a park,) was a member of the U. S. Senate from Minnesota from 1885 until 1895, was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection to the United States Senate in 1894, built and operated the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad between 1885 and 1889, was the president of the board of trustees of the Minneapolis Orphan's Home in 1886, built the Bismarck, Washburn & Great Falls Railway, united with the flour mills of Pillsbury & Company in 1889, forming the Pillsbury-Washburn Flour Mills Company Ltd., owned W. D. Washburn & Company, a lumber company, was the principal owner and the president of the Washburn Lignite Coal Company, with mines in North Dakota, was the principal owner and the president of the Washburn Elevator Company, with elevators in North Dakota, was the principal owner and the president of the North Star Feed & Cereal Company in Minneapolis, was a member of the board of directors of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie RailRoad, received a legal doctorate from Bowdoin College in 1902, was a member of the Union League Club of New York City, New York, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a Universalist, was the president of the First Universalists Society in Minneapolis, was president of the Universalist National Convention, was a trustee and the president of the Lakewood Cemetery Association, resided at Fair Oaks in 1907, officed at the Metropolitan Life Building in 1907, died in Minneapolis, and was buried in Lakewood Cemetery. William Drew Washburn moved to Minneapolis in 1857 as an agent for Minneapolis Mill Company, which controlled the waterpower on the west side of St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota, made a fortune in lumber and flour mills, land speculation, banking, and railroads, and served as a Congressman and U.S. Senator from Minnesota, was a cousin of Dorilus Morrison, and was one of the richest and most powerful men in Minnesota by the 1880's. William Drew Washburn and Elizabeth L. Muzzy Washburn were the parents of nine children, Franklin Muzzy Washburn (1861-1877,) William Drew Washburn, Jr. (1863- ,) Cadwallader Lincoln Washburn (1866- ,) Mary Caroline Washburn (1868- .) Edwin Chapin Washburn (1870- ,) George Henry Washburn (1871-1872,) Elizabeth Washburn (1874- ,) Stanley Washburn (1878- ,) and Alice Washburn (1881-1881.) William Drew Washburn, Jr. (1863-1929,) the son of William Drew Washburn and Elizabeth L. Muzzy Washburn, was born in St. Paul, was educated in the Minneapolis Public Schools, graduated from the Phillips Andover Academy in Massachusetts in 1883, graduated from Yale University in 1888, sold farm lands and real estate, was a railroad contractor, engaged in newspaper reporting (Chicago Tribune) and editing (Minneapolis Tribune,) married Florence Agnes Savier in 1890 in Portland, Oregon, was the author of Some Rejected Verse in 1902, was a Republican, and was a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (Districts 31 and 41) from 1901 to 1913 and from 1917 to 1927. The current owner of record is Verne K. Greenlee. [See note on the Minneapolis & St. Louis RailRoad.] [See note for the Minneapolis, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic RailRoad.] [See note for Dorilus Morrison for 2400 Third Avenue South.] [See note for Cadwallader Colden Washburn, the Washburn Crosby Company, and General Mills for 2201 First Avenue South.]

2119 1/2 Third Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.2 story, 2968 square foot, ten room, four bathroom, two bedroom, house. The property was last sold in 1987 by T. L. Whiting to J. Bernstein for $152,000 and in 1993 by John Berstein to Arlander T. Greenlee for $149,000. The current owner of record is Verne K. Greenlee.

2201 Third Avenue South: Built in 1951. The structure is a three story, 12741 square foot, 17 unit (five efficiency units and 12 one bedroom units,) apartment building. The structure was last sold in 1993 by Nisshelle Apt. Corp. to Jas Apartments, Inc. for $300,000 and in 2005 by Jas Apartments, Inc. to 2201 Partners LLC for $875,500. The current owner of record is 2201 Partners LLC.

342-344-346 Franklin Avenue East: Built in 1926. The structure is a three story, 29812 square foot, 26 unit apartment building. The current owner of record is Silver Bars Inc. Nevada and the taxpayer of record is Silver Building Properties, Inc. The property was last sold in 1992 by the Jerome Baer Estate to Silver Bars Inc. Nevada for $220,000. Reverend Charles W. Roberts, pastor of the African M. E. Church, boarded at the nearby former 336 Franklin Avenue East according to the 1909 city directory.

2211 Third Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2 1/2 story, 11138 square foot, ten unit (seven efficiency units and three one bedroom units,) apartment building. The current owner of record is John E. Gutmanis, who resides at 2215 Third Avenue South.

2215 Third Avenue South: Built in 1909. The structure is a two story, 1670 square foot, one rsidence building. The current owner of record is John E. Gutmanis.

2301-2303 Third Avenue South: George Henry Christian House/Hennepin County Historical Society Museum; Built in 1919; Renaissance/Late English Gothic in style; Hewitt & Brown, architects. Its brick facade is broken by a two-story window bay with carvings and a balustrade that encircles the roof. The interior features cypress floors, carved fireplaces, and ironwork by well-known artist Samuel Yellin of Philadephia. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that Carolyn Christian, the widow of George C. Christian, resided at this address from 1920 to 1956. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Fisk and their daughters and H. P. Fisk resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mrs. G. C. Christian resided at this address. George Henry Christian, the president of the Hardwood Manufacturing Company, resided at 404 South Eighth Street and George C. Christian, vice president of S. T. McKnight Company, resided at 414 South Eighth Street according to the 1909 city directory. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Hennepin County Historical Society was located at this address from 1957. George H. Christian (1838-1918) arrived in Minneapolis in 1866 from Alabama to manage the Washburn "B" Mill, and, as manager for the Washburn-Crosby Company, coordinated the perfection of a "New Process" of milling spring wheat. This new technology revolutionized the industry and made Minneapolis the flour milling capital of the world from 1880 to 1930. The construction of the Washburn "B" Mill in 1866 was critical to the success of the flour milling industry in Minneapolis. Built of limestone, three stories high with 12 run of stone, it was the largest mill west of Buffalo, New York, when it was built. Christian hired two Frenchmen, brothers Edmund La Croix and Nicholas La Croix, to install a device, called a "middlings purifier," for the Washburn mill. The "New Process" midlings purifier consisted of an arrangement of moving sieves over which a stream of air was blasted to remove the bran and leave the middlings of the wheat, an important breakthrough in flour milling in Minnesota that made spring wheat the best type of wheat for making flour, and made it possible to produce flour on a large scale. The next big discovery was the grinding of flour by rollers instead of flat stones. After these two milling improvements were inaugurated, Minnesota was on its way to becoming the flour mill capital of the U.S., and flour milling would soon become the state's most important single industry. The construction of new mills in the 1870s made Minneapolis the nation's leading flour producer by 1880. The rapid rise to prominence was only temporarily slowed by the explosion of the Washburn "A" Mill in 1878, which destroyed the largest of the Minneapolis mills and five other mills, the Pettit, the Zenith, the Galaxy, the Humboldt, and the Diamond. George H. Christian married Leonora Hall in 1867. Henry Hall Christian died of tuberculosis in 1905. Leonora Hall Christian dedicated herself to the fight against tuberculosis, lobbied the Legislature, surveyed doctors, paid nurses� salaries, and, in 1906, established Minnesota�s first treatment facility for tubercular children, a summer camp which was located at Lake Street and North River Road. The TB camp was transferred to Glenwood Park (renamed Theodore Wirth Park) in 1909 and then was transferred to the Glen Lake Sanatorium in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, in 1925. Leonora Hall Christian authored Excerpts from a family record in 1904. George Christian created the Children�s Aid Society in 1916. Christian made so much money from the "New Process" that he retired from flour milling in 1875 to pursue his interests in art, music, philosophy, and philanthropy. The Christian name continued to be associated with flour milling through his two brothers and his son, George Chase Christian (1873-1919,) who remained active in the business. George Chase Christian graduated with a bachelors degree from Harvard University in 1895. The Company was taken over in 1875 by J. A. Christian and was renamed J. A. Christian & Company. In 1882, George Christian and Albert R. Hall purchased the Northwestern Hub and Spoke Factory in Knapp, Wisconsin, which was started by Knute Hubbard and Thomas Morgan in 1876. George H. Christian began work on this house in 1917. He selected the architectural firm of Hewitt & Brown, each partner of which had married a niece of Christian. Before the project was finished, George H. Christian, his wife, and George Chase Christian died, leaving Carolyn McKnight Christian, George Chase Christian's widow, seven servants, and several foster children as the only occupants for the next forty years. Among Mrs. Christian's many charitable acts were the endowment of a professorship in cancer research at the University of Minnesota in her husband's name, and the donation of her house and art objects to the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts in 1957. John Augustus "Gus" Christian (1832-1896) was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, moved to Walworth county, Wisconsin, in 1847, to Chicago in 1851, to Caledonia, Illinois, until 1860, to Colorado, and in 1869, to Minnesota. In 1871, J. A. Christian came to Minneapolis and ran the Zenith mill, then entered the firm of George H. Christian and Company, in 1873, and, in 1874, the firm took the name of J. A. Christian and Company. The mill explosion in 1878 caused suspension of business and a new firm was formed under the name of Christian, Brother & Company, and the firm owned the Crown Roller mill. In 1874, J. A. Christian married Mary Ellen Hall (1851-1881,) the daughter of Nathaniel Hall (1805-1888) and Hepzibah Seavey Hall (1814-1893,) and the couple had three daughters, Caroline Mary "May Virginia/Carrie" Christian (Mrs. Edwin Hawley) Hewitt (1875- ,) Anna "Annie" Christian (Mrs. Sam) Auchincloss (1876- ,) and Susan W. "Susie" Christian (Mrs. Edwin Hacker) Brown, and one son, John Augustus Christian, Jr. (1880-1892.) John Augustus Christian died in Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota. Mary Ellen Hall attended the St. Paul Female Seminary in St. Paul and St. Mary's Hall in Faribault, Minnesota. George C. Christian, a member of the Anti-Tuberculosis Committee of the Associated Charities of Minneapolis, was the first president of the American Lung Association of Minnesota, which was organized in 1906 as the Minnesota Association for the Prevention and Relief of Tuberculosis. There is a George Chase Christian Room at the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University and a George Chase Christian Scholarship at Harvard University, a gift of Carolyn McKnight Christian, George Chase Christian's wife, established in 1936, which is restricted to residents of Minnesota with a preference to graduate students. In 1925, the University of Minnesota's first specialty hospital, the George Chase Christian Memorial Cancer Hospital, was built to help fulfill the needs for greater specialization in a progressing field of medicine and there also is a George Chase Christian Professor of Cancer Biology at the University. Caroline M. Macomber authored Manville-Vincent line of descent, compiled for Mrs. George Chase Christian in 1928. The father of Carolyn McKnight Christian was Sumner T. McKnight, a Minneapolis real estate pioneer and lumber tycoon, and Mrs. Christian established The Carolyn Foundation, with $29 million in assets in 2002. Carolyn McKnight Christian was an early member of the Lake Minnetonka Garden Club. Albert R. Hall (1841-1905) was born in Windsor, Vermont, served with the Second Minnesota Regiment and the 11th Minnesota Regiment during the Civil War, was involved in real estate and flour milling in Minnesota following the war, and was a member of the Minnesota Legislature (1869-1874, 1877), serving as Speaker of the House from 1872 through 1874, moved to Knapp, Wisconsin, in 1880, and served from 1890 through 1902 in the Wisconsin legislature, where he was considered a pioneer in reform legislation. Hall was a major backer of Robert M. LaFollette's gubernatorial candidacy in Wisconsin in both 1896 and 1898, and of legislation to stop the railroads' practice of issuing free passes to legislators. George H. Christian ( -1918) and George Chase Christian ( -1919) both died in Hennepin County. Carolyn McKnight Christian (1875-1964) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Manville, and died in Hennepin County. Sumner T. McKnight, Jr., (1884-1959) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Manville, and died in Hennepin County. Carolyn Arabella Hall (1838-1918) was a sister of G. H. Christian, was the secretary of her uncle, Oliver H. Kelley (1826-1913,) and the Patrons of Husbandry (the Grange,) moved to to Minnesota, Washington, D.C., Louisville, Kentucky, and Florida with Kelly, was lady assistant steward of the Grange from 1873 to 1879, returned to Minneapolis to care for the children of her deceased sister, Caroline Christian, Anna Christian, Susan Christian, and John Augustus Christian, Jr., in 1881, moved to Knapp, Wisconsin to care for her brother, Albert R. Hall, and died in California. Carolyn Mary Christian attended the Misses Ely's School in Brooklyn, New York from 1889 to 1890, married Edwin Hawley Hewitt, and the couple had two children--Charles Christian Hewitt (1901- ) and Helen Hewitt (1904-1911,) and adopted three children, John Edwin Hewitt, Mary Hewitt, and Elizabeth "Betty" Hewitt. The Hennepin County Historical Society purchased the house in 1957. Samuel Yellin (1885-1940) is reputed to have been the 20th Century�s foremost artisan in iron, was born and trained in Poland, came to Philadelphia in 1906, was an instructor at the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Arts from 1907 to 1922, and started his business, Samuel Yellin Metalworkers, in West Philadelphia in 1909, eventually employing over 200 craftspeople. The current owner of record is the Hennepin County Historical Society. [See note on George Henry Christian and George Chase Christian for 100-104 Franlikn Avenue West.]

