Fathers of the Church
Long index , wait patiently .............. 516 files

The Work of God

1. ANF1-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians

From the Codex Alexandrinus, missing chapters 57, 6 to 64, 1. Cf. ANF9-5.TXT for the complete text. This description fits the complete text: 1. Content: Earliest Christian writing (outside NT) with author's name, position and date hist. attested. Clement intervenes to settle disputes in Church of Corinth. Gives hist. summary of situation, speaks of relevant vices and virtues, gives general teaching on God, His creation, etc. Then speaks of order and obedience to hierarchy required by God, exhorts guilty party to repentance. A. Church History: Peter in Rome, Paul in Spain, their martyrdoms, Neronian persecution. B. History of Dogma: ecclesiastical jurisdiction through apostolic succession; primacy of Roman Church; resurrection of the dead; harmony in the world order. C. Liturgy: Distinction between laity and hierarchy (presbyteroi, divided into episkopoi and diakonoi). Includes a Roman liturgical prayer which attests to divinity of Christ, and concludes with petition on behalf of the state. 2. Date: 95-96 A.D. 3. Other points: Uses the plural "we"; read during liturgy at Corinth as late as 170 A.D., author seems to have been of Jewish descent.

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2. ANF1-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Papias of Hierapolis, Fragments

FRAGMENTS: from the Exposition of the Oracles of the Lord, c. 130 A.D. Important because in addition to commentary on gospel passages, it contains oral teaching of disciples of the Apostles. Best attestation of the authenticity of St. Mark's gospel, also info. on St. Matthew's.

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3. ANF1-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Justin Martyr, First Apology

148-161, addressed to Antoninus Pius. A. Intro., cc. 1-3: Requests emp. to take up case of Christians personally and form own judgment. B. Two main sections: I. cc. 4-12: Criticizes judicial procedure (punishing simply for name "Christian"), false accusations against Christians. II. cc. 13-67: Apology for Christianity, gives detailed description of doctrine and worship, hist. basis, and reason for believing. a) Dogmatic and moral doctrine: Prophecies show Jesus Son of God and founder of Christianity. Resemblances to Christianity in pagan worship due to mockery by the demons. Philosophers, like Plato, borrowed from OT. b) Christian Worship: description of baptism, eucharistic service and social life of Christians. C. Concludes with admonition to emperor and copy of rescript of emp. Hadrian to proconsul of Asia calling for more just and correct court procedure in trials of Christians.

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4. ANF1-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Justin Martyr, Second Apology

148-161. Generally agreed to be appendix or later addition to the First Apology (ANF1-11.TXT). Addressed to Antoninus Pius, Roman senate. Appeals to public opinion against martyrdom for confessing Christianity. Persecution arises from demons' hatred of truth and virtue, leads to virtue and ultimately eternal life, demonstrates superiority of Christianity to paganism.

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5. ANF1-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Justin Martyr, Dialogue with Trypho the Jew

Oldest extant Christian apology against Jews; introduction and part of c. 74 lost. Written after Apologies; Based on discussions held probably with Rabbi Tarphon et Ephesus at time of the war of Bar Kochba (132-35). 1) cc. 2-8: story of Justin's intellectual development and conversion; 2) cc. 9-47: Christian view of Old Testament; 3) cc. 48-108: justify adoration of Christ as God; 3) cc. 109-142: Christian nations form the new Israel and chosen people of God. Work stresses the Old Testament, esp. the prophets, in support of Christian truth.

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6. ANF1-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Justin Martyr, spur., Discourse to the Greeks Oratio ad Graecos

Prob. first half of 3rd c. A Greek convert's "apologia pro vita sua." Attacks the immorality of gods pictured by Homer and Hesiod; concludes with appeal for conversion. Rhetorical style and excellent knowledge of Greek mythology exclude authorship of St. Justin.

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7. ANF1-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Justin Martyr, spur., Hortatory Address to the Greeks

Prob. 3rd c. The poets' ideas of the gods are objectionable; teachings of the philosophers on religious problems full of contradictions. Truth can be found in Moses and prophets, who antedate the Greek philosophers. Philosophers and poets borrowed what truth they had from the Jewish books. Different attitude toward Greek philosophy, superior style and distinctive vocabulary exclude authorship of St. Justin.

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8. ANF1-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Justin Martyr, spur., On the Sole Government of God

Prob. 3rd. c. Tries to prove monotheism using quotations from Greek poets. Difference in style calls authorship of St. Justin into question, and Eusebius' description of the authentic "De Monarchia" of St. Justin (lost), does not correspond to the content of this treatise.

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9. ANF1-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Justin Martyr, Fragments of the lost work "On the Resurrection"; other fragments

Fragments from "On the Resurrection" preserved in St. John Damascene's "Sacra Parallela"; authenticity has been questioned.

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10. ANF1-18.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Martyrdom of Justin Martyr

The Acts of St. Justin and his Companions. Contain the official court proceedings against St. Justin, who with six companions, was imprisoned by the prefect Q. Junius Rusticus during the reign of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, scourged and beheaded, prob. in 165 at Rome. Justin Martyr: Most important Greek apologist of 2nd c. Born at Flavia Neapolis (Palestine), studied various philosophies and ended up a Christian. Founded a school in Rome during reign of Antoninus Pius (138-161). First ecclesiastical writer to attempt bridge between Christianity and pagan philosophy.

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11. ANF1-19.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Irenaeus of Lyons, Against Heresies, Book I Adversus Haereses

Full title "Detection and Overthrow of the Pretended but False Gnosis." Preserved in very literal Latin translation of the Greek. Suffers from lack of clear arrangement and unity of thought, prolixity, frequent repetition, partly because written intermittently. Book I concerned with "Detection". Detailed description of doctrine of Valentinians; then history of Gnosticism, speaking of Simon Magus and Menander, Satornil, Basilides, Carpocrates, Cerinthus, the Ebionites, the Nicolaites, Cerdon, Marcion, Tatian, the Encratites. Cf. ANF1-20, ...21, ...22, ...23.TXT.

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12. ANF1-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Epistle to Diognetus

Apology in form of letter to high-ranking pagan, Diognetus. Author and addressee unknown; possibly by Quadratus. If so, date: 123-4 or 129 A.D. But seems to depends on Irenaeus and Hippolytus, would thus be dated beginning 3rd c. Superiority of Christianity to idolatry of pagans and external formalism of Jews. Supernatural life and charity of Christians. Christians are the soul of the world, spread throughout the world and giving it life. Divine origin of Christianity. Quasten, I, 251: "Deserves to rank among the most brilliant and beautiful works of Christian Greek literature."

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13. ANF1-20.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Irenaeus of Lyons, Against Heresies, Book II Adversus Haereses

Full title "Detection and Overthrow of the Pretended but False Gnosis." Preserved in very literal Latin translation of the Greek. Suffers from lack of clear arrangement and unity of thought, prolixity, frequent repetition, partly because written intermittently. Book II: Refutes gnosis of Valentinians and Marcionites from reason. Cf. ANF1-19, ...21, ...22, ...23.TXT.

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14. ANF1-21.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Irenaeus of Lyons, Against Heresies, Book III Adversus Haereses

Full title "Detection and Overthrow of the Pretended but False Gnosis." Preserved in very literal Latin translation of the Greek. Suffers from lack of clear arrangement and unity of thought, prolixity, frequent repetition, partly because written intermittently. Book III: Refutes gnosis of Valentinians and Marcionites from doctrine of Church on God and Christ. Cf. ANF1-19, ...20, ...22, ...23.TXT.

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15. ANF1-22.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Irenaeus of Lyons, Against Heresies, Book IV Adversus Haereses

Full title "Detection and Overthrow of the Pretended but False Gnosis." Preserved in very literal Latin translation of the Greek. Suffers from lack of clear arrangement and unity of thought, prolixity, frequent repetition, partly because written intermittently. Book IV: Refutes gnosis of Valentinians and Marcionites from sayings of the Lord. Cf. ANF1-19, ...20, ...21, ...23.TXT.

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16. ANF1-23.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Irenaeus of Lyons, Against Heresies, Book V Adversus Haereses

Full title "Detection and Overthrow of the Pretended but False Gnosis." Preserved in very literal Latin translation of the Greek. Suffers from lack of clear arrangement and unity of thought, prolixity, frequent repetition, partly because written intermittently. Book V: Treats of resurrection of the flesh, denied by all Gnostics. Millenium--Irenaeus shows himself a chiliast. Cf. ANF1-19, ...20, ...21, ...22.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


17. ANF1-24.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Irenaeus of Lyons, Fragments from lost writings

From De Ogdoade, the Epistle to Pope Victor, Sermo de Fide, On the Resurrection, Miscellaneous Dissertations, Epistle to Blastus de Schismate, possibly others.

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18. ANF1-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Polycarp, Epistle to the Phillipians

LETTER: sent along with copies of St. Ignatius's letters requested by the Phillipians. Moral exhortation; used Clement's First Epistle to the Corinthians as a source. Portrays the doctrine, organization and Christian charity of the early 2nd c. Church. Prob. consists of two letters: cc. 13-14: cover letter with epistles of Ignatius, c. 110 A.D. ; cc. 1-12: c. 130's. A. Doctrine: Incarnation and crucifixion. B. Organization: Obedience to hierarchy. Other: Almsgiving, prayer for civil authorities and persecutors.

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19. ANF1-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Marcion at Smyrna, Encyclical Epistle on the Martyrdom of Polycarp

Oldest detailed extant account of (arrest and) martyrdom of single individual. A.D. 156, to Christian community at Philomelium in Greater Phrygia. Earliest evidence for cult of martyrs, including relics; distinguished from worship due to Christ. Dying prayer of P. reminiscent of liturgical formulae.

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20. ANF1-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Ignatius of Antioch, Epistles

Shorter and longer versions. AUTHOR: 2nd bishop of Antioch; devoured by beasts at Roman Colliseum, c. 110 A.D. LETTERS: A. Written as prisoner being taken from Antioch to Rome. At Smyr., wrote to Eph., Mag., Tral., whose Christians had greeted him on his way, and ahead to Rome, begging them not to try to rescue him. From Troas, wrote to Phil., Smyr., who had greeted him, and to Polycarp, giving advice on being a bishop. Letters show internal condition of Christian communities. B. Theology: Divine economy of salvation. Christology Pauline, enriched by Johannine teaching. Christ God made true man: attacks Docetism. Ecclesiology: Church is "place of sacrifice." Real presence of Christ in Eucharist. First to use the "Catholic Church" (Smyrn. 8,2). Monarchical episcopate; priests and deacons under bishop, who represents Christ as teacher, ruler, high priest with control over liturgy. Teaching on marriage and virginity. Earliest avowal of Roman Primacy by non-Roman ecclesiastic. C. Spiritual Theology: combines St. Paul and St. John. Imitation of Christ, thus enthusiasm for martyrdom. Christians--theophoroi; christophoroi: God-bearers, Christ-bearers, are also "in Christ" by mystical union. Long recension tampered with and interpolated in 4th c.

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21. ANF1-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Ignatius of Antioch, Epistles: Syriac version

Ancient abridgment of as Syrica version of letters found in anf1-5.txt/zip.

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22. ANF1-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Ignatius of Antioch (spur.), Spurious epistles attributed to Ignatius of Antioch

Letters to the Tarsians, to the Antiochians; to Hero, a deacon of Antioch; to the Philippians, from Mary the Proselyte to Ignatius, from Ignatius to Mary at Neapolis, two to John the Apostle, to the Virgin Mary.

Spurious epistles composed and attributed to Ignatius by the interpolator of the long recension of the genuine epistles. Cf. description of ANF1-5.TXT.

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23. ANF1-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Martyrdom of Ignatius of Antioch

Legend composed long after Ignatius' death.

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24. ANF1-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Attributed by tradition to Apostle Barnabas, Epistle of Barnabas

Thought to be inspired by Codex Sinaiticus, Origen, possibly Clement of Alexandria. Hostility to everything Jewish, difference from teachings of St. Paul show could not have been by Barnabas. Use of allegorical interpretation points to Alexandrian origin. Date: prob. 130-31 or 138. Sources: Common source with Didache (ANF7-17.TXT), Scripture, others now lost. Theological tract set in form of letter. Two parts: 1. cc. 1-17: Dogmatic: Old Law always meant to be interpreted allegorically; examples. Jews misinterpreted, mislead by a devil, ended up with worship resembling pagan idolatry. 2. cc. 18-21: Moral: like Didache, the two ways, here of light and darkness. Doctrine: preexistence of Christ, incarnation a) to catch Jews off guard and complete their iniquity, b) "to suffer for us". Baptism: gives adoption to sonship, stamps God's image and likeness on soul, makes temples of Holy Spirit. Worship on Sunday, not Sabbath. Condemns abortion, infanticide. Chiliasm (millenarianism).

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25. ANF2-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Hermas, The Pastor of Hermas The Shepherd of Hermas.

Composed in two different periods: 90-100 A.D. and 140-150 A.D. Relates revelations granted to Hermas in Rome by two heavenly figures, old woman and angel in form of shepherd. External division into five visions, twelve precepts or mandates and ten parables or similitudes. Vivid picture of life of Christian community: good and evil bishops, priests, deacons, martyrs, apostates, converts, sinners, heretics, etc. Purpose: to exhort the wicked to penance and comfort timid souls. Optimistic picture of life. Doctrine: of penance, with Church necessary for salvation. Confused Christology. Church. Baptism absolutely necessary for salvation. Ethics: distinction between commandments and counsels. Angels and demons; no divorce and remarriage, but remarriage permitted after death of spouse. Thought to be inspired by Irenaeus, Tertullian, in pre-Montanistic period, Origen.

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26. ANF2-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, or Miscellanies, Books VI-VIII

Third of three major theological works; follows "The Instructor". Most important subject relation of Christian faith to secular learning. Books III-VII deal with refutation of Gnosis, and describe the true Gnosis and its relation to faith. The true gnostic strives for moral perfection, consisting in chastity and love of God. Book VIII: Collection of sketches and studies used earlier in the work, prob. not intended for publication. Cf. ANF2-6, ...7, ...8, ...9.TXT.

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27. ANF2-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Alexandria, Fragments

FRAGMENTS: from the Latin translation of Cassiodorus, the Hypotyposes, On Providence, On the Soul, On Slander, On Marriage, etc.

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28. ANF2-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Alexandria, Who is the Rich Man that Shall be Saved? Quis dives salvetur?

Homily on Mark 10.17-31. Wealth itself does not exclude one from heaven, but only desire for wealth and inordinate attachment to it. How would Christians support the poor if they all gave up their possessions?

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29. ANF2-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tatian the Syrian, Address to the Greeks; fragments The Discourse to the Greeks

Not so much apology as polemic treatise rejecting and belittling all Greek culture. I. Christian cosmology: God, Logos, creation, angels, demons, free will, Adam and Eve. II. Christian demonology: Astrology, etc. III. Greek civilization: gods, theatres, arena, dancing, music poetry, philosophy, law. IV. Age and moral value of Christianity: Moses before Homer and others, morality of Christians.

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30. ANF2-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Theophilus of Antioch, To Autolycus Ad Autolycum

Composed soon after 180. Defends Christianity against objections of pagan friend Autolycus. God, idolotry, emperor, prophets vs. poets. Genesis: creation, fall. Monotheism supported by words of the Sibyl. Superior morals of Christians. Moses and prophets older than philosophers. First to use the Greek "trias" (trinity). Logos endiathetos, logos prophorikos. Immortality of soul is a reward for keeping the commandments.

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31. ANF2-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athenagoras of Athens, A Plea for the Christians

The Supplication for the Christians. Apology. c. 177, addressed to Emperors Marcus Aurelius Antoninus and and Lucius Aurelius Commodus. The Christians suffer unjustly. Refutes accusations of atheism, cannibalism, Oedipean incest. First attempt to prove monotheism scientifically. Avoids subordinationism of the other Greek apologists. Angels. Inspiration of Scripture. Virginity, marriage, abortion, infanticide. No remarriage after death of spouse.

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32. ANF2-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athenagoras of Athens, On the Resurrection of the Dead

Philosophical. Proves resurrection from reason. 1) cc. 1-10: from God's wisdom, omnipotence, justice; 2) cc. 11-25: human nature. Man created for eternity, consists of body and soul, whose unity must be restored. Body as well as soul should be rewarded or punished.

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33. ANF2-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation to the Heathen Exhortation to the Greeks

First of three major theological works. Intends to stimulate enthusiasm for only true philosophy, Christian religion. Folly of paganism and mysteries. True religion brought by Logos, who was announced by prophets and has appeared as Christ; this religion leads to human fulfillment. Cf. ANF2-7, ...8, ...9, ...10.TXT.

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34. ANF2-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor The Tutor. Paidagogos

Second of three major theological works; follows "Exhortation to the Greeks". Book I portrays Logos as instructor of men to lead them to virtuous life; his teaching based on love but he also disciplines. Books II-III deal with problems of daily life: eating, drinking, homes, music and dancing, recreation, bathing, marriage. Morality, but not complete rejection of surrounding culture and worldly possessions. Ends with hymn to Christ the Savior. Cf. ANF2-6, ...8, ...9, ...10.TXT.

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35. ANF2-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, or Miscellanies, Books I-II

Third of three major theological works; follows "The Instructor". Most important subject relation of Christian faith to secular learning. Book I: Philosophy given to Greeks as Law to Jews, now can serve Christianity as preparation for theology. Book II: Defends faith against the philosophers. Faith foundation of all knowledge; Greeks, even Plato, borrowed from Old Testament. Cf. ANF2-6, ...7, ...9, ...10.TXT.

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36. ANF2-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, or Miscellanies, Books III-V

Third of three major theological works; follows "The Instructor". Most important subject relation of Christian faith to secular learning. Books III-VII deal with refutation of Gnosis, and describe the true Gnosis and its relation to faith. The true gnostic strives for moral perfection, consisting in chastity and love of God. Cf. ANF2-6, ...7, ...8, ...10.TXT.

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37. ANF3-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Apology Apologeticum

197 A.D. Most important work; directed to governors of Roman provinces. Christians are persecuted through ignorance; court procedure against them defies justice; only wicked emperors have persecuted. Refutes charges of private crimes (sacramental infanticide, cannibalism, incest) and public (contempt for the religion of the state, treason). True vs. false religion. Demand for freedom of religion. Christians pray for emperors. Describes Christian worship. Divine origin of Christianity. [PATRISTC ]


38. ANF3-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, The Prescription against Heretics De praescription haereticorum

200 A.D. A "praescriptio" was a juridical objection with which the defendant wishes to bar the suit in the form in which the plaintiff enters it, leading to a complete rejection of the case. Tertullian argues that the heretics cannot use the Scriptures against Catholic doctrine, since the Scriptures themselves belong to the Catholic Church. Furthermore, any doctrine which is not that of the churches founded by the apostles (which is identical to the Catholic doctrine) is prejudged as false. Quasten, II, 272: "...the most finished, the most characteristic, and the most valuable of Tertullian's writings."

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39. ANF3-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Five Books against Marcion, Books I-III Adversus Marcionem

207-212 A.D. T.'s longest work. Book I: refutes Marcion's dualistic distinction between the Gods of the Old and New Testaments. There can only be one God. Book II: The maker of the world is identical with the good God. Book III: Marcion's Christology. Jesus was the Savior foretold by the prophets and sent by the Creator, drawing on Justin's Dialogue with Trypho and Irenaeus' Against Heresies. Cf. ANF3-12.TXT.

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40. ANF3-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Five Books against Marcion, Books IV-V Adversus Marcionem

207-212 A.D. T.'s longest work. Book IV-V: Critical commentary on Marcion's New Testament (Antitheses), showing that there are no contradictions between the Old and New Testaments and that Marcion's own N.T. refutes his doctrines. Book IV: Marcion's Gospel; Book V: his Apostolicon. Cf. ANF3-11.TXT

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41. ANF3-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Against Hermogenes Adversus Hermogenem

After 200 A.D. Against the painter and Gnostic Hermogenes of Carthage. Tertullian's brilliant defense of the Christian teaching on creation refutes Hermogenes's view that matter is eternal and equal to God by exposing its contradictions. Prob. used Theophilus of Antioch's Against the Heresy of Hermogenes (lost) as a source.

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42. ANF3-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Against the Valentinians Adversus Valentianos

Caustic comment on the tenets of Valentinian Gnosticism. Depends closely for its substance and arrangement on Book I of Irenaeus' Against Heresies, but also owes something to Justin Martyr, Miltiades and Proculus.

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43. ANF3-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On the Flesh of Christ De carne Christi

Perhaps 210-12 A.D. Together with the treatise On the Resurrection of the Flesh (ANF3-16.TXT), this treatise provides an irrefutable argument for the resurrection of the body. It is written against the Gnostic sects of Marcion, Apelles, Basilides and Valentinus, which had revived the Docetic heresy, denying the reality of Christ's flesh to avoid admitting the resurrection of the body. T. stresses the humanness of Christ's body so strongly as to maintain that he was ugly.

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44. ANF3-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On the Resurrection of the Flesh De resurrectione carnis

Perhaps 210-12 A.D. Complements the treatise On the Flesh of Christ (ANF3-15.TXT). 1) cc. 1-2: show the inconsistency of the teaching of the pagans, Sadducees and heretics who deny the resurrection of the flesh. 2) cc. 3-15: Evidence for the resurrection: the body was created by God, redeemed by Christ, and must be judge together with the soul. 3) cc. 16-17: Objections refuted. 4) cc. 18-55: The main topic: The resurrection according to the Old and New Testaments. This begins with an explanation of how to deal with figurative language in Scripture. 5) cc. 56-63: Integrity of the risen body and identity with the present one.

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45. ANF3-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Against Praxeas Adversus Praxean

Prob. 213 A.D. Againt Praxeas, a proponent of modalism or patripassianism. T. speaks of Praxeas and his teaching, then deals with the Catholic doctrine of the Trinity (divine economy or dispensation). The doctrine of the Trinity does not impair the divine monarchy. Generation of the Word. Refutation of Praxeas' exegesis. First Latin author to use "trinitas" as a technical term. Unfortunately somewhat subordinationist. Quasten, II, 285: "Its terminology is clear, precise and apposite, its style vigorous and brilliant. The Council of Nicaea used not a few of its formulae and its influence on subsequent theologians cannot be overestimated." [PATRISTC ]


46. ANF3-18.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Scorpiace: Antidote for the Scorpion's Sting

Prob. 213 A.D. A defense of martyrdom against the Gnostics, who are compared to scorpions. Rather than making God a murderer, martyrdom is the duty of every Christian whenever there is no other way of avoiding participation in idolatry. It is a rebirth and wins for the soul an everlasting existence.

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47. ANF3-19.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Against All Heresies

Once attributed to Tertullian and appended to "The Prescription against Heretics" (ANF3-10.TXT), this catalogue of 32 heresies is usually regarded as a summary of the Syntagma of Hippolytus. According to E. Schwartz, however, it is an anti-Origenistic treatise, composed in Greek by Pope Zephyrinus or one of his priests and translated into Latin by Victorinus of Pettau.

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48. ANF3-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On Idolatry De Idolatria

Prob. c. 211 A.D. Christian may not be an astrologer, mathematician, schoolmaster, professor of literature, trainer of gladiarors, frankincenseller, enchanter, magician, all of which are subservient to paganism. Condemns painting, modelling, sculpture, participation in national festivals, serving in public office, military service (which requires an oath to the emperor.

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49. ANF3-20.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On Repentance De paenitentia

203 A.D. 1) Penance necessary for adults in preparation for baptism. 2) Penance after baptism, which God allows once. This insistence that only one such opportunity is granted is not on dogmatic grounds, but is a matter of psychology and method, to avoid encouraging further sin. This second repentance is that followed by ecclesiastical reconciliation through public confession and disciplinary acts. T. clear has in find the forgiveness of grave sins. [PATRISTC ]


50. ANF3-21.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On Baptism De baptismo

Perhaps 198-200 A.D. Important for history of liturgy of initiation and sacraments of baptism and confirmation; only Ante-Nicene treatise on any sacrament, written to answer Quintilla. Answers rationalistic objections. Washing itself does not cleanse from sin, but rather the sacred action united to the trinitarian formula. Prefigurements of the sacrament; answers to Scriptural objections. Baptism of blood. Ordinary minister the bishop; even laymen in necessity. T. does not favor the baptism of infants, who have not yet sinned.

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51. ANF3-22.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On Prayer De oratione

c. 198-200 A.D. Addressed to catechumens. New Testament introduces a form of prayer superior in privacy, faith, brevity, as shown in the Our Father. Earliest surviving exposition of the Pater Noster in any language. Practical counsels for prayer. Fasting and station days, posture, kiss of peace, Good Friday, Communion, veils, place, time, spiritual sacrifice. Practical, not speculative. Quasten, II, 297: "His treatise is precious not for the depth of his ideas but as a spirited expression of a truly Christian conception of life."

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52. ANF3-23.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Ad martyras To the Martyrs

Prob. 197 or 202 A.D. Addressed to confessors awaiting death in prison, to arouse their enthusiasm for death for Christ. Has much in common with the Passion of Perpetua and Felicity (ANF3-24.TXT). [PATRISTC ]


53. ANF3-24.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian?, Martyrdom of Perpetua and Felicity

Passion of Perpetua and Felicitas. An account of the martyrdom, on 7 March 202, of the three catechumens Saturus, Saturninus and Revocatus, and two young women, Vibia Perpetua, 22 years of age with an infant son, and her slave Felicitas, who was pregnant when arrested and gave birth to a girl shortly before her death in the arena. Cc. 3-10 are Perpetua's own diary; cc. 11-13 are by Saturus. The resemblance in phrase, syntax, words and ideas between the Passion and Tertullian's works Ad martyras (ANF3-23.TXT) and De patientia (ANF3-25.TXT) indicate that Tertullian may be edited the work and written the remaining chapters. Perpetua's visions are important for knowledge of the eschatological views of early Christians, including belief in purgatory.

[PATRISTC ]


54. ANF3-25.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Of Patience De patientia

200-203 A.D. T. begins by lamenting his own lack of patience. Patience has its origin and prototype in the Creator, and its greatest example is Christ. It is acquired through obedience to God. Impatience is the mother of all sins, and has the devil for its father. From it flow many blessings.

[PATRISTC ]


55. ANF3-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, The Shows, or De Spectaculis

Prob. c. 197 A.D. Condemns all public games, which history shows to be a form of idolatry; since they incite the passions, they undermine morality. Last chapter depicts the greatest spectacle, the second coming.

[PATRISTC ]


56. ANF3-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, The Chaplet, or De Corona

211 A.D. Wearing crowns is incompatible with Christianity, since it is unnatural and of pagan origin; the military wreath is forbidden simply because Christians may not serve in the military, which requires an oath to the emperor. Criticizes Catholics for rejecting the Holy Spirit and his prophecies, and because their clergy are willing to flee to avoid martyrdom.

[PATRISTC ]


57. ANF3-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, To Scapula Ad Scapulam

212 A.D. To the Proconsul of Africa who was persecuting Christians. Freedom of religion is a fundamental human right. He writes out of love and concern for enemies, who will bring wrath upon themselves by persecuting Christians. Christians love and honor the emperor, who is appointed by God. Persecution will only increase the number of Christians.

[PATRISTC ]


58. ANF3-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, Ad nationes; Appendix: spur. fragment

Concerning the Execrable Gods of the Heathen To the Heathen. De execrandis gentium diis. 197 A.D. Book I: Juridical procedure against Christians is unreasonable, unjust, and results from ignorance. Refutes the usual calumnies, and shows that the pagans commit even worse crimes. Book II: Criticism of paganism, showing that the gods of the philsophers, of the poets, and of the nations are all human inventions. APPENDIX: Criticizes pagan concepts of deity with Jupiter as example. Style shows not by Tertullian.

[PATRISTC ]


59. ANF3-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, An Answer to the Jews Against the Jews (Adversus Judaeos)

1) cc. 1-8: Since Israel has rejected grace, Old Testament no longer has force and must be interpreted spiritually; thus the gentiles were called. Law of nature preceeded Mosaic law. Christ foretold by prophets. Draws on Justin's Dialogue with Trypho. 2) cc. 9-14: continue proof of fulfillment of Messianic prophecies in Christ, excerpts from T.'s Adv. Marcionem added here by someone else.

