Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!

29th INFANTRY DIVISION NORMANDY BATTLE SITES IN THE ST. LO AREA

As They Appear Today

Photos by Joseph Balkoski
Last update September 7, 2010



The view northward from the crest of Hill 192, seized by the 38th Infantry, 2nd Infantry Division on July 11, 1944. This success made possible the 29th Division's breakthrough of the enemy line on July 11. "This height was an artillery observer's dream." (Beyond the Beachhead, page 242.)



The crest of Martinville Ridge, northeast of St. Lo. Near this point, Maj. Bingham's 2nd Battalion, 116th Infantry broke through the German lines on the night of July 15, 1944. "There were approximately 200 of us in the two-and-a-half companies, and though we were completely cut off, I decided to stay put." (Maj. Sidney V. Bingham, as related in Beyond the Beachhead, page 258.)



The Famille Blanchet mausoleum in the St. Lo cemetery. Here Maj. Glover Johns established his 1st Battlion, 115th Infantry command post on July 18, 1944 -- the day the city fell. "The crypt had a large sargophagus which the staff used as a table for maps and a telephone switchboard." (Beyond the Beachhead, page 272.)



St. Lo's Ste. Croix Church. On July 18, 1944 Major Tom Howie's flag-draped body was laid on a pile of rubble near the doors. "The 29ers and some of the few civilians remaining in the city adorned the site with flowers." (Beyond the Beachhead, page 277.)

CLICK HERE for historical information on the 29th Infantry Division

RETURN TO MAIN PAGE