2325 Third Avenue South: Rode Way Inn. The structure is a 98 room inn. The current owner of record is the Minneapolis Institute Of Arts.

2323 Clinton Avenue South: Built in 1950. The structure is a three story, 11529 square foot, 17 unit (17 one bedroom units,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 2005 by Martinez Properties LLC to Clinton Avenue LLC in $1,847,000. The current owner of record is the Clinton Avenue LLC, located in Eden Prairie, Minnesota.

2405 Third Avenue South: Village Apartment Homes II; Built in 1940. The structure is a four story, 41040 square foot, 42 unit (36 one bedroom units and six two bedroom units) apartment building. The property is managed by the Otness Management Company of St. Paul.

2401 Clinton Avenue South: Built in 1962. The structure is a three story, 13608 square foot, 22 unit (two efficiency units, 19 one bedroom units, and one two bedroom unit,) apartment building. In 1907, Alexander T. Ankeny resided at this address. Alexander Thompson Ankeny (1837-1904,) the son of Isaac Ankeny and Eleanor Parker Ankeny, was born in Somerset, Pennsylvania, attended the Disciples College, Hiram, Ohio, attended the Monongahela Academy, Morgantown, West Virginia, attended Jefferson College, Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, from 1857 until 1858, was employed by the U. S. Department of Justice in 1860, was admitted to the practice of law in 1861, married Martha V. Moore in Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1861, was employed by the U. S. War Department from 1861 until 1865, returned to Somerset, Pennsylvania in 1865 and practiced law there, established a private bank, moved to Minneapolis in 1872, was engaged in the lumber business, W. P. Ankeny & Brother, with his brother in Minneapolis until 1877, was a member of the Minneapolis Board of Education in 1877 and from 1889 until 1890, was one of the incorporators of the Minneapolis Masonic Temple Association in 1885, was a trustee of the Portland Avenue Church of Christ, was unsuccessful as a Democratic candidate for Hennepin County district court judge in 1890, was a member of the State Board of Equalization from 1878 until 1882, was appointed a Hennepin County court commissioner regarding a property dispute with the St. Paul & Northern Pacific RailRoad, was a member of the Minneapolis Library Board in 1885, was a member of State Democratic Central Committee in 1888, was unsuccessful as a Democratic candidate for mayor of Minneapolis in 1896, and was president of the State normal school board from 1899 until 1903. The current owner of record is the Clinton Avenue LLC, located in Eden Prairie, Minnesota.

332 24th Street East: Built in 1909. The structure is a 1.7 story, 1139 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, house. The property is currently owned by Edward J. Hertko. The property was sold twice in the last 20 years, first in 1984 by S. M. and S. E. N. Rydberg to W. J. Olson and B. H. Rivers for $51,500 and secondly in 1994 by W. Olsen and B. Rivers to E. and V. B. Hertko for $52,500.

2322 Fourth Avenue South: Built in 1962. The structure is a two story, 3455 square foot, vehicle and equipment repair and maintenance facility. The property was last sold in 1998 by Medibus-Helpmobile,Inc. to Irving R. Krueger, Jr., for $59,500. The property is currently owned by Irving R. Krueger, Jr., who resides at 2206 4th Avenue South. Minnesota Historical Society records indicate that the Olsen Ambulance Service was located at the nearby former 2324 Fourth Avenue South from 1963 to 1969.

2419 Fifth Avenue South: Built in 1971. The structure is a 13 story, 100965 square foot, 254 unit (252 one bedroom units and two two bedroom units,) apartment building. The current owner of record is the Minneapolis Public Housing Authority.

2400 Fourth Avenue South: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is the Minnesota Department Of Transportation.

502 24th Street East: Built in 1901. The structure is a one story, 3080 square foot, five room, one bedroom, one bathroom, house. The property is currently owned by Gregory H. Walsh.

504-506 24th Street East: Built in 1901. The structure is a three story, 9974 square foot, six unit (one efficiency unit and five one bedroom units) multifamily apartment building. The property is currently owned by Leigh M. Rolfshus and D. A. Rolfshus of Golden Valley, Minnesota.

508-512 24th Street East: Built in 1901. The structure is a three story, 9856 square foot, six one bedroom unit multifamily apartment building. The property is currently owned by Arkhitekton Ltd. The property was last sold in 1992 by Richard A. Heintz to Arkhitekton Ltd. for $58,500. Arkhitekton Ltd. is a remodeling and repairing building contractor.

515-517 24th Street East: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 2414 square foot, five unit (three efficiency units and two one bedroom units) multifamily apartment building. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Thomas resided at 515 24th Street East. The property is listed in Minneapolis property tax records as currently being owned by Frank J. Trisko. The property was last sold in 1997 by Frank Trisko to Benito Reyes for $75,000.

2320 Portland Avenue South: Built in 1910. The structure is a two story, 1520 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, one bathroom, house. The property was last sold in 1987 by G. H. and M. A. Westigard to M. D. Mar for $43,000, in 1989 by the U.S. Department Of Veterans Affairs to Gregory H. Walsh for $38,500, in 1994 by Gregory H. Walsh to M. T. and A. M. Curtiss for $40,000, in 1998 by Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota National Association to Kathleen A. Gustafson for $46,500, and in 2005 by Kathleen A. Gustafson to Timothy Cummings for $185,000. The property is currently owned by Timothy Cummings and the current taxpayers of record are Flerida Cummings and Timothy Cummings.

2315 Portland Avenue South: Built in 1990. The structure is a two story, 1584 square foot, seven room, three bedroom, two bathroom, house. The property was last sold in 1986 by J. E. and B. E. Bernatz to F. A. Tangen for $55,000 and in 1992 by Honeywell Foundation to Robert E. Bailey for $58,500. The current owner of record is Robert E. Bailey.

2400 Portland Avenue: Built in 1923. The structure is a 1.5 story, 1332 square foot, eight room, four bedroom, two bathroom, house. The property was last sold in 1983 by G. D. and S. K. Glaser to N. F. Strizek for $56,500, in 1995 by Dennis J. Waters to Daniel and Katrina Adams for $50,000, in 2004 by Katrina and D. Adams to Mcgovern Sadusky Investment Inc. for $130,000, and in 2004 by Mcgovern Sadusky Investment Inc. to Debra Jo Johnson for $205,000. The current owner of record is Debra Jo Johnson.

618 24th Street East: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1672 square foot, nine room, two bedroom, two bathroom, house. The current owner of record is George F. Brady and the taxpayer of record is Mrs. Raymond G Findorff, Sr.

620 24th Street East: The property is a vacant duplex. The current owner of record is Robert E. Bailey.

2318 Oakland Avenue South:

2304 Oakland Avenue South:

2226 Oakland Avenue South: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is the Minneapolis War Memorial Blood Bank Inc., located at 2304 Park Avenue.

2222 Oakland Avenue South: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is the Minneapolis War Memorial Blood Bank Inc., located at 2304 Park Avenue.

2219 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1904. The structure is a two story, 8160 square foot, office building. The current owner of record is Freeport West Inc., located at 2222 Park Avenue. John P. Rheberg, associated with Rheberg Mantel Company, a mantels, gtares, tiles, and floor tiling company, resided at the nearby former 2220 Oakland Avenue South and Josephine Rheberg, a seamstress, Rachel Rheberg, a teacher at the Minnehaha School, and Ruth Rheberg, a teacher, all boarded at the nearby former 2220 Oakland Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Ruth B. Rheberg, a student, resided at the former nearby.

2218 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1792 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, two bathroom, duplex. The property was last sold in 1985 by Harvey Evans to J. Moe for $22,000, in 1998 by J. E. and S. L. Moe to Ronnie C. Franklin for $27,500, in 1999 by Ronnie C. Franklin to Eddye Hurt for $60,000, in 2000 by Eddye Hurt to John Santi for $71,000, in 2001 by John Santi to Candido Conde for $134,900, and in 2002 by Candido Conde to Mohan Ray Ramsarran for $150,000. The current owner of record is Mohan Ray Ramsarran, who resides in Richfield, Minnesota.

2216 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1792 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, two bathroom, duplex. The current owner of record is Robert D. Knudtson.

2210-2212 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 2.2 story, 3951 square foot, 20 room, eight bedroom, three bathroom, multiple family dwelling. The property was last sold in 1999 by W. L. and M. V. Zuk to Carlos R. Jara for $73,000. The current owner of record is Mildred H. Gittens and the taxpayers of record are Carlos and Teresa Jara.

2208 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 2295 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, two bathroom, duplex. The current owner of record is Martin Melina.

2207 Oakland Avenue South: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is American Indian Services Inc., located at 2200 Park Avenue.

2206 Oakland Avenue South: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is Alfred H. Keith, who resides at 25 Groveland Terrace.

615 22nd Street East: Built in 1910. The structure is a two story, 1383 square foot, six room, three bedroom, one bathroom, house. The property was last sold in 1985 by G. M. Colarich to J. H. Williams for $44,000. The current owner of record is H. M. Colarich and the taxpayer of record is Jorel H. Williams.

616-618 22nd Street East: The property is part of Hope Community. The current owner of record is David Markle.

2024-2026-2108-2110-2114-2120-2122 Oakland Avenue South: Hope Community Court. The 1909 city directory indicates that Burton B. Swetland, a salesman for the Minneapolis Dry Goods Comapny, resided at 2108 Oakland Avenue South. Hope Community began as a shelter and hospitality house for women and children in a three-story, red Victorian house in 1977, St. Joseph�s House of Hope (2122 Oakland Avenue South,) operated by three Roman Catholic nuns. The crack cocaine epidemic and related violence and devastation overwhelmed the adjacent block, and the organization began to acquire and redevelop the area around the intersection of Franklin Avenue and Oakland Avenue. It is operated by a 20 member board, consisting in 2005 of Mary Merrill Anderson, Heidi Lasley Barajas, Anne Barry, Cecile Bedor, Sharon Sayles Belton, Rolando Borja, Katy Gray Brown, DeAnna D. Cummings, Patricia Cummings, Deanna Foster, Clint Hewitt, Jody Jonas, Michou Kokodoko, Maria Rose McLemore-Sklar, Repa Mekha, Patricia Mullen, David Newman, Steve Shapiro, Roland Wells, and Lorraine White. The organization has 88 units of affordable rental housing in 17 buildings. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier�s Bonus Board (#8913) indicate that Henry J. Gustafson (1888- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a Private First Class in the 151st Field Artillery, who was born in Sweden, had blue eyes, brown hair, and a fair complexion, was 5' 8" tall, was a glass cutter at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including Loraine, Champagne, Chateau Thierry, St. Mihiel, Verdun, and Argonne, was an art glass worker employed by the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at the nearby former 2111 Oakland Avenue.