[PATRISTC ]


60. ANF3-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, The Soul's Testimony The Testimony of the Soul (De testimonio animae)

197 A.D. The soul not ruined by education testifies to the existence and attributes of God, life after death, reward and punishment after death. No need for recourse to philosophy; the "soul naturally Christian" is spontaneously aware of the Creator from its experience of the world.

[PATRISTC ]


61. ANF3-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, A Treatise on the Soul De anima

210-213 A.D. Anti-herectical; continuation of the De censu animae (lost). Preface (cc. 1-3): attacks the philosophers even when their conclusions are correct, since discussion of the soul must resort to divine revelation. 1) cc. 4-22: Soul has a beginning in time; it is a material substance akin to breath. Free will. 2) cc. 23-37,4: Origin of the soul: Platonic theory refuted; body and soul come to be simultaneously, both from the process of generation. 3) cc. 37,5-58: Growth, puberty and sin, sleep, dreams, death, fate after death. Only the martyrs enter heaven before the resurrection. Imp. source: On the Soul, Soranus of Ephesus.

[PATRISTC ]


62. ANF4-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On the Pallium De pallio

193 or 209-11 A.D. T. wrote this brief treatise in defense of his own substitution of the pallium for the toga. Changes in style are natural; the pallium recommends itself for its simplicity and handiness; it is a sign of the liberal arts and studies. If clothing is to be criticized, let it be that which is immodest.

[PATRISTC ]


63. ANF4-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Minucius Felix, The Octavius

c. 197. Dialogue between the author, lawyer Marcus Minucius Felix, and two friends, the Christian Octavius (in whose memory the work was written), and the pagan Caecilius. Dialogue seems merely a literary form. Legal debate: Caecilius is prosecutor, Octavius for the defense, Minucius arbiter. Caecilius a sceptic, but says disorder in universe indicates no providence, so ought to stick to beliefs of elders, who conquered world; it is pride to try to overthrow the ancient religion. Christians immoral, defend absurd doctrines. Octavius answers, using a number of pagan authors; shows outstanding lives of Christians. Quasten, II, 158: "The setting of the dialogue, the charm of its presentation, its clearness of expression, its careful disposition of material, the absence of digressions--all these features contribute towards making it the finest of the early Christian apologies." [PATRISTC ]


64. ANF4-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Commodianus, Instructions in Favour of Christian Discipline, against the Gods of the Heathens

80 poems, arranged in order by the author. First book: criticism of paganism and Judaism; second book: eschatology, duties of catechumens, the faithful in general, penitents, apostates, schismatics, or other evildoers; matrons, the entire people, aspirants to martyrdom, lectors, ministers, and bishops. [PATRISTC ]


65. ANF4-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, De Principiis, Books I-II On First Principles. Peri archon.

220-230 A.D. His most important work, the first Christian system of theology and the first manual of dogma. Survives only in free Latin translation by Rufinus, who expurgated dubious passages. Book I: Supernatural world: God, three divine persons (serious subordinationism). Angels. Book II: Material world, man as fallen spirit enclosed in material body, Adam's sin, redemption by incarnate Logos, the resurrection, judgment, afterlife. Cf. ANF4-14.TXT [PATRISTC ]


66. ANF4-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, De Principiis, Books III-IV On First Principles. Peri archon

220-230 A.D. His most important work, the first Christian system of theology and the first manual of dogma. Survives only in free Latin translation by Rufinus, who expurgated dubious passages. Book III: Union of body and soul allows soul to struggle for victory. Angels help, demons hinder, but will remains free. Outline of moral theology. Book IV: Recapitulation of basic doctrine, Scripture. [PATRISTC ]


67. ANF4-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Letter of Africanus to Origen about the History of Susanna; Origen's reply

c. 240 A.D Origen defends with erudition and scholarship the canonicity of the story of Susanna and other passages lacking in the Hebrew text of the Book of Daniel. [PATRISTC ]


68. ANF4-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Letter to Gregory Thaumaturgos

Cf. another translation given in ANF9-9.TXT. 238-243 A.D. Admonishes former student "to draw from Greek philsophy such things as are capable of being made general or preparatory studies to Christianity." Acknowledges the dangers involved. [PATRISTC ]


69. ANF4-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Against Celsus, Books I-III Contra Celsum. Kata Kelsou

c. 246 A.D. Refutes point by point the arguments levelled against Christianity by Celsus in the "True Discourse", which gives Jewish arguments against Christ and then those of Celsus, who sees Jesus as a magician and an imposter, but does not reject all Christian teaching. Origen replies with prophecies and miracles showing the divinity of Christ. To Celsus' fears that Christianity will undermine the state, Origen replies that Christians are subject to the secular rule as long as it does not contradict the law of God. Cf. ANF4-18, ...19.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


70. ANF4-18.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Against Celsus, Books IV-V Contra Celsum. Kata Kelsou

c. 246 A.D. Refutes point by point the arguments levelled against Christianity by Celsus in the "True Discourse", which gives Jewish arguments against Christ and then those of Celsus, who sees Jesus as a magician and an imposter, but does not reject all Christian teaching. Origen replies with prophecies and miracles showing the divinity of Christ. To Celsus' fears that Christianity will undermine the state, Origen replies that Christians are subject to the secular rule as long as it does not contradict the law of God. Cf. ANF4-17, ...19.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


71. ANF4-19.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Against Celsus, Books VI-VIII Contra Celsum. Kata Kelsou

c. 246 A.D. Refutes point by point the arguments levelled against Christianity by Celsus in the "True Discourse", which gives Jewish arguments against Christ and then those of Celsus, who sees Jesus as a magician and an imposter, but does not reject all Christian teaching. Origen replies with prophecies and miracles showing the divinity of Christ. To Celsus' fears that Christianity will undermine the state, Origen replies that Christians are subject to the secular rule as long as it does not contradict the law of God. Cf. ANF4-17, ...18.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


72. ANF4-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On the Apparel of Women On the Dress of Women. De cultu feminarum

After 198-200. Consists of two originally distinct works, De habitu muliebri and De cultu feminarum. Women are not to be dominated by pagan fashion, but are to show modesty in apparel. Ornaments and cosmetics are of diabolical origin; the dyeing of garments is unnatural. The second book far milder and more broad-minded, suggesting a considerably later date of composition. [PATRISTC ]


73. ANF4-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On the Veiling of Virgins De virginibus velandis

Before 207 A.D. Tertullian argues that Scripture, nature and good manners all demand that the maiden should cover her head. [PATRISTC ]


74. ANF4-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, To His Wife Ad uxorem

200-206 A.D. 1st of three treatises on marriage. Suggestions which his wife is to follow after his death. She should remain a widow, but if she desires to remarry, she should be certain to marry only a Christian. Mixed marriages are a danger to faith and morals even if the infidel is tolerant. Marriage of two Christians, on the other hand, is described in glowing terms. [PATRISTC ]


75. ANF4-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On Exhortation to Chastity De exhortatione castitatis

204-212 A.D. 2nd of three treatises on marriage. Addressed to a friend who had recently lost his wife, urging him not to remarry. God tolerates such remarriage, but it is really nothing but a kind of fornication. T.'s leaning to Montanism has become evident, and unlike in his Ad uxorem (ANF4-4.TXT), he regards marriage as legitimate debauchery, and extols virginity and continence. [PATRISTC ]


76. ANF4-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On Monogamy De monogamia

Prob. 217 A.D. Third of three treatises on marriage. Open Montanism. He now judges second marriage illicit, claiming to uphold the golden mean between the Gnostic rejection of marriage and the Catholic licentiousness in permitting repeated marriage. [PATRISTC ]


77. ANF4-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On Modesty De pudicitia

Openly Montanist. The power of the keys belongs not to the ecclesiastical hierarchy but to the spiritual, i.e. apostles and prophets. T. for the first time introduces the distinction between peccata remissibilia and irremissibilia (pardonable and unpardonable sins): idolotry, fornication and murder cannot be forgiven by the Church after baptism. [PATRISTC ]


78. ANF4-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, On Fasting De ieiunio adversus psychicos

Montanist. Directed against Catholics (the psychici), who had condemned the Montanists for adding new penances based on heresy or pseudo-prophesy. T. demonstrates the necessity of fasting, refutes the charges of heresy and pseudo-prophecy, and then attacks the self-indulgence of the Catholics, who he says are more irreligious that the pagans and are "enthralled with voluptuousness and bursting with gluttony." [PATRISTC ]


79. ANF4-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Tertullian, De Fuga in Persecutione On Flight in Persecution

212 A.D. Is the Christian permitted to take refuge in flight during a persecution? In his Ad uxorem 1, 3 (ANF4-4.TXT) and De patientia 13 (ANF3-25.TXT), Tertullian thought it was better to flee than apostatize under torture. Now he claims that escape goes against the will of God, who sends persecution to strengthen faith. [PATRISTC ]


80. ANF5-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Hippolytus, The Refutation of All Heresies, Books I-V Philosophumena

Discovered in parts in 1701 and 1842; attributed to Origen until 1859; Books II-III still lost. Depends on Irenaeus for material and method, but still an important source for history of Gnosticism. Attempts to show unchristian character of heresies by proving their dependence on pagan philosophy. Book I: Poor compendium of history of Greek philosophy from Thales to Hesiod; secondhand and unreliable sources. Books II-III (lost): mystery cults, mythologies of Greeks and barbarians; Book IV: Astrology, magic. Books V-IX (more independent, better critical judgment): Refute heresies by coupling each of 33 Gnostic sects with a previously mentioned philosophical or pagan system. Cf. ANF5-2.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


81. ANF5-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, On the Dress of Virgins De habitu virginum

Prob. 249 A.D. The brides of Christ must dress plainly and avoid jewelry and cosmetics, use their money for good purposes, and avoid unwholesome places. Main source Tertullian's De cultu feminarum (ANF4-2.TXT), but Cyprian is more balanced. [PATRISTC ]


82. ANF5-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, On the Lapsed De lapsis

Spring 251. Praises martyrs and confessors, but condemns the those who have fallen away under persecution, exhorting them to the rigourous penance necessary for reconciliation to the Church. Treatise became basis for a uniform policy concerning the lapsed for the entire Church of North Africa.

[PATRISTC ]


83. ANF5-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, On the Lord's Prayer De dominica oratione

251-52. Used but greatly expanded Tertullian's De oratione (ANF3-22.TXT). Introduction: Prayer in general. Commentary on the Our Father, the most excellent prayer. Unity a major theme. Necessity of earnestness and freedom from distraction; fasting and almsgiving increase the power of prayer. [PATRISTC ]


84. ANF5-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, An Address to Demtrianus Ad Demetrianum

prob 252 A.D. Refutes Demetrianus, who accused the Christians of being responsible for the recent calamities of war, pestilence, famine and drought. C. turns the charge back against the sins of the pagans. Christians are willing to show their enemies the way to eternal safety. Written also to strengthen Christians whose faith was shaken by the accusations. Quasten, II, 356: "one of the most powerful and original of Cyprian's writings." [PATRISTC ]


85. ANF5-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, On the Vanity of Idols That the Idols are not Gods. Quod idola dii non sint

An early effort. 1) cc 1-7: The pagan deities are not gods but former kings who began to be worshipped after their deaths. 2) cc. 8-9: There is only one God, invisible and incomprehensible. 3) cc. 10-15: Outline of christology. Borrows much from Tertullian and Minucius Felix; sums up the existing arguments on the subject with frequent quotations; perhaps never intended for publication. [PATRISTC ]


86. ANF5-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, On the Mortality (or Plague) De mortalitate

252 A.D. A plague has just followed the Decian persecution. Cyprian shows that in nothing do the faithful differ more from pagans than in the spirit with which they face death. For the Christian death is a release from conflict, a summons of Christ, leading to immortality. The faithful departed "should not be mourned, since we know that they are not lost, but sent before". Many conscious or unconscious borrowing from Stoics, esp. Cicero and Seneca. [PATRISTC ]


87. ANF5-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, On Works and Alms Concerning Works and Almsgiving. De opere et eleemosynis

252 A.D. The recent plague has left many destitute. Cyprian reminds his "beloved brethren" of the gifts they have received, and teaches the efficacy of good works for forgiveness and salvation. God takes care of those who support others. Popular in antiquity; the Council of Ephesus (EPHESUS.TXT) quotes several passages.

[PATRISTC ]


88. ANF5-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, On the Advantage of Patience De bono patientiae

c. 256 A.D. Originally a sermon, based closely on Tertullian's De patientia (ANF3-25); however the difference in spirit and language is obvious. True patience, unlike Stoic indifference, is a special distinction of Christians, which they have in common with God. It is imitation of Christ, the perfect example of patience. [PATRISTC ]


89. ANF5-18.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, On Jealousy and Envy De zelo et livore

251-2 or 256-7 A.D. Satan fell by jealousy and envy, and through these vices he robs man of the grace of immortality. They are the source of others sins, such as hatred, discord, ambition, avarice and disobedience. Illustrations from the Old Testament. They are the most dangerous enemies of the unity of the Church. Its only remedy is love of neighbor.

[PATRISTC ]


90. ANF5-19.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, Exhortation to Martyrdom, Addressed to Fortunatus Ad Fortunatum de exhortatione martyrii

Refers to a persecution, therefore c. A.D. 250-1 (Decius), 253 (Gallus), or 257 (Valerian). A compendium of Scripture to strengthen the Christians for a coming persecution. 1) 1-5: Idolatry, worship of the true God, God's anger against idolaters. Those redeemed by Christ ought to prefer nothing to Him. Perseverance. Persecutions are to test the faithful; the Lord's protection is certain. Reward for the righteous and martyrs. [PATRISTC ]


91. ANF5-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Hippolytus, The Refutation of All Heresies, Books VI-X Philosophumena

Discovered in parts in 1701 and 1842; attributed to Origen until 1859; Books II-III still lost. Depends on Irenaeus for material and method, but still an important source for history of Gnosticism. Attempts to show unchristian character of heresies by proving their dependence on pagan philosophy. Books V-IX (more independent, better critical judgment): Refute heresies by coupling each of 33 Gnostic sects with a previously mentioned philosophical or pagan system. Book X: Chronology of Jewish history, exposition of true doctrine. Cf. ANF5-1.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


92. ANF5-20.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, Three Books of Testimonies Addressed to the Jews Ad Quirinum (Testimonium libri III).

Before 249 A.D. Scriptural passages grouped under a number of headings. Book I: Jews have departed from God's favor, succeeded by Christians coming out of all nations. Book II: mystery of Christ, who was announced by the Scriptures: compendium of christology. Book III: Summary of moral and disciplinary duties and a guide to the Christian virtues: 120 theses with proofs from Scripture. Prob. combined w/ Books I-II after Cyprian's time. Great influence. [PATRISTC ]


93. ANF5-21.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, The Seventh Council of Carthage under Cyprian

In Carthage, the absolute repudiation of baptisms performed by heretics seems to have been traditional. The view that they are invalid was reaffirmed by the Seventh Council of Carthage, held under St. Cyprian in 256.

[PATRISTC ]


94. ANF5-22.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Novatian (formerly attributed to Cyprian), On the Public Shows On Shows. De spectaculis

Condemns attendance at public shows, which are offspring of idolatry. Rather, Christians should enjoy the beauty of the world and of Sacred Scripture. Borrows from Tertullian's De spectaculis (ANF3-3.TXT) and Cyprian's Ad Donatum (not printed in ANF). [PATRISTC ]


95. ANF5-23.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, spur., On the Glory of Martyrdom De laude martyrii

In the form of a sermon, explains in three parts the meaning (4-12), the greatness (13-18), the advantages of martyrdom (19-24). Gives a description of the tortures of hell embodying ancient elements. Of the third century, but not by Cyprian or Novation, perhaps by a layman.

[PATRISTC ]


96. ANF5-24.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Novation (formerly attributed to Cyprian), On the Discipline and Advantage of Chastity On the Advantage of Modesty. De bono pudicitiae

Excellent treatise contrasts chastity (rel. to bodily dignity, morality, modesty, purity, peacefulness of home, concord, innocence) with immodesty (rel. to incontinence, lust, destruction of good conscience, impenitence, disgrace). Three degrees of chastity: virginity, continence. faithfulness to marriage bond. Praises of virginity; examples of chastity from Old Testament. Dangers to the virtue and means of protecting it. Sources: Tertullian's De virginibus velandis (ANF4-3.TXT), De cultu feminarum (ANF4-2.TXT), De pudicitia (ANF4-7.TXT); Cyprian's De habitu virginum (ANF5-10.TXT). [PATRISTC ]


97. ANF5-25.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, spur., Exhortation to Repentance Exhortatio de paenitentia

A collection of biblical quotations similiar to Cyprian's Ad Fortunatum (ANF5-19.TXT) and Ad Quirinum (ANF5-20.TXT). Arranged under the heading: "That all sins can be forgiven him who has turned to God with his whole heart." Opposes the Novatians. Later than Cyprian; attributed to fourth or fifth century without convincing reasons. [PATRISTC ]


98. ANF5-26.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Hippolytus, Caius (Gaius), Fragments

1) Fragment from A Dialogue or Disputation Against Proclus, quoted by Eusebius of Caesarea, attributed by him to Gaius (or Caius), presbyter of Rome during pontificae of Zephyrinus (199-217). 2) Fragments from Against the Heresy of Artemon. Quoted by Eusebius without giving an author, attributed by author of a marginal note in Photius to Gaius; most likely actually by Hippolytus. 3) Muratorian Canon (Muratorian Fragment). c. 160-200 A.D. Discovered, published by L. A. Muratori in 1740. Ennumerates books of New Testament, demonstrates apostolic origin, gives details about authorship, canonicity. Omits Hebrews, 1-2 Peter, James; includes Apocalypse of Peter, indicating that this latter was controversial. Rejects several apocryphal books. Has been attributed to Clement of Alexandria, Melito of Sardes, Polycrates of Ephesus and Caius, but can be attributed to Hippolytus with greater probability than to any of these. [PATRISTC ]


99. ANF5-27.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Novatian, Treatise Concerning the Trinity De trinitate

Prob. well before 250 A.D. Poetical prose, oustanding form and content. Exposition of 3 chief articles of Creed. Sums up doctrine of trinity as developed by Theophilus of Antioch, Irenaeus, Hippolytus, Tertullian, without lacking originality or independence. More exact, sytematic, complete, extensive than any prior attempt. 1) c. 1: God as creator (Stoic influence), man, the spiritual powers. cc. 2-8: essence and attributes of God. 2) cc. 9-28: union of two natures in Christ, against Docetism, Ebionitism, Adoptianism, Modalism, Patripassianism. 3) cc. 29: Holy Spirit, gifts to and work in true. 4) cc. 30-31: unity of the Godhead, not destroyed by divinity of Son. Eternal relationship of Father and Son. [PATRISTC ]


100. ANF5-28.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Novatian, On the Jewish Meats On Jewish Foods. De cibis Judaicis

Jewish dietary laws are now to be understood spiritually. Examples. However, Christians should still observe fasting and continence. Influenced by Seneca and Virgil. [PATRISTC ]


101. ANF5-29.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, spur., A Treatise Against Novatian by an Anonymous Bishop Ad Novatianum

Prob. 253-257 A.D. Polemic against Novatian, attributed to Pope Sixtus II by A. Harnack, but actually by some African bishop who shares Cyprian's view on baptism conferred by heretics.

[PATRISTC ]


102. ANF5-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Hippolytus, The Extant Works and Fragments, Part I: Exegetical

WORKS: from On the Hexaemeron; On the Blessing of Jacob; from the Blessing of Balaam; from The Witch of Endor; from On the Psalms; from Proverbs; from The Commentary on the Canticle of Canticles; from Part of Isaiah; from Parts of Ezekiel; from The Commentary on Daniel; from Parts of Matthew; on Luke; spurious fragments on the Pentateuch; more from On the Psalms. Like Origen, H. follows the typological and allegorical method of interpretation, but his applications are more jejune. Cf. ANF5-4.TXT.

[PATRISTC ]


103. ANF5-30.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, spur., A Treatise on Re-Baptism De rebaptismate

After A.D. 256, prob. before Sept. 258. Opposes Cyprian on the issue of rebaptism, defending its validity by a very peculiar and unfortunate distinction between baptism of water and baptism of the spirit to be conferred by the bishop's imposition of hands. Prob. by an African prelate. [PATRISTC ]


104. ANF5-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Hippolytus, The Extant Works and Fragments, Part II: Dogmatical and Historical

Treatise on Christ and Antichrist, from Expository Treatise against the Jews (Demonstration against the Jews, poss. spur.); from Against Plato, on the Cause of the Universe (On the Universe, against the Greeks and Plato); Against the Heresy of One Noetus (Homily on the Heresy of Noetus); from a discourse on the divine nature and the Incarnation against Beron and Helix; Discourse on the Holy Theophany; from Discourse on the Resurrection; from Homily on the Lord's Paschal Supper; from Discourse on Elkanah and Hannah; from Oration on "The Lord is my Shepherd"; from Discourses on the "Great Song"; from Part of Isaiah; second Oration on Daniel; from Oration on the Distribution of Talents (The Parable of the Talents); from Discourse on "The two Robbers" (The Two Thieves). Cf. ANF5-3.TXT.

[PATRISTC ]


105. ANF5-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Hippolytus, spur., Appendix: Dubious and Spurious Pieces

Works whose inauthenticity has been suggested or established: Discourse on the End of the Word, Antichrist, and the Second Coming; On the Twelve Apostles; On the Seventy Apostles; Heads of the Canons of Abulides or Hippolytus, used by Aethiopian Christians; Canons of the Church of Alexandria, wrongly ascribed to Hippolytus.

[PATRISTC ]


106. ANF5-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Pontius, The Life and Passion of Cyprian, Bishop and Martyr

The Proconsular Acts of St. Cyprian, bishop of Carthage executed September 14, 258 (during the reign of emperors Valerian and Gallienus), are founded on official reports connected by a few phrases of the editor. They consist of three separate documents containing: (1) The first trial and exile to Curubis, (2) the arrest and second trial, and (3) the execution. CYPRIAN: Caecilius Cyprianus, b. 200-210 Africa, prob. Carthage, rich pagan family. Famous rhetorician, disgusted by corruption of public life, converted, gave fortune to poor. Soon after, 248-9, elected bishop of Carthage. During Decian persecution went into hiding, encouraged flock by letters. Afterwards fought schism in Carthage and wrote against anti-pope Novatian. Controversy with Pope Stephen over re-baptism; died still in communion. [PATRISTC ]


107. ANF5-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, Epistles I-LIV

Imp. source for history of this period of the Church and of Canon Law. 81 letters; 65 from C.; 16 to him or clergy of Carthage from presbytery of Rome, Novatian, Pope Cornelius, etc. 44-61, 64, 66: Exchange with Popes Cornelius and Lucius (44-55: schism of Novatian). 67-75: baptismal controversy. 78-81: from his last exile. 63: basically a treatise "On the Sacrament of the Cup of the Lord." Not all letters extant. Cf. ANF5-8.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


108. ANF5-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, Epistles LV-LXXXII

LETTERS: Imp. source for history of this period of the Church and of Canon Law. 81 letters; 65 from C.; 16 to him or clergy of Carthage from presbytery of Rome, Novatian, Pope Cornelius, etc. 44-61, 64, 66: Exchange with Popes Cornelius and Lucius (44-55: schism of Novatian). 67-75: baptismal controversy. 78-81: from his last exile. 63: basically a treatise "On the Sacrament of the Cup of the Lord." Not all letters extant. Cf. ANF5-7.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


109. ANF5-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Cyprian, On the Unity of the Catholic Church De ecclesiae catholicae unitate

Prob. May 251. Composed to deal with schisms of Novatian at Rome and Felicissimus at Carthage. Schisms and heresies more dangerous than persecutions; Church is unified around Peter, though all bishops have equal authority; no salvation outside the Church. [PATRISTC ]


110. ANF6-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), A Declaration of Faith The Creed or Exposition of Faith

Short creed restricted to trinitarian dogma. [PATRISTC ]


111. ANF6-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), On All the Saints

Of doubtful authenticity. [PATRISTC ]


112. ANF6-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), On the Gospel according to Matthew

Fragment. Of doubtful authenticity. [PATRISTC ]


113. ANF6-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Dionysius of Alexandria, Fragments

FRAGMENTS: 1) From the two books On Promises, written to refute the chiliastic views defended by Nepos, bishop of Arsinoe; in it D. denies that the apostle John wrote the Apocalypse. 2) From the books On Nature, written to refute the Epicurean materialism based on the atomism of Democritus and to demonstrate the Christian doctrine of creation. 3) From the epistle to Dionysius the bishop of Rome (Refutation and Apology, four books), written to demonstrate his orthodoxy in trinitarian doctrine. 4) The (entire) epistle to Bishop Basilides, answering questions on the duration of Lent and preparation for reception of the Eucharist. 5) The letter to Novatian pleading for his return to the Church; from the Letter to Fabius, bishop of Antioch, on the reconciliation of apostates (Eucharist, penance); from letters to Popes Cornelius, Stephen, Sixtus II; other letters. 6) Exegetical fragments: on Ecclesiastes, Luke, John. [PATRISTC ]


114. ANF6-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Julius Africanus, Extant Writings

WORKS: 1) Epistle to Aristides, tries to harmonize the genealogies of Jesus given by Matthew and Luke. 2) Narrative of Events Happening in Persia on the Birth of Christ (from the Kestoi); 3) fragments of the Five Books of the Chronography (Chronicles), the first synchronistic history of the world, giving the events of the Bible and the Hellenistic and Jewish compendia. Lacks critical attitude towards sources; chiliastic purpose; used by Eusebius and later historians. [PATRISTC ]


115. ANF6-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Anatolius of Alexandria, The Paschal Canon; fragments

A treatise on the Chronology of Easter; fragments of the books on arithmetic. [PATRISTC ]


116. ANF6-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Minor Writers of the Alexandrian School, Fragments

1) Alexander of Cappadocia (Pupil of Pantaenus and Clement of Alexandria; bishop of a church in Cappadocia, later of Jerusalem. Died in prison A.D. 251): From his epistles. 2) Theognostus of Alexandria (Directed school of Alexandria c. 265-282): From seven books of Hypotyposes (Outlines: a dogmatic summa following the doctrine of Origen). 3) Pierius of Alexandria (Succeeded Theognostus, ascetic, published much; suffered in persecution of Diocletian, spent rest of life in Rome, d. after 309): fragment on 1 Corinthians, Photius on the writings of Pierius. 4) Theonas of Alexandria (bishop c. 282-300): Epistle to Lucianus chief chamberlain on duties of his office. 5) Phileas (bishop of Thmuis (Tmai) in Lower Egypt, martyred at Alexandria A.D. 307): Ep. to people of Thmuis, Ep. to Meletius, bishop of Lycopolis. 6) Pamphilus of Caesarea (Studied w/ Pierius, ordained at, established school at Caesarea, expanded Origen's library; teacher, friend of Eusebius of Caesarea, whom he trained in textual studies, lit. criticism; defender of Origen; martyred 309-10): An Exposition of the Chapters of the Acts of the Apostles, attrib. by many to P. 7) Malchion (priest, head of a school of rhetoric at Antioch, responsible for condemnation of Paul of Samosata in 268): Epistle written vs Paul of Samosata for synod of Antioch, fragments seems of same epistle, fragment from acts of disputation by Malchion against Paul.

[PATRISTC ]


117. ANF6-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Hegemonius (Archelaus), The Acts of the Disputation with the Heresiarch Manes Acta Archelai.

Attributed to this Hegemonius by Heraclian of Chalcedon. As there is no evidence for the historical reality of any of the participants except Mani (Manes) himself, the "disputation" is simply a literary device for presenting arguments against Manichaeanism. Composed in the first half of the fourth century (before 348), probably after the Council of Nicaea.

[PATRISTC ]


118. ANF6-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Alexander of Lycopolis, Of the Manichaeans

The author, well acquainted with Manichaeanism, sets out to refute the entire Manichaean system.