2026 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 2124 square foot, ten room, four bedroom, three bathroom, house. The current owner of record is Hope Community Inc.

2024 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1999. The structure is a two story, 2448 square foot, 12 room, six bedroom, four bathroom, triplex. The current owner of record is Hope Community Inc.

2020-2022 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1908. The structure is a 2.2 story, 2730 square foot, 14 room, six bedroom, two bathroom, rental duplex. The property was last sold in 2000 by Vang Pao and Xiong Doud to Vue Lia and Yang See for $105,000 and in 2001 by See Yang and Lia Vue to Casey K. Vue for $155,000. The rental license for the property is under review and the property has been flagged by the city for a lack of maintenance. The current owner of record is Constance Abbott and the current taxpayer of record is Marlys G. Fiterman.

2019 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 2596 square foot, 12 room, four bedroom, two bathroom, duplex. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#8202) indicate that Gerald E. Simpson (1896- ,) a 1917 enlistee and a First Sergeant in Company "C" of the 352nd Infantry, who was born in Clearmont, Missouri, had blue eyes, dark brown hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 10 1/2" tall, was a traveling salesman at induction, served in the American Expeditionary Force in France, including Alsace, was a traveling salesman employed by the Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company after the completion of service, and was married, resided with his wife, Ione Ongryln Simpson at this address. The property was last sold in 2002 by Hilary L. Hardeman, Jr., to Manuel J. Romero for $135,900, in 2002 by Manuel J. Romero to Carlos Vasquez Ramon for $144,981, in 2003 by Manuel J. Romero to Carlos Vasquez Ramon for $144,981, and in 2005 by Carlos Vasquez Ramon to Harold E. Flores for $244,000. The current owner of record is Harold E. Flores.

2016-2018 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 3422 square foot, four one bedroom unit, fourplex. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board indicate that Robert Henri Petzke (1892- ,) a 1917 draftee and a Pharmacists Mate Third Class in U. S. Navy, who was born in Riceville, Iowa, had blue eyes, light brown hair, and a ruddy complexion, was 5' 5 1/4" tall, was a lawyer employed by William J. Quinn after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided at 2018 Oakland Avenue South. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier's Bonus Board (#1576) indicate that Olaf Wetteland (- ,) a Chief Master at Arms in the U. S. Navy, retired after 30 years of service, who was born in Stavanger, Norway, and moved to Minnesota in 1913, resided at 2018 Oakland Avenue South. A. F. Petzke was the father of Robert H. Petzke. Toralf Wetteland was the grother of Olaf Wetteland. The property was last sold in 2002 by Brandon J. Wells to Carlos A. Alavena for $200,000 and in 2003 by Carlos A. and Joan Alavena to Jessica Adame for $233,000. The current owner of record is Jessica Adame.

2014 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 1848 square foot, seven room, two bedroom, one bathroom, house. The property was last sold in 1983 by E. M. Doherty to T. J. Schuster for $39,900 and in 1989 by Thomas Schuster to James Laux for $41,712. The current owner of record is James P. Laux and the current taxpayers of record are J. P. Laux and W. D. Phillips.

2012 Oakland Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a 1.7 story, 1641 square foot, eight room, two bedroom, two bathroom, duplex. The property was last sold in 1991 by George and Carol Guthrie to Lawrence Mcneill for $36,000 and in 1997 by Tony and Barbara Martin to Kenath Richard Stein for $7,000. The current owner of record is Hope Community Inc.

2010 Oakland Avenue South: The structure is a triplex. The current owner of record is Franklin-Portland Gateway.

611 Franklin Avenue East: Children Village Center. The property was last sold in 1996 by Noor And Bibi Mohamed to St. Josephs Hope Community for $9,900. The current owner of record is the Franklin-Portland Gateway.

612 Franklin Avenue East: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is Ray M. Tharp and the current taxpayer of record is the Central Community Housing Trust Minneapolis.

616 Franklin Avenue East: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is the Minneapolis Department Of Community Planning and Economic Development.

620-622 Franklin Avenue East: The structure is an apartment building. The property was last sold in 1990 by Jeffrey McGeadry to Rehabilitation Invest for $220,619. The current owner of record is the Minneapolis Department Of Community Planning and Economic Development.

623 Franklin Avenue East: Built in 1895. The structure is a four story, 13657 square foot, 18 unit (eight efficiency units and ten one bedroom units,) apartment building. The current owners of record are Donald Krizan and others and the current taxpayers of record are Lucretia LLC and others.

624 Franklin Avenue East: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is the Crosstown Covenant Church and the current taxpayer of record is The Straitgate Church Inc.

624 1/2 Franklin Avenue East: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is the Crosstown Covenant Church and the current taxpayer of record is The Straitgate Church Inc.

627 Franklin Avenue East/2012 Park Avenue South: Built in 1895. The structure is a four story, 13657 aquare foot, 18 unit (eight efficiency units and ten one bedroom units,) apartment building. The current owners of record are Donald Krizan and others and the current taxpayers of record are Lucretia LLC and others.

628-630 Franklin Avenue East: Built in 1904. The structure is a four story, 15720 square foot, 23 unit (17 efficiency units and six one bedroom units,) apartment building. The structure is condemned and boarded. The current owner of record is the Minneapolis Greenway LLC and the current taxpayer of record is the Shane LLC.

638 Franklin Avenue East: Built in 1900. The structure is a one story, 26714 square foot, church. Roger Magnuson is the pastor of the nondenominational Christian Straitgate Church and is also a lawyer. Roger Magnuson represents the Twins and Major League Baseball in Minnesota, represented the Florida Legislature in the Bush/Gore election recount case in 2000, is the author of Are Gay Rights Right?, published by Straitgate Press in Minneapolis in 1985, and is the founder and dean of the California-based Oak Brook College of Law, a distance-learning Internet-based institution. The current owner of record is the Crosstown Covenant Church and the current taxpayer of record is The Straitgate Church Inc.

1935 Park Avenue South: The property is a vacant lot. The current owner of record is Ronald V. Hurlburt, who resides in Durand, Wisconsin.

2000 Park Avenue South: Built in 1895. The structure is a four story, 15769 square foot, 18 unit, apartment building. The current owners of record are Donald Krizan and others and the current taxpayers of record are Lucretia LLC and others.

2006 Park Avenue South: Built in 1895. The structure is a four story, 16777 square foot, 19 unit (two efficiency units and 17 one bedroom units,) apartment building. The 1910-1911 Directory of the University of Minnesota indicates that Mary A. Lyon, an employee of the Registrar's Office, resided at this address. The current owners of record are Donald Krizan and others and the current taxpayers of record are Lucretia LLC and others.

2010-2012 Park Avenue South: Built in 1895. The structure is a four story, 15769 square foot, 18 unit (two efficiency units and 16 one bedroom units,) apartment building. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that Rista N. Best, an 1892 graduate and an employee of the Washburn-Crosby Company, resided at 2012 Park Avenue. The 1909 city directory indicates that Ethel Stansberry, a nurse, roomed at this address. Rista N. Best, a member of the Alpha Nu Fraternity at the University of Minnesota in 1902, was employed by the First National Bank of Minneapolis in 1894. Rista N. Best was associated with the First Presbyterian Church of Minneapolis before 1910. In 1901, Rista N. Best hosted a sailing party on Lake Minnetonka for Miss Lillian Parks, Miss Katherine Best, Mrs. O. A. Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. John Kinmont, and David A. Worley. In 1901, Rista N. Best managed the Park Avenue Apartments. Rista N. Best was the president of Star Milling Company of Minneapolis in 1922. The current owners of record are Donald Krizan and others and the current taxpayers of record are Lucretia LLC and others.

2020 Park Avenue South: Built in 1900. The structure is a two story, 3704 square foot, 14 room, three bedroom, three bathroom, triplex. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Ole E. Brecke resided at this address in 1907. Ole E. Brecke (1861- ,) the son of Andrew Brecke and Anna Hopperstad Brecke, was born in Wineshick County, Iowa, was educated at Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, moved to Minneapolis in 1881, studied for one year at the University of Minnesota, became connected with the passenger business after 1881, was a partner with August E. Ekman (1866-1910) in the firm Brecke & Ekman from 1898 until 1902 in the steamship passenger business in Minneapolis for Holland-American, Mercantile Marine and Dominion steamship lines, was the Northwestern passenger agent of the American, Atlantic Transport, Dominion, Holland America, Red Star and White Star steamship lines after 1896, was the Northwestern passenger agent of the tourist firm of Thomas Cook & Son, was a Republican, was a Lutheran, married Sigrid __?__/Serianna Tollefson (1861- ) in Minneapolis in 1888, and officed at 121-123 South Third Street in 1907. In 1896, Ole E. Brecke was the treasurer of the Lincoln Life & Accident Company of Minneapolis. Ole E. Brecke and Sigrid __?__ were the parents of one child, Frederick Theodore Brecke (1901-1997,) who married Norah Isabel Sandels (1905-2003.) The property was last sold in 1988 by T. J. Murphy to R. F. Van Doeren for $80,500. The current owner of record is Richard F. Vandoeren.

2030 Chicago Avenue South: The property is a park and playground. The current owner of record is the Minneapolis Park And Recreation Board.

2022 Park Avenue South: Built in 1967. The structure is a two story, 17920 square foot, 29 unit (nine efficiency units and 20 one bedroom units,) apartment building. The property was last sold in 1984 by William and Norma Hunter to Douglas and Celia Lohmar for $441,000 and in 1999 by Garrison Properties to Martinez Properties II for $493,000. The current owner of record is Mena'S Properties LLC.

2104 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former Francis R. Woodard House/Community Action Of Minneapolis Office; Built in 1965. The building is a 9398 square foot, one story, office building. The 1909 city directory indicates that Francis R. Woodard, a physician who officed at the Pillsbury Building, resided at this address and that Joseph S. Woodard, a student, boarded at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Dr. and Mrs. F. R. Woodard resided at this address. The records of the 1919-1920 Minnesota World War I Soldier�s Bonus Board (#14347) indicate that Lawrence B. Woodard (1890- ,) a 1918 draftee and a Private First Class in Company C of the 604th Engineers, who was born in Minneapolis, had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion, was 5' 7 3/4" tall, was a salesman at induction, was issued one bronze Victory button, was a bond salesman employed by the First Loan & Security Company after the completion of service, and was unmarried, resided with his mother, Mrs. F. R. Woodard, at this address. It was last sold in 1995 by Kaufman's Children's Center for Speech, Language and Sensory Disorders, Inc., to Community Action Of Minneapolis for $243,000. Bill Davis is President and CEO of Community Action Of Minneapolis. The Minneapolis Community Action Agency became a non-profit organization, Community Action of Minneapolis, in 1994. Francis Reuben Woodard (1848- ,) the son of Joseph S. Woodard and Frelove M. Baker Woodard, was born in Madison, Ohio, moved to Minnesota with his parents in 1858, settled in Rochester, Minnesota, was a pharmacist in his father's drug store, attended the University of Michigan after 1869, married __?__ __?__ in 1874, graduated from the Rush Medical College in 1879, was a physician, initially practiced medicine at Claremont, Minnesota, moved to Minneapolis in 1881, was a member of the surgical staffs of the Asbury Hospital, the Swedish Hospital, and the City Hospital of Minneapolis, was a member of the Park Avenue Congregational Church, was a Republican, was a member of the Minneapolis Board of Charities and Corrections, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Hennepin County Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota State Medical Society, was a member of the Minnesota Academy of Medicine, was a member of the American Medical Association. Francis Reuben Woodard and __?__ __?__ were the parents of five children, Harry S. Woodard, Joseph N. Woodard, Lawrence B. Woodard, Francis H. Woodard, and Luella Woodard.

2110 Park Avenue South: Martinez Properties LLC Apartments; Built in 1959. The structure is a two story, 15252 square foot, 22 unit (five efficiency units and 17 one bedroom units,) apartment building. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Stanley S. Staring resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Miss Dollie Burkholder, J. B. Burkholder, and Mrs. M. C. Burkholder resided at this address. Stanley S. Staring, president and manager of the Staring Company, a real estate company, and resided at 4300 Fremont Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory. In 1927, Stanley S. Staring was a leading Minneapolis realtor with the Staring Company Realtors, was a member of the advertising committee of the National Association of Real Estate Boards, and was the director of the Minneapolis Yogoda Self-Realization Fellowship Center, which was organized by students of Swami Paramahansa Yogananda. Joseph B. Burkholder, the manager of Burkholder Lumber Company, which was located at the Lumber Exchange Building, resided at 3249 Humboldt Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory. The property was last sold in 1994 by Linn Property Holdings to Rolando Martinez for $270,500. The current owner of record is Mena'S Properties LLC.

Former 2119 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former Frederick Wells and Mary Wells House. The 1909 city directory indicates that Frederick B. Wells, the vice president of F. H. Peavey Company, resided at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Brown Wells resided at this address. In 1916, Frederick B. Wells was a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Brown Wells and their daughter, F. H. Peavey Wells, and Thomas B. Wells II resided at this address. Frederick Brown Wells (1873- ) was born in Mentone, France, the son of Thomas Buchlin Wells, the rector of the St. Mark's Episcopal Church in Minneapolis from 1880 to 1891, and Annie E. J. Wells, studied at Yale University and at the University of Minnesota, joined F. H. Peavey and Company in 1891 and eventually was the vice president of F. H. Peavey & Company, was a World War I veteran, and was a member of the Minneapolis Semi-Annual Association for single men in 1884 with James Ford Bell, Charles Cranston Bovey, John Alden Bovey, John Crosby, Karl DeLaittre, Edward White Durant, Jr., Edward Cheney Gale, Charles Sumner Gale, John B. Gilfillan, Robert Alexander Hastings, Sumner Thomas McKnight, Charles Stinson Pillsbury, and John Sargent Pillsbury, and Thomas Freeman Wallace. Frederick B. Wells married Mary Drew Peavey (1875- ) in 1898 and the couple had four children. Mary Drew Peavey was one of three children of Frank Hutchinson Peavey (1850-1901) and Mary Dibble Wright Peavey (1850-1903,) along with Lucia Louise Peavey (1873-1941) and George W. Peavey. Grace Louise Broadfoot (1889-1975) was born at Reed's Landing, Wabasha County, Minnesota, married Frederick Brown Wells (1873-1953) in 1934, and moved to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after Frederick Wells' death, where she died. In Burnet, Commissioner of Internal Revenue v. Wells, 289 U.S. 670 (1933,) the U. S. Supreme Court addressed the issue of the taxation of an interrelated set of trusts established by Frederick Brown Wells for the preservation of policies of insurance, ruling for the Internal Revenue Service. The Frederick B. Wells Jr. Trust gave $28 million in support of the Department of Psychiatry of the Medical School of the University of Minnesota to be used to support the study, prevention, management, and treatment of schizophrenia. The F. H. Peavey & Company was a family-held, Minneapolis-based, grain merchandising and processing firm which was an outgrowth of an agricultural implement business located at Sioux City, Iowa and which became part of ConAgra, Inc. in 1982. The Wells Memorial House, established in 1908 and named for Thomas Buchlin Wells, was a settlement house in downtown Minneapolis organized by St. Mark's Episcopal Church which maintained a free dispensary, mental clinic, pathology laboratory, and tuberculosis clinic in cooperation with St. Barnabas Hospital, and operated a kindergarten, day nursery, library, employment bureau, and chapel. Frederick Brown Wells III (1928-2005,) the son of Frederick B. Wells, Jr. and Adele Hodgman Roller, was a Minneapolis milling executive with the Peavey Company (V. P. of International Operations and member of the Board of Directors,) married Ellen Errede Wells, had a Masters degree in East Asian History from the University of Minnesota, was a tennis enthusiast who donated $4,000,000 to the Minneapolis Park Board's Neiman Complex for the Tennis Center, was a museum benefactor, was a supporter of the Textile Center, and was an Asian art expert, died of cancer in Wayzata, Minnesota, and also had a second home at Ocean Reef in Key Largo, Florida. The 140 foot long, 38 foot wide, 3800 horsepower, 1979 Peavey towboat #0602459 was originally named the "Frederick B. Wells," but was renamed the "Amy Frances" in 1999. The associate concertmaster of the Minnesota Orchestra holds the Frederick B. Wells chair. Edward Payson Wells (1847-1936) and Stuart W. Wells (ca. 1877-1959) also were associated with the Peavey Company. Edward Payson Wells, the son of Rev. Milton Wells and Melissa Smith Wells, was born in Troy, Wisconsin, received a common school and academic education, resided in Minneapolis from 1868 until 1871, married Nellie March Johnson in 1871, resided in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from 1872 until 1878, moved to Jamestown, Dakota Territory, in 1878, resided in Jamestown, North Dakota, from 1878 until 1899, engaged in banking and milling, founded the land company, the Wells-Dickey Company, began publication of the Northwestern Land Journal in 1879, built the first permanent house in Jamestown, Dakota Territory in 1879, was the president of the James River Valley National Bank from 1881 until 1909, was involved in railroad construction, grain, elevators, milling, the James River Navigation Company, and political affairs, was the president of the James River Valley RailRoad from 1881 until 1883, was the vice president and then president of the Aberdeen, Bismarck & North West RailRoad from 1887 until 1888, was the president of the Jamestown & Valley City Telegraph & Telephone Company from 1881 until 1900, was the president of the James River National Bank, was a member of the North Dakota territorial legislature, was the namesake of Wells County, North Dakota, reorganized and became president of the Russell-Miller Milling Company in 1896, resided in Minneapolis after 1899, was the president of the Occident Elevator Company, was a member of the board of directors of the North West National Bank of Minnesota, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Reform Club of New York City, New York, resided at 230 Oak Grove Street in 1907, officed at the Security Bank Building in 1907, and retired in 1922. Frederick B. Wells ( -1953) died in Hennepin County. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See note on the Wells-Dickey Company for 777 Lincoln Avenue.]

2120 Park Avenue South: Franklin M. Crosby House/Park House; Built in 1900 (Built in 1903 according to St. Paul-Minneapolis Archdiocese records). The structure is a two story, 30765 square foot, community center. The 1909 city directory indicates that Franklin M. Crosby, a buyer for the Washburn-Crosby Company, resided at this address. The 1915 and 1923 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Crosby resided at this address. Franklin Muzzy Crosby (1875-1947) was the son of John Crosby III (1829-1887) and Olive Loring Muzzie Crosby (1841-1876). F. M. Crosby married Harriet Eugenie McKnight (1873-1949) in 1901 and the couple had seven children, Franklin Muzzy Crosby, Jr. (1902-1937,) Olive McKnight Crosby (1906- ,) Eugenie Crosby (1903- ,) Carolyn Christian Crosby (1907- ,) George Christian Crosby (1911- ,) Thomas Manville Crosby (1914- ,) and Sumner McKnight Crosby (1910-1982.) John Crosby was a founder of the Washburn Crosby Company, a milling company that was the predecessor of General Mills. Franklin M. Crosby joined the Washburn Crosby Company in 1898 and became a vice president and a member of the board of General Mills in 1928, when James Ford Bell became the president and the chair of the board of General Mills and was also on the board of trustees of Abbott Hospital. Harriet Eugenie McKnight was the daughter of Sumner McKnight and Eugenie McKnight, who resided at 2200 Park Avenue South, across the street. Sumner McKnight Crosby was educated at Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, at Yale University, and at the Ecole des Chartres at the Sorbonne, graduating with a Ph. D. from Yale in 1937, was a Medievalist architectural historian, was the principal scholar of the abbey church of St. Denis, where gothic architecture was born, was chair of the Department of Art History at Yale University from 1947 to 1953, was Special Advisor to the American Commission for the Protection and Salvage of Artistic and Historic Monuments in War Areas during World War II, advised the U.S. Department of State on the Restitution of Cultural Materials in 1944 and 1945, was the author of The Apostle Bas-relief at Saint-Denis, and was awarded the Chevalier of the Legion of Honor by the French government in 1950. The house was the winter "in-town" house for the Crosbys, who spent summers at their Minnetonka house. In 1941, the Crosbys donated the house to the Minneapolis-St. Paul archdiocese, who used it as the Catholic Youth Center. The building is owned by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis and its use has been donated to Abbott Northwestern Hospital. Park House, an outpatient service of Abbott Northwestern Hospital, is a place where individuals with HIV or AIDS can find support and socialization within a structured day health program, serving an average of 17 patients each day. Franklin "Muzzy" Crosby III was a 1951 graduate of the Blake School and John Crosby II was a 1953 graduate of the Blake School. Franklin M. Crosby III is a Board Member of the Carolyn Foundation. There is a Franklin Muzzy Crosby Professor of the Human Environment endowed at Yale University. Franklin Crosby ( -1937) died in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Franklin M. Crosby ( -1947) died in Hennepin County. Thomas Manville Crosby (1914-1988) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McKnight, and died in Hennepin County. George Christian Crosby (1911-1964) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of McKnight, and died in Hennepin County.