[PATRISTC ]


119. ANF6-18.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Peter of Alexandria, The Genuine Acts of Peter; Canonical Epistle; Fragments

ACTS: Acts of Martyrdom of St. Peter of Alexandria, extant in Gk., Ltn., Syriac and Coptic versions; none an authentic report of his death: all later legends. Present translation from Anastasius Bibliothecarius' Ltn. trans. of a Gk. version. EPISTLE: 306 A.D. 14 canons from lost On Penance, prob. Easter letter of 306. Treatment of repentant apostates and those who rashly sought martyrdom, w/ commentaries of Theodore Balsamom and John Zonaras. FRAGMENTS from: Letter to church at Alexandria on Meletius; On the Godhead (quoted in Acts of Council of Ephesus); On the Advent of Our Saviour (perhaps identical to On the Godhead); Sermo in Sanctum Pascha (On Easter); On the Soul, etc. [PATRISTC ]


120. ANF6-19.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Alexander of Alexandria; Athanasius?, Extant Works

LETTERS: 1) To Alexander, Bishop of Byzantium (encyclical letter to all non-Egyptian bishops warning them of Arius and his followers); 2) Epistle Catholic, encyclical to the Catholic hierarchy everywhere warning them that Eusebius of Nicomedia has joined Arians, giving important summary of their doctrine. Newman thought due to internal evidence that this was written by Athanasius, A's deacon; 3) to clergy of Alexandria and Mareotis, asking them to sign previous encyclical (for 2,3 cf. PII4-2 for another translation); 4) 2 fragments from another epistle; 5) sermon De anima et corpore deque passione Domini; On the Soul and Body and the Passion of the Lord. Intro. on relation between soul and body; main part on necessity and fruit of Our Lord's Passion. [PATRISTC ]


121. ANF6-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), A Metaphrase of the Book of Ecclesiastes The Metaphrase of Ecclesiastes

Paraphrase of the Septuagint text of Ecclesiastes.

[PATRISTC ]


122. ANF6-20.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Methodius, The Banquet of the Ten Virgins; or, Concerning Chastity The Banquet or On Virginity

Dialogue: ten virgins sing praises of virginity; ends with hymn to Christ, bridegroom and the Church, his Bride. Influenced by Irenaeus's doctrine of recapitulation, but here New Eve is not Mary but the Church. Also reveals influence of Origen, whom M. praised in his early works. [PATRISTC ]


123. ANF6-21.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Methodius, Concerning Free-Will

On God, Matter and Free Will. Aims to prove in dialogue form that man's free will is cause of evil, which is not from God, nor eternal. Rejects Origen's indefinite succession of worlds. Directed against dualism of Valentinians, other Gnostics. Only the (greater) part of the text extant in Greek is here printed.

[PATRISTC ]


124. ANF6-22.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Methodius, From the Discourse on the Resurrection

Dialogue refuting in three books Origen's theory of resurrection in a spiritual body, defending the identity of the risen body with the present one. Also refutes O.'s tenets about pre-existence of soul, flesh as spirit's prison, purpose and end of the world. Original immortality of man, death through sin, immorality restored by redemption. Lacks clear arrangement but lofty speculation makes important contribution to theology. Only some of the parts extant in Greek are here printed. Cf. ANF6-23.TXT for another fragment.

[PATRISTC ]


125. ANF6-23.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Methodius, Fragments

FRAGMENTS: On the history of Jonah from the book on the Resurrection (cf. ANF6-22.TXT); extracts from the work on things created; from the Books Against Porphyry; from the Discourse concerning Martyrs; on the Cross and Passion of Christ, attributed to Methodius as from his Books against Porphyry; etc. [PATRISTC ]


126. ANF6-24.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Methodius, disp., Oration concerning Simeon and Anna on the day that they met in the temple

Not mentioned by the ancient authors; style often reminiscent of Methodius. [PATRISTC ]


127. ANF6-25.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Methodius, disp., Oration on the Psalms

Authenticity doubtful.

[PATRISTC ]


128. ANF6-26.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Arnobius, Against the Heathen, Books I-III Adversus nationes

During persecution of Diocletian, before 311 A.D. Composed for the local bishop as a proof of the sincerity of his desire to enter the Church. Hastily composed and give little evidence of close acquaintance with the faith. McCracken, Quasten II, 384: "the most intense and most sustained of all extant counterattacks upon the contemporary pagan cults". Poor source for Christian teaching but rich in information on contemporary pagan religions. Book I: Refutes charge that Christians caused recent evils; in fact the religion of Christ promotes peace. Divinity of Christ from his teaching, miracles, and rapid spread of his faith. Book II: Pagan hate of Christ's name unreasonable because much Christian doctrine can be found in their philosophers. Attack on Plato's concept of truth. Book III: Denounces anthropomorphism and immorality of pagan gods. Cf. ANF6-27.TXT.

[PATRISTC ]


129. ANF6-27.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Arnobius, Against the Heathen, Books I-III Adversus nationes

During persecution of Diocletian, before 311 A.D. Composed for the local bishop as a proof of the sincerity of his desire to enter the Church. Hastily composed and give little evidence of close acquaintance with the faith. McCracken, Quasten II, 384: "the most intense and most sustained of all extant counterattacks upon the contemporary pagan cults". Poor source for Christian teaching but rich in information on contemporary pagan religions. Book IV: Ridicules pagan deification of abstraction, their sinister divinities, and Jupiter's loves. Book V: Censures myths of Numa, Attis, the Great Mother, excoriates the mystery cults, rejects allegorical intrepretation of the tales connected with these. Book VI: Polemic against pagan temples and images. Book VII: Against pagan sacrifices. Opposes Christian to pagan notion of divinity. Cf. ANF6-26.TXT.

[PATRISTC ]


130. ANF6-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), Canonical Epistle

Addressed to an unknown bishop; on of the most ancient treatises on casuistry, concerning moral issues arises during the invasion of the Boradi and Goths (c. 251). G. is resolved to re-establish order and discipline while remaining merciful, mild and tolerant. the last canon enumerates the different classes of penitents.

[PATRISTC ]


131. ANF6-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), The Oration and Panegyric Addressed to Origen Panegyric to Origen

Delivered by Gregory on leaving the school of Origen at Caesarea. Expresses with great tenderness of feeling as well as polish of style his sense of obligation to his revered guide. He thanks God, his guardian angel, and Origen. Gives a detailed and valuable description of Origen's method of instruction--important for the history of Christian education. [PATRISTC ]


132. ANF6-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Apollinaris of Laodicea (Gregory Thaumaturgos), A Sectional Confession of Faith

Detailed Confession of Faith. A.'s followers attributed certain of his works to orthodox writers to camouflage the fact that the real author was a heretic. Thus the Confession of Faith was ascribed to Gregory Thaumaturgos.

[PATRISTC ]


133. ANF6-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), On the Trinity

To Philagrius on Consubstantiality, preserved in Syriac under Gregory's name, but of doubtful authenticity. Containing a brief exposition of the trinitarian doctrine, it is nothing but a translation of the Greek Epistle to Euagrius found among the works of Gregory of Nazianzus and of Gregory of Nyssa. [PATRISTC ]


134. ANF6-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), Twelve Topics on the Faith

Of doubtful authenticity. [PATRISTC ]


135. ANF6-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), On the Subject of the Soul

To Tatian on the Soul. Of doubtful authenticity. [PATRISTC ]


136. ANF6-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory Thaumaturgos (Gregory the Wonder-Worker), Four Homilies

Three on the Annunciation; one on the Baptism of Christ. Of doubtful authenticity. [PATRISTC ]


137. ANF7-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, The Divine Institutes, Books I-II Divinae institutiones

Written c. 304 to after 313. First attempt at Latin summa of Christians. Lacks theological demonstration, metaphysical depth; many quotations from classical sources, few from Bible (mostly from Cyprian's Ad Quirinum, ANF5-20.TXT). No familiarity with Greek Christian authors. To show falsehood of paganism and set forth true doctrine and worship. Book I, "The False Worship of the Gods", and Book II, "The Origin of Error", refute polytheism, primary source of error. Cf. ANF7-2, ...3, ...4, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


138. ANF7-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, disp., The Phoenix De ave Phoenice

Tells of an eastern paradise inhabited by a single bird, the phoenix, reborn every thousand years. Ancient myth behind story is embellished by features of Christian origin. Symbolism is of Christ, Who comes from East, paradise, but returns after resurrection. Attributed to L. by Gregory of Tours, who sees phoenix as a symbol of resurrection. Some think it a pagan work, but thought, language, style favor L.'s authorship. [PATRISTC ]


139. ANF7-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | HREF="http://www.ewtn.com/library/PATRISTC/ANF7-11.TXT">VIEW

Lactantius, spur., A Poem on the Passion of the Lord

Formerly ascribed to Lactantius but certainly not by him.

[PATRISTC ]


140. ANF7-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Venantius Fortunatus, Poem on Easter, or De Resurrectione

[PATRISTC ]


141. ANF7-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Asterius Urbanus, Fragments

Perhaps written in the mid 2nd century.

[PATRISTC ]


142. ANF7-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Victorinus, On the Creation of the World De fabrica mundi

Chiliastic tendency.

[PATRISTC ]


143. ANF7-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Victorinus, Commentary on the Apocalypse of the Blessed John De fabrica mundi

Chiliastic tendency. Jerome's edition (printed here, as the original was not published until 1916) omits the unmistakable milleniarism of the conclusion and several valuable references to earlier writers, including Papias. J.'s edition was later enlarged, and in the eight century used by the Spanish priest Beatus in his great commentary on the Apocalypse.

[PATRISTC ]


144. ANF7-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Dionysius of Rome, Against the Sabellians

Fragment from a letter written to Dionysius, bishop of Alexandria against Sabellianism and overreaction against it, and informing him that he was being accused of the latter (subordinationism). [PATRISTC ]


145. ANF7-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles (Didache)

The Lord's Teaching through the Twelve Apostles to the Nations. Most important document of subapostolic period, oldest extant source of ecclesiastical law. Discovered 1883. Compendium of precepts of morality, insctructions on organization of communities, regulations of liturgical functions. 1) cc. 1-10: Liturgical instructions. a) 1-6: Directions for instructing catechumens. Moral norms set forth by description of Way of Life (1-4), Way of Death (5-6). b) 7-10: How to baptize, fasting, recital of Lord's Prayer. 9: Oldest recorded eucharistic prayer. 10: Prayer after communion, worthy reception. (for newly baptized at Easter Vigil. 2) cc. 11-15: Disciplinary regulations. Sunday liturgy (14). Liturgical confession of sins. Bishops, deacons, prophets. Almsgiving, yet duty of working for a living. Universal Church. Eucharist symbol of unity (9). Eschatological attitude. DATE: Prob. common source with Epistle of Barnabas. 1, 3 c to 2, 1 are later addition, perhaps also 6 and 14. Not coherent whole but artless compilation of existing texts, regulations which had already acquired force of law. Internal evidence point to an origin from 100 to 150 A.D., prob. Syria. [PATRISTC ]


146. ANF7-18.TXT -- 06/25/96 -- | VIEW

Constitutions of the Holy Apostles (Apostolic Constitutions), Books I-V.

WORK: Longest of the ancient Church Orders. Compiled in Syria (Antioch) or perhaps Constantinople c. 390-420, by an Arian, from three main sources. Books I-VI practically identical to the Didaskalia. Cf. ANF7-19.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


147. ANF7-19.TXT -- 06/25/96 -- | VIEW

Constitutions of the Holy Apostles (Apostolic Constitutions), Books VI-VIII, Canons.

WORK: Longest of the ancient Church Orders. Compiled in Syria (Antioch) or perhaps Constantinople c. 390-420, by an Arian, from three main sources. Books I-VI practically identical to the Didaskalia; Book VII: a) enlarged version of the Didache (ANF7-17.TXT), b) prayer formulae, rules for catechumenate instruction, baptism; Book VIII: Based to a great extent on Hippolytus' Apostolic Tradition: charismatic gifts pertaining to service of neighbor, texts for ordinations/blessings of persons, things; 85 Aposto [PATRISTC ]


148. ANF7-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, The Divine Institutes, Books III-IV Divinae institutiones

Written c. 304 to after 313. First attempt at Latin summa of Christians. Lacks theological demonstration, metaphysical depth; many quotations from classical sources, few from Bible (mostly from Cyprian's Ad Quirinum, ANF5-20.TXT). No familiarity with Greek Christian authors. Book III, "The False Wisdom of the Philosophers": philosophy as the secondary source of all error; correct knowledge given only by revelation. Book IV, "True Wisdom and Religion": Christ, Son of God, brought the right idea of the Divinity to men. Incarnation, crucifixion defended. Cf. ANF7-1, ...3, ...4, ...5.TXT.

[PATRISTC ]


149. ANF7-20.TXT -- 06/25/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, spur., Homily known the second epistle of Clement

Incomplete; cf. ANF9-6.TXT for the complete text. Though not by Clement, this is the oldest extant Christian sermon. Quotes Scripture and apocryphal gospels. Most probable opinion is that it originated in Corinth, about 150 A.D. Clear expression of the divinity and humanity of Christ, of his saving sufferings. Church is body and spouse of Christ, mother of the faithful (earliest such reference). Baptism a seal to be kept inviolate. Penance after baptism. Necessity of good works, esp. almsgiving but also fa [PATRISTC ]


150. ANF7-21.TXT -- 07/01/96 -- | VIEW

Divine Liturgy of St. James

Eastern liturgy of the patriarchate of Antioch. The texts seems to have been composed before the Monophysite schism; this liturgy was known in some form to St. Jerome. In its essential parts it follows the liturgy of the Apostolic Constitutions (ANF7-18, ...19.TXT). [PATRISTC ]


151. ANF7-22.TXT -- 07/01/96 -- | VIEW

Divine Liturgy of St. Mark

Eastern liturgy of the patriarchate of Alexandria. [PATRISTC ]


152. ANF7-23.TXT -- 07/01/96 -- | HREF="http://www.ewtn.com/library/PATRISTC/ANF7-23.TXT">VIEW

Sts. Adaeus and Maris, The Liturgy of the Blessed Apostles

Addai and Mari. An ancient Syriac liturgy used in Mesapotamia and Persia. Though used by the Nestorians (one of three Nestorian liturgies), it was probably pre-Nestorian in origin. It is now used by Nestorians mostly in Kurdistan, and, in an expurgate form, by the Chaldean Uniates of that region. [PATRISTC ]


153. ANF7-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, The Divine Institutes, Books V-VI Divinae institutiones

Written c. 304 to after 313. First attempt at Latin summa of Christians. Lacks theological demonstration, metaphysical depth; many quotations from classical sources, few from Bible (mostly from Cyprian's Ad Quirinum, ANF5-20.TXT). No familiarity with Greek Christian authors. Book V, "Justice", key virtue for human society, banished by idolatry, restored by Christ. Based on piety to God and knowledge he has created all men equal. Book VI, "True Worship": religion to God, mercy to men prerequisites of justice, true worship. These two books the best in content, style. Cf. ANF7-1, ...2, ...4, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


154. ANF7-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, The Divine Institutes, Books VII Divinae institutiones

Written c. 304 to after 313. First attempt at Latin summa of Christians. Lacks theological demonstration, metaphysical depth; many quotations from classical sources, few from Bible (mostly from Cyprian's Ad Quirinum, ANF5-20.TXT). No familiarity with Greek Christian authors. Book VII, "on the Happy Life": chiliastic eschatology: end of world, second coming, judgment, heaven, hell. Cf. ANF7-1, ...2, ...3, ...5.TXT.

[PATRISTC ]


155. ANF7-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, The Epitome of the Divine Institutes Divinae institutiones

After 314. Abridged re-edition of The Divine Institutes for a certain "brother Pentadius". Includes additions, changes, corrections. Cf. ANF7-1, ...2, ...3, ...4.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


156. ANF7-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, A Treatise on the Anger of God De ira dei

A.D. 313-14. Refutes Epicurean belief that God's happiness depends on his being totally inert, neither angry nor kind, and Stoic belief that God is kind but not angry. God loves those who do good and hates those who do evil. Addressed to a certain Donatus.

[PATRISTC ]


157. ANF7-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, On the Workmanship of God or the Formation of Man De opificio dei

Prob. 303-4. Treatise addressed to former pupil Demetrianus. The human body in its admirable organization and beauty could only have come from God. Man's reason sets him above beasts. Anatomy, physiology, abbreviated psychology. Fails of distinctively Christian ideas; has a purely rational character. Main sources Cicero and Varro. [PATRISTC ]


158. ANF7-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, On the Manner in which the Persecutors Died The Death of the Persecutors. De mortibus persecutorum

c.316-321 A.D. Shows tremendous effects of divine anger in terrible deaths of the persecutors Nero, Domitian, Decius, Valerian, Aurelian, Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius, Severus, Maximus. Licinius and Constantine now rule; joy that Christ has conquered. Addressed to a certain Donatus. Great historical importance for Diocletian persecution.

[PATRISTC ]


159. ANF7-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Lactantius, Fragments

FRAGMENTS: Fragment de motibus animi, another prob. from Grammaticus, another from the third book of Epistles to Probus. [PATRISTC ]


160. ANF8-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs

An Old Testament Apocryphon interpolated by Christian author(s). [PATRISTC ]


161. ANF8-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Apocryphal Gospels

1) Protoevengelium of James (on of Infancy Gospels, which narrate youth of Mary and birth, childhood of Jesus, prob. mid-2nd c., to prove perpetual virginity of Mary; several authors, great influence on liturgy, literature, art); 2) Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew (Birth of Mary and infancy of Jesus); 3) Gospel of the Nativity of Mary (in substance the same as the first part of Ps.-Matthew); 4) Arabic History of Joseph the Carpenter (life and death of Joseph, and Jesus' eulogy for him, to foster devotion to St. Joseph); 5) Gospel of Thomas (prob. an expurgated version of a Manichaean original. Strange miracules of the child Jesus); 6) Arabic Gospel of the Saviour's Infancy (of the Childhood of Jesus: late compilation expanding on Pr. of James and Gospel of Th.); 7) Gospel of Nicodemus (cc. 1-11 - Acts of Pilate, cc. 12-16 - Jewish debates about Christi's resurrection, cc. 17-27 - Descent of Christ into Hell. Compiled early 5th c. from earlier material); 8) Letter of Pilate to Tiberius (middle ages); 9) Report of Pilate to the Emperor Claudius (before A.D. 197); 10) Paradosis of Pilate (his sentencing by the Emperor, middle ages); 11) Death of Pilate (middle ages); 12) Narrative of Joseph (popular in middle ages); 13) Avenging of the Saviour (legend of Veronica, 7th-8th c.). [PATRISTC ]


162. ANF8-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Apocryphal Acts of Apostles (1 of 2)

1) Acts of Peter and Paul (apostolic work and martyrdom in Rome: 3rd. c.); 2) Acts of Paul and Thecla (now know to form part of Acts of Paul written before 190 A.D. by priest of Asia Minor suspended for propagating them as genuine); 3) Acts of Barnabas (more realistic than others; before 478); 4) Acts of Philip (prob. 4th-5th c.); 5) Acts of Philip in Hellas (later than preceeding); 6) Acts and Martyrdom of Andrew (composed after 400, seems not connected with earlier Gnostic Acts (cf. ANF8-12.TXT)). [PATRISTC ]


163. ANF8-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Apocryphal Acts of Apostles (2 of 2)

1) Acts of Andrew and Matthias; 2) Acts of Peter and Andrew (A. & M. among the cannibals of the Black Sea, both prob. by Leukios Charinos, c. 260); 3) Acts of Matthew (4th-5th c., only last part extant); 4) Acts of Thomas (only apocryphal Acts w/ complete text extant, written in Syriac 1st half 3rd c. T. in India; clear Gnostic origin, Manichaean tendency; several beautiful liturgical hymns); Consummation of Thomas the Apostle (actually part of the preceeding); 5) Martyrdom of Bartholomew (4th-5th c.); Acts of Thaddaeus (Syria, based on local legends. This is the later version Doctrina Addei, c. 400); 6) Acts John (Earliest extant Apocryphal Acts, Asia Minor A.D. 150-180. Incomplete; Docetic and Gnostic tendencies. Valuable souce for history of Christianity, e.g. first mention of celebration of Eucharist for the dead.). Cf. ANF8-11.TXT, ...9-4.TXT.

[PATRISTC ]


164. ANF8-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Apocryphal Apocalypses or Revelations (1 of 2)

1) Apocalypse of Moses (Old Testament apocryphon); 2) Apocalypse of Esdras (weak imitation of the apocryphal Fourth Book of Esdras (this c. 70 A.D.); 3) Apocalypse of Paul (A.D. 240-250, prob. Egypt. We have revision from 380-388; Paul visits heaven and hell, angelology, mitigation of the punishment of the damned on Sunday. Great influence on middle ages); 4) Apocalypse of John (Q. & A. on the end of the world; 5) Book of John concerning the Falling Asleep of Mary (three forms, various titles. ca. 4th c.). Cf. ANF9-3.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


165. ANF8-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Pseudo-Isidore, False Decretals

c. 830-840, forgeries attributed to Pope Clement and his successors. The samples printed were attributed to Popes Zephyrinus, Callistus, Urban I, Pontianus, Anterus, Fabian.

[PATRISTC ]


166. ANF8-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Ancient Syriac Documents (1 of 3)

1) Story Concerning the King of Edessa; 2) Canticle of Mar Jacob the Teacher of Edessa; 3) Extracts from Various Books concerning Abgar the King and Addaeus the Apostle; 4) Teaching of Addaeus the Apostle; Teaching of the Apostles; 5) Teaching of Simon Cephas in the City of Rome. The documents are presumably ante-Nicene, while Jacob of Serug belonged to the 4th c.? The acts of the martyrs of Edessa are legendary. Cf. ANF8-16.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


167. ANF8-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Ancient Syriac Documents (2 of 3)

1) Acts of Sharbil; 2) Martyrdom of Barsamya; 3) Martyrdom Barsamya; 3) Martyrdom of Habib the Deacon; 4) Martyrdom of the Holy Confessors Shamuna, Guria, and Habib; Moses of Chorene. The documents are presumably ante-Nicene, while Jacob of Serug belonged to the 4th c.? The acts of the martyrs of Edessa are legendary. Cf. ANF8-15.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


168. ANF8-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Ancient Syriac Documents (3 of 3)

1) Homily on Habib the Martyr; 2) Homily on Guria and Shamuna; Bardesan; 3) Letter of Mara, Son of Serapion; 4) Ambrose. The documents are presumably ante-Nicene, while Jacob of Serug belonged to the 4th c.? The acts of the martyrs of Edessa are legendary. Bardesanes, b. 154, was a Valentinian Gnostic who became a Christian at age 25, without leaving behind all of his heretical views. The dialogue "Concerning Fate" or "Book of the Laws of the Countries" is actually by his disciple Philip. Mara was not a Christian, but represents Stoic ethical views. The work by Ambrose is a Syriac version of the longer recension of the Discourse to the Greeks attributed to Justin Martyr (cf. ANF1-14.TXT). Cf. ANF8-15., 16.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


169. ANF8-18.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Various authors, Remains of the Second and Third Centuries

FRAGMENTS: 1) Quadratus of Athens (oldest Chr. apologist, treatise to Hadrian 123-4 or 129); 2) Aristo of Pella (1st apol. to write vs. Judaism, Dispute between Jason and Papiscus, c. 140 A.D.); 3) Melito of Sardis (bishop of S. in Lydia martyred A.D. 177; c. 170 apology to Marcus Aurelius, several other works, only fragments or titles remain. Nearly complete Homily on the Passion discovered after publication of ANF); 4) Hegesippus (2nd c. Easter Christian, prob. Hellenistic Jew, visited Rome to collect info. on authentic teaching, against Gnosticism; 5 books vs. Gn.); 5) Dionysius of Corinth (bishop, 8 letters, incl. one c. 170 to Soter, bishop of Rome); 6) Rhodon (late 2nd c., pupil of Tatian, adversary of Marcion's disciple Apelles); 7) Maximus of Jerusalem (late 2nd c. against Gnostics on problem of evil, creation of matter); 8) Claudius Apollinaris (bishop at time of Marcus Aurelius (161-180)); 9) Polycrates of Ephesus (bishop late 2nd c., letter to Pope Victor (189-99)); 9) Theophilus of Caesarea (6th bishop of Antioch, author of Ad Autolycum (ANF2-3.TXT)); 10) Serapion of Antioch (8th bishop of A., c. 200, fragments of 2 letters); 11) Apollonius (c. 211, bishop in Asia wrote against Montanism); 12) Pantaenus (Siciliam convert, missionary as far as India, first known rector of school of Alexandria, d. shortly before 200); 13) Letter of the Churches of Vienne and Lyons to the Churches of Asia and Phrygia (describes persecution at Lyons 177-78).

[PATRISTC ]


170. ANF8-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Theodotus, Excerpts of Theodotus

or, Selections from the Prophetic Scriptures "Eclogues". Excerpta ex Theodoto and Eclogae propheticae. Appendix to Clement of Alexandria's Stromata (ANF2-8, ...9, ...10.TXT). Excerpts from Gnostic writings like those of Theodotus, a Gnostic of the Oriental school of Valentinus. Contents speak of the mysteries of Baptism, the Eucharist of bread and water, and annointing, as means to free oneself from the domination of the evil power. In addition, typical Valentinian doctrines regarding the pleroma, the Ogdoas and the tree classes of men. Incomplete as printed.

[PATRISTC ]


171. ANF8-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, spur., Two Epistles Concerning Virginity

WORKS: One of oldest sources for history of early Christian asceticism. Handed down in Clement's name; actually from first half third century. Coptic version of cc. 1-8 of #1 mentions Athanasius as author. 1) Nature and meaning of virginity; continency divine, a supernatural life. But w/o works of charity, will not guarantee eternal life. Life of virginity imposes strict obligations. Condemns communal life of men and women ascetics, evils of idleness. 2) Begins as first, then describes customs, laws among ascetics in author's country. Examples from Bible, concluding with Christ. AUTHOR: Seems born in Palestine, prob. prominent, highly revered ascetic. [PATRISTC ]


172. ANF8-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, spur., Pseudo Clementina: Recognitions of Clement, Preface and Books I-II

PSEUDO-CLEMENTINES--title of comprehensive didactic novel starring Clement of Rome, portrayed as scion of Roman imperial family, who searches in vain among the philosophers to solve doubts on immortality of soul. Rumors of incarnation lead him to East, instructed by St. Peter in Caesarea, accompanies him on his journeys, encounter with Simon Magus. Narrative serves as intro. for missionary sermons of St. Peter. Extant fragments: Twenty Homilies (ANF8-7, ...8, ...9.TXT), Ten Books of Recognitions (ANF8-4, ...5, ...6.TXT). These two seem based on common basic document (prob. Syrian, early 3rd c.), fairly long, with biography of Clement as nucleus. Thus narrative element of both is almost identical, but discourses vary considerably. Author prob. of heretical Jewish-Christian association. RECOGNITIONS: "Autobiography" of Clement. Family separated, united by St. Peter after various adventures--hence title. Differences from Homilies: Judaistic element toned down. Judaism preparation for Christianity; Christ is the only faithful and true prophet. Doctrine of Trinity clearly stated, but such statements may have been inserted by translator, Rufinus. [PATRISTC ]


173. ANF8-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, spur., Pseudo Clementina: Recognitions of Clement, Books III-VII

PSEUDO-CLEMENTINES--title of comprehensive didactic novel starring Clement of Rome, portrayed as scion of Roman imperial family, who searches in vain among the philosophers to solve doubts on immortality of soul. Rumors of incarnation lead him to East, instructed by St. Peter in Caesarea, accompanies him on his journeys, encounter with Simon Magus. Narrative serves as intro. for missionary sermons of St. Peter. Extant fragments: Twenty Homilies (ANF8-7, ...8, ...9.TXT), Ten Books of Recognitions (ANF8-4, ...5, ...6.TXT). These two seem based on common basic document (prob. Syrian, early 3rd c.), fairly long, with biography of Clement as nucleus. Thus narrative element of both is almost identical, but discourses vary considerably. Author prob. of heretical Jewish-Christian association. RECOGNITIONS: "Autobiography" of Clement. Family separated, united by St. Peter after various adventures--hence title. Differences from Homilies: Judaistic element toned down. Judaism preparation for Christianity; Christ is the only faithful and true prophet. Doctrine of Trinity clearly stated, but such statements may have been inserted by translator, Rufinus. [PATRISTC ]


174. ANF8-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, spur., Pseudo Clementina: Books VIII-X

PSEUDO-CLEMENTINES--title of comprehensive didactic novel starring Clement of Rome, portrayed as scion of Roman imperial family, who searches in vain among the philosophers to solve doubts on immortality of soul. Rumors of incarnation lead him to East, instructed by St. Peter in Caesarea, accompanies him on his journeys, encounter with Simon Magus. Narrative serves as intro. for missionary sermons of St. Peter. Extant fragments: Twenty Homilies (ANF8-7, ...8, ...9.TXT), Ten Books of Recognitions (ANF8-4, ...5, ...6.TXT). These two seem based on common basic document (prob. Syrian, early 3rd c.), fairly long, with biography of Clement as nucleus. Thus narrative element of both is almost identical, but discourses vary considerably. Author prob. of heretical Jewish-Christian association. RECOGNITIONS: "Autobiography" of Clement. Family separated, united by St. Peter after various adventures--hence title. Differences from Homilies: Judaistic element toned down. Judaism preparation for Christianity; Christ is the only faithful and true prophet. Doctrine of Trinity clearly stated, but such statements may have been inserted by translator, Rufinus.