2200 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former Sumner McKnight House/American Indian Services. The former house was built in 1891, and held the dubious distinction of being insulated with the manes and tails of 20,000 horses. The current structure was built in 1931, has 40696 square feet in area, is three stories, and has 31 rooms. The 1909 city directory indicates that Alfred F. Shuler, manager of the Hammond-Homberger Company, which dealt in bolting and cloth, and Sumner T. McKnight, president of the S. T. McKnight Company, a real estate firm, both resided at this address and that Elof Swanson was a chauffeur at this address. In 1909, Mrs. Schuler lived at this address and was active in the Coreopsis circle of the Minnesota State Sunshine Society. The 1915 and 1923 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. S. T. McKnight resided at this address. Sumner Thomas McKnight (1836- ,) a well known Minneapolis lumberman, real estate developer and philanthropist, was born in Truxton, New York. In 1856, he was in the lumber business in Wausaw, Wisconsin, and organized the Northwestern Lumber Company in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, in 1871. He was vice president of the Flour City National Bank from 1895 to 1901 and was a president of the Northwestern Lumber Company from 1898 to 1902. In 1901, he was a director of the Security Bank. He was the president of the S. T. McKnight Company, originally of Hannibal, Missouri, which built the McKnight Building, an early skyscraper. Sumner T. McKnight, Sr., married Eugenia M. Manville, of Ripon, Wisconsin, and they had three children, Carolyn McKnight Christian, who bequeathed the initial assets of The Carolyn Foundation, Mrs. Harriet Crosby, and Sumner T. McKnight, Jr. Other officers of the S. T. McKnight Company in 1909 included George C. Christian, vice president, F. M. Crosby, treasurer, and J. H. Palmer, secretary. Sumner T. McKnight, Jr., (1885- ) graduated from Yale University, served as a captain in World War I, was a member of the Minnesota Legislature in 1923, was the vice president of the First National Bank of Minneapolis, was the president of the S. T. McKnight Building Company, and was considered to be expert on criminal pardons and paroles. Sumner McKnight-Crosby, Jr., is vice chair of the Carolyn Foundation. There is a Sumner T. McKnight Foundation, located in Baltimore, Maryland. The W. Scott Woodworth Memorial Fund was established at Carlton College in 1929 by Mr. and Mrs. Sumner T. McKnight to assist students of music. In 1899, the Northern Pacific RailRoad sold 900,000 acres of timber land in Washington State to Frederick Weyerhaeuser and a dozen other investors, including Sumner T. McKnight. Sumner T. McKnight built Chateau LaSalle, located at 1818 LaSalle Avenue South. From 1913-1949, S. T. McKnight owned the Internet Exchange Building, built in 1913 by the Andrews Construction Company, and had BF Goodrich, Gamble-Skogmo, and May Brothers Grocers as past tenants. S. T. McKnight, Delos Moon and Gilbert Porter, in partnership forming Northwestern Lumber Company, were owners of lumber mills at Porter's Mills, Wisconsin, outside of Eau Claire, in the 1860's, rebuilding the mills in 1864 and 1867. The current owner of record is the American Indian Services Inc.

2205 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former Frank T. Heffelfinger and Lucia Heffelfinger House. The 1909 city directory indicates that Frank T. Heffelfinger, president of F. H. Peavey and Company and of the Miller Mercantile Company, resided at this address and that James A. Graham was the caretaker at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Shevlin resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Beckwith resided at this address. Thomas H. Shevlin was the president and Thomas L. Shevlin was the vice president of the Shevlin-Carpenter Lumber Company. Thomas L. Shevlin resided at 1917 Vine Place/La Salle Avenue and Thomas H. Shevlin resided at 129 Oak Grove Street according to the 1909 city directory. Thomas Henry Shevlin (1852-1912) operated the Crookston Lumber Company, acquiring it from Thomas B. Walker in 1897. Thomas Henry Shevlin (1852-1912,) the son of John Shevlin and Matilda Leonard Shevlin, was born in Albany, New York, was employed by John McGraw & Company, a lumber dealer in Albany, New York, in 1867, worked for the firm in Albany, New York, Tonawanda, New York, and Bay City, Michigan, moved to Muskegon, Michigan, in 1879 as an agent of Chicago lumber dealer of T. W. Harvey, was a partner of Stephen C. Hall ( -1889) of Muskegon, Michigan, in 1880, became treasurer and general manager of the Stephen C. Hall Lumber Company in 1882, married Alice A. Hall in 1882, came to Minneapolis with the North Star Lumber Company, a subsidiary of the Stephen C. Hall Lumber Company, in 1886, made his fortune in the lumber business of his father-in-law, Stephen Crosby Hall, was associated with the Hall & Ducey Lumber Company, subsequently reorganized as the Hall & Shevlin Lumber Company, and finally reorganized as the Shevlin-Carpenter Company, associated with J. Neils of Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, in organizing the J. Neils Lumber Company in 1895, organized the St. Hilaire Lumber Company with Frank P. Hixon of La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1896, acquired the Red River Lumber Company of Crookston, Minnesota, acquired the Crookston Lumber Company from Thomas B. Walker in 1897, purchased a large interest in the Winn Parish Lumber Company of Louisiana, organized the Shevlin-Clarke Company, Lim�ited, in Ontario, Canada, in 1903, organized the Rainy River Lumber Company, Limited, in western Ontario, Canada, in 1903, was a director of the Security Bank of Minnesota, was the president of the Iron Range Electric Telephone Company, donated the full cost of $60,000 for the Alice Shevlin Hall at the University of Minnesota in honor of his late wife in 1906, also established a fellowship at the University of Minnesota to support graduate students in the biological and agricultural sciences, the basic physical and medical sciences, and the liberal arts, was a Republican, was a member of the Republican National Committee from Minnesota from 1900 until 1904, was a member of the Minnesota Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Commercial Club, was a member of the Minnetonka Yacht Club, was a member of the Minneapolis Automobile Club, was a member of the Union League Club of New York, was a member of the Union League Club of Chicago, was a member of the the Manitoba Club of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, was elected a life member of the Minnesota Historical Society in 1906, and died in Pasadena, California. Thomas Henry Shevlin and Alice Ann Hall Shevlin were the parents of three children, Thomas Leonard Shevlin ( -1915,) Florence Shevlin (Mrs. D. D.) Tenney, and Helen Shevlin (Mrs. George C.) Beckwith. Alice Shevlin Hall is a Renaissance Revival building designed by Ernest Kennedy and constructed on the site of "Old Main", the first University building, that was originally used as a student union building for women students, boasting a two-story, dark wood-paneled hall complete with a massive fireplace and multi-colored stained glass windows. Alice Ann Hall Shevlin (1865-1910,) the daughter of Stephen Crosby Hall (1834-1888) and Alice Albina Clark Hall (1840-1920,) was the wife of Thomas H. Shevlin and had siblings Emma L. Hall (Mrs. Charles A.) Bennet (1865- ,) Stephen Austin Hall (1865- ,) and Harriet Albina Hall (Mrs. Edwin C.) Shevlin (1868- .) Stephen Crosby Hall (1834-1888,) the son of Deacon Jonathan Hall and Anna Whitaker Hall, was born in Penn Yann, New York, was trained as a civil engineer, engaged in the lumber business in Michigan, married Alice Clark of Grand Haven, Michigan, in 1862, was a surveyor, operated sawmills for Thompson Brothers & Company of Chicago, was the president of the Bay State Lumber Company of Menominee, Michigan, was the president of the S. C. Hall Lumber Company, settled in Minneapolis in 1884, was engaged in the lumber business in Minnesota, was a partner with Colonel James Goodnow in the North Star Lumber Company, was the president and general manager of the Hall & Ducey Lumber Company in 1886, and died in Minneapolis. Stephen Crosby Hall and Alice Clark Hall had four children, Alice A. Hall (Mrs. Thomas H.) Shevlin ( -1910,) Emma Hall (Mrs. Charles A.) Bennett, Hattie Hall (Mrs. Edwin) Shevlin, and Stephen A. Hall ( -1914.) The former North Star Sawmill in Minneapolis was rebuilt in 1886 by Stephen Hall and Thomas Shevlin, who supplied lumber for the Hall & Ducey Lumber Company, and after 1893, when H. M. Carpenter bought part of the sawmill, it became known as the Shevlin-Carpenter Mill. Shevlin hosted a banquet honoring Vice President Theodore Roosevelt at the Minneapolis Club in 1901. Thomas Leonard Shevlin (1883-1915) was born in Muskegon, Michigan, attended the Hill School in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, graduated from Yale University, was an All-American football end and coach at Yale University, was one of the few players in the history of college football to be selected as an All-American four consecutive years, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954, competed in track and field, baseball, boxing, and hockey at Yale University, purchased a $15,000 French automobile and raced it in New England, married Elizabeth Sherley in 1909, was active in Republican Party politics, was a millionaire lumberman, coached the University of Minnesota football team and originated "the Minnesota shift," coached the Yale University football team in 1910 and in 1915, formed, with his sisters, in 1912, the Shevlin Company, a holding company for the family's lumber interests, and died in Minneapolis of pneumonia contracted while coaching football. There is a Thomas H. Shevlin Fellowship at the University of Minnesota which is open to graduate students in the biological and agricultural sciences, basic physical and medical sciences, and liberal arts, with an $18,000 annual stipend. In 1902, T. L. Shevlin, son of Thomas H. Shevlin, was fined $10 in Minneapolis for traveling faster than the 10 mph city speed limit. Thomas L. Shevlin played college football from 1902 to 1905, captained the 1905 Yale University team which had a 10-0 record and outscored its opponents 222-4, was a concensus All-American football player in 1902, 1904, and 1905 as an end for Yale University, and was elected to the National Football Foundation�s hall of Fame for 1902-04. Thomas L. Shevlin succeeded his father as president of the Shevlin-Hixon Lumber Company in 1912, during the initial stages of construction of the Bend, Oregon, lumber mill, but T. L. Shevlin died of pneumonia before the mill was finished. Franklin P. Hixon and E. D. Shevlin oversaw the completion of the Bend, Oregon, lumber mill. Edwin Charles Shevlin (1867- ) was born in Albany, New York, moved to Minneapolis, married Harriet Albina Hall in 1895, and the couple had two children, Crosby Shevlin (1896- ) and Edwin Leonard Shevlin (1898-.) Shevlin, Minnesota, took its name from lumberman Thomas Shevlin, who was active in the Red Lake Cession north of Shevlin in 1896 and in the the White Earth Cession south of Shevlin in 1905 as the Lyman-Irwin Lumber Company and as the Nichols-Chisholm Lumber Company. The J. Neils Lumber Company was incorporated in Sauk Rapids, Minnesota, in 1895 by Julius Neils and Thomas Shevlin. In 1906, Shevlin obtained nearly 120,000 acres of timber in Oregon. The Shevlin-Clarke Co. Ltd, which operated Canada's largest pine sawmill in Fort Frances, Ontario, from 1911 to 1940. In 1928, Elizabeth Brite Shevlin of Manhattan, daughter of Thomas L. Shevlin, married Paul Morton Smith, son of Mrs. Charles Hamilton Sabin, wife of the famed Manhattan banker. Mrs. John P. Rutherfurd was the daughter of Thomas L. Shevlin and made a substantial donation of a large collection of 18th-century pottery and porcelain to the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. John P. Rutherfurd was a 1933 letter winner from Princeton University in rowing. John P. Rutherfurd (1910-1987) was born in New York and died in Bedford Hills, Westchester, New York. Alice A. Shevlin ( -1910) and Thomas L. Shevlin ( -1915) both died in Hennepin County. Frank Totton/Totten Heffelfinger (1869-1959) was the president of F. H. Peavey and Company. Frank T. Heffelfinger was born in Minneapolis, the son of Christopher B. Heffelfinger and Mary E. Totton Heffelfinger. Christopher B. Heffelfinger (1834-1915,) the son of William Heffelfinger and Margaret Biestle Heffelfinger, was born in Mifflin, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, was educated in the public and district schools of Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, initially was a Lutheran, apprenticed at a tannery, was a partner in the tannery firm of Cover & Company from 1854 until 1857, moved to Minnesota in 1857, settled in Minneapolis, was employed as a painter and paper hanger before 1861, served in the American Civil War (as a Second Lieutenant, a First Lieutenant, and a Captain with the First Minnesota Infantry, Company D "Lincoln Guards" (1861-1864,)) was slightly wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia, on May 3, 1863, and at the battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on July 3, 1863, was mustered out at Fort Snelling, MInnesota, in 1864, re-enlisted, served as a Major with the First Minnesota Heavy Artillery Regiment (1865,) received a brief appointment as a relief agent in the United States Sanitary Commission in 1864, married Mary Ellen Totton/Totten, the daughter of John Totton, in 1864 in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, was engaged in the sale and manufacture of shoes and boots from 1866 until 1870 as a partner with John S. Walker in the firm Walker & Heffelfinger, which included his brother, C. A. Heffelfinger, operated a shoe and boot firm alone as C. B. Heffelfinger from 1870 until 1873, organized, with A. M. Reid, the North Star Shoe Company in 1873, was the president of the North Star Shoe Company after 1885, was the president of the First Minnesota Association, was a member of the Minnesota Commandery of the Loyal Legion of the United States, was on the staff of the National Commandery of the Loyal Legion of the United States, was a charter member of the Rawlins G. A. R. Post #126 in Minneapolis, was a member of the George N. Morgan G. A. R. Post #4, in Minneapolis, was a member of the Minnesota Gettysburg Battlefield Monument Commission in 1891, was a Republican, was a Mason, was a Minneapolis alderman from 1867 until 1870, subsequently was a Presbyterian, attended the Westminster Presbyterian Church, officed at 424-430 First Avenue North in 1907, and was buried at Lakewood Cemetery. Frank Heffelfinger had six siblings, Alfred Heffelfinger, William Heffelfinger, Mary Heffelfinger, Fannie Heffelfinger, Charles Heffelfinger, and Annie Heffelfinger. Frank T. Heffelfinger was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire and then joined his father in the shoe business. In 1866, Christopher Heffelfinger got into the boot and shoe business with a man named Walker. Their firm, Walker & Heffelfinger, included Christopher Heffelfinger's brother, C. A. Heffelfinger (1850- ). Four years later, Christopher Heffelfinger bought out his partner and, in 1873, organized the North Star Boot and Shoe Company. C. A. Heffelfinger was a native of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, first located in Minneapolis in 1866, engaged with the firm of Walker and Heffelfinger, boot and shoe dealers, and succeeded the firm, in 1874, as sole proprietor. He is also a partner in the firm of Heffelfinger & Kingman, of Red Wing, Minnesota. He married Carrie B. King, the daughter of W. S. King, in 1879. In 1898, Frank Heffelfinger went into the grain business and became associated with F. H. Peavey. F. H. Peavey & Company was established at Sioux City, Iowa, in 1874 by Frank H. Peavey, moved to Minneapolis in 1884, changed its name to the Peavey Company in 1962, went public in 1973, and, in 1982, was acquired by ConAgra, Inc. In 1921, Frank Heffelfinger was the president of the Civic and Commerce Association of Minneapolis. In 1895, Frank T. Heffelfinger married Lucia Louise Peavey (1878- ), the daughter of Frank Hutchison Peavey (1850-1901) and Mary Dibble Wright ( - ), and the couple had four children, including Frank Peavey Heffelfinger (1897- ) and Totten Peavey Heffelfinger (1899- ). Frank T. Heffelfinger was the director of the Governor's Relief Committee of Minnesota in 1932. Frank Totten Heffelfinger took a tour in 1900 of grain storage facilities in Europe with Charles F. Haglin to determine whether concrete grain elevators existed in Europe. Frank Totten Heffelfinger also was the director of the Governor's Relief Committee of Minnesota. Frank Peavey Heffelfinger married Elizabeth Bradley Heffelfinger (1900-1981), a Republican National Committeewoman (1948-1960), the chair of the Women's Activities Division of the Minneapolis Civilian Defense Council (1942-1946), a member of the Minnesota Birth Control League, a defeated candidate for the Minnesota Legislature in 1944, and an executive committee member of the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO, and an activist in Harold Stassen's bid for the 1952 Republican presidential nomination. Lucia L. Peavey Heffelfinger was the author of Memoirs of Christopher B. Heffelfinger, published in Minneapolis in 1922. W. W. Heffelfinger, of Minneapolis, was a delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1904. Elizabeth Heffelfinger, of Wayzata, Minnesota, was a delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1952 and 1960. Mrs. F. Peavey Heffelfinger, of Wayzata, Minnesota, was a delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1944. Totten P. Heffelfinger, of Minneapolis, was a delegate to Republican National Convention from Minnesota in 1936 and 1940. Totten P. Heffelfinger was involved with the Quetico-Superior Council and was involved in the pro-business Citizens Alliance during the 1937 Minneapolis truckers strike. In 1960, Totten P. Heffelfinger, the former president of the U. S. Golf Association, was the nonplaying captain of the U. S. amateur golf team to the World Amateur Golf Championship. In the 1950's, Totton P. Heffelfinger, a member of Minikahda Golf Club in Minneapolis, with Robert Fischer, was a driving force behind the establishment of the Hazeltine National Golf Club in Chaska, Minnesota. Totton Heffelfinger's original 6,000 square foot, four bedroom, rambler house adjoining the tenth tee at Hazeltine was recently for sale for $1.35 million. William W. Heffelfinger was vice president of the North Star Shoe Company and treasurer of the Flour City Trunk Company and resided at 1725 Third Avenue South according to the 1909 city directory. William W. "Pudge" Heffelfinger (1867-1954) graduated from Minneapolis Central High School, was "drafted" as a high school senior to play the second half of the 1897 season with the University of Minnesota football team, graduated from Yale University, was a guard on the first All-American football team selected, in 1889, and repeated in 1890 and in 1891, originated the "pulling guard" play at Yale University, Coached the University of California football team in 1893, coached the Lehigh University football team to a 6-8-0 record in 1894 and had a 7-3-0 record as the coach of the University of Minnesota football team in 1895, became a stockbroker in Minneapolis, returned to Yale University in 1916 to coach the linemen, played in charity football games at age 54 in 1922 and at age 65 in 1933, published Heffelfinger Football Facts in the 1930's, and died in Blessing, Texas. In 1995, Totton Heffelfinger and Joanne Heffelfinger, attorneys, reside in San Francisco and Totton Heffelfinger was a board member of the Nepalese Youth Opportunity Foundation and was the Wetlands Chair of the Bay Area Chapter of the Sierra Club in 2000. Totton Heffelfinger, a retiree, was engaged in commercial and corporate law practice in the San Francisco Bay Area for 35 years, was vice president, general counsel, and secretary of Kaiser Cement Company, was an adjunct professor at the law schools of the University of California and of the University of San Francisco, served on the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission, the Point Reyes Bird Observatory, the Planning and Conservation League, and the San Francisco Bay Joint Venture. The Heffelfinger line descends from William Heffelfinger and Margaret Bistle Heffelfinger, who lived near Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, and the couple had 13 children, John Heffelfinger, Margaret Heffelfinger, Catherine Heffelfinger, Elizabeth Heffelfinger, Mary Heffelfinger, Christopher B. Heffelfinger (1834-1915,) William Heffelfinger, Annie Heffelfinger, Martha Heffelfinger, Alfred Heffelfinger, Joseph Heffelfinger, Lemuel Heffelfinger, and Charles Heffelfinger. Elizabeth Heffelfinger married Frederick Sheckler, lived in Richland County, Ohio, and the couple had eight children, David Sheckler, John Sheckler, Benjamin Sheckler, Daniel Sheckler, Sarah Sheckler, George L. Sheckler, Alfonzo Sheckler, and William F. Sheckler. Christopher B. Heffelfinger was born in Mifflin, Pennsylvania, moved to Minneapolis, enlisted in Company B of the First Minnesota Regiment in 1861 and became a sergeant, was promoted to a Second Lieutenant, a First Lieutenant, a Captain, and a Major, also served in the First Minnesota Heavy Artillery Regiment, mustered out of the Union Army in 1865, returned to Minneapolis, and was a Minneapolis alderman. Christopher B. Heffelfinger also was a collector of military items, including a Spanish cavalry saber and scabbard from Toledo, Spain, from 1841, which is in the collection of the Minnesota Historical Society. Frank Hutchinson Peavey (1850-1901,) the son of Albert Daniel Peavey (1824-1859) and Mary Drew Peavey (1824- ,) was born in Easton, Washington County, Maine, married Mary Dibble Wright (1850-1903) in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1873, settled in Minneapolis in 1884, developed an extensive grain elevator business, owned a line of Great Lakes freight steamships, built the Peavey-Haglin experimental concrete grain elevator in 1900, and died of pneumonia in Chicago. Frank Hutchinson Peavey and Mary Dibble Wright Peavey were the parents of three children, George Wright Peavey (1873- ,) Mary Drew Peavey (Mrs. Frederick) Wells (1875- ,) and Lucia Louise Peavey (Mrs. Frank T.) Heffelfinger (1878- .) Christopher B. Heffelfinger (1834-1915,) Mary Ellen Tooten Heffelfinger ( -1916,) Celia Heffelfinger ( -1918,) Lucia Louise Peavey Heffelfinger ( -1941,) Frank Joseph Heffelfinger ( -1944,) Leonard B. Heffelfinger ( -1948,) Charles Edwin Heffelfinger ( -1948,) and May Heffelfinger ( -1954) all died in Hennepin County. Alfred Sully Heffelfinger ( -1921,) named after the Union Army General, Alfred Sully (1821-1879) of Iowa, who participated the punitive expedition against the Dakota Indians after the 1962 Uprising, died in Hennepin County. Edith Pryce Heffelfinger (1896-1973) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Elizabeth Heffelfinger (1899-1981) was born outside of Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Ewrly, and died in Hennepin County. Elsmore Anderson Heffelfinger (1910-1984) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Peterson, and died in Hennepin County. F. Peavey Heffelfinger (1897-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Peavey, and died in Hennepin County. Frank Totton Heffelfinger (1869-1959) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Totton, and died in Hennepin County. Freda Heffelfinger (1899-1979) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Grasscamp, and died in Hennepin County. George W. P. Heffelfinger (1901-1970) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Peavey, and died in Hennepin County. Karl B. Heffelfinger (1895-1973) was born outside of Minnesota and died in Hennepin County. Mary Ellen Heffelfinger (1871-1955) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Totton, and died in Hennepin County. Totton Peavey Heffelfinger (1899-1987) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Peavey, and died in Hennepin County. William Robert Heffelfinger (1892-1955) was born in Minnesota, had a mother with a maiden name of Byrnes, and died in Hennepin County.

Former 2210 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former George Peavey House; Built in 1903; Renaissance Revival in style; Charles F. Haglin, architect. The rectangular building is typical of its style, with a symmetrical facade, a low hip roof with a balustrade, an elaborated bracketed cornice, columns, an arched entry, and corner quions. George Wright Peavey (1877-1913) was associated with the Peavey Company. George W. Peavey was the son of Frank Hutchinson Peavey (1850-1901) and Mary Dibble Wright Peavey (1850-1903.) George W. Peavey married Katherine S. Jordan. His two sisters were Lucia Louise Peavey (1873-1941) and Mary Drew Peavey (1875-1924). Lucia Louise Peavey married Frank T. Heffelfinger (1870-1959). Mary Drew Peavey married Frederick B. Wells. Frank T. Heffelfinger, Heffelfinger's son, Frank Peavey Heffelfinger, and Frederick B. Wells were involved together in the grain business. Frank T. Heffelfinger was president and Frederick Wells was vice president of the F. H. Peavey and Company. Frederick D. Wells was the son of Thomas Buchlin Wells, the rector of St. Mark's Episcopal Cathedral in Minneapolis from 1880 to 1891, and Annie E. J. Wells. Frederick Brown Wells was born in 1873 in Mentone, France, studied at Yale University and at the University of Minnesota, joined F. H. Peavey and Company in 1891, was a World War I veteran, and married Mary Drew Peavey in 1898. Wells and his wife had four children. The Wells Memorial House, established in 1908, was a settlement house in downtown Minneapolis organized by St. Mark's Episcopal Church which maintained a free dispensary, mental clinic, pathology laboratory, and tuberculosis clinic in cooperation with St. Barnabas Hospital, and operated a kindergarten, day nursery, library, employment bureau, and chapel. The Peavey Company was a family-held, Minneapolis-based grain merchandising and processing firm. The F. H. Peavey & Company was established at Sioux City, Iowa, in 1874 by Frank H. Peavey. Minneapolis became headquarters of the firm in 1884. The name of the business was changed to the Peavey Company in 1962, went public in 1973, and, in 1982, was acquired by ConAgra, Inc. Lucia Heffelfinger de Grazia (1927-2002) was born in Minneapolis, the daughter of Elizabeth Heffelfinger, the treasurer of the National Women's Republican Organization, and Peavey Heffelfinger, a wealthy grain dealer, moved to Princeton in 1948 with her first husband, John W. Ballantine, was active in the New Jersey juvenile justice system in the 1960's and 1970's, serving on the civilian parole board of the Clinton, New Jersey, Home for Girls and on the board for the Jamesburg, New Jersey, State Home for Boys, founded the Center for Women in Politics, subsequently married the Pulitzer Prize winning author Sebastian de Grazia, with whom she spent much time in Capri, Italy, and died in Princeton, New Jersey.