[PATRISTC ]


175. ANF8-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, spur., Pseudo Clementina: Clementine Homilies, I-V

PSEUDO-CLEMENTINES--title of comprehensive didactic novel starring Clement of Rome, portrayed as scion of Roman imperial family, who searches in vain among the philosophers to solve doubts on immortality of soul. Rumors of incarnation lead him to East, instructed by St. Peter in Caesarea, accompanies him on his journeys, encounter with Simon Magus. Narrative serves as intro. for missionary sermons of St. Peter. Extant fragments: Twenty Homilies (ANF8-7, ...8, ...9.TXT), Ten Books of Recognitions (ANF8-4, ...5, ...6.TXT). These two seem based on common basic document (prob. Syrian, early 3rd c.), fairly long, with biography of Clement as nucleus. Thus narrative element of both is almost identical, but discourses vary considerably. Author prob. of heretical Jewish-Christian association. HOMILIES: Missionary sermons of St. Peter, reputedly excerpted by C. and sent to James, brother of the Lord, in Jerusalem. Preceded by two letters, by Peter and Clement, to James, which serve as a guide for proper use of the collection. Homilies espouse tenets of Judaist Ebionites, Elkasaites, for whom Christianity merely a purged Judaism. God appeared to man in Adam, Moses, finally as Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who is prophet, teacher but not redeemer. Excludes doctrine of Trinity. Conception of personal God mixed with pantheistic elements. [PATRISTC ]


176. ANF8-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, spur., Pseudo Clementina: Clementine Homilies, VI-XII

PSEUDO-CLEMENTINES--title of comprehensive didactic novel starring Clement of Rome, portrayed as scion of Roman imperial family, who searches in vain among the philosophers to solve doubts on immortality of soul. Rumors of incarnation lead him to East, instructed by St. Peter in Caesarea, accompanies him on his journeys, encounter with Simon Magus. Narrative serves as intro. for missionary sermons of St. Peter. Extant fragments: Twenty Homilies (ANF8-7, ...8, ...9.TXT), Ten Books of Recognitions (ANF8-4, ...5, ...6.TXT). These two seem based on common basic document (prob. Syrian, early 3rd c.), fairly long, with biography of Clement as nucleus. Thus narrative element of both is almost identical, but discourses vary considerably. Author prob. of heretical Jewish-Christian association. HOMILIES: Missionary sermons of St. Peter, reputedly excerpted by C. and sent to James, brother of the Lord, in Jerusalem. Preceded by two letters, by Peter and Clement, to James, which serve as a guide for proper use of the collection. Homilies espouse tenets of Judaist Ebionites, Elkasaites, for whom Christianity merely a purged Judaism. God appeared to man in Adam, Moses, finally as Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who is prophet, teacher but not redeemer. Excludes doctrine of Trinity. Conception of personal God mixed with pantheistic elements. [PATRISTC ]


177. ANF8-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, spur., Pseudo Clementina: Clementine Homilies, XIII-XX

PSEUDO-CLEMENTINES--title of comprehensive didactic novel starring Clement of Rome, portrayed as scion of Roman imperial family, who searches in vain among the philosophers to solve doubts on immortality of soul. Rumors of incarnation lead him to East, instructed by St. Peter in Caesarea, accompanies him on his journeys, encounter with Simon Magus. Narrative serves as intro. for missionary sermons of St. Peter. Extant fragments: Twenty Homilies (ANF8-7, ...8, ...9.TXT), Ten Books of Recognitions (ANF8-4, ...5, ...6.TXT). These two seem based on common basic document (prob. Syrian, early 3rd c.), fairly long, with biography of Clement as nucleus. Thus narrative element of both is almost identical, but discourses vary considerably. Author prob. of heretical Jewish-Christian association. HOMILIES: Missionary sermons of St. Peter, reputedly excerpted by C. and sent to James, brother of the Lord, in Jerusalem. Preceded by two letters, by Peter and Clement, to James, which serve as a guide for proper use of the collection. Homilies espouse tenets of Judaist Ebionites, Elkasaites, for whom Christianity merely a purged Judaism. God appeared to man in Adam, Moses, finally as Jesus Christ, the Son of God, who is prophet, teacher but not redeemer. Excludes doctrine of Trinity. Conception of personal God mixed with pantheistic elements. [PATRISTC ]


178. ANF9-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

The Gospel According to Peter

Before A.D. 190. Relates the passion, death and resurrection of Jesus, and embellishes the narrative of his resurrection with interesting details concerning the miracles which followed. Slight traces of Docetism, for which it was rejected by Serapion of Antioch c. 190, but doubtfully of heretical origin. Includes a synoptical table comparing it to the canonical gospels, which has been scanned but cannot be displayed properly in text only format. [PATRISTC ]


179. ANF9-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of John, Books I-II, parts of IV-V

8 books out of at least 32. I-V written beginning in A.D. 226. Mixture of philological, textual, historical, etymological notes and philosophical, theological observations. Searches for mystical sense by allegorical method, thus falling into many errors despite his spiritual penetration into the inner meaning. Of great importance for a study of Origen the mystic, and his concept of the inner life. [PATRISTC ]


180. ANF9-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of John, Books VI, X

8 books out of at least 32. Written beginning in A.D. 226. Mixture of philological, textual, historical, etymological notes and philosophical, theological observations. Searches for mystical sense by allegorical method, thus falling into many errors despite his spiritual penetration into the inner meaning. Of great importance for a study of Origen the mystic, and his concept of the inner life. [PATRISTC ]


181. ANF9-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of John, Books VI, X

8 books out of 25 preserved in Greek, 5 printed here. Written after 244. Mixture of philological, textual, historical, etymological notes and philosophical, theological observations. Searches for mystical sense by allegorical method, thus falling into many errors despite his spiritual penetration into the inner meaning. [PATRISTC ]


182. ANF9-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew, Books XIII-XIV

8 books out of 25 preserved in Greek, 5 printed here. Written after 244. Mixture of philological, textual, historical, etymological notes and philosophical, theological observations. Searches for mystical sense by allegorical method, thus falling into many errors despite his spiritual penetration into the inner meaning.

[PATRISTC ]


183. ANF9-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Apocryphal Apocalypses or Revelations (2 of 2)

Apocalypse of Peter (Most important apocryphal apocalypse. A.D. 125-50. Thought canonical by Clement of Alexandria and Muratorian Fragment (ANF5-26.TXT). Complete text found 1910, after ANF. Describes heaven and hell, influenced by Orphic-Pythagorean eschatology and oriental religions); Vision of Paul (Latin version of the Apocalypse of Paul (ANF8-13.TXT), c. 500 A.D.); Apocalypse of the Virgin (ca. 9th c. Mary receives revelations on torments of hell, intercedes for the damned); Apocalypse of Sedrach (10th or 11th c. Resembles apocryphal 4 Esdras, like it deals with intercession for sinners and the reluctance of the seer to die.). Cf. ANF8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


184. ANF9-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

More Apocrypha

Testament of Abraham (Longer and shorter versions, perhaps based on an original of 2nd c. Egypt which embodied legends even earlier than that, receiving its present form in 9th or 10th c. Jewish Christian, or Jewish interpolated by Christian(s)); Acts of Xanthippe and Polyxena (mid 3rd c. Religious novel based about St. Paul's journey to Spain, featuring Xanthippe, her husband Proclus and sister Polyxena, apostles Peter, Paul, Andrew, an ass-driver, the Jewess Rebecca, a wicked prefect, his kind-hearted son, and Onesimus.); Narrative of Zosimus (Original form before A.D. 250. Account of a visit to the Makares, or Blessed Ones, given by a hermit Zosimus. The Blessed Ones are faithful Jews from the time of Jeremiah, imprisoned but rescued by angels and taken to a Paradise. Also features a visit from Satan and 1360 demons.). Cf. ANF8-12.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


185. ANF9-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians

Corrected and completed from manuscript discovered by Bryennios in Jerusalem in 1875 (cf. ANF1-1.TXT). 1. Content: Earliest Christian writing (outside NT) with author's name, position and date hist. attested. Clement intervenes to settle disputes in Church of Corinth. Gives hist. summary of situation, speaks of relevant vices and virtues, gives general teaching on God, His creation, etc. Then speaks of order and obedience to hierarchy required by God, exhorts guilty party to repentance. A. Church History: Peter in Rome, Paul in Spain, their martyrdoms, Neronian persecution. B. History of Dogma: ecclesiastical jurisdiction through apostolic succession; primacy of Roman Church; resurrection of the dead; harmony in the world order. C. Liturgy: Distinction between laity and hierarchy (presbyteroi, divided into episkopoi and diakonoi). Includes a Roman liturgical prayer which attests to divinity of Christ, and concludes with petition on behalf of the state. 2. Date: 95-96 A.D. 3. Other points: Uses the plural "we"; read during liturgy at Corinth as late as 170 A.D., author seems to have been of Jewish descent.

[PATRISTC ]


186. ANF9-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Clement of Rome, spur., Homily known as the Second Epistle of Clement

Corrected and completed from manuscript discovered by Bryennios in Jerusalem in 1875 (cf. ANF7-20.TXT). Though not by Clement, this is the oldest extant Christian sermon. Quotes Scripture and apocryphal gospels. Most probable opinion is that it originated in Corinth, about 150 A.D. Clear expression of the divinity and humanity of Christ, of his saving sufferings. Church is body and spouse of Christ, mother of the faithful (earliest such reference). Baptism a seal to be kept inviolate. Penance after baptism. Necessity of good works, esp. alsgiving but also fasting and prayer. Strong Pauline influence.

[PATRISTC ]


187. ANF9-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Aristides, Apology

Earliest preserved apology, addressed to Hadrian. Greek text, edited c. 630 in the form of a religious novel, the History of Barlaam and Josaphat (Joasaph); Syriac translation of the original, c. 350 A.D. Author has come to a knowledge of God by mediation on the harmony of the world, uses this limited knowledge to evaluate the pagan religions. Jews were better off, but put to much weight on the externals. Only the Christians have the true idea of God, as manifested by the purity of their life. Simple and without art, yet lofty tone. Surveys all mankind as a unit and concludes, "I do not hesitate to say that the world continues to exist only because of the prayers of supplication of the Christians."

[PATRISTC ]


188. ANF9-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

The Passion of the Scillitan Martyrs

The Acts of the Martyrs of Scilli constitute the oldest document in African Church history, the official record of the trial of Namphano of Madaura, Miggin, Sanam and six other Christians of Numidia, sentenced to death by the proconsul Saturninus and beheaded on 17 July 180. [PATRISTC ]


189. ANF9-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Origen, Letter to Gregory Thaumaturgos

Cf. another translation given in ANF4-16.TXT. 238-243 A.D. Admonishes former student "to draw from Greek philsophy such things as are capable of being made general or preparatory studies to Christianity." Acknowledges the dangers involved. [PATRISTC ]


190. PII1-1.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

Eusebius of Caesarea, Church History, Books I-III

Ten books covering period from foundation of the Church to defeat of Licinius and sole rule of Constantine. Rich collection of historical facts, documents and exerpts from writings of the early Church. Presents 1) list of bishops in most important communities; 2) Christian teachers and authors; 3) heretics; 4) divine punishment of the Jewish people; 5) Christian persecutions; 6) martyrdoms and final victory of Christianity. Thus it aims to show the divine foundation and direction of the Church and its final victory over the power of the pagan state. Book I: Christ, his times, friends and enemies. Book II: The apostolic age to the beginning of the last Jewish War against the Romans. Book III: Apostolic and sub-apostolic age to the time of Trajan. [PATRISTC ]


191. PII1-2.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

Eusebius of Caesarea, Church History, Books IV-VI

Ten books covering period from foundation of the Church to defeat of Licinius and sole rule of Constantine. Rich collection of historical facts, documents and exerpts from writings of the early Church. Presents 1) list of bishops in most important communities; 2) Christian teachers and authors; 3) heretics; 4) divine punishment of the Jewish people; 5) Christian persecutions; 6) martyrdoms and final victory of Christianity. Thus it aims to show the divine foundation and direction of the Church and its final victory over the power of the pagan state. Book IV: Early to mid 2nd century. Book V: Late second century. Book VI: 1st half of 3rd century: the time of Origen. [PATRISTC ]


192. PII1-3.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

Eusebius of Caesarea, Church History, Books VII-X

Ten books covering period from foundation of the Church to defeat of Licinius and sole rule of Constantine. Rich collection of historical facts, documents and exerpts from writings of the early Church. Presents 1) list of bishops in most important communities; 2) Christian teachers and authors; 3) heretics; 4) divine punishment of the Jewish people; 5) Christian persecutions; 6) martyrdoms and final victory of Christianity. Thus it aims to show the divine foundation and direction of the Church and its final victory over the power of the pagan state. Book VII: 2nd half of 3rd century: Decian persecution through the beginning of Manichaeanism. Book VIII: Early 4th century: the time of the Diocletian persecution. Book IX: Continuation of the persecution; the victory of Constantine and Licinius. Book X: Constantine's rule up to his victory over Licinius. [PATRISTC ]


193. PII1-4.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine

Vita Constantini. Four books. Not an historical biography but an encomium with eulogistic and exaggerated tone. By Eusebius' own admission it contains only C.'s good religious actions: exact title is "On the Life of the Blessed Constantine, Emperor." Vivid picture of Constantine, up to that time the only "friend of God" among the Roman emperors. C.'s vision. Imperial orders and letters. Possibility of revisions after his death. [PATRISTC ]


194. PII1-5.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

Eusebius of Caesarea, To the Assembly of the Saints

Ad coetum sanctorum. Appendix to the 4th book of the Vita Constantini (PII1-4.TXT), an apology for Christianity composed by Constantine, dealing (1st part) with God, the Father of Christ, as creator and Lord of the universe, the falsehood of paganism, and the mistaken ideas of the philosophers and poets, and with (2nd part) Christian doctrine of redemption through Christ, who is God and God's Son, Christ in the Old Testament and the pagan oracles. Attributes (3rd part) his own victories to Christ and shows the fates of the persecutors, stresses the duty of thanking God for blessings. Authenticity probable. [PATRISTC ]


195. PII1-6.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

Eusebius of Caesarea, Praise of Constantine

Laus Constantini (Laudes Constantini). Actually two works. 1) Chapters 1-10: Panegyric of Constantine given 25 July 335, 30th anniversary of Constantine's reign. Overflowing praise of the Emperor. 2) Chapters 11018: Treatise presented to Constantine at dedication of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, 335. Justifies the erection of the magnificent building, a symbol of the Emperor's God-given mission, in the course of an introduction to the faith for pagan readers. [PATRISTC ]


196. PII10-1.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, On the Duties of the Clergy, Book I

De officiis ministrorum. Between 377-391. Follows Cicero's De officiis in title, division, formal content. Book I: on the virtuous; Book II: on the practical; Book III: on the opposition between the virtuous and the pratical. Especially for the clergy, but perhaps also to all the faithful, differs from the original in showing difference between Stoic morality centered on man, and Christian morality, centered on God, which Ambrose shows through the eschatological viewpoint of the work as a whole. [Cf. PII10-2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


197. PII10-10.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, Concerning Widows

De viduis. Either a reworked homily or a treatise, published soon after De virginibus (PII10-9.TXT) in 377 or 378. In treating widowhood, it never condemns second marriages. [PATRISTC ]


198. PII10-11.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, Selected Letters

Ambrose's letters 17-8, 20-2, 40-1, 51, 57, 61-3. Ambrose's letters are one of most important sources for his life and the religious and political situation of his time. 1, 21, 51, 57 deal with relations of Church and state; 21-22 deal with the Arian question; 17-18 document his anti-pagan attitude; 40-41 cast light on his anti-Jewish policy; 22 shows his preoccupation with the life of the Church. [PATRISTC ]


199. PII10-2.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, On the Duties of the Clergy, Book II-III

De officiis ministrorum. Between 377 and 391. Follows Cicero's De officiis in title, division, formal content. Book I: on the virtuous; Book II: on the practical; Book III: on the opposition between the virtuous and the pratical. Especially for the clergy, but perhaps also to all the faithful, differs from the original in showing difference between Stoic morality centered on man, and Christian morality, centered on God, which Ambrose shows through the eschatological viewpoint of the work as a whole. [Cf. PII10-1.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


200. PII10-3.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, On the Holy Spirit

De Spiritu Sancto. Completed in 381, dedicated to the emperor Gratian. Continues the instruction of the De Fide (PII10-.TXT), showing divinity and place in the Trinity of the Holy Spirit, supported by Scripture. Follows closely the work of Didymus of Alexandria; also uses the On the Holy Spirit (PII8-1.TXT) and Against Eunomius of Basil, and the Letters to Serapion I and IV of Athanasius. [PATRISTC ]


201. PII10-4.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, On the Decease of His Brother Satyrus

De excessu fratris. 378. Two books, the redactions of two homilies given during the funeral and week's mind memorial of his brother. Shows, in the customary consolatory style, Ambrose's rhetorical and classical culture, his warm humanity, and the Christian reality of death from the pastoral perspective. [PATRISTC ]


202. PII10-5.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, Books I-III

De fide ad Gratianum. Treatise of five books (1-2: 377-8; 3-5: by 380) to the emperor Gratian, in response to his request for instruction in the faith against Arianism. Refutes, without innovation, six Arian claims, stating in reply: the Son is not unlike the Father; the Son did not have a beginning; the Son was not created; the Son is good; the Son is true God; the Son does not have a divinity other than that of the Father. Books III-V deal with the inferiority of Christ to the Father ("The Father is greater than I.") [Cf. PII10-6.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


203. PII10-6.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, Books IV-V

De fide ad Gratianum. Treatise of five books (1-2: 377-8; 3-5: by 380) to the emperor Gratian, in response to his request for instruction in the faith against Arianism. Refutes, without innovation, six Arian claims, stating in reply: the Son is not unlike the Father; the Son did not have a beginning; the Son was not created; the Son is good; the Son is true God; the Son does not have a divinity other than that of the Father. Books III-V deal with the inferiority of Christ to the Father ("The Father is greater than I.") [Cf. PII1056.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


204. PII10-7.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, On the Mysteries

De mysteriis. Selection and reworking of earlier homilies, published c. 390. Addresses the neophytes on the rites of Baptism and the Eucharist, using Scripture to explain their symbolism. [PATRISTC ]


205. PII10-8.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, Concerning Repentance

De paenitentia. Written between 384 and 394. In two books, Ambrose attacks the Novatian position on the church's power to forgive sins. Of interest for penitential discipline of fourth century Milan. Sources include especially the works of Cyprian and Tertullian. [PATRISTC ]


206. PII10-9.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ambrose, Concerning Virgins

De virginibus. His first writing. Written by Dec. 377 for his sister, Marcellina, in letter form, but probably of homiletic origin. Rhetorically excellent. Draws on Origen's mystical exegesis of the Canticle of Canticles, abounds in scripture citations, also references pagan works. The three books take Agnes, Mary, and John the Baptist respectively as examples, along with other figures. Di Berardino (Quasten IV) 167: "First organic treatise of spirituality and theology on the theme of virginity in Latin, maintains a balanced and positive judgment on matrimony. [PATRISTC ]


207. PII11-1.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Sulpicius Severus (Sulpitius Severus), Life of St. Martin (of Tours)

Vita Martini. Written during Martin's life, sent to Paulinus in 397; additions and reworkings by the author after 400. Opposes the anti-ascetical movement among bishops and clergy of the time by defending spiritual character of St. Martin. Thus apologetic character. Following classical tradition and Athanasius' Life of Antony (PII4-10.TXT), emphasizes miraculous side of the hero to point of exaggeration, thus guaranteeing popularity of the work. This has generated doubts about the reliability of the story, but it has been defended as a serious work written with the liberty allowed to hagiography of the time, mixing truth and fiction according to imaginative schemes at one popular and mystical. [PATRISTC ]


208. PII11-10.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

John Cassian, Conferences 11-17

Conlationes XXIV. Conceived as the complement to the Institutes (PII11-7.TXT). Cassian's recollections of his conversations with the Desert Fathers. Conferences 11-17, completed 427, form the second part, and are situated at Panephysis at the beginning of the voyage in Egypt. 11) perfection; 12) chastity; 13) the protection of God; 14) spiritual knowledge; 15) charisms and miracles; 16) friendship among the perfect; 17) resolutions. [PATRISTC ]


209. PII11-11.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

John Cassian, Conferences 18-20

Conlationes XXIV. Conceived as the complement to the Institutes (PII11-7.TXT). Cassian's recollections of his conversations with the Desert Fathers. Conferences 18-24 form the third part. 18-20, 428-9, are situated at Diolcos: 18) on the three types of monks; 19) on the goal of the cenobitic and eremitic life; 20) on penance and reparation. [PATRISTC ]


210. PII11-12.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

John Cassian, Conferences 21-24

Conlationes XXIV. Conceived as the complement to the Institutes (PII11-7.TXT). Cassian's recollections of his conversations with the Desert Fathers. Conferences 18-24 form the third part. 21-24, seem to belong to the period of Scete: 21)interior freedom; 22) temptations of the flesh; 23) the impeccability which is not of this world; 24) the sweetness of the service of God. The well-intentioned editors unfortunately omit Conference 22, in deference to the sensibilities of readers. [PATRISTC ]


211. PII11-13.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

John Cassian, Seven Books on the Incarnation of the Lord, against Nestorius

De incarnatione Domini contra Nestorium libri VII. Written 430 at request of Leo, archdeacon of Rome, later Pope. Uses excerpts from Nestorius' sermons. Denounces Pelagianism as the source of all evils, including errors of Leporius and Nestorius. (This last link is also found in Prosper and Augustine). Affirms unity of two natures in one substance or person, defends title "Theotokos," adduces numerous texts from Old, New Testaments and fathers. Composition weak, structure obscure, theological formulation uncertain; some expressions close to those of Nestorius. Cassian is not a natural theologian, but recognizes spiritual implications of the doctrines: If Christ be not the Son of God and Son of Man, the monastic and entire Christian life witness the collapse of its foundations. [PATRISTC ]


212. PII11-2.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Sulpicius Severus (Sulpitius Severus), Authentic Letters

Written in 397-398, these three letters complete the Life of St. Martin (PII11-1.TXT). Like that work, they are addressed to a group of fervent aristocratic converts who followed the ascetic ideal and were admirers of Martin. The first is polemical, against M.'s detractors; the second a letter of consolation and a panegyric of M. The third recounts Martin's last journey, his death and funeral, drawing on the second edition of the "Life" and passing from hagiography to panegyric. [PATRISTC ]


213. PII11-3.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Sulpicius Severus (Sulpitius Severus), The Dialogues

Called by Gennadius the Consolation Postumiani et Galli (two monks in Gaul). Composed in two books (the second is here divided in two); unclear whether the literary form is historical or fictitious. They recount two days of conversation between the two monks, the first a disciple of St. Martin of Tours, the seond a great admirer of the monks of Egypt. Obvious influence of lives of Desert Fathers, esp. of St. Anthony (PII4-10.TXT). Shows a disdain of the authoritarian and anti-monastic attitude of a certain part of the clergy opposed to the person and prestige of St. Martin. [PATRISTC ]


214. PII11-4.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Sulpicius Severus (Sulpitius Severus), Apocryphal Letters

These seven letters, attributed to Severus by J. Clericus, are apocryphal. [PATRISTC ]


215. PII11-5.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Sulpicius Severus (Sulpitius Severus), The Sacred History

Orginal title The Chronicles (Chronica). Finished c. 400. A brief history of the world form creation to A.D. 400, based chiefly on passages of Scripture analyzed with true histrical and critical sense, omitting the history of Christ and the Apostles, which he regards as unsuitable for a resume, due to its greatness. Resumes with the destruction of Jerusalem. More concerned with chronology than theology. Observations on the contemporary Priscillianist Movement are particuarly valuabe. S. draws on Jerome's translation of Eusebius' Chronicle, Tacitus, Paulinus. Treatment of the Book of Judith offers a rare example of a philological and critical analysis similar to that of modern times. [PATRISTC ]


216. PII11-6.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Vincent of Lerins, Commonitory

Treatise for the antiquity and universality of the Catholic Faith against the profane novelties of all heresies. A.D. 434. Two Commonitories were written, but the second was stolen from the author. A discourse on methodology: how to distinguish the Catholic faith from new heresies based on Scriptures (which is not enough by itself) and the Church's tradition, which gives the authentic interpretation of Scripture. Universality, antiquity, and unanimous consent guarantee orthodoxy. Several examples. Important of universal councils. Development of doctrine. Draws on Irenaeus, Tertullian, Cassian, Augustine. Not, as formerly thought, hostile to St. Augustine. [PATRISTC ]


217. PII11-7.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

John Cassian, On the Institutes of the Coenobia

And on the remedies for the eight principal faults. De institutis coenobiorum. Written at a mature age. First part on the life of the monk: 1) clothing; 2) the night office; 3) the day office; 4) the common life and the virtues proper to it. Second part on the vices the monk must fight: 5) gluttony; 6) lust; 7) greed; 8) anger; 9) melancholy; 10) sloth; 11) vainglory; 12) pride. Cast as an intruduction to the interior and sublime doctrine of the Conferences (PII11-8..., 9..., 10..., 11..., 12.TXT), which he already had in mind. The well-intentioned editors unfortunately omit the book on lust, in deference to the sensibilities of readers. [PATRISTC ]


218. PII11-8.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

John Cassian, Conferences 1-5

Conlationes XXIV. Conceived as the complement to the Institutes (PII11-7.TXT). Cassian's recollections of his conversations with the Desert Fathers. Conferences 1-10, 425-6, which constitute the first part, are from his sojourn at Scete, and form a treastise on perfection. 1-5: 1) The aim of the monastic life; 2)discretion; 3) the three vows; 4) concupiscence; 5) the eight deadly vices. [PATRISTC ]


219. PII11-9.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

John Cassian, Conferences 6-10

Conlationes XXIV. Conceived as the complement to the Institutes (PII11-7.TXT). Cassian's recollections of his conversations with the Desert Fathers. Conferences 1-10, 425-6, which constitute the first part, are from his sojourn at Scete, and form a treastise on perfection. 6-10: 6) sin; 7-8) spiritual combat and the powers of the spirit of evil; 9-10) the analysis and ways of prayer. [PATRISTC ]


220. PII12-1.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Leo the Great, Letters 1-59

Of 173 letters, 143 by and 30 to Leo, dating from 442-460. Leo circulated widely those of his letters he considered to be of particular interest. Many are of doctrinal significance, especially for the Monophysite controversy, the "robber council" of Ephesus and the Ecumenical Council of Chalcedon. Of special interest is Letter 28, the "Tome" of Leo, adopted by the Council of Chalcedon. [Cf. PII12-2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