2215 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former James Ford Bell and Louise Heffelfinger Bell House/Phillips Eye Institute. The 1902 University of Minnesota Alumni Record indicates that James Ford Bell, a 1901 graduate and associated with the milling business, resided at this address. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that James Stroud Bell resided at this address in 1907. The 1909 city directory indicates that James S. Bell, president of the Washburn-Crosby Company and vice president of the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator Company, resided at this address and James F. Bell, a salesman for the Washburn-Crosby Company, boarded at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Bell and J. F. Bell, Jr., all resided at this address. James Ford Bell (1879-1961) initially was a salesman for the Washburn-Crosby Company and became its vice president in 1915. He was born in Philadelphia, the son of James Stroud Bell, the former chief executive of the Washburn-Crosby Company since 1888. James Ford Bell was a 1901 graduate of the University of Minnesota, with a bachelor of science degree and a major in chemistry. He became a director of the Washburn-Crosby Company in 1910. He also was the president of four firms, the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator Company, the Barnum Grain Company, the Royal Mills, and the Kallispell Mountain Flour Mill. Additionally, he was a director of the Lehigh Valley RailRoad and a director of the Northwestern National Bank and was the vice president of the Minnesota Art Museum. During World War I, he was appointed by the U. S. Food Administration as chairman of the Milling Division and, in 1918, he accompanied Herbert Hoover on Hoover's European Hunger Relief Mission. For this, he was awarded the Belgian Order of the Crown and was made a member of the French Legion of Honor. James Ford Bell became president of Washburn-Crosby Company in 1925 and, three years later, was responsible for the founding of General Mills, a consolidation of many western and midwestern milling companies. He became chairman of the Board of General Mills in 1932, a position that he held until his retirement in 1947. Throughout his life, he was active in national and international affairs. James Ford Bell was an inveterate outdoorsman, an early conservationist, a lifelong scientist and leading philanthropist. Mr. Bell was a driving force in the building and development of the Museum of Natural History at the University of Minnesota, renamed in his honor in 1966. Established in 1872, the James Ford Bell Museum of Natural History is recognized as one of the premier natural history museums in the country. A devoted friend of the University of Minnesota, Mr. Bell served as a member of the Board of Regents from 1939 until 1961. The James Ford Bell Library, a part of the Library at the University, houses Mr. Bell's collection of rare books dedicated to the field of trade containing fine manuscripts, books and maps dating to the earliest available records throughout the fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. He married Louise Heffelfinger in 1902. He also was the most generous individual donor to the Department of Decorative Arts, Sculpture and Architecture of The Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Bell's gifts range from the beautiful American and English silver pieces which are the foundation of the Institute's distinguished collection to two elegant rooms from the colonial Charleston, South Carolina, home of Colonel John Stuart. James Ford Bell allocated a portion of his estate to the Foundation which bears his name upon his death. Charles Heffelfinger Bell was James Ford Bell's son, became the chairman and president of General Mills, Inc., and was involved in the creation of the Belwin Foundation and the Belwin Outdoor Education Laboratory and its relationship with the St. Paul school system. James Stroud Bell (1847-1915,) the son of Samuel Bell and Elizabeth Faust Bell, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was educated in the public schools and the Central High School of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, married Sallie Montgomery Ford ( -1905) at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1873, was a clerk employed by his father in the firm of W. & S. Bell, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1864, was admitted to the firm of Samuel Bell & Son, the sales agent in Pennsylvania for Washburn Crosby & Company, from 1868 until 1888, moved to Minneapolis in 1888, was a flour miller, was a partner in firm of Washburn, Martin & Company from 1888 until 1889, was the president of the successor Washburn-Crosby Company after 1889, manufacturer of flour at Minneapolis, Buffalo, New York, Louisville, Kentucky, Great Falls, Montana, and Kalispell, Montana, was the vice president of the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator Company, was the vice president of the Barnum Grain Company, was the vice president of the Minneapolis Trust Company, was the president of the Royal Milling Company, was the president of the Frontier Elevator Company, was a member of the board of directors of Northwestern National Bank in Minneapolis, married Mabel Sargent in 1912, was a Republican, initially was a Quaker, subsequently was a Presbyterian, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, and officed at the Washburn-Crosby Company in 1907. The Phillips Eye Institute, built in 1986, is a specialty hospital of Allina Hospitals & Clinics dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases and disorders. The Phillips Eye Institute was designed to function as a free standing eye specialty center associated with Mount Sinai Medical Center. It was developed by and for ophthalmologists. Jay Phillips was the main benefactor of Mount Sinai Hospital and a strong supporter of Mount Sinai's Division of Ophthalmology. Because of Jay Phillips' generous philanthropic support, the Phillips Eye Institute bears his name. The 1916 University of Minnesota Alumni Directory indicates that Oscar A. Brecke resided at the former nearby 2020 Park Avenue. Oscar A. Brecke (1897- ) was a member of the Class of 1915 at the University of Minnesota Law School.

2222 Park Avenue South: Freeport West Inc. Office Building; Built in 1904. The structure is a three story, 14736 square foot, office building. Among other community-strengthening programs, Freeport West Inc. addresses the problem of youth homelessness in the Twin Cities region through a coordinated street-based outreach program known as StreetWorks, with 33 outreach workers, featuring emergency shelter, transitional housing, drop-in centers, meal sites, clothing, HIV/STD prevention, medical care, mental health counseling, alcohol and chemical dependency treatment, employment opportunities, educational programs, and life skills programs, and addresses community building through its Community Living Rooms program, which are informal gatherings where parents and residents meet to engage in various activities and talk about their lives.

Former 2300 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former James Park Quirk and Florence Henrietta Akeley Quirk House. The book of Minnesotans: A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Living Men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis and published in 1907, indicates that Healey C. Akely resided at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Quirk resided at this address. J. Park Quirk was the secretary/treasurer of the James Quirk Milling Company in 1909 and resided at this address. James Park Quirk and Florence A. Quirk (1878-1956), the daughter of Healey C. Akeley (1836- ) of Stowe, Lamoille County, Vermont, and Henrietta E. "Hettie" Smith Akeley (1870- ) of Ohio, married in Naples, Italy, in 1904, and the couple had at least one child, Akeley Park Quirk (1910- .) Healey C. Akeley (1836-1912,) the son of George Akeley, was born in Stowe, Vermont, was educated in the common schools of Stowe, Vermont, attended the Poughkeepsie, New York, Law School, initially was a farmer in Vermont, then became a surveyor, then was a lawyer after 1857, first married Anna Murray in Waterbury, Vermont, in 1859, moved to Michigan, practiced law in Grand Haven, Michigan, served in the Second Michigan Cavalry Regiment during the American Civil War from 1863 until 1865, fought in the Battle of Franklin, fought in the Battle of Nashville, was the customs collector in Michigan from 1866 until 1872, later married Hattie/Hettie E. Smith in Grand Haven, Michigan, in 1869, was the mayor of Grand Haven, Michigan, engaged in the lumber manufacturing business in Grand Haven, Michigan, from 1872 until 1887, was a partner with Charles Boyden in the Grand Haven Lumber Company, a shingle manufacturer, organized the Itasca Lumber Company in 1886, moved to Minneapolis in 1887, was the president of the H. C. Akely Lumber Company, was the vice president of the Itasca Lumber Company, combined the H. C. Akely Lumber Company and the Itasca Lumber Company in 1903, managed the Akeley & Sprague lumber mills of Washburn, Wisconsin, was associated with Thomas B. Walker in and was the president of the Minneapolis Threshing Machine Company, was the president of the Lumber Exchange Company of Minneapolis, was a member of the board of directors of the Security Bank of Minnesota, was associated with Thomas B. Walker in the Red River Logging Company, purchased a half interest in the Crow Wing Crest Lodge in Akeley, Minnesota, from Thomas B. Walker in 1893, married Clara Hood Royce, a former housekeeper at the Hotel Virginia, Long Beach, California, in 1911, erected a Soldiers' Memorial Building in Stowe, Vermont, donated the Blanche Hall Akeley Institute for Girls in Grand Haven, Michigan, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, was a member of the Minnetonka Club, was a member of the Minikhada Club, officed at the Lumber Exchange Building in 1907, and died at Long Beach, California. Mrs. J. P. Quirk, the daughter of H. C. Akeley, contested the supposed will of H. C. Akeley and the attempted disposition of his $1 million estate in a Denver, Colorado, court in 1912, against Clara R. Akeley, the widow of H. C. Akeley, unsuccessfully opposing her efforts to have the estate probated in California and ultimately settled for 7-12ths of her father's estate. [See note for the Minikahda Club for 702 Fairmount Avenue.] [See the note for Platt B. Walker, Thomas B. Walker, and the Walker family for 1046 Summit Avenue.]

2304 Park Avenue South: Memorial Blood Center Of Minneapolis; Built in 1956. The structure is a two story, 36114 square foot, blood donation center. Memorial Blood Centers is a private, nonprofit community blood center which has donor centers in Minneapolis, Plymouth, Minnesota, Coon Rapids, Minnesota, Duluth, Minnesota, Hibbing, Minnesota, and Superior, Wisconsin. Memorial Blood Centers is a major supplier of blood and blood components to hospitals in Hennepin County and Anoka County, Minnesota, and in the Arrowhead (NorthEast) Region of Minnesota. The owner of record is the Minneapolis War Memorial Blood Bank Inc. and the taxpayer of record is the Memorial Blood Center Of Minneapolis.