221. PII12-2.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Leo the Great, Letters 60-173

Of 173 letters, 143 by and 30 to Leo, dating from 442-460. Leo circulated widely those of his letters he considered to be of particular interest. Many are of doctrinal significance, especially for the Monophysite controversy, the "robber council" of Ephesus and the Ecumenical Council of Chalcedon. [Cf. PII12-1.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


222. PII12-3.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Leo the Great, Sermons

Leo's 97 preserved sermons are divided according to the Roman liturgical year of his time. They include 10 on Christmas, 8 for Epiphany, 2 for Easter, 2 for the Ascension, 3 for Pentecost, 12 for Lent, 19 for Holy Week, 4 for the ember days of Pentecost, 9 for the ember days of September, 9 for the ember days of December, and 6 for the so-called collects, plus sermons for the feasts of Sts. Peter and Paul, St. Lawrence, the Maccabees, and for his ordination and anniversary. LNPF II includes 48 sermons. [PATRISTC ]


223. PII12-4.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory the Great, Book of Pastoral Rule

Pastoral Care. Liber Regulae Pastoralis. Gregory describes what kind of man should undertake the episcopal office, give general guidelines for the life of a pastor (bishop), explains how he is to admonish men of different types of characters and vices. Stresses preaching and guidance of souls, and discipline. During his lifetime, it was translated into Greek by commission from the Byzantine Emperor Maurice. Brought to England by Augustine of Canterbury, and later rendered in Anglo-Saxon by Alfred the Great. A series councils held by command of Charlemagne enjoined its study on all bishops, shortly after, a copy was given to all bishops upon their consecration. [PATRISTC ]


224. PII12-5.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory the Great, Letters, Books I-II

Covering the years 590-592. Among other things: Book I: Gregory arranges the proper administration of lands and distribution of the revenues of the Roman church, curbs abuses in various monastic communities, intercedes with the Emperor on behalf of the inhabitants of Sardinia, arranges for due election of bishops in the metropolitan province of Rome, brings his authority to bear on neglectful bishops, invokes the civil power for suppression of the remains of Donatism in Africa. Also letters of sympathy and friendship. Most of these types of things recur in subsequent books. Book II: In particular: beginning of dealings with the Lombards, claim of jurisdiction over East Illyricum as well as West, exemption of monasteries from episcopal control. [Cf. PII12-6, ...12-7, ...13-1, ...13-2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


225. PII12-6.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory the Great, Letters, Books III-V

Covering the years 592-595. See description of Book I (PII12-5.TXT). In particular: Book III: his authority resisted in East Illyricum, relations between Rome and Constantinople, remonstrances with the bishops of Ravenna for their claim of higher dignity than other metropolitans, submissiveness but advice of the Church to Emperor with regard to civil laws, relations of Christians with Jews. Book IV: Resistance to Gregory on the issue of the "Three Chapters," resistance to his authority in Africa, regulations for confirmation, use of relics (Letters 30). Book V: Beginning of protest against the Patriarch of Constantinople's use of the title "Universal Bishop." Gregory does not claim this title for himself, but does exercise the authority of Peter. Authority of the Church in Gaul. [Cf. PII12-5, ...12-7, ...13-1, ...13-2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


226. PII12-7.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory the Great, Letters, Books VI-VIII

Covering the years 595-598. See description of Book I (PII12-5.TXT). In particular: Sending of Augustine to evangelize England; ten letters to the notorious queen Brunehild in Gaul. Book VII-VIII: Special emphasis on exemption of monasteries from episcopal jurisdiction. Sale of church plate for charitable purposes. Good examples of his letters of spiritual counsel. [Cf. PII12-5, ...12-6, ...13-1, ...13-2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


227. PII13-1.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory the Great, Letters, Books IX-X

Covering the years 598-600. See description of Book I (PII12-5.TXT). In particular: Book IX: Renewed efforts to bring back the Istrian bishops to communion with Rome; liturgical uses of the Roman Church, correspondence with Visigothic king Reccared in Spain; correction of abuses prevalent in the Church of Gaul; letter from St. Columbanus. [Cf. PII12-5, ...12-6, ...12-7, ...13-2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


228. PII13-2.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory the Great, Letters, Books XI-XIV

Covering the years 600-604. See description of Book I (PII12-5.TXT). In particular: Book XI: use and abuse of pictures in Churches; miracles; married persons not to enter monasteries without mutual consent; baptism; ways to reconcile heretics to the Church; refutation of Nestorianism; efforts to correct immorality prevalent among Gallic clergy; letters relating to the English mission. Book XIII: abuses in Gaul; ascension of Phocas to the empire; Book XIV: no abate in his care for the Churches despite bad gout, last letters before his death on 12 March 604. [Cf. PII12-5, ...12-6, ...12-7, ...13-1.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


229. PII13-3.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Ephraim the Syrian, Nisibene Hymns

This series of hymns, when complete, consisted of 77 hymns. 1-34 treat of the fortunes of the Church in Nisibis, Carrhena (Haran), and an unnamed city, probably Edessa. 35-77 deal with death and the resurrection. LNPF II/XIII includes 46: 1-21, 35-42, 52-68. [PATRISTC ]


230. PII13-4.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Ephraim the Syrian, Hymns on the Nativity of Christ in the Flesh

Nineteen hymns for Christmas composed by St. Ephraim, parts of which are still in use in the Syriac liturgy. [PATRISTC ]


231. PII13-5.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Ephraim the Syrian, Hymns for the Epiphany

Fifteen hymns for the feast of the Epiphany composed by St. Ephraim, parts of which are still in use in the Syriac liturgy. [PATRISTC ]


232. PII13-6.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Ephraim the Syrian, The Pearl: Seven Hymns on the Faith

Seven hymns by St. Ephraim on the faith, which is represented as the pearl of great price. [PATRISTC ]


233. PII13-7.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Ephraim the Syrian, Three Homilies

Homilies by St. Ephraim (1) On our Lord; (2) On Reproof and Repentance; (3) On the Sinful Woman. [PATRISTC ]


234. PII13-8.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Aphrahat, Select Demonstrations

Aphrahat's Demonstrations are 22 in number, one beginning with each letter of the Syriac alphabet. 10 on Christian graces, hopes and duties, (On Faith, Charity, Fasting, Prayer, Wars, Monks, Penitents, the Resurrection, Humility, Pastors). 3 on the Jews (On Circumcision, the Passover, the Sabbath). 1 ("Hortatory") letter of rebuke on behalf of a Synod of Bishops to clergy/people of Seleucia & Ctesiphon; 5 more on the Jews (On Divers Meats, The Call of the Gentiles, Jesus the Messiah, Viginity, the Dispersion of Israel), 3 more like 1st 10: On Almsgiving, Persecution, Death and the Latter Times. Attached is a 23rd, "On the Grape," a chronological diquisition of some importance. LNPF II/XIII prints 1, 5, 6, 8, 10, 17, 21, 22. [PATRISTC ]


235. PII14-1.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

The First Council of Nicaea (Nicea)

The First Ecumenical Council: Nicaea I, A.D. 325; Emperor--Constantine; Pope--Silvester. Contents: the Nicene Creed; the Creed of Eusebius of Caesarea; the 20 Canons of the Council of Nicaea, with the ancient epitomes; Contents of the spurious Arabic Canons; the Synodal Letter; the Decree on the Keeping of Easter. [PATRISTC ]


236. PII14-10.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

The Second Council of Nicaea (Nicea)

The Seventh Ecumenical Council: Nicaea II, A.D. 787; Emperors--Constantine VI And Irene; Pope--Hadrian. Contents: The Sacra to Hadrian; The Sacra read at Session 1; Extracts from the Acts, Session 1; Session II; Session III; Session IV; Session VI containing the Epitome of the decree of the iconoclastic Conciliabulum; The dogmatic Decree of the Synod; The Canons, with the Ancient Epitome; Synodal Letter to the Emperors. [PATRISTC ]


237. PII14-11.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Non-conciliar canons

Containing canons and rulings not having conciliar origin but approved by name in canon 2 of the synod in Trullo: The 85 Apostolical Canons. Johnson's Epitome of the Canons of the following: I. Dionysius of Alexandria; II. Peter of Alexandria. III. Gregory Thaumaturgus; IV. Athanasius of Alexandria; V. Basil of Caesarea; VI. Gregory Nyssen; VII. Gregory Theologus; VIII. Amphilochius of Iconium; IX. Timothy of Alexandria; X. Theophilus of Alexandria; XI. Cyril of Alexandria; XII. Gennadius of Constantinople.[1] [PATRISTC ]


238. PII14-2.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Ancient Canons

The Canons of Ancyra, Gangra, Neocaesarea, Antioch, and Laodicea, which accepted by the ecumenical councils, with synodal letters, where applicable. Includes the ancient epitomes of the canons. [PATRISTC ]


239. PII14-3.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

The First Council of Constantinople

The Second Ecumenical Council: Constantinople I, A.D. 381; Emperor--Theodosius; Pope--Damasus. Contents: The Creed and Epiphanius's two Creeds; Synodal Letter to the Emperor; The Canons with the Ancient Epitome; Synodical Letter of the Council of Constantinople, A.D. 382. [PATRISTC ]


240. PII14-4.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

The Council of Ephesus

The Third Ecumenical Council: Ephesus, A.D. 431; Emperors--Theodosius II and Valentinian III; Pope--Celestine I. Contents: Extracts from the Acts, Session I; St. Cyril's Letter to Nestorius, Intelligo quosdam; Continuation of Session I; The Canonical Epistle of St. Cyril, Cum Salvator noster; The XII Anathematisms of St. Cyril, with Nestorius's Counter-anathematisms; Extracts from the Acts, Session I. continued; Decree against Nestorius; Extracts from the Acts, Session II; St. Celestine's Letter to the Synod; Continuation of Session II; Session III; The Canons, with the Ancient Epitome; A Letter from the Synod to the Synod in Pamphylia; The Letter of the Synod to Pope Celestine; The Definition against the Messalians. The Decree re Euprepius and Cyril. [PATRISTC ]


241. PII14-5.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

The Council of Chalcedon

The Fourth Ecumenical Council: Chalcedon, A.D. 451; Emperors--Marcian and Pulcheria (in the East), Valentinian III (in the West); Pope--Leo I. Contents: Extracts from the Acts, Session I. Session II; The Letter of Cyril to John of Antioch; Extracts from the Acts, Session II., continued; The Tome of St. Leo; Extracts from the Acts, Session II., continued; Session III; The Sentence of Condemnation of Dioscorus; Session IV. Session V; The Definition of Faith of the Council; Session VI; Decree on the Jurisdiction of Jerusalem and Antioch; Session VII; Decree with regard to Bp. of Ephesus; Session XII; Decree with regard to Nicomedia; Session XIII; The Canons with the Ancient Epitome and Notes; Extracts from the Acts, Session XVI. [PATRISTC ]


242. PII14-6.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

The Second Council of Constantinople

The Fifth Ecumenical Council: Constantinople II, A.D. 553; Emperor--Justinian I; Pope--Vigilius. Contents: The Emperor's Letter; Extracts from the Acts, Session VII.; The Sentence of the Synod; The Capitula of the Council; The Anathemas against Origen paralleled with the Anathematisms of the Emperor Justinian; The Decretal Letter of the Pope. [PATRISTC ]


243. PII14-7.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

The Third Council of Constantinople

The Sixth Ecumenical Council: Constantinople III, A.D. 680-681; Emperor--Constantine Pogonatus; Pope--Agatho I. Contents: Extracts from the Acts, Session I; The Letter of Pope Agatho to the Emperor; The Letter of the Roman Synod to the Council; Extracts from the Acts, Session VIII; The Sentence against the Monothelites, Session XIII; The Acclamations, Session XVI; The Definition of Faith; Abstract of the Prosphoneticus to the Emperor; The Synodal Letter to Pope Agatho; The Imperial Edict in abstract. [PATRISTC ]


244. PII14-8.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

The Canons of the Council in Trullo

A.D. 692. Often called the Quinisext Council. The Canons with the Ancient Epitome. [PATRISTC ]


245. PII14-9.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Local Councils

The Canons of the synods of Sardica, Carthage, Constantinople, and Carthage under St. Cyprian, which canons were received by the Council in Trullo and Ratified by II Nice (Nicaea, Nicea). [PATRISTC ]


246. PII2-1.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Socrates, Ecclesiastical History I-II

A Church History in 7 books, continuation of Eusebius' (PII1-1, ...2, ...3.TXT), whom he surpasses in objectivity and sincerity. Covers 305-439, 1 book for each of seven emperors after Diocletian. Focus on Church w/o omitting secular history. Special attention to Constantinople. Sources: Rufinus, Eusebius, Athanasius, Gelasius of Caesarea, Eutropius, episcopal lists, the collection of Conciliar Acts issued c. 375 by the Macedonian Sabinus of Heraclea, letters of emperors and bishops, all examined carefully and usually referenced. Many sources reproduced verbatim. Present text is a 2nd ed. correcting errors discovered in Rufinus. Bk. I: Constantine I; Bk. II: Constans, Constantius I. (Athanasius, Arianism.) [Cf. PII2-2, ...3.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


247. PII2-2.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Socrates, Ecclesiastical History III-V

A Church History in 7 books, continuation of Eusebius' (PII1-1, ...2, ...3.TXT), whom he surpasses in objectivity and sincerity. Covers 305-439, 1 book for each of seven emperors after Diocletian. Focus on Church w/o omitting secular history. Special attention to Constantinople. Sources: Rufinus, Eusebius, Athanasius, Gelasius of Caesarea, Eutropius, episcopal lists, the collection of Conciliar Acts issued c. 375 by the Macedonian Sabinus of Heraclea, letters of emperors and bishops, all examined carefully and usually referenced. Many sources reproduced verbatim. Present text is a 2nd ed. correcting errors discovered in Rufinus. Bk. III: Julian the Apostate, Jovian; Bk. IV: Valentinian, Valens; Bk. V: Gratian, Theodosius I. (Athanasius, Arianism.) [Cf. PII2-1, ...3.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


248. PII2-3.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Socrates, Ecclesiastical History VI-VII

A Church History in 7 books, continuation of Eusebius' (PII1-1, ...2, ...3.TXT), whom he surpasses in objectivity and sincerity. Covers 305-439, 1 book for each of seven emperors after Diocletian. Focus on Church w/o omitting secular history. Special attention to Constantinople. Sources: Rufinus, Eusebius, Athanasius, Gelasius of Caesarea, Eutropius, episcopal lists, the collection of Conciliar Acts issued c. 375 by the Macedonian Sabinus of Heraclea, letters of emperors and bishops, all examined carefully and usually referenced. Many sources reproduced verbatim. Present text is a 2nd ed. correcting errors discovered in Rufinus. Bk. VI: Honorius and Arcadius (John Chrysostom); Bk. VII: Theodosius II. (Nestorius.) [Cf. PII2-1, ...2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


249. PII2-4.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Sozomen, Ecclesiastical History I-II

439-50. A Church History in 9 books, continuation of Eusebius' (PII1-1, ...2, ...3.TXT). Covers 324-425. Long passages identical to Socrates, whom he frequently copies word for word without ever mentioning him. However, he consulted a number of sources himself (more Western sources than Socrates), and many passages have no parallel in Socrates, such as the account of the persecution of Persian Christians under Sapor II (2.9-14), based on Acts of Persian Martyrs. Perhaps intended to correct and enlarge Socrates' work; his style is better but historical sense and critical judgment weaker; includes many legends. Bk. I: Reign of Constantine to Nicaea; Bk. II: Discovery of the cross to death of Constantine. [Cf. PII2-5, ...6, ...7.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


250. PII2-5.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Sozomen, Ecclesiastical History III-IV

439-50. A Church History in 9 books, continuation of Eusebius' (PII1-1, ...2, ...3.TXT). Covers 324-425. Long passages identical to Socrates, whom he frequently copies word for word without ever mentioning him. However, he consulted a number of sources himself (more Western sources than Socrates), and many passages have no parallel in Socrates. Perhaps intended to correct and enlarge Socrates' work; his style is better but historical sense and critical judgment weaker; includes many legends. Bk. III: Arian controversy to death of emp. Constans; Bk. IV: Struggle against heretics beginning of Meletian schism, just before death of Constantius I. [Cf. PII2-4, ...6, ...7.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


251. PII2-6.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Sozomen, Ecclesiastical History V-VI

439-50. A Church History in 9 books, continuation of Eusebius' (PII1-1, ...2, ...3.TXT). Covers 324-425. Long passages identical to Socrates, whom he frequently copies word for word without ever mentioning him. However, he consulted a number of sources himself (more Western sources than Socrates), and many passages have no parallel in Socrates. Perhaps intended to correct and enlarge Socrates' work; his style is better but historical sense and critical judgment weaker; includes many legends. Bk. V: Apostasy of Julian to the attempt to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem; Bk. VI: Death of Julian to death of Valens. [Cf. PII2-4, ...5, ...7.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


252. PII2-7.TXT -- 08/06/96 -- | VIEW

Sozomen, Ecclesiastical History VII-IX

439-50. A Church History in 9 books, continuation of Eusebius' (PII1-1, ...2, ...3.TXT). Covers 324-425. Long passages identical to Socrates, whom he frequently copies word for word without ever mentioning him. However, he consulted a number of sources himself (more Western sources than Socrates), and many passages have no parallel in Socrates. Perhaps intended to correct and enlarge Socrates' work; his style is better but historical sense and critical judgment weaker; includes many legends. Bk. VII: Accession of Gratian to death of Theodosius the Great; Bk. VIII: Death of Thedosius to death of John Chrysostom; Bk. IX: Death of Arcadius; Honorius, Theodosius II. [Cf. PII2-4, ...5, ...6.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


253. PII3-1.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Theodoret of Cyrus, Ecclesiastical History, Books I-II

Historia ecclesiastica. Continues the Church History of Eusebius (PII1, ...2, ...3.TXT), covering 323-428: Arian controversy to death of Theodore of Mopsuestia. Nestorian controversy omitted, perhaps for the sake of objectivity. However, the 5 books have a strong anti-heretical and apologetic tendency; their purpose is to show the victory of the Church over the Arians. All heretics are black sheep; faults of orthodox rulers omitted. Preserves many important documents. Selection and evaluation of sources often hasty and uncritical; chronology unreliable. Completed 449-50 during exile to Apamea. [Cf. PII3-2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


254. PII3-11.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Rufinus of Aquileia, Apology against Jerome

Apologia contra Hieronymum. Written in 401 with the intention of responding to charges made against him by his former friend Jerome, and taking the offensive on these personal questions. Intended to be his last word in the Origenistic debate. [PATRISTC ]


255. PII3-12.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Apology against the Books of Rufinus

Apologia adversus libros Rufini. 401-402. A rude response, more personal than dogmatic, to the Rufinus's Apology (PII3-11.TXT). [PATRISTC ]


256. PII3-13.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Rufinus, Commentary on the Apostles' Creed

400 A.D. Rufinus' commentary on the Apostles' Creed is based on the model he learned in Jerusalem and which was now spreading throughout the Christian world. [PATRISTC ]


257. PII3-14.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Rufinus, More Prefaces

1) Preface to his translation (406 A.D.) of the Recognitions of Clement (ANF8-4, ...4, ...6.TXT), which he thought authentic. 2) To his translation (before 401) of the Sayings of Xystus (Sentences of Sextus), an ascetic writing attributed to by Rufinus to Pope Sixtus, but (correctly) by St. Jerome to the pagan Pythagorean philosopher Sextus. 3) To the two books of Church History which he added to his translation of Eusebius based on the now lost history of Gelasius of Caesarea. 4) To his translation (401) of Origen's commentaries on Psalms 36-38. 5) To his translation (405-6) of Origen's Commentary on Romans; also his epilogue. 6) To his translation (410) of Origen's homilies on Numbers. [PATRISTC ]


258. PII3-2.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Theodoret of Cyrus, Ecclesiastical History, Books III-V

Historia ecclesiastica. Continues the Church History of Eusebius (PII1, ...2, ...3.TXT), covering 323-428: Arian controversy to death of Theodore of Mopsuestia. Nestorian controversy omitted, perhaps for the sake of objectivity. However, the 5 books have a strong anti-heretical and apologetic tendency; their purpose is to show the victory of the Church over the Arians. All heretics are black sheep; faults of orthodox rulers omitted. Preserves many important documents. Selection and evaluation of sources often hasty and uncritical; chronology unreliable. Completed 449-50 during exile to Apamea. [Cf. PII3-1.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


259. PII3-3.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Theodoret of Cyrus, Eranistes, or Polymoruphus, Books I-II

c. 447. Treatise against the Monophysites. Views their heresy as a miscellany previous falsehoods gathered from Simon Magus, Cerdo, Marcion, Valentinus, Bardesandes, Apollinaris, Arius and Eunomius. Books I-III are in the form of dialogues between an orthodox Christian and a beggar (Monophysite), establishing the (I) unchangeable character of Christ's divinity, (II) the non-mixture of the divinity and humanity, and (III) the impassibility of the divinity. Book IV summarizes the dialogues in 40 syllogisms. Valuable for quotation of 238 passages from 88 patristic sources. Arrangement, division, and quotations borrowed from a dogmatic florilegia which the Bishops of Antioch had intended to use against Cyril's Christology at Ephesus (431). [Cf. PII3-4.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


260. PII3-4.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Theodoret of Cyrus, Eranistes, or Polymoruphus, Books III

c. 447. Treatise against the Monophysites. Views their heresy as a miscellany previous falsehoods gathered from Simon Magus, Cerdo, Marcion, Valentinus, Bardesandes, Apollinaris, Arius and Eunomius. Books I-III are in the form of dialogues between an orthodox Christian and a beggar (Monophysite), establishing the (I) unchangeable character of Christ's divinity, (II) the non-mixture of the divinity and humanity, and (III) the impassibility of the divinity. Book IV summarizes the dialogues in 40 syllogisms. Valuable for quotation of 238 passages from 88 patristic sources. Arrangement, division, and quotations borrowed from a dogmatic florilegia which the Bishops of Antioch had intended to use against Cyril's Christology at Ephesus (431). [Cf. PII3-3.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


261. PII3-5.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Theodoret of Cyrus, Demonstrations by Syllogisms

Eranistes, Book IV. The Eranistes, written c. 447, is a treatise against the Monophysites. Views their heresy as a miscellany previous falsehoods gathered from Simon Magus, Cerdo, Marcion, Valentinus, Bardesandes, Apollinaris, Arius and Eunomius. Books I-III are in the form of dialogues between an orthodox Christian and a beggar (Monophysite), establishing the (I) unchangeable character of Christ's divinity, (II) the non-mixture of the divinity and humanity, and (III) the impassibility of the divinity. Book IVsummarizes the dialogues in 40 syllogisms. Valuable for quotation of 238 passages from 88 patristic sources. Arrangement, division, and quotations borrowed from a dogmatic florilegia which the Bishops of Antioch had intended to use against Cyril's Christology at Ephesus (431). [PATRISTC ]


262. PII3-6.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Theodoret of Cyrus, Letters 1-123

Less than half of the 500 + letters of Theodoret extant in the 14th century have reached us, yet they are rich in information on the history of the 5th century, Theodoret's life, and the history of dogma in general. Ep. 113 is to Pope Leo I. Here we see a new genre, the Festal Letters (not to be confused with the Festal Letters of the Patriarchs of Alexandria (cf. PII4-22.TXT).), sent after major liturgical feasts to exchange good wishes with friends: cf. Epp. 4-6, 25-6, 38-41, 54-6, 63-4, 74. The most important are the theological letters. In 12, addressed to influential persons at Constantinople, T. asks protection against the charge that he divided the One Son of God into two Sons (Epp. 92-6, 99-101, 103-4, 106, 109). [Cf. PII3-7.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


263. PII3-7.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Theodoret of Cyrus, Letters 124-181

Less than half of the 500 + letters of Theodoret extant in the 14th century have reached us, yet they are rich in information on the history of the 5th century, Theodoret's life, and the history of dogma in general. [Cf. PII3-6.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


264. PII3-8.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Lives of Illustrious Men

De viris illustribus (De viris inlustribus). Catalogue of Christian writers, written in 393. Drawn from the Church History of Eusebius (PII1-1, ...2, ...3.TXT) with new additions for the Latin world. The first handbook of patrology. [PATRISTC ]


265. PII3-9.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gennadius of Marseilles, Lives of Illustrious Men

De viris illustribus (De viris inlustirubus). Continuation of Jerome's work by the same name (PII3-8.TXT), this is a catalogue of Christian writers composed most likely in 480, at least up through chapter 90, the rest probably added before 500 by Gennadius or other authors. Gennadius expresses a critical judgment more often than does Jerome, and gives more interesting glimpes of his own (semi-Pelagian) point of view. [PATRISTC ]


266. PII4-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Adversum Gentes Libri Duo

1. Discourse against the Heathen (Oratio contra gentes); 2. Discourse on the Incarnation of the Word (Oratio de incarnatione Verbi). Prob. c. A.D. 318. 1. Refutation of pagan mythologies, worship and beliefs. Immorality and folly of idolatry; refutation of polytheism, pantheism. Soul, mirror of Logos, can know God through creation. 2. Continuation of preceeding--necessity of Incarnation, Death, Resurrection of Christ as remedy for corruption of mankind. Is the classical exposition of the doctrine of Redemption. [PATRISTC ]


267. PII4-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Life of St. Antony

Vita Sancti Antonii; Life of St. Anthony. c. A.D 357. Life of St. Antony (c. 250-356), father of Christian monachism. Writes from personal acquaintance with Ant; calls his life the "ideal pattern of the ascetical life": wishes his readers to imitate his holiness, not his miracles and visions. Includes Ant.'s address to the monks, his denunciation of Arianism. Much on demons; monastic life viewed as war against them. Daily examination of conscience. In form an encomium, model for all subsequent Greek and Latin hagiography. [PATRISTC ]


268. PII4-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Encyclical to the Bishops of Egypt

Epistula encyclica ad episcopos Aegypti et Libyae. Written between A.'s expulsion from Alexandria 9 Feb 356 and the arrival of Arian bishop George 24 Feb 357, to warn hierarchy of heretics attempt to replace Nicene Creed with another, refuting their false teaching from Scripture. Death of Arius described, coalition of Arians with Meletians denounced. [PATRISTC ]


269. PII4-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Apology to the Emperor Constantius

Defense before Constantius; Apologia ad Constantium imperatorem. Present form: A.D. 357. A. defends himself against charges of having poisoned mind of Emp. Constans against his brother Constantius. Quasten, III, 36: "... his most careful work, written in forceful and dignified language and with artistic skill and finish." [PATRISTC ]


270. PII4-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Apology for his Flight

Defense of his Flight. Apologia pro fuga sua. A.D. 357, refutes the charge of cowardice circulated against him by giving reasons for his flight and citing example of Christ and Saints of Scripture. [PATRISTC ]


271. PII4-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, History of the Arians

Historia Arianorum ad monachos. A.D. 358. Written for monks with whom he had taken refuge. A year after seeking his favor, A. now attacks Constantius as enemy of Christ, patron of heresy and precursor of Antichrist. Fragment preserved begins with admission of Arius to communion at synod of Jerusalem, dealing with events of 335-357. [PATRISTC ]


272. PII4-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Discourses against the Arians, I

Orationes contra Arianos. c. A.D. 358. His chief dogmatic work. Four discourses: 1) Summarizes Arian doctrine as contained in Arius' Thalia; defends definition of Nicaea. (Cf. PII4-16, ...17, ...18.TXT.) [PATRISTC ]


273. PII4-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Discourses against the Arians, II

Orationes contra Arianos. c. A.D. 358. His chief dogmatic work. Four discourses: 2) Explanation of scripture texts on generation of Son (Hebr 3.2; Acts 2.36; Prov 8.22), refuting Arian interpretation and establishing true sense. (Cf. PII4-15, ...17, ...18.TXT.) [PATRISTC ]


274. PII4-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Discourses against the Arians, III

Orationes contra Arianos. c. A.D. 358. His chief dogmatic work. Four discourses: 3) Explanation of scripture texts on relation of Son to Father from Fourth Gospel, on Incarnation (Mt 28.18; Jn 3.35; Mt 26.39; Jn 12.27; Mk 13.32; Lk 2.52), refuting Arian interpretation and establishing true sense. (Cf. PII4-15, ...16, ...18.TXT.) [PATRISTC ]


275. PII4-18.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, spur., Discourses against the Arians, IV

Orationes contra Arianos. Author unkown. Found in most manuscripts with St. Athanasius' three Discourses against the Arians (Cf. PII4-15, ...16, ...17.TXT). Differs from these in address, content, style; written mainly against Marcellians, though cc. 1-8 deal with Arians and parts deal with Sabellian and Samosatene heresies. No link with 1st three. Compiler unknown; certainly not by Athanasius, as striking contrast in style and phraseology show. Not an oration; added to the first three discourses at a later time. [PATRISTC ]


276. PII4-19.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Epistula de synodis Arimini in Italia et Seleuciae in Isauria celebratis

The Councils of Ariminum and Seleucia. Letter of fall 359. 1) cc. 1-14: history of the two synods of 359, showing them unneeded, as Nicaea had already dealt with Arianism; 2) History of Arian creeds beginning with Arius' Thalia and letter to Alexander of Alexandria; 3) Refutation of Homoeans; appeal to Semi-Arians showing that terms they object to are misunderstood. A. later added (c. 55) the letter of Constantius to Ariminum, bishops' reply. CC. 30-31 appear also to be a later insertion. [PATRISTC ]


277. PII4-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Alexander of Alexandria; Athanasius?, The Deposition of Arius

c. 319, Epistle Catholic, encyclical to the Catholic hierarchy everywhere warning them that Eusebius of Nicomedia has joined Arians, giving important summary of their doctrine, prefixed by letter to clergy of Alexandria and Mareotis, asking them to sign this encyclical. Newman thought due to internal evidence that Epistle Catholic was written by Athanasius, A's deacon. [PATRISTC ]


278. PII4-20.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Tome to the People of Antioch

Tomus ad Antiochenos. Synodal Letter in name of Alexandrian synod of 362, dealing with state of Church at Antioch; recommends best course to establish peace, and says Arians may not be readmitted to communion without express anathema of Arius' doctrine, but nothing positively required beyond Nicene Creed. Defends integrity of Christ's human nature and its perfect union with the Word. 2 meanings of "hypostasis" recognized. [PATRISTC ]


279. PII4-21.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Letter to the African Bishops

Epistula ad Afros episcopos; Ad afros epistola synodica. Synodal letter in name of 90 bishops of Egypt, Libya, at Alexandrian synod of 369. Warns hierarchy of Western Africa against Arian attempts to represent synod of Ariminum (cf. PII4-19.txt) as final settlement of faith at expense of Nicaea, which is contrasted with local synods held since. Nicene formula is in accord with Scripture; reasons for using "homoousios." Divinity of Holy Spirit. [PATRISTC ]


280. PII4-22.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Festal Letters, etc.

A) Historia Athanasii (Historia acephala) written 385-412, a life of Athanasius missing beginning. B) Index (Chronicon Athanasium) Athanasius's the Festal Letters, w/ historical circumstances, by compiler of letters. C) In 3rd c., became custom of bishops of Alexandria to announce beginning of Lent, correct date for Easter each year to suffragan sees by letter issued usually shortly after Epiphany. Discuss current Church affairs/problems, exhort to fasting, almsgiving, reception of sacraments. A.'s collected by friend soon after his death. 40 day Lent now customary even in Egypt. Letter 39 gives Canon of Scripture, regarding deutero-canonical books as non-scriptural, but for 1st time listing our present 27 New Testament books as alone canonical. [PATRISTC ]


281. PII4-23.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Personal Letters

Include: 46-47: Authenticity has been questioned. 48: involuntary thoughts and nocturnal pollutions not sins. 54: Death of Arius. 55. Influential letter on reconciling repentant Arians, incorporated in canonical collection of Greek Church. 56. Exposition of true faith for emp. Jovian, composed by command of Alexandrian synod of 363. 59: Relation of historical Christ to eternal Son, against Arians/Apollinarists with Docetic views. Adopted by Council of Chalcedon. 60. Refutes Arian charge of creature-worship against Nicene Christology. [PATRISTC ]


282. PII4-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Eusebius of Caesarea, Letter to his people at Caesarea

Written upon conclusion of Council of Nicaea to explain the council and justify his own conduct, esp. his consent to homoousios. Brief explanation of the baptismal creed of Caesarea. [PATRISTC ]


283. PII4-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, spur., Statement of Faith Exposition Fidei (Ecthesis)

Formerly attributed to Athanasius; possibly by Eustathius of Antioch or Marcellus of Ancyra. A trinitarian creed (1) followed by comment emphasizing distinct existence and essential uncreatedness of the Son (2-4). Perhaps directed against Arianism, but only the Sabellians are mentioned by name. [PATRISTC ]


284. PII4-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, In illud 'omnia,' etc.

c. A. D. 335? Commentary on Lk 10.22 (Mt 11.27) with comments on Jn 16.15. Perhaps from a sermon or other work no longer extant. [PATRISTC ]


285. PII4-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Epistula ad episcopos encyclica

Encyclical Letter to the Bishops throughout the World. Written mid 339 appealing to the bishops to unite with him against Gregory, the Arian bishop who has usurped the see of Alexandria. Detail on the outrages accompanying G's arrival on 15 Apr 339, and acts of violence by the governor, who seized the churches and delivered them to the Arians. [PATRISTC ]


286. PII4-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Apology against the Arians

Defence against the Arians. Apologia contra Arianos. c. A.D. 357 after return from 2nd exile. A collection of documents in his defense, against the calumnies of the Eusebian party. Letter from: Council of Egypt; Pope Julius (authority of Rome); Council of Serdica (Sardica); Constantius; bishops of Palestine; Arian bishops Valens, Ursacius; Constantine; Synod of Tyre, etc. Points out sufferings of Western bishops at hands of Arians, esp. Pope Liberius and bishop Ossius (Hosius). [PATRISTC ]


287. PII4-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, Defence of the Nicene Definition

Epistula de decretis Nicaenae synodi. c. A.D. 350-351, addressed to a friend confused by Arian claim. Defense of Nicene definition, esp. non scriptural terms "of the substance" and "consubstantial" (of the essence, coessential). These protect Scriptural doctrine. A. appended the letter of Eusebius to his diocese, found in PII4-3.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


288. PII4-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Athanasius, On the Opinion of Dionysius

De Sententia Dionysii episcopi Alexandrini. Refutes the Arians' claim of Dionysius the Great for their side by challenging their interpretation of passages in his writings, proving the disputed passages orthodox but only an incomplete presentation of D.'s belief. [PATRISTC ]


289. PII5-1.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book I

In 316 Eunomius, a leader of the extreme sect of Arians known as the Anomoians, wrote an Apology, which Basil the Great refuted in 363-5. In 378, Eunomius wrote an "Apology for the Apology." After Basil's death, Gregory of Nyssa defended his brother, refuting Eunomius' second Apology. Here is Gregory's first treatise against Eunomius, composed c. 380 and refuting the first book of the "Apology for the Apology." [Cf PII5-2, ...3, ...4, ...5.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


290. PII5-10.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On Virginity

De virginitate. 370-371, Gregory's earliest work. Discusses the ascetical life in general, with his brother St. Basil as exemplar. Views virginity as "a necessary door of entrance to a holier life"; sees the entire divine economy in the light of virginity, with Christ as "archvirgin" and Mary as the striking example of virginity. There is a spiritual incarnation of God in every virginal soul; virginity is the ground of all virtues, the preparation for the vision of God. It cannot be attained without grace. Earthly and spiritual marriage cannot coexist in the same soul. Gregory follows Origen and Methodius. He sees the ascetic life as fulfillment of the philosophers' dream of the comtemplative life. [PATRISTC ]


291. PII5-11.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On Infants' Early Deaths

The author advances the opinion that infants who die prematurely, though not liable to punishment, cannot receive the reward of a virtuous life, since they do not have the capacity for knowledge of and being in God which virtue brings. Such a soul "does in the first instance partake only so far in that life beyond . . . as this nursling can receive; until the time comes that is has thriven on the contemplation of the truly Existent as on a congenial diet, and, becoming capable of receiving more, takes at will more from that abundant supply . . ." Some infants are cut off, he conjectures, because God foresaw from them a life of vice. Authenticity has been questioned. [PATRISTC ]


292. PII5-12.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On Pilgrimages

Gregory's epistle 2 (modern numbering) is a warning against indiscriminate pilgrimages to the Holy Land by ascetics, both men and women. It led to lively controversies between Catholics and Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries. [PATRISTC ]


293. PII5-13.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On the Making of Man

De opificio hominis. Intended to complete the homilies of Basil on the Hesaemeron, the six days of creation (PII8-2.TXT). Chiefly an anthropological and physiological explanation of Genesis 1.26, but theology is not neglected. Written shortly after Basil's death (1 Jam 379) or else in the last period of Gregory's life (d. 394). [PATRISTC ]


294. PII5-14.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On the Soul and the Resurrection

Dialogus de anima et resurrectione qui inscribitur Macrinia. A Christian counterpart to Plato's Phaedo, this dialogue records a conversation in 379 between Gregory and his dying sister, the abbess St. Macrina, shortly after the death of their brother St. Basil. Macrina died the next day, and the dialogue must been composed soon after. Gregory's views concerning the soul, death, resurrection, and the final restoration of all things (apocatastasis) are put into his sister's mouth; she is portrayed as "the Teacher." The work is thus often called the Macrinia. [PATRISTC ]


295. PII5-15.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, The Great Catechism

Oratio catechetica magna. c. 385; most important of Gregory's dogmatic writings, compendium of doctrine to help teachers organize their material.1st attempt at a systematic theology since Origen's On First Principles (ANF4-13, ...14.TXT). Remarkable presentation of chief dogmas of the faith, defended against pagans, Jews and heretics. Cc. 1-4: One God in 3 Persons, consubstantiality of Son, divinity of Spirit. Cc 5-32: Christ and his mission (creation of man, original sin, restoration of the first order by Incarnation, Redemption). Cc. 33-40: distribution of grace through Baptism, Eucharist, belief in Trinity. Relies chiefly on Origen, Methodius, universalist teaching the Last things--nonetheless, a great achievement. [PATRISTC ]


296. PII5-16.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, Funeral Oration on Meletius

A month's mind oration for Bishop Meletius of Antioch, who died in May 381 at the Second Ecumenical Council at Constantinople. A Christion "Consolatio," modelled on the paramythikos logos of the ancient rhetoricians. That he was chosen to give sermons such as this in the imperial capital over outstanding figures of his time shows his great reputation as an orator. [PATRISTC ]


297. PII5-17.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On the Baptism of Christ

A sermon for the Day of Lights, the feast of the Epiphany (= Baptism of the Lord). In diem Luminum sive in baptismum Chrisit. Probably given on Epiphany 383. [PATRISTC ]


298. PII5-18.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, Letters

18 of the 30 letters now known were printed in LNPF II/V, numbered differently than in modern editions. They include purely social communications, letters of introduction or recommendation, theological letters. Examples include # 17, on the deep impression made on him by sight of the holy places; # 16, a description of a martyrion, important for the history of Christian architecture and art. [PATRISTC ]


299. PII5-2.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book II

Gregory's refutation of Eunomius' "Confession of Faith," (383) has nothing to do Gregory's first three tracts against Eunomius, written in defense of his brother. Nevertheless, it replace in the manuscripts the second of these three tracts (PII5-5.TXT), which was not restored to its proper until 1921, after publication of LNPF. Eunormius was the leader of the extreme sect of Arians known as the Anomoians. [Cf PII5-1, ...3, ...4, ...5.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


300. PII5-3.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book III-VII

In 316 Eunomius, a leader of the extreme sect of Arians known as the Anomoians, wrote an Apology, which Basil the Great refuted in 363-5. In 378, Eunomius wrote an "Apology for the Apology." After Basil's death, Gregory of Nyssa defended his brother, refuting Eunomius' second Apology (cf. PII1, ...2.TXT). Gregory's third treatise against Eunomius (381-383), refuting yet another attack on Basil by the heretic, was divided into ten books at an early date, forming books 3 ff. of 12 books in all. The first five of these are given here. [Cf. also PII4, ...5.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


301. PII5-4.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book VIII-XII

In 316 Eunomius, a leader of the extreme sect of Arians known as the Anomoians, wrote an Apology, which Basil the Great refuted in 363-5. In 378, Eunomius wrote an "Apology for the Apology." After Basil's death, Gregory of Nyssa defended his brother, refuting Eunomius' second Apology (cf. PII1, ...2.TXT). Gregory's third treatise against Eunomius (381-383), refuting yet another attack on Basil by the heretic, was divided into ten books at an early date, forming books 3 ff. of 12 books in all. The last five of these are given here. [Cf. also PII3, ...5.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


302. PII5-5.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, Answer to the Second Book of Eunomius

In 316 Eunomius, a leader of the extreme sect of Arians known as the Anomoians, wrote an Apology, which Basil the Great refuted in 363-5. In 378, Eunomius wrote an "Apology for the Apology." After Basil's death, Gregory of Nyssa defended his brother, refuting Eunomius' second Apology. Here is Gregory's second treatise against Eunomius, composed shortly after the first and refuting the second book of the "Apology for the Apology." It had formerly been replaced in the manuscripts by the reply to Eunomius' "Confession of Faith" (PII5-2.TXT), and relegated to the end of the anti-Eunomian writings, but in 1921 (after publication of LNPF), it was restored to its proper place after Book I. [PATRISTC ]


303. PII5-6.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On the Holy Spirit against the Followers of Macedonius

Sermo de Spiritu Sancto adversos Pneumatomachos Macedonios. Aimed at the Pneumatomachi, contenders against the Spirit. Macedonius was the chief representative known to us of the Arian teaching on the Holy Spirit, and was bishop of Constantinople from the deposition of the Nicene Paul, to 360, when he was deposed by the Synod of Constantinople. [PATRISTC ]


304. PII5-7.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On the Holy Trinity, and of the Godhead of the Holy Spirit, against Eustathius

Ad Eustathium de sancta Trinitate. A refutation of the Pnematomachi (contenders against the Spirit), addressed to the physician Eustathius. Most of it is also found as Ep. 189 of Basil the Great, to whom it has been falsely attributed.

[PATRISTC ]


305. PII5-8.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On "Not Three Gods", to Ablabius

That there are not three Gods. Ad Ablabium quod non sint tres dii. 375or 390. Ablabius was a churchman who had asked why we should not speak of three Gods in recognizing the divinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. "God," replies Gregory, denotes essence (being), not persons, and so must be used in the singular with each of the personal names: "God the Father," etc.

[PATRISTC ]


306. PII5-9.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nyssa, On the Faith, to Simplicius

Ad Simplicium de fide sancta. Addressed to the tribune Simplicius, this tract defends the divinity and consubstantiality of the Son and the Holy Spirit against the Arians, refuting their interpretation of various passages from Scripture. Its introduction and conclusion have been lost. [PATRISTC ]


307. PII6-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Letters 1-38

His most widely read writings after Bible translation; marked by personality and spirit of the author; some are brief exegetical treatises. Most famous of 1-38 include 14, on monastic life; 22, on virginity; 23, 24, 33, eulogies for disciples. Cf. PII6-2, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


308. PII6-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Dialogue Against the Luciferians

Altercatio Luciferiani et Orthodoxi. A.D. 382 or earlier. L. was a Nicene extremist who had consecrated Bishop Paulinus of Antioch, to whom J. was connected; led to schism by his refusal to recognize the ordinations of the neo-Nicenes. As a defender of P., J. must separate himself from schismatics while manifesting sympathy. Uses arguments of the validity of Arian baptism, accepted by L., general attitude of Church, and historical precedents from the dispute between Cyprian and Stephen. [PATRISTC ]


309. PII6-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, The Perpetual Virginity of Blessed Mary, Against Helvidius

Contra Helvidium. H., a Roman layman connected with Arian Auxentius of Milan, had picked a quarrel with monk Carterius to prove, against claims of asceticism, that Mary had given birth to subsequent children by Joseph. J. explains disputed texts, praises virginity. [PATRISTC ]


310. PII6-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Against Jovinianus, Book I

Adversus Jovinianum. Monk Jovinian, come to Rome from Milan, attacked virginity and ascetic life by claiming salvation won by Christ to be equal for all. Opinions condemned 390-91 by Pope Siricius and Ambrose. J.'s brilliant refutation exceeded his purpose; exegesis of 1 Cor 7 and expressions drawn from pagan antifeminist lit. provoked resentment, which J. attempted to placate in Lett. 40-50. [PATRISTC ]


311. PII6-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Against Jovinianus, Book II

Adversus Jovinianum. Monk Jovinian, come to Rome from Milan, attacked virginity and ascetic life by claiming salvation won by Christ to be equal for all. Opinions condemned 390-91 by Pope Siricius and Ambrose. J.'s brilliant refutation exceeded his purpose; exegesis of 1 Cor 7 and expressions drawn from pagan antifeminist lit. provoked resentment, which J. attempted to placate in Lett. 40-50. [PATRISTC ]


312. PII6-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Against Vigilantius

Contra Vigilantium

Vigilantius, priest from Aquitania, denounced to J. in 406 as opponent of cult of martyrs, certain liturgical practices he considered superstitious, of the claim of monastic poverty, and the celibacy of the clergy. J. claimed to have dictated the violent pamphlet against his errors in one night. [PATRISTC ]


313. PII6-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, To Pammachius against John of Jerusalem

Contra Johannem Hierosolymitanum. After ordaining Paulinian, John wrote a defense to Theophilus of Alexandria in June 396 explaining his complaints against Jerome and Epiphanius. The next spring, J. wrote a harsh response. Discusses the errors of Origen with irony and bad faith. [PATRISTC ]


314. PII6-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Dialogue Against the Pelagians

A.D. 414. J. uses dialogue from to discuss without invective the limit's of man's liberty and consequently the impassibility to which he could aspire. At end of book II, the Pelagian retires without surrendering. [PATRISTC ]


315. PII6-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Prefaces

Value of prefaces is varyingly a) personal, in expressions of his feelings to those whom he trusts; b) historical, in mention of particular events; c) in showing the difficulties he encountered as a translator, or the state of mind for those for whom he wrote; d) in showing extent, limits of his knowledge, views on points such as inspiration of Scripture which actuated him as a translator or commentator; e) in particular interpretations. PNPF II/VI includes specimens and important passages, summarizing the rest. [PATRISTC ]


316. PII6-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Letters 39-53

His most widely read writings after Bible translation; marked by personality and spirit of the author; some are brief exegetical treatises. Most famous of 39-53 include 39, a eulogy for a disciple; 46, on widowhood; 52, on the clerical state. Cf. PII6-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


317. PII6-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Letters 54-72

His most widely read writings after Bible translation; marked by personality and spirit of the author; some are brief exegetical treatises. Most famous of 54-72 include 58, on monastic life; 60, a eulogy for Nepotian; 66, a eulogy for a disciple. Cf. PII6-1, ...2, ...4, ...5, ...6.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


318. PII6-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Letters 73-107

Letters 73-107

His most widely read writings after Bible translation; marked by personality and spirit of the author; some are brief exegetical treatises. Most famous of 73-107 include 75, a eulogy for Lucinus; 77, a eulogy for a disciple; 79, on widowhood; 107, on the education of young girls. Cf. PII6-1, ...2, ...3, ...5, ...6.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


319. PII6-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Letters 108-124

His most widely read writings after Bible translation; marked by personality and spirit of the author; some are brief exegetical treatises. Most famous of 108-124 include 108, a eulogy for a disciple; 122, on monastic life. Cf. PII6-1, ...2, ...3, ...5, ...6.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


320. PII6-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Letters 125-150

His most widely read writings after Bible translation; marked by personality and spirit of the author; some are brief exegetical treatises. Most famous of 125-150 include 127, a eulogy for a disciple; 128, on the education of young girls; 130, on virginity. Cf. PII6-1, ...2, ...3, ...4, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


321. PII6-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Life of Paulus the First Hermit

Vita Pauli. A.D. 375-9. Biographic novelette of a predecessor to St. Anthony of the Desert (cf. PII4-10.TXT), giving free reign to imagination while keeping in mind some real information concerning the subject as well as J.'s own lived experiences in Syria and Egypt. One can notice behind the more fantastic elements is the somewhat fanciful model the young J. had wanted to realized in the desert. [PATRISTC ]


322. PII6-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Life of S. Hilarion

Life of Hilarion. Bethlehem, A.D. 386-90. Biographic novelette of Hilarion of Gaza, spiritual father of Epiphanius of Salamis. H. an historical figure, if not so his acquaintance with St. Anthony. Gives free reign to imagination while keeping in mind some real information concerning the subject as well as J.'s own lived experiences in Syria and Egypt. J. presents, in contrast to the Life of Paul, a wonder-working monk who lived in contact with men. [PATRISTC ]


323. PII6-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Jerome, Life of Malchus, the Captive Monk

A.D. 390. Biographic novelette giving the story told him by a old man who had practiced perfect chastity with a woman whom the Bedouins had forced him to marry after taking the both as prisoners. Gives free reign to imagination while keeping in mind some real information concerning the subject as well as J.'s own lived experiences in Syria and Egypt. [PATRISTC ]


324. PII7-1.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Cyril of Jerusalem, Procatechesis, Catechetical Lectures 1-12

Quasten III, 363: "one of the most precious treasures of Christian antiquity." 24 lectures, most give in church of the Holy Sepulchre, taken down in shorthand by one of his listeners. First group contains the Procatechesis and 18 Catecheses given to the photizomenoi, or catechumens. Procatechesis stresses the seriousness of the step they are to take, the need for penance and prayer, etc., and insists on the rule of secrecy (disciplina arcani). Cat. 1: attitude necessary for baptism; 2: repentance and forgiveness; 3: baptism, salvation, the baptismal rite; 4: summary of Christian doctrine; 5: nature and origin of faith; 6-18: exposition of the Jerusalem Creed. [Cf. PII7-2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


325. PII7-2.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures 6-18; Mystagogical Catecheses

Quasten III, 363: "one of the most precious treasures of Christian antiquity." 24 lectures, most give in church of the Holy Sepulchre, taken down in shorthand by one of his listeners. First group contains the Procatechesis and 18 Catecheses given to the photizomenoi, or catechumens during Lent. Catecheses 6-18: exposition of the Jerusalem Creed. 5 Mystagogical Catecheses (lectures 19-23): given to the neophotistoi (neophytes, newly-enlightened) during Easter week. Possibly from different year than Lenten catecheses; possibly actually by Cyril's successor bishop John. Based on the liturgical ceremonies of the 3 sacraments which the neophytes had received at the Easter Vigil. Cat 19-20: Baptism; 21: Confirmation; 22: Eucharistic doctrine; 23: liturgy of the Mass. [Cf. PII7-1.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


326. PII7-3.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nazianzus (Gregory Nazianzen), Select Orations: 1-3, 7-8, 12, 16, 18, 21

Most of Gregory's preserved orations date from his years as bishop of Constantinople, 379-81. They were later read and studied in the schools of rhetoric. Include: Or. 2: Apologeticus de fuga (Apology for His Flight), describes the duties of the priest, to justify his flight from them after ordination and subsequent return. Used by Chrystostom and Gregory the Great in their respective treatise on this subject (PNI9-1.TXT, PII12-4). Panegyrical: Or. 7, on his brother Caesarius; Or. 8, on his sister Gorgonia; Or. 18, on his father, Gregory of Nazianzus the elder. Hagiographic: Or. 21, on St. Athanasius. [PATRISTC ]


327. PII7-4.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nazianzus (Gregory Nazianzen), The Five Theological Orations

Orations 37-31. Given at Constantinople in 380; the most admired of Gregory's compositions, which won him the title "the Theologian." Defend orthodox doctrine against the Eunomians and Macedonians. 27: Introduction: prerequisites for the practice of theology; 28: Existence, nature and attributes of God; 29: Unity of nature in the 3 divine Persons, divinity of Logos and coequality with Father; 30: Refutes Arian objections to divinity of Son, including the false exegesis; 31: Divinity of Holy Spirit against the Macedonians. [PATRISTC ]


328. PII7-5.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nazianzus (Gregory Nazianzen), Select Orations: 33-4, 37-41

Most of Gregory's preserved orations date from his years as bishop of Constantinople, 379-81. They were later read and studied in the schools of rhetoric. Include: Or. 37, on Mt 19.1. Liturgical sermons: Or. 38, on the Theophany, or Birthday of Christ; Or. 39, on the Feast of Lights (Epiphany); Or. 40. on Baptism; Or. 41, on Pentecost. [PATRISTC ]


329. PII7-6.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nazianzus (Gregory Nazianzen), Select Orations: 42-3, 45.

Most of Gregory's preserved orations date from his years as bishop of Constantinople, 379-81. They were later read and studied in the schools of rhetoric. Include: Or. 42: farewell to the people of Constantinople and the bishops assembled there; Or. 43: panegyric on St. Basil; Or. 45, on Easter. [PATRISTC ]


330. PII7-7.TXT -- 08/22/96 -- | VIEW

Gregory of Nazianzus (Gregory Nazianzen), Select Letters

First Greek author to publish a collection of his letters. They are pleasing in style and spirit, but generally not as important as Basil's, being mostly of autobiographical value. Given here are Letters on the Apollinarian controversy (including 101-2, well-known for their theology; 101 was quoted in part by the Council of Ephesus and in full by that of Chalcedon); correspondence with St. Basil; groups of letters to his brother Caesarius, St. Gregory of Nyssa, Eusebius of Samosata, Sophronius the prefect of Constantinople, Amphilochius the Younger, Nectarius the archbishop of Constantinople, Theodore the bishop of Tyana, Nicobulus (including letters 51 and 54, on letter-writing), Olympius. [PATRISTC ]


331. PII8-1.TXT -- 07/11/96 -- | VIEW

Basil the Great, On the Holy Spirit

De Spiritu Sancto. c. 375; Defends the consubstantiality of the Son and the Holy Spirit with the Father, and that equal honor with the Father belongs to both. Refutes Sabellianism and Arianism. Used by St. Ambrose as a source for his De Spiritu Sancto, 381, so many of Basil's ideas reached the West. [PATRISTC ]


332. PII8-2.TXT -- 07/11/96 -- | VIEW

Basil the Great, On the Hexaemeron

In Hexaemeron. Nine homilies on the Six Days of creation, deliverd before 370, while still a presbyter, as Lentern sermons during the course of one week. Show traces of improvisation, but surpass all late Greek literature for rhetorical beauty; used by St. Ambrose in his homilies on the subject. Explanation of the literal sense, giving a Christian idea of the world, contrasted to pagan and Manicaean notions. Colorful picture of the beauty of nature; great knowledge of contemporary scholarship in natural science and philosophy. Borrows from Aristotle, Plato, Poseidonios, Plotinus. The last announces a further lecture on man as the image of God, never given. [PATRISTC ]


333. PII8-3.TXT -- 07/11/96 -- | VIEW

Basil the Great, Letters 1-46

Basil's letters reveal his education and literary taste even more than his homilies; are an invaluable source of information for history of Eastern Church in 4th c., and are best source for his life and times. Collection includes letters to as well as from Basil. 1-46 were written before his episcopate, from 357-370, and include letters of: Friendship: 1, 3-4, 7, 12-4, 17, 19-21, 27; Recommendation (interceding for the poor and oppressed, cities or towns, relatives, friends): 3, 15, 31-7; Consolation: 5-6, 28, 29; Moral-ascetical: 2, 10, 11, 14, 18, 22-6; Dogmatic: 9. Several spurious letters are noted as such. [PATRISTC ]


334. PII8-4.TXT -- 07/11/96 -- | VIEW

Basil the Great, Letters 47-122

Basil's letters reveal his education and literary taste even more than his homilies; are an invaluable source of information for history of Eastern Church in 4th c., and are best source for his life and times. Collection includes letters to as well as from Basil. 47-291 date from the years of his episcopate, 370-378; 47-122 include letters of: Friendship: 56-8, 63-64, 95, 118; Recommendation (interceding for the poor and oppressed, cities or towns, relatives, friends): 72-8, 83-8, 96, 104, 108-12; Consolation: 62, 101, 107; on canon law: 53-4; Moral-ascetical: 49, 65, 83, 85, 97, 106, 112, 115-6; Dogmatic: 52, 105, 113-4; 93 recommends daily communion. Several spurious letters are noted as such. [PATRISTC ]


335. PII8-5.TXT -- 07/11/96 -- | VIEW

Basil the Great, Letters 123-196

Basil's letters reveal his education and literary taste even more than his homilies; are an invaluable source of information for history of Eastern Church in 4th c., and are best source for his life and times. Collection includes letters to as well as from Basil. 47-291 date from the years of his episcopate, 370-378; 123-196 include letters of: Friendship: 123-4, 132-5, 145-9, 152-8, 162-5, 168, 172-6, 181, 184-6, 192-6; Recommendation (interceding for the poor and oppressed, cities or towns, relatives, friends): 137, 142-4, 177-80; Consolation: 139, 140; 1st Canonical Epistle: 188 (this and 2 others (199, 217) contain regulations on penitential discipline, are important for its history; they acquired force of law in Greek Church); Moral-ascetical: 161, 173-4, 182-3; Dogmatic: 125, 129, 131, 159, 175. Spurious letters are noted as such. [PATRISTC ]


336. PII8-6.TXT -- 07/11/96 -- | VIEW

Basil the Great, Letters 197-236

Basil's letters reveal his education and literary taste even more than his homilies; are an invaluable source of information for history of Eastern Church in 4th c., and are best source for his life and times. Collection includes letters to as well as from Basil. 47-291 date from the years of his episcopate, 370-378; 197-236 include letters of: Friendship: 198, 200-1, 208-10, 232; Consolation: 206, 227; 2nd & 3rd Canonical Epistle: 199, 217 (these and 1st (188) contain regulations on penitential discipline, are important for its history; they acquired force of law in Greek Church); Moral-ascetical: 197, 219, 220-2; Dogmatic: 210, 214, 226; Liturgical: 207. Spurious letters are noted as such. [PATRISTC ]


337. PII8-7.TXT -- 07/11/96 -- | VIEW

Basil the Great, Letters 237-291

Basil's letters reveal his education and literary taste even more than his homilies; are an invaluable source of information for history of Eastern Church in 4th c., and are best source for his life and times. Collection includes letters to as well as from Basil. 47-291 date from the years of his episcopate, 370-378; 237-291 include letters of: Friendship: 241, 252, 254-5, 259, 267-8, 271, 278, 282, 284-5; Recommendation (interceding for the poor and oppressed, cities or towns, relatives, friends): 271, 273-6, 279-81; Consolation: 238, 247, 256-7, 269; Moral-ascetical: 240, 246, 249, 251, 259, 277, 283, 291; Dogmatic: 251, 258, 261-2. Spurious letters are noted as such. [PATRISTC ]


338. PII8-8.TXT -- 07/11/96 -- | VIEW

Basil the Great, Letters 292-366

Basil's letters reveal his education and literary taste even more than his homilies; are an invaluable source of information for history of Eastern Church in 4th c., and are best source for his life and times. Collection includes letters to as well as from Basil. 292-366 include the letters which cannot be dated, and also many doubtful or spurious letters. They include letters of: Friendship: 320, 332-4; Recommendation (interceding for the poor and oppressed, cities or towns, relatives, friends): 303-19; Consolation: 300-2; Moral-ascetical: 292-99, 366. Correspondence with pagan sophist and rhetorician (335-359): some spurious or at least doubtful; others like 335-46, 358 are authentic. B.'s letters to L. introduce to him young Cappadocian students; L. returns notes of thanks. Interesting because is friendly correspondence between priest and prominent pagan. [PATRISTC ]


339. PII9-1.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Hilary of Poitiers, On the Councils

De synodis. 359; written in preparation for the councils of Rimini Seleucia. Hilary was convinced that Western condemnation as Arian of all Easterns not accepting "homoousios" was too simplistic and counterproductive in fighting the real Arians. Part I (cc. 1-65): Interprets favorably various Eastern professions of faith, rejecting only the Sirmian blasphemy of 357. Part II (cc. 66-92): interprets homoiousios as equivalent to homoousios, admitting that both terms can be used heretically. Di Bernardino (Quasten IV), 44: "A work of rare intelligence and penetration, reveals for the first time in a Western theologian a full awareness of the complex religious reality of the East." In an appendix written after Rimini, he admits that his continued defense of "homoiousios" is above all tactical. [PATRISTC ]


340. PII9-2.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, Books I-V

De Trinitate. His chief doctrinal work, written during his exile. Sources: Novatian, Tertullian, homoiousian writings, but not Athanasius. Strong influence on subsequent anti-Arian writers. Book I: Introductory. Books II-III: general exposition of relation between Father and divinity of Son (and Spirit); refutation of Arian arguments. Books IV-VII: Arius's profession of faith provides a negative framework for Hilary's own argument demonstrating the divinity of the Son and His unity with the Father from the Old and New Testaments. Book VI, 1-23, actually gives a precise and complete refutation of the Arian text. [Cf. PII9-3, ...4, ...5.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


341. PII9-3.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, Books VI-VIII

De Trinitate. His chief doctrinal work, written during his exile. Sources: Novatian, Tertullian, homoiousian writings, but not Athanasius. Strong influence on subsequent anti-Arian writers. Books IV-VII: Arius's profession of faith provides a negative framework for Hilary's own argument demonstrating the divinity of the Son and His unity with the Father from the Old and New Testaments. Book VI, 1-23, actually gives a precise and complete refutation of the Arian text. Books VIII-XII: refute various Arian arguments. [Cf. PII9-2, ...4, ...5.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


342. PII9-4.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, Books IX-X

De Trinitate. His chief doctrinal work, written during his exile. Sources: Novatian, Tertullian, homoiousian writings, but not Athanasius. Strong influence on subsequent anti-Arian writers. Books VIII-XII: refute various Arian arguments. [Cf. PII9-2, ...3, ...5.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


343. PII9-5.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, Books XI-XII

De Trinitate. His chief doctrinal work, written during his exile. Sources: Novatian, Tertullian, homoiousian writings, but not Athanasius. Strong influence on subsequent anti-Arian writers. Books VIII-XII: refute various Arian arguments. Book XII concludes with an appendix (cc. 55-56) on the Holy Spirit. [Cf. PII9-2, ...3, ...4.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


344. PII9-6.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

Hilary of Poitiers, Homilies on the Psalms

Expositions of psalms 1, 53(54), and 130(131), given as examples from Hilary's Commentary on the Psalms. According to Jerome, Hilary relied heavily on Origen, and the feel and content of the work bear this out. His own additions include, for example, discussions on the Latin translation of the psalms and Trinitarian statements which show signs of the results of the Arian controversy. [PATRISTC ]


345. PII9-7.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

John of Damascus (John Damascene), Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, Books I-II

De fide orthodoxa. A formal exposition of the faith and a lasting monument in the history of systematic theology. The third part of his theological masterpiece, a three-part work entitled "The Fountain of Wisdom." De fide orthodoxa was widely used by the scholastics, and remains an important source for the dogmatic teachings of the chief Eastern Fathers. Book I: existence and nature of God, the Trinity. Book II: Spiritual and material creation, including man, concluding with providence, foreknowledge, and predestination. [Cf. PII9-8.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


346. PII9-8.TXT -- 08/12/96 -- | VIEW

John of Damascus (John Damascene), Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, Books III-IV

De fide orthodoxa. A formal exposition of the faith and a lasting monument in the history of systematic theology. The third part of his theological masterpiece, a three-part work entitled "The Fountain of Wisdom." De fide orthodoxa was widely used by the scholastics, and remains an important source for the dogmatic teachings of the chief Eastern Fathers. Book III: the Incarnation, passion and death of Christ. Book IV: the Resurrection, the glorified Christ, more Christological questions, faith, worship, baptism, the Eucharist, honoring the Saints, images, Scripture, evil, sin, the Jews, antichrist, the resurrection of the dead. [Cf. PII9-7.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


347. PNI1-1.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Confessions, I-VI

397-400. An autobiographical composition, as well as a work of philosophy, theology, mysticism, poetry. Complements his "Dialogues" of Cassiacum. Divided into 2 parts: Books I-IX cover his life up to the time of his conversion and the death of him mother; Books X-XIII, added at a later date, describe Augustine as he is writing. The unity of the work derives from the aspect of praise of God (confessio), common to the entire work, and in the autobiographical aspect, found in both parts. Cf. PNI1-2, ...3.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


348. PNI1-10.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Letters 146-172

A.'s correspondence rich in historical, philosophical, theological, exegetical, spiritual, literary, autobiograpical content. Letters often of treatise length, form commentary on his other works, aid to understanding questions and controversies of his day, esp. Donatist, Pelagian conflicts. Of 270 published by Maurist Benedictines, 53 are addressed to Augustine. (9 others are included among his other works). Most of the 270 are translated here; at least 6 more discovered since. 3rd division, 124-231, inclu [PATRISTC ]


349. PNI1-11.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Letters 173-269

A.'s correspondence rich in historical, philosophical, theological, exegetical, spiritual, literary, autobiograpical content. Letters often of treatise length, form commentary on his other works, aid to understanding questions and controversies of his day, esp. Donatist, Pelagian conflicts. Of 270 published by Maurist Benedictines, 53 are addressed to Augustine. (9 others are included among his other works). Most of the 270 are translated here; at least 6 more discovered since. 2nd division, 31-123, includes letters from episcopal ordination until the Donatist conference of 411. 3rd division, 124-231, includes letters from 411 until death. 4th division includes letters of uncertain date. Cf. PNI1-4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


350. PNI1-2.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Confessions, VII-X

397-400. An autobiographical composition, as well as a work of philosophy, theology, mysticism, poetry. Complements his "Dialogues" of Cassiacum. Divided into 2 parts: Books I-IX cover his life up to the time of his conversion and the death of him mother; Books X-XIII, added at a later date, describe Augustine as he is writing. The unity of the work derives from the aspect of praise of God (confessio), common to the entire work, and in the autobiographical aspect, found in both parts. Cf. PNI1-1, ...3.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


351. PNI1-3.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Confessions, XI-XIII

397-400. An autobiographical composition, as well as a work of philosophy, theology, mysticism, poetry. Complements his "Dialogues" of Cassiacum. Divided into 2 parts: Books I-IX cover his life up to the time of his conversion and the death of him mother; Books X-XIII, added at a later date, describe Augustine as he is writing. The unity of the work derives from the aspect of praise of God (confessio), common to the entire work, and in the autobiographical aspect, found in both parts. Cf. PNI1-1, ...2.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


352. PNI1-4.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Letters 1-30

A.'s correspondence rich in historical, philosophical, theological, exegetical, spiritual, literary, autobiograpical content. Letters often of treatise length, form commentary on his other works, aid to understanding questions and controversies of his day, esp. Donatist, Pelagian conflicts. Of 270 published by Maurist Benedictines, 53 are addressed to Augustine. (9 others are included among his other works). Most of the 270 are translated here; at least 6 more discovered since. 1st division, 1-30, includes letters from conversion to episcopal ordination. Cf. PNI1-5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


353. PNI1-5.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Letters 31-57

A.'s correspondence rich in historical, philosophical, theological, exegetical, spiritual, literary, autobiograpical content. Letters often of treatise length, form commentary on his other works, aid to understanding questions and controversies of his day, esp. Donatist, Pelagian conflicts. Of 270 published by Maurist Benedictines, 53 are addressed to Augustine. (9 others are included among his other works). Most of the 270 are translated here; at least 6 more discovered since. 1st division, 1-30, includes letters from conversion to episcopal ordination. Cf. PNI1-5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


354. PNI1-6.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Letters 58-86

A.'s correspondence rich in historical, philosophical, theological, exegetical, spiritual, literary, autobiograpical content. Letters often of treatise length, form commentary on his other works, aid to understanding questions and controversies of his day, esp. Donatist, Pelagian conflicts. Of 270 published by Maurist Benedictines, 53 are addressed to Augustine. (9 others are included among his other works). Most of the 270 are translated here; at least 6 more discovered since. 1st division, 1-30, includes letters from conversion to episcopal ordination. Cf. PNI1-5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


355. PNI1-7.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Letters 87-97

A.'s correspondence rich in historical, philosophical, theological, exegetical, spiritual, literary, autobiograpical content. Letters often of treatise length, form commentary on his other works, aid to understanding questions and controversies of his day, esp. Donatist, Pelagian conflicts. Of 270 published by Maurist Benedictines, 53 are addressed to Augustine. (9 others are included among his other works). Most of the 270 are translated here; at least 6 more discovered since. 1st division, 1-30, includes letters from conversion to episcopal ordination. Cf. PNI1-5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


356. PNI1-8.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Letters 99-123

A.'s correspondence rich in historical, philosophical, theological, exegetical, spiritual, literary, autobiograpical content. Letters often of treatise length, form commentary on his other works, aid to understanding questions and controversies of his day, esp. Donatist, Pelagian conflicts. Of 270 published by Maurist Benedictines, 53 are addressed to Augustine. (9 others are included among his other works). Most of the 270 are translated here; at least 6 more discovered since. 1st division, 1-30, includes letters from conversion to episcopal ordination. Cf. PNI1-5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


357. PNI1-9.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Letters 124-145

A.'s correspondence rich in historical, philosophical, theological, exegetical, spiritual, literary, autobiograpical content. Letters often of treatise length, form commentary on his other works, aid to understanding questions and controversies of his day, esp. Donatist, Pelagian conflicts. Of 270 published by Maurist Benedictines, 53 are addressed to Augustine. (9 others are included among his other works). Most of the 270 are translated here; at least 6 more discovered since. 1st division, 1-30, includes letters from conversion to episcopal ordination. Cf. PNI1-5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


358. PNI10-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew, 1-9

90 Homilies on Matthew--oldest extant complete commentary on 1st Gospel. Antioch, prob. 390. Often attacks Manichaeans, esp. dualism betwen OT God of justice and NT God of love. OT preparatory for New. Son equal to Father, vs. Arians. Attacks theatres, praises monks. Opening verse(s)of each homily: 1) Introduction; 2) 1.1; 3) 1.1; 4) 1.17; 5) 1.22-3; 6)2.1-2; 7) 2.4-5; 8) 2.11; 9) 2.16. [PATRISTC ]


359. PNI10-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew, 10-17

90 Homilies on Matthew--oldest extant complete commentary on 1st Gospel. Antioch, prob. 390. Often attacks Manichaeans, esp. dualism betwen OT God of justice and NT God of love. OT preparatory for New. Son equal to Father, vs. Arians. Attacks theatres, praises monks. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 10) 3.1-3; 11) 3.7; 12) 3.13; 13) 4.1; 14) 4.12; 15) 5.1-2; 16) 5.17; 17) 5.27-8.

[PATRISTC ]


360. PNI10-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew, 18-26

90 Homilies on Matthew--oldest extant complete commentary on 1st Gospel. Antioch, prob. 390. Often attacks Manichaeans, esp. dualism betwen OT God of justice and NT God of love. OT preparatory for New. Son equal to Father, vs. Arians. Attacks theatres, praises monks. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 18) 5.38-40; 19) 6.1; 20) 6.16; 21) 6.24; 22) 6.28-9; 23) 7.1; 24) 7.21; 25) 7.28; 26) 8.5. [PATRISTC ]


361. PNI10-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew, 27-36

90 Homilies on Matthew--oldest extant complete commentary on 1st Gospel. Antioch, prob. 390. Often attacks Manichaeans, esp. dualism betwen OT God of justice and NT God of love. OT preparatory for New. Son equal to Father, vs. Arians. Attacks theatres, praises monks. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 27) 8.14-5; 28) 8.23-4; 29) 9.1-2; 30) 9.9; 31) 9.18; 32) 9.27-30; 33) 10.16; 34) 10.23; 35) 10.34; 36) 11.1. [PATRISTC ]


362. PNI10-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew, 37-48

90 Homilies on Matthew--oldest extant complete commentary on 1st Gospel. Antioch, prob. 390. Often attacks Manichaeans, esp. dualism betwen OT God of justice and NT God of love. OT preparatory for New. Son equal to Father, vs. Arians. Attacks theatres, praises monks. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 37) 11.7-9; 38) 11.25-6; 39) 12.1; 40) 12.9-10; 41) 12.25-6; 42) 12.33; 43) 12.38-9; 44) 12.46-9; 45) 13.10-1; 46) 13.24-30; 47) 13.34-5; 48) 13.53. [PATRISTC ]


363. PNI10-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew, 49-57

90 Homilies on Matthew--oldest extant complete commentary on 1st Gospel. Antioch, prob. 390. Often attacks Manichaeans, esp. dualism betwen OT God of justice and NT God of love. OT preparatory for New. Son equal to Father, vs. Arians. Attacks theatres, praises monks. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 49) 14.13; 50) 14.23-4; 51) 15.1-6; 52) 15.21-2; 53) 15.32; 54) 16.13; 55) 16.24; 56) 16.28; 57) 17.10. [PATRISTC ]


364. PNI10-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew, 58-67

90 Homilies on Matthew--oldest extant complete commentary on 1st Gospel. Antioch, prob. 390. Often attacks Manichaeans, esp. dualism betwen OT God of justice and NT God of love. OT preparatory for New. Son equal to Father, vs. Arians. Attacks theatres, praises monks. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 58) 17.22-3; 59) 18.7; 60) 18.15; 61) 18.21; 62) 19.1; 63) 19.16; 64) 19.27; 65) 20.17-9; 66) 20.29-30; 67) 21.12-13. [PATRISTC ]


365. PNI10-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew, 68-78

90 Homilies on Matthew--oldest extant complete commentary on 1st Gospel. Antioch, prob. 390. Often attacks Manichaeans, esp. dualism betwen OT God of justice and NT God of love. OT preparatory for New. Son equal to Father, vs. Arians. Attacks theatres, praises monks. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 68) 21.33-44; 69) 22.1-14; 70) 22.15; 71) 22.34-6; 72) 23.1-3; 73) 23.14; 74) 23.29-30; 75) 24.1-2; 76) 24.16-8; 77) 24.32-3; 78) 25.1-30. [PATRISTC ]


366. PNI10-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. Matthew, 79-90

90 Homilies on Matthew--oldest extant complete commentary on 1st Gospel. Antioch, prob. 390. Often attacks Manichaeans, esp. dualism betwen OT God of justice and NT God of love. OT preparatory for New. Son equal to Father, vs. Arians. Attacks theatres, praises monks. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 79) 25.31-41; 80) 26.6-7; 81) 26.17-8; 82) 26.26-8; 83) 26.36-8; 84) 26.51-4; 85) 26.67-9; 86) 27.11-2; 87) 27.27-9; 88) 27.45-8; 89) 27.62-4; 90) 28.11-14. [PATRISTC ]


367. PNI11-1.TXT -- 07/27/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Acts of the Apostles, 1-10

400 A.D. Text drawn up from notes taken by stenographers during the preaching, evidently never revised by Chyrsostom. Though less polished, no less valuable then other works, esp. for clear and for exposition of the historical sense. Follows the narrative carefully; condemns delay of baptism, treats miracles, suffering, prayer, study of the Scriptures, gentleness and almsgiving, oaths and swearing. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) 1.1-2; 2) 1.6; 3) 1.12; 4) 2.1-2; 5) 2.14; 6) 2.22; 7) 2.37; 8) 3.1; 9) 3.12; 10) 4.1. Cf. PNI11-2, ...3, ...4, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


368. PNI11-2.TXT -- 07/27/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Acts of the Apostles, 11-20

400 A.D. Text drawn up from notes taken by stenographers during the preaching, evidently never revised by Chyrsostom. Though less polished, no less valuable then other works, esp. for clear and for exposition of the historical sense. Follows the narrative carefully; condemns delay of baptism, treats miracles, suffering, prayer, study of the Scriptures, gentleness and almsgiving, oaths and swearing. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 11) 4.23; 12) 4.36-7; 13) 5.17-8; 14) 5.34; 15) 6.8; 16) 7.6-7; 17) 7.35; 18) 7.54; 19) 8.26-7; 20) 9.10-2. Cf. PNI11-1, ...3, ...4, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


369. PNI11-3.TXT -- 07/27/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Acts of the Apostles, 21-30

400 A.D. Text drawn up from notes taken by stenographers during the preaching, evidently never revised by Chyrsostom. Though less polished, no less valuable then other works, esp. for clear and for exposition of the historical sense. Follows the narrative carefully; condemns delay of baptism, treats miracles, suffering, prayer, study of the Scriptures, gentleness and almsgiving, oaths and swearing. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 21) 9.26-7; 22) 10.1-4; 23) 10.23-4; 24) 10.44-6; 25) 11.19; 26) 12.1-3; 27) 12.18-9; 28) 13.4-5; 29) 13.16-7; 30) 13.42. Cf. PNI11-1, ...2, ...4, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


370. PNI11-4.TXT -- 07/27/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Acts of the Apostles, 31-42

400 A.D. Text drawn up from notes taken by stenographers during the preaching, evidently never revised by Chyrsostom. Though less polished, no less valuable then other works, esp. for clear and for exposition of the historical sense. Follows the narrative carefully; condemns delay of baptism, treats miracles, suffering, prayer, study of the Scriptures, gentleness and almsgiving, oaths and swearing. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 31) 14.14-5; 32) 15.1; 33) 15-13-5; 34) 15.35; 35) 16.13-4; 36) 16.25-6; 37) 17.1-3; 38) 17.16-7; 39) 17.32-4, 18.1; 40) 18.18; 41) 19.8-9; 42) 19.21-3. Cf. PNI11-1, ...2, ...3, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


371. PNI11-5.TXT -- 07/27/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Acts of the Apostles, 43-55

400 A.D. Text drawn up from notes taken by stenographers during the preaching, evidently never revised by Chyrsostom. Though less polished, no less valuable then other works, esp. for clear and for exposition of the historical sense. Follows the narrative carefully; condemns delay of baptism, treats miracles, suffering, prayer, study of the Scriptures, gentleness and almsgiving, oaths and swearing. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 43) 20.1; 44) 20.17-21; 45) 20.32; 46) 21.18-9; 47) 21.39-40; 48) 22.17-20; 49) 23.6-8; 50) 23.31-3; 51) 24.22-3; 52) 25.23; 53) 26.30-2; 54) 28.2-3; 55) 28.17-20. Cf. PNI11-1, ...2, ...3, ...4.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


372. PNI11-6.TXT -- 07/27/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Romans, 1-8

381-98, prob. shortly after 391. By far the best patristic commentary on Romans. Does not discuss the great dogmatic problems, but, following his characteristic leanings, stays with moral and ascetical questions. Thus sometimes disappointing from theological point of view. Great enthusiasm for St. Paul. Some so long they would have taken two hours to deliver; thus probably not preached in present form. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) 1.1-2; 2) 1.8; 3) 1.18; 4) 1.26-7; 5) 1.28; 6) 2.17-8; 7) 3.9-18; 8) 4.1-2. Cf. PNI11-7, ...8, ...9.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


373. PNI11-7.TXT -- 07/27/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Romans, 9-14

381-98, prob. shortly after 391. By far the best patristic commentary on Romans. Does not discuss the great dogmatic problems, but, following his characteristic leanings, stays with moral and ascetical questions. Thus sometimes disappointing from theological point of view. Great enthusiasm for St. Paul. Some so long they would have taken two hours to deliver; thus probably not preached in present form. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 9) 4.23; 10) 5.12; 11) 6.5; 12) 6.19; 13) 7.14; 14) 8.12-3. Cf. PNI11-6, ...8, ...9.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


374. PNI11-8.TXT -- 07/27/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Romans, 15-21

381-98, prob. shortly after 391. By far the best patristic commentary on Romans. Does not discuss the great dogmatic problems, but, following his characteristic leanings, stays with moral and ascetical questions. Thus sometimes disappointing from theological point of view. Great enthusiasm for St. Paul. Some so long they would have taken two hours to deliver; thus probably not preached in present form. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 15) 8.28; 16) 9.1; 17) 10.1; 18) 10.14-5; 19) 11.7; 20) 12.1; 21) 12.4-5. Cf. PNI11-6, ...7, ...9.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


375. PNI11-9.TXT -- 07/27/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Romans, 22-32

381-98, prob. shortly after 391. By far the best patristic commentary on Romans. Does not discuss the great dogmatic problems, but, following his characteristic leanings, stays with moral and ascetical questions. Thus sometimes disappointing from theological point of view. Great enthusiasm for St. Paul. Some so long they would have taken two hours to deliver; thus probably not preached in present form. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 22) 12.14; 23) 13.1; 24) 13.11; 25) 14.1-2; 26) 14.14; 27) 16.25-7; 28) 15.8; 29) 15.14; 30) 15.25-7; 31) 16.5; 32) 16.17-8. Cf. PNI11-6, ...7, ...8.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


376. PNI12-1.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on 1st Corinthians, 1-10

At Antioch, thus between 386 and 397. This complete commentary on 1 Corinthians is among the best examples of Chrysostom's thought and teaching. Note especially Homily 7, 1-2, a detailed discussion of the Pauline concept of the Christian mystery, which is the best key to Chrysostom's own understanding of 1 Cor 2.6-10. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) 1.1-3; 2) 1.4-5; 3) 1.10; 4) 1.18-20; 5) 1.26-7; 6) 2.1-2; 7) 2.6-7; 8) 3.1-3; 9) 3.12-15; 10) 3.18-9. Cf. PNF12-2, ...3, ...4, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


377. PNI12-2.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on 1st Corinthians, 11-19

At Antioch, thus between 386 and 397. This complete commentary on 1 Corinthians is among the best examples of Chrysostom's thought and teaching. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 11) 4.3-4; 12) 4.6; 13) 4.10; 14) 4.17; 15) 5.1-2; 16) 5.9-11; 17) 6.12; 18) 6.15; 19) 7.1-2. Cf. PNF12-1, ...3, ...4, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


378. PNI12-3.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on 1st Corinthians, 20-27

At Antioch, thus between 386 and 397. This complete commentary on 1 Corinthians is among the best examples of Chrysostom's thought and teaching. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 20) 8.1; 21) 9.1; 22) 9.13-4; 23) 9.24; 24) 10.13; 25) 10.25; 26) 11.2; 27) 11.17. Cf. PNF12-1, ...2, ...4, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


379. PNI12-4.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on 1st Corinthians, 28-35

At Antioch, thus between 386 and 397. This complete commentary on 1 Corinthians is among the best examples of Chrysostom's thought and teaching. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 28) 11.28; 29) 12.1-2; 30) 12.12; 31) 12.21; 32) 12.27; 33) 13.4; 34) 13.8; 35) 14.1. Cf. PNF12-1, ...2, ...3, ...5.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


380. PNI12-5.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on 1st Corinthians, 36-44

At Antioch, thus between 386 and 397. This complete commentary on 1 Corinthians is among the best examples of Chrysostom's thought and teaching. Note especially Homily 40, which quotes part of a baptismal creed containing the clauses "and in the remission of sins, and in the resurrection of the dead, and in life everlasting. Entire Homily important for history of the baptismal liturgy and the rule of secrecy (disciplina arcani). Opening verse(s) of each homily:36) 14.20; 37) 14.34; 38) 15.1-2; 39) 15.11; 40) 15.29; 41) 15.35-6; 42) 15.47; 43) 16.1; 44) 16.10. Cf. PNF12-1, ...2, ...3, ...4.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


381. PNI12-6.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on 2nd Corinthians, 1-8

At Antioch, thus between 386 and 397. Thus complete commentary on 2 Corinthians is among the best examples of Chrysostom's thought and teaching. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) 1.1-4; 2) 1.6-7; 3) 1.12; 4) 1.23; 5) 2.12-13; 6) 3.1; 7) 3.7-8; 8) 4.1-2. [PATRISTC ]


382. PNI12-7.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on 2nd Corinthians, 9-19

At Antioch, thus between 386 and 397. Thus complete commentary on 2 Corinthians is among the best examples of Chrysostom's thought and teaching. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 9) 4.8-9; 10) 5.1; 11) 5.11; 12) 6.1-2; 13) 6.11-2; 14) 7.2-3; 15) 7.8; 16) 7.13; 17) 8.7; 18) 8.16; 19) 9.1.

[PATRISTC ]


383. PNI12-8.TXT -- 07/30/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on 2nd Corinthians, 20-30

At Antioch, thus between 386 and 397. Thus complete commentary on 2 Corinthians is among the best examples of Chrysostom's thought and teaching. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 20) 9.10; 21) 10.1-2; 22) 10.7; 23) 11.1; 24) 11.13; 25) 11.21; 26) 12.1; 27) 12.11; 28) 12.16-8; 29) 13.1; 30) 13.10. [PATRISTC ]


384. PNI13-1.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Commentary on Galatians

Composed at Antioch, prob. after homilies on Corinthians (PNI12-1 to PNI12-8.TXT). Now in the form of a modern work, i.e., a verse by verse explanation of the text; originally a series of homilies (he now and then addresses his hearers directly). [PATRISTC ]


385. PNI13-10.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Second Timothy

Written at Antioch. Much on Timothy's office as bishop. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) 1.1-2; 2) 1.8-10; 3) 1.13-8; 4) 2.1-7; 5) 2.11-14; 6) 2.20-1; 7) 3.1-7; 8) 3.1-4; 9) 3.16-7; 10) 4.9-13. [PATRISTC ]


386. PNI13-11.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Titus

Written at Antioch. Includes a long essay on the burden of a bishop. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) 1.1-4; 2) 1.5-6; 3) 1.12-4; 4) 2.2-5; 5) 2.11-4; 6) 3.8-11. [PATRISTC ]


387. PNI13-12.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Philemon

Prob. written at Antioch around the same time as those on Timothy and Titus (PNI13-9, ...10, ...11.TXT). Valuable for Chrysostom's ideas on slavery, which he saw as an established fact and consequence of sin but refused to accept as a law of nature. The Church, he says, does not distinguish between slave and free; encourages manumission by Christian masters in every way, calling the slaves brothers of Christ and demanding that they be treated as such. Opening verse(s) of each homily: i) Argument; 1) 1.1-3; [PATRISTC ]


388. PNI13-2.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Ephesians, 1-11

Composed at Antioch. Opening verse(s) of each homily: i) The Argument; 1) 1.1-2; 2) 1.11-14; 3) 1.15-20; 4) 2.1-3; 5) 2.11-2; 6) 2.17-22; 7) 3.8-11; 8) 4.1-2; 9) 4.1-3; 10) 4.4; 11) 4.4-7. [Cf. PNI13-3.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


389. PNI13-3.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Ephesians, 12-24

Composed at Antioch. Homily 20 important for Chrysostom's teaching on marriage: moral code for husband and wife showing ideal of Christian wedded life. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 12) 4.17; 13) 4.17-9; 14) 4.25-7; 15) 4.31; 16) 4.31-2; 17) 4.32, 5.1-2; 18) 5.5-6; 19) 5.15-7; 20) 5.22-4; 21) 6.1-3; 22) 6.5-8; 23) 6.14; 24) 6.14-7. [Cf. PNI13-2.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


390. PNI13-4.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Philippians, 1-7

Given at Constantinople. Homily 7 a great defense of the doctrine of the Incarnation against various heretics: Marcionites, Paul of Samosata and Arians. Stresses perfect divinity and perfect humanity (body and soul), distinct but united in one Christ, the Son of God. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) 1.1-2; 2) 1.8-11; 3) 1.18-20; 4) 1.22-6; 5) 2.1-4; 6) 2.5-8; 7) 2.5-11. [Cf. PNI13-5.TXT.] [PATRISTC ]


391. PNI13-5.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Philippians, 8-15

Written at Constantinople. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 8) 2.12-6; 9) 2.19-21; 10) 3.1-3; 11) 3.7-10; 12) 3.13-4; 13) 3.18-21; 14) 4.4-7; 15) 4.10-4. [Cf. PNI13-4.TXT.]

[PATRISTC ]


392. PNI13-6.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Colossians

Written at Constantinople, delivered in 399. In general not as good as his other commentaries, though there are a great variety in content and a number of excellent passages. Opening verses and themes: 1) 1.1-2 ff. (discusses the different types of friendship among men); 2) 1.9-10; 3) 1.15-8 (of Christological importance); 4) 1.21-22 (why Christ's coming was delayed; use of historical books of the Old Testament); 5) 1.26-8 (human reason insufficient for supernatural mysteries); 6) 2.6-7 (the Redemption); 7) 2.16-9 (desctructive and regenerative effects of baptism); 8) 3.5-7 (thankfulness as a philosophy of life, equal to martyrdom if given for injuries); 9) 3.16-7 (necessity of reading Scripture, use of Psalms for moral instruction); 10) 3.18-25; 11) 4.5-6; 12) 4.12-3 (condemns abuses of wedding-feasts, pictures Christ and angels present at Christian marriage). [PATRISTC ]


393. PNI13-7.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on First Thessalonians

Written at Constantinople. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) 1.1-3; 2) 1.8-10; 3) 2.9-12; 4) 3.5-8; 5) 4.1-3; 6) 4.9-10; 7) 4.13; 8) 4.15-7; 9) 5.1-2; 10) 5.12-3; 11) 5.19-22. [PATRISTC ]


394. PNI13-8.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on Second Thessalonians

Written at Constantinople. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) Argument; 2) 1.1-2; 3) 1.9-10; 4) 2.6-9; 5) 3.3-5. [PATRISTC ]


395. PNI13-9.TXT -- 08/01/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on First Timothy

Written at Antioch. Much on Timothy's office as bishop. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) 1.1-2; 2) 1.5-7; 3) 1.12-4; 4) 1.15-6; 5) 1.18-9; 6) 2.1-4; 7) 2.2-4; 8) 2.8-10; 9) 2.11-5; 10) 3.1-4; 11) 3.8-10; 12) 4.1-3; 13) 4.11-4; 14) 5.8; 15) 5.11-5; 16) 5.21-3; 17) 6.2-7; 18) 6.13-16. [PATRISTC ]


396. PNI14-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. John, 1-16

c. A.D. 391. 88 short homilies on St. John's Gospel; missing the episode of the adulterous woman, which was therefore not in copies of the Bible used in Antioch at that time. Often controversial, against Arians, esp., Anomoeans--develops doctrine of condescension. Quoted by Council of Chalcedon. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 1) Preface; 2) 1.1; 3) 1.1; 4) 1.1; 5) 1.3; 6) 1.6; 7) 1.9; 8) 1.9; 9) 1.11; 10) 1.11; 11) 1.14; 12) 1.14; 13) 1.15; 14) 1.16; 15) 1.18; 16) 1.19. [PATRISTC ]


397. PNI14-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. John, 17-32

c. A.D. 391. 88 short homilies on St. John's Gospel; missing the episode of the adulterous woman, which was therefore not in copies of the Bible used in Antioch at that time. Often controversial, against Arians, esp., Anomoeans--develops doctrine of condescension. Quoted by Council of Chalcedon. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 17) 1.28-9; 18) 1.35-7; 19) 1.41-2; 20) 1.43-4; 21) 1.29-50; 22) 2.4; 23) 2.11; 24) 2.23; 25) 3.5; 26) 3.6; 27) 3.12-13; 28) 3.17; 29) 3.22; 30) 3.31; 31) 3.35-6; 32) 4.13-4. [PATRISTC ]


398. PNI14-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. John, 33-48

c. A.D. 391. 88 short homilies on St. John's Gospel; missing the episode of the adulterous woman, which was therefore not in copies of the Bible used in Antioch at that time. Often controversial, against Arians, esp., Anomoeans--develops doctrine of condescension. Quoted by Council of Chalcedon. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 33) 4.21-2; 34) 4.28-9; 35) 4.40-3; 36) 4.54, 5.1; 37) 5.6-6; 38) 5.14; 39) 5.23-4; 40) 5.31-2; 41) 5.39-40; 42) 6.1-4; 43) 6.16-8; 44) 6.26-7; 45) 6.28-30; 46) 6.41-2; 47) 6.53-4; 48) 7.1-2. [PATRISTC ]


399. PNI14-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. John, 49-61

c. A.D. 391. 88 short homilies on St. John's Gospel; missing the episode of the adulterous woman, which was therefore not in copies of the Bible used in Antioch at that time. Often controversial, against Arians, esp., Anomoeans--develops doctrine of condescension. Quoted by Council of Chalcedon. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 49) 7.9-10; 50) 7.25-7; 51) 7.37-8; 52) 7.45-6; 53) 8.20; 54) 8.31-2; 55) 8.48-9; 56) 9.1-2; 57) 9.6-7; 58) 9.17-8; 59) 9.34-6; 60) 10.14-5; 61) 10.22-4. [PATRISTC ]


400. PNI14-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. John, 62-76

c. A.D. 391. 88 short homilies on St. John's Gospel; missing the episode of the adulterous woman, which was therefore not in copies of the Bible used in Antioch at that time. Often controversial, against Arians, esp., Anomoeans--develops doctrine of condescension. Quoted by Council of Chalcedon. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 62) 11.1-2; 63) 11.30-1; 64) 11.41-2; 65) 11.49-50; 66) 12.8; 67) 12.25-6; 68) 12.34; 69) 12.42-3; 70) 13.1; 71) 13.12; 72) 13.20; 73) 13.36; 74) 14.8-9; 75) 14.15-7; 76) 14.31, 15.1. [PATRISTC ]


\

401. PNI14-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Gospel of St. John, 77-88

c. A.D. 391. 88 short homilies on St. John's Gospel; missing the episode of the adulterous woman, which was therefore not in copies of the Bible used in Antioch at that time. Often controversial, against Arians, esp., Anomoeans--develops doctrine of condescension. Quoted by Council of Chalcedon. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 77) 15.11-2; 78) 16.4-6; 79) 16.16-7; 80) 17.1; 81) 17.6; 82) 17.14; 83) 18.1; 84) 18.37; 85) 19.16-8; 86) 20.10-1; 87) 20.24-5; 88) 21.15. [PATRISTC ]


402. PNI14-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Epistle to the Hebrews, 1-10

34 homilies from the last year before exile, 403-404, published after his death from notes by Constantine, a priest of Antioch. Opening verse(s) of each homily: i) Summary; 1) 1.1-2; 2) 1.3; 3) 1.6-8; 4) 2.5-7; 5) 2.16-7; 6) 3.7-11; 7) 4.11-3; 8) 5.1-3; 9) 6.1-3; 10) 6.7-8. [PATRISTC ]


403. PNI14-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Epistle to the Hebrews, 11-23

34 homilies from the last year before exile, 403-404, published after his death from notes by Constantine, a priest of Antioch. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 11) 6.13-16; 12) 7.1-3; 13) 7.11-14; 14) 8.1-2; 15) 9.1-5; 16) 9.15-8; 17) 9.24-6; 18) 10.8-13; 19) 10.19-23; 20) 10.26-7; 21) 10.32-4; 22) 11.3-4; 23) 11.7. [PATRISTC ]


404. PNI14-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Epistle to the Hebrews, 24-34

34 homilies from the last year before exile, 403-404, published after his death from notes by Constantine, a priest of Antioch. Opening verse(s) of each homily: 24) 11.13-6; 25) 11.17-9; 26) 11.20-2; 27) 11.28-31; 28) 11.37-8; 29) 12.4-6; 30) 12.11-3; 31) 12.14; 32) 12.18-24; 33) 12.28-9; 34) 13.17.

[PATRISTC ]


405. PNI2-1.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, I-II

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-2, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


406. PNI2-10.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, XX-XI

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


407. PNI2-11.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, XX

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


408. PNI2-12.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, Books I-II

De doctrina christiana libri IV. 397, 426-7. The work is important a) for the dogmatic synthesis, based on the distinction between use and enjoyment (Bk. 1), which served as the model for the medieval Sententiae; b) for the doctrine of the sign and biblical hermeneutic (Bk. 2-3); c) for the principles and exmaples of sacred oratory (Bk. 4). Cf. PNI2-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


409. PNI2-13.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, Books III-IV

De doctrina christiana libri IV. 397, 426-7. The work is important a) for the dogmatic synthesis, based on the distinction between use and enjoyment (Bk. 1), which served as the model for the medieval Sententiae; b) for the doctrine of the sign and biblical hermeneutic (Bk. 2-3); c) for the principles and exmaples of sacred oratory (Bk. 4). Cf. PNI2-12.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


410. PNI2-2.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, III-IV

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


411. PNI2-3.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, V-VI

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


412. PNI2-4.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, VII-VIII

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


413. PNI2-5.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, IX-X

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


414. PNI2-6.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, XI-XIII

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


415. PNI2-7.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, XIV-XV

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


416. PNI2-8.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, XVI-XVII

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


417. PNI2-9.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, City of God, XVII-XIX

De civitate Dei libri XXII. 413-426. Possibly his greatest work; synthesis of his philosophical, theological, political thought, one of most significant works of Christian and world literature. Prompted by pagan accusations against Christians; two parts: Books 1-10: refutation of paganism; Books 11-22: exposition, defense of Christian doctrine. 1-5: social sterility, 6-10: spiritual sterility of paganism; 11-14: origin, 15-18: course, 19-22: destinies of the two cities of God and the world. Perfect structure, though numerous digressions. Divine providence in human history; history divided into two cities based on two loves, of self and God. Five parts to the history: creation, fall, preparation for Christ, Incarnation and Church, final destiny. Confronts problems of good and evil. Cf. PNI2-1, ...3, ...4, ...5, ...6, ...7, ...8, ...9, ...10, ...11.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


418. PNI3-1.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Trinity, Books I-IV

De Trinitate libri XV. 399-412 & 420. Augustine's chief dogmatic work; decisive influence on Western Trinitarian theology. Presents exposition, defense, formulation, illustration and contemplation of the dogma. More original aspects include doctrine of relations, psychological model of the Trinity, personal properties of Holy Spirit (proceeding as love), connection between mystery of Trinity and life of grace. Books 1-4: biblical theology of the Trinity. Cf. PNI3-2, ...3, ...4.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


419. PNI3-10.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Creed: a Sermon to Catechumens

Sermo ad catechumenos de symbolo. Uncertain date. Authenticity has been questioned; the three sermons which follow it in the manuscripts are not authentic and have been attributed by some to Quodvultdeus, bishop of Carthage. [PATRISTC ]


420. PNI3-11.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Of continence

De continentia liber I. 395 or after 412. Treatise on the virtue and charism of continence. [PATRISTC ]


421. PNI3-12.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Good of Marriage

De bono coniugale liber I. c. 401. Written in response to the controversy begun by Jovinian, who attacked virginity and the ascetic life; emphasizes the dignity and goods of marriage. [PATRISTC ]


422. PNI3-13.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Of Holy Virginity

De sancta virginitate liber I. Written c. 401, immediately after his De bono coniugale (PNI3-11.TXT); teaches esteem of virginity without slighting matrimony, necessity of humility to persevere in virginity. [PATRISTC ]


423. PNI3-14.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Good of Widowhood

De bono viduitatis liber seu epistola. 414. Letter to Juliana, mother of the virgin Demetriades, on the merits of widowhood. [PATRISTC ]


424. PNI3-15.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Lying

De mendacio liber I. 395. Considered by Augustine himself as "obscure and complicated." Still, the work is not without value. Cf. Contra mendacium, PNI3-15.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


425. PNI3-16.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, To Censentius: Against Lying

Contra mendacium liber I. 420-421. Again takes up the subject of lying and demonstrates its immorality. Cf. De mendacio, PNI3-14.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


426. PNI3-17.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Of the Work of Monks

De opere monachorum liber I. 401. Address to moks at Carthage; shows necessity for monks to have manual labor as well as prayer, if not prevented by weakness, pastoral ministry, or study. Theology of ora et labora; considerable influence on Western monasticism. [PATRISTC ]


427. PNI3-18.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Patience

De patientia liber I. 415. Parallel work to the De continentia (PNI3-11.TXT); on with the virtue and charism of patience. [PATRISTC ]


428. PNI3-19.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Care To Be Had for the Dead

De cura pro mortuis gerenda liber I. 424-5. Response to Paulinus of Nola, on concern for the dead and the benefit they receive from being buried near the memorials of the martyrs.

[PATRISTC ]


429. PNI3-2.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Trinity, Books V-VIII

De Trinitate libri XV. 399-412 & 420. Augustine's chief dogmatic work; decisive influence on Western Trinitarian theology. Presents exposition, defense, formulation, illustration and contemplation of the dogma. More original aspects include doctrine of relations, psychological model of the Trinity, personal properties of Holy Spirit (proceeding as love), connection between mystery of Trinity and life of grace. Books 5-7: speculative theology and defense of the dogma; 8: introduction to mystical knowledge of God. Cf. PNI3-1, ...3, ...4.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


430. PNI3-3.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Trinity, Books IX-XIV

De Trinitate libri XV. 399-412 & 420. Augustine's chief dogmatic work; decisive influence on Western Trinitarian theology. Presents exposition, defense, formulation, illustration and contemplation of the dogma. More original aspects include doctrine of relations, psychological model of the Trinity, personal properties of Holy Spirit (proceeding as love), connection between mystery of Trinity and life of grace. Books 9-14: search for the image of the Trinity in man. Cf. PNI3-1, ...2, ...4.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


431. PNI3-4.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Trinity, Book I-IV

De Trinitate libri XV. 399-412 & 420. Augustine's chief dogmatic work; decisive influence on Western Trinitarian theology. Presents exposition, defense, formulation, illustration and contemplation of the dogma. More original aspects include doctrine of relations, psychological model of the Trinity, personal properties of Holy Spirit (proceeding as love), connection between mystery of Trinity and life of grace.

Book 15: summary and conclusion. Cf. PNI3-1, ...2, ...3.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


432. PNI3-5.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, The Enchiridion

On Faith Hope and Love. Enchiridion ad Laurentium or De fide, spe et caritate liber I. 421. Manual arranged around the three theological virtues explains the creed (faith), the Lord's Prayer (hope), and the moral precepts (love). Brief yet clear synthesis of Augustine's theology. [PATRISTC ]


433. PNI3-6.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Catechising the Uninstructed

De catechizandis rudibus liber I. c. 400. Manual of catechetical instruction, rich in pedagogical insights. [PATRISTC ]


434. PNI3-7.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Faith and the Creed

De fide et symbolo liber I. Contains the explanation of the creed give by Augustine in October 393 before the African bishops meeting at Hippo. Important witness to beginnings of Augustine's Trinitarian doctrine. [PATRISTC ]


435. PNI3-8.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Concerning Faith of Things not Seen

De fide rerum quae non videntur liber I. Written after the laws of Honorius of 399, is on the relations between reason and faith. Cf. his De utilitate credendi, PNI3-9.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


436. PNI3-9.TXT -- 07/25/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Profit of Believing

De utilitate credendi liber I. 391. First work after priestly ordination. Acute analysis of the relations between reason and faith; demonstrates the truth of the Catholic faith, which is not a blind faith since founded on indisputable reasons. Cf. his De fide rerum quae non videntur, PNI3-8.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


437. PNI4-1.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Morals of the Catholic Church and on the Morals of the Manichaeans

De moribus Ecclesiae catholicae et de moribus Manichaeorum libri II. His first apology, written by the new convert in Rome, 388, published in Africa the following year. Based on comparison between doctrine and life of the Catholic Church, centered on and formed by love, and that of the Manichaeans, whose doctrine was untenable and life inconsistent. [PATRISTC ]


438. PNI4-10.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Baptism, against the Donatists, Books I-IV

De baptismo libri VII. 400. Shows the validity of baptism administered by heretics and takes away from the Donatists the authority of Cyprian, to whom they appealed. Cf. Cyprian's letters on rebaptism to Jubaianus (72), Quintus (70) and Pompey (73), ANF5-8.TXT, and the Seventh Council of Carthage, ANF5-21.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


439. PNI4-11.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Baptism, against the Donatists, Books V-VII

De baptismo libri VII. 400. Shows the validity of baptism administered by heretics and takes away from the Donatists the authority of Cyprian, to whom they appealed. Cf. Cyprian's letters on rebaptism to Jubaianus (72), Quintus (70) and Pompey (73), ANF5-8.TXT, and the Seventh Council of Carthage, ANF5-21.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


440. PNI4-12.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Answer to Letters of Petilian, Bishop of Cirta, Books I-II

Contra litteras Petiliani libri III. Written during pontificate of Pope Anastasium (398-401) as a response to the letter of the Donatist bishop of Cirta, Petilianus, and his reply to Augustine's reponse. PNI4-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


441. PNI4-13.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Answer to Letters of Petilian, Bishop of Cirta, Books III

Contra litteras Petiliani libri III. Written during pontificate of Pope Anastasium (398-401) as a response to the letter of the Donatist bishop of Cirta, Petilianus, and his reply to Augustine's reponse. Cf. PNI4-12.TXT.

[PATRISTC ]


442. PNI4-14.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, The Correction of the Donatists

De correptione donatistarum liber I. 417. Shows that the Donatist heresy has nothing to do with the Arian, and defends the imperial legislation against the Donatists.

[PATRISTC ]


443. PNI4-2.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Two Souls, against the Manichaeans

De duabus animabus liber I. 392. Refutes fundamental Manichaean thesis of the two souls, one deriving from the principle of good and the other from evil, which denies human freedom. Rather, in each man is one soul endowed with free will, from which evil arises. [PATRISTC ]


444. PNI4-3.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Acts against Fortunatus the Manichaean

Acta contra Fortunatum Manichaeum. The minutes of a debate on the origin of evil held at Hippo, 28-29 August 392. Augustine shows that evil proceeds from the freely chosen sin of man. Fortunatus was unable to respond and left Hippo. [PATRISTC ]


445. PNI4-4.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Against the Epistle of Manichaeus called Fundamental

Contra epistolam Manichaei quam vocant fundamenti liber I. Written at beginning of his episcopate against the letter which was a kind of catechism of the sect. Refutes its commencement and principles by showing that Mani cannot refer to Christ, whereas the Catholic Church can, and by showing the absurdity of Manichaean dualism. [PATRISTC ]


446. PNI4-5.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Reply to Faustus the Manichaean, Books 1-15

Contra Faustum Manichaeum libri XXXIII. 397-8. Gives a thorough defense of the Old and New Testaments by citing and refuting Faustus' own words. Denies the Manichaeans can call themselves Christians. Cf. PNI4-6, ...7, ...8.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


447. PNI4-6.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Reply to Faustus the Manichaean, Books 16-21

Contra Faustum Manichaeum libri XXXIII. 397-8. Gives a thorough defense of the Old and New Testaments by citing and refuting Faustus' own words. Denies the Manichaeans can call themselves Christians. Cf. PNI4-5, ...7, ...8.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


448. PNI4-7.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Reply to Faustus the Manichaean, Books Book 22

Contra Faustum Manichaeum libri XXXIII. 397-8. Gives a thorough defense of the Old and New Testaments by citing and refuting Faustus' own words. Denies the Manichaeans can call themselves Christians. Cf. PNI4-5, ...6, ...8.TXT.

[PATRISTC ]


449. PNI4-8.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Reply to Faustus the Manichaean, Books Book 23-33

Contra Faustum Manichaeum libri XXXIII. 397-8. Gives a thorough defense of the Old and New Testaments by citing and refuting Faustus' own words. Denies the Manichaeans can call themselves Christians. Cf. PNI4-5, ...6, ...7.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


450. PNI4-9.TXT -- 07/18/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Concerning the Nature of Good, against the Manichaeans

De natura boni liber I. 399. Shows that all things, insofar as they exist, are good, and that evil is nothing but a privation of good. The Manichaean principle of absolute evil is absurd. [PATRISTC ]


451. PNI5-1.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Merits and Remission of Sins, and on the Baptism of Infants

De peccatorum meritis et remissione et de baptismo parvulorum ad Marcellinum libri III. 412. A fundamental work: first attempt at biblical theology of redemption, original sin. Necessity of baptism, necessity of grace for observing commandments of God. Answers difficulties against notion of hereditary sin proposed by Pelagius in explaining Rom. 5:12. [PATRISTC ]


452. PNI5-10.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Grace and Free Will

De gratia et libero arbitrio liber I. 426 or 427. Writes to monks at Hadrumentum to put to rest difficulties arising from his Letter 194. Proves the necessity of grace and the existence of free will according to the teaching of Scripture, and exhorts the monks to profess both even if they do not know how to reconcile them. Defends gratuity of grace, shows that God, in crowning our merits, crowns His own gifts. [PATRISTC ]


453. PNI5-11.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Rebuke and Grace

De correptione et gratia liber I. 426 or 427. Writes to the monks at Hadrumetum to correct the false conclusion that some of them had formed from his "On Grace and Free Will" (PNI5-10.TXT): that if grace is necessary, fraternal correction is useless. Treats of predestination and the efficacy of grace. Grace, though it renders correction beneficial, does not take away free will. However, for Augustine, the grace now given to the predestined makes it impossible that they should not persevere, and those to whom this grace is not given cannot be saved. Most important work for A.'s doctrine on grace. [PATRISTC ]


454. PNI5-12.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Predestination of the Saints and On the Gift of Perseverance

De praedestinatione sanctorum and De dono perseverantiae. These works were written to Prosper and Hilary, who had informed Augustine from Gaul of Semi-Pelagianism among the monks of Marseilles, who vigorously opposed Augustine's "On Grace and Free Will" (PNI5-10.TXT) and "On Rebuke and Grace" (PNI5-11.TXT). Shows that the beginning of faith and final perseverance are gifts of God, not merely the work of free will.

[PATRISTC ]


455. PNI5-2.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Spirit and the Letter

De spiritu et littera ad Marcellinum liber I. 412. Key work for Augustine's doctrine of grace. Relation between law and grace; no justification from the law alone: grace is needed. The law enables us look for grace; grace enables us to keep the law. The commandments of the law are an occasion of death; grace is the source of life. [PATRISTC ]


456. PNI5-3.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Nature and Grace

De natura et gratia liber I. 415. Response to Pelagius' De natura. Shows it unnecessary to defend nature against grace or grace against nature, but rather to defend both together, since grace frees and heals nature. [PATRISTC ]


457. PNI5-4.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Man's Perfection in Righteousness

De perfectione iustitiae hominis epistola sive liber. 415. Response to the Definitiones of Caelestius, in which this disciple of Pelagius defended sinlessness and denied the necessity of grace. Augustine replies that full righteousness can never be obtained on earth; the command to love God with all one's heart is the ideal to strive for, not the goal to be reached. [PATRISTC ]


458. PNI5-5.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Proceedings of Pelagius

De gestis Pelagii liber I. 417. Examines the proceedings of the Synod of Diospolis; shows that Pelagius was absolved but Pelagianism condemned. [PATRISTC ]


459. PNI5-6.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Grace of Christ, on on Original Sin

De gratia Christi et de peccato originali libri II. 418. At the request of Albina, Pinianus and Melania, Augustine denounces the error of Pelagius, who called freedom the law and revelation grace, but denied the interior help of grace except as an aid to observing the commandments more easily. Shows that neither Pelagius nor Caelestius, his disciple, believed the fundamental doctrine of original sin. However, Augustine teaches that through original sin, all have been condemned, so that infants who die unbaptized justly suffer the pains of hell. [PATRISTC ]


460. PNI5-7.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On Marriage and Concupiscence

De nuptiis et concupiscentia libri II. 419-420. Response to Julian, who accused Augustine of denying the goodness of marriage because he taught that original sin is transmitted by generation and that disordered concupiscence is an evil. Julian wrote four books in response to Augustine's first; Augustine when he received these added the second. [PATRISTC ]


461. PNI5-8.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, On the Soul and its Origin

De anima et eius origine libri IV. 419 Refutes the errors of the young Vincentius Victor, who had reproved him for his hesitation between creationism and (spiritual) traducianism on the origin of the soul. Rejects the Manichaean theory of emanation and the Origenist preexistence of the soul, meanwhile defending his own uncertainty. [PATRISTC ]


462. PNI5-9.TXT -- 07/20/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Against Two