Former 2305 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former A. E. Clerihew House. The 1915 and 1923 city directories indicate that Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Clerihew resided at this address. Alexander E. Clerihew (1861- ,) the son of Alexander M. Clerihew ( -1908) and Emily Van Wyck House Clerihew ( -1918,) was born in New York City, New York, was educated in the public schools of Montclair, New Jersey, and of Cincinnati, Ohio, studied at Princeton University (class of 1885,) came to Minneapolis in 1884, and initially worked at his father's firm, Shotwell, Clerihew & Lothman, was a manufacturer and wholesale dealer, was the vice president of Forman, Ford & Company, wholesale dealers in glass, mirrors, paints and oils, was the vice president of the Northern Linseed Oil Company, manufacturers of linseed oil, and officed at 116 S. Washington Avenue in 1907. In 1888, there was the "Maidens Strike" at Shotwell, Clerihew & Lothman, when 260 female employees at the clothing factory walked out based on a longstanding demand that piece rates which had been cut at the start of the year be restored to the former level. The strike was not resolved, organized labor initiated a boycott of the company, the striking maidens either found other work or returned to their homes in the country and, several months later, Shotwell, Clerihew & Lothman closed its doors. A.H. Lindeke of the firm of Lindeke, Warner Schurmier became the assignee of the company's assets in order to protect creditors. In 1890, Clerihew became associated with Forman, Ford & Company, wholesale dealers in glass and paints and paint manufacturers, as a credit man. Subsequently, Clerihew was the vice president and president of Forman, Ford & Company, was the vice president of the Northern Linseed Oil Company, and was the vice president and then the president of the National Glass Distributors Association and was a director of the First National Bank of Minneapolis in 1911. In 1886, Alexander E. Clerihew married Evelyn J. Forman, a daughter of Frank W. Forman, a senior partner of Forman, Ford & Company, and the couple had a daughter, Catharine/Katherine Clerihew, who was a debutante in 1909. Catharine Clerihew married George Norton Northrop of New York City, New York. Clerihew was a member of the Minneapolis Club, the Minikahda Club, the Lafayette Club, the Automobile Club, and the University Club of Chicago. Clerihew had two sisters, Mrs. R. K. Buckman, Jr., and Mrs. Anson C. Morgan, both of Highland Park, Illinois. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Frank W. Forman resided at the former nearby 2303 Park Avenue South in 1907. Frank W. Forman (1835- ,) the son of Jonathan M. Forman and Martha Burleson Forman, was born in Oneida, New York, was educated in the public schools of New York State, was a merchant and manufacturer, conducted general merchandise business in Le Roy, New York, for 29 years, married Mary J. Bridge in Lenox, New York, in 1857, came to Minneapolis in 1883, assisted in the organization of the firm of Forman, Ford & Company, wholesale dealers in paints, was the president of Forman, Ford & Company, was the president of the Northern Linseed Oil Company, was a Democrat, was an Episcopalian, had the hobby of traveling abroad for pleasure, and officed at 116-120 Washington Avenue South in 1907. Frank W. Forman was the half-brother of Justus Miles Forman, a Le Roy, Minnesota, author, who died in the sinking of the Lusitania just before World War I. Forman, Ford & Company were wholesale dealers in glass and paints and paint manufacturers. Forman, Ford & Company was organized in Minneapolis in 1883 as a glass jobbing house by W. E. Steele, J. W. Birdwell, and Theo. Ford ( -1885.) In 1884, F. B. Forman purchased J. W. Birdwell's interest in the firm, which became the Steele, Forman & Ford Company. After the death of Theo. Ford, his brother, F. D. Ford, purchased his interest in the company. In 1886, W. E. Steele sold his interest in the company to F. B. Forman and the company was renamed Forman, Ford & Company. In 1887, Forman, Ford & Company began the manufacture of leaded stained glass, beveled plate glass, and mirrored plate glass. In 1892, F. D. Ford sold his interest in the company to F. W. Forman and F. B. Forman, who elected to retain the name Forman, Ford & Company. Forman, Ford & Company established distribution offices in Des Moines, Iowa, and Great Falls, Montana. Fred B. Atwood was associated with Forman, Ford & Company from 1898 until at least 1907. In 1915, Edgar G. Barratt was a member of the board of directors of Forman, Ford & Company. In 1943, George R. "Doc" Matchan, a member of the Minnesota House of Representatives representing Hennepin County (District 36,) was a salesman employed by Forman, Ford & Company in 1943. Forman, Ford & Company was still in existence in 1947 and in 1952. Forman Ford, glass and glazing contractors, had offices in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa, Hiawatha, Iowa, and Overland Park, Kansas, in 2011. Forman Ford Paint has a facility in Golden Valley, Minnesota.

2309 Park Avenue South: The structure is a hospital. The owner of record is the Health One Corporation and the taxpayer of record is the Allina Health System.

Former 2313 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former E. R. Barber and Hattie S. Barber House. The book of Minnesotans: a biographical dictionary of leading living men of Minnesota, edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, indicates that Edwin Roswell Barber resided at this address in 1907. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Barber and their daughter and E. R. Barber, Jr., all resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Rand resided at this address. Edwin Roswell Barber was the president of the Barber Milling Company. Edwin R. Barber (1852-1920,) the son of Daniel R. Barber and Ellen L. Bottom Barber, was born in Benson, Rutland County, Vermont, moved with his family to Minnesota in 1855, was educated in the public schools of Minneapolis, attended the University of Minnesota, but did not graduate, worked in grain milling first for Gardner, Pillsbury, & Crocker, and then Cataract Mills, lobbied for the construction of the Lake Street bridge, and married Hattie Sidle, the daughter of Henry G. Sidle of the First National Bank, in Minneapolis in 1873 and they had four children, Henry Sidle Barber (1877- ,) Nellie L. Barber (1882-1888,) Katharine Sidle Barber (1890- ,) and Edwin Roswell Barber, Jr. (1892- .) Barber associated with his father, D. R. Barber, owner of the the Cataract Flouring Mills, and with his brother-in-law in the milling industry, and was the president and treasurer of the Barber Milling Company, which was organized in 1859 and was incorporated in 1896. Barber was a member of the firm of Gardner & Barber in 1871, which was renamed D. R. Barber & Company in 1876, and which was renamed the Barber Milling Company in 1896, was a Republican, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, was a member of the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Minikahda Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a member of the Automobile Club, and officed at the Flour Exchange Building. Edwin R. Barber, Jr. (1892- ,) was born in Minneapolis, was educated in the Minneapolis public elementary schools of the city, then went to a Lawrenceville, New Jersey, preparatory school, attended the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis for a year and a half, was first employed by the Nye-Jenks Grain Company for two years, then became associated with the Barber Milling Company, became the president and treasurer of Barber Milling Company, was a Republican, was a Presbyterian, was a member of the Minneapolis Club, was a member of the Lafayette Club, was a golfer, married Etta O'Connor, the daughter of Timothy O'Connor, a banker, in Renville, Minnesota, and resided at 1901 Humboldt Avenue South in 1921. In 1859, William W. Eastman and Parison Gibson were the proprietors of Cataract Mills. William Wallace Eastman (1827- ) built Cataract Mills, built the North Star Woolen Mill, built the first paper mill and the first wheat elevator in the State in 1866, built the Anchor Flouring Mill (later traded to John S. Pillsbury), founded the lumber business, Eastman, Bovey & Co, owning timber lands in Washington State, purchased Nicollet Island, owned the construction company that helped build the first section of road from Duluth to the Red River in 1872, and purchased the consolidated Breweries of Minneapolis in the 1890's. George Augustus Brackett (1836-1921) operated the Cataract Flour Mill for several years in partnership with W. S. Judd, under the firm name of Judd & Brackett. George Augustus Brackett (1836- ) was born at Weston/Calais, Maine, arrived at St. Anthony in 1856 or 1857 and drove the meat wagon for Stimson & Hayes and worked on the dam of the Minneapolis Mill Company, opened a meat market of his own in 1858 and, in 1862, was given the contract to supply beef to the troops that were serving under General Sully against the Dakota, married Miss Anna M. Hoit (1837-1890), daughter of William Hoit, in 1858, was elected Minneapolis alderman from the Third ward in 1867, was instrumental in organizing the fire department of Minneapolis, was the chief engineer of the Minneapolis Fire Department from 1869 to 1872, was the purchasing agent for the Northern Pacific Railway Company from 1870 to 1875, was a construction contractor on the Northern Pacific RailRoad's Duluth, Minnesota, to Bismarck, North Dakota, line, on Minnesota segments of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway, and on rail lines in Canada, built a pork packing plant in Minneapolis with Anthony Kelly in 1873, was elected mayor of Minneapolis as a Republican in 1873, was surveyor general of logs and lumber for the Second district from 1874 to 1882, appointed to the post by Governor Cushman Davis, was a commissioner of the park board of the City of Minneapolis during its first six years of operation, was commodore of the Lake Minnetonka Yacht Club in 1882, led a successful drive to carve the City of Orono, Minnesota, out of the southern 11 sections of Medina, Minnesota, in 1889, was president of the Minneapolis Stock Yards and Packing Company, located at New Brighton, from 1890 to 1893, was forced by financial failure to prospect for gold in the Klondike, established an Alaskan wagon toll road from Skagway, Alaska, to White Pass, Yukon, during the gold rush between 1897 and 1900 after witnessing the 1897 carnage of most of the 3,000 horses used on the White Pass trail, eventually selling the right of way to the White Pass & Yukon Railroad Company for $50,000 in 1898, returned to Minneapolis, and was buried in Lakewood Cemetery. The 110 mile White Pass & Yukon RailRoad was completed in 1900, connecting the deep water port of Skagway, Alaska, to Whitehorse, Yukon, climbing almost 3000 feet in just 20 miles and featuring steep grades of up to 3.9 percent, cliff-hanging turns of 16 degrees, two tunnels, and numerous bridges and trestles, including a steel cantilever bridge that was the tallest of its kind when constructed in 1901.

2318 Park Avenue South: Katahdin, Inc.; Built in 1923. The structure is a 3.2 story, 13620 square foot, office building. Katahdin, Inc. provides education and counseling to youth and families and operates a non-residential treatment program for repeat offenders and truants, ages 12 to 18, who live in Hennepin County. Katahdin Inc. provides counseling and education for youth. With a Bush Foundation grant and other resources, in 1997, the organization purchased and rennovated this building. The property was last sold in 1983 by the Estate of John Cowles to Park Ave Partners for $605,000 and in 1996 by the M.R. Bolin Revocable Trust to Katahdin Inc for $780,000. The current owner of record is Katahdin Inc.

Former 2323 Park Avenue South: Site of the Former Edmund J. Phelps and Louise Phelps House. The 1909 city directory indicates that Edmund J. Phelps, the president of the Belt Line Elevator Company and the Moore Carving Machine Company, resided at this address and that Richardson Phelps, a student, boarded at this address. The 1915 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Phelps and their daughter, E. J. Phelps, Jr., and Richardson Phelps resided at this address. The 1923 city directory indicates that Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Phelps and their daughter resided at this address. Edmund Joseph Phelps (1845-1923) was president of the Belt Line Elevator Company and was associated with the Citizen's Alliance of Minneapolis, an organization formed by a group of business and professional men in 1903 to promote "industrial peace" and steady employment, and to support the "open-shop" principle and also ran a free employment service from 1919 to 1936. The Belt Line Elevator Company was associated with the Peavey Company. Edmund Phelps was born in Ohio. Initially, he was employed in banking. In 1870, he formed E. J. Phelps & Co., a furniture retailer, and in 1878, he purchased J. B. Hanson Co., a furniture trader. After moving to Minneapolis, he partnered with J. S. Bradstreet as Phelps & Bradstreet. Subsequently, he organized the Minnesota Loan & Trust Company with Eugene A. Merrill in 1883. He also established the Minneapolis Business Union and helped form the Minneapolis Treshing Machine Company, the Brown & Haywood Glass Company, the Northwestern Elevator Company, the National Bank of Commerce, and the Moore Carving Machine Company. He was a member of the Minneapolis Park Board and was a trustee of the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts. He married Louisa A. Richardson in 1874 and they had five children. In 1902, nine local businessmen and automobile enthusiasts James Ford Bell, Franklin M. Crosby, F. B. Foreman, L. B. Newell, Edmund J. Phelps, Alfred F. Pillsbury, George C. Christian, Sewell D. Andrews and John O. P. Wheelwright gathered to form the Automobile Club of Minneapolis. Richardson Phelps was a member of the Class of 1910 at Yale University. See information on Eugene A. Merrill for 2116 2nd Avenue South

710 24th Street East: Built in 1983. The structure is a 19 story, 75072 square foot, office building. The current owner of record is Health One Corporation and the current taxpayer of record is Allina Health System.

715 24th Street East: Phillips Eye Institute Parking Lot. Built in 1982. The structure is a 5.2 story, 174216 square foot, parking lot. The current owner of record is Allina Health System and the current taxpayer of record is the Mount Sinai Hospital Association.

This webpage was last updated on July 25, 2011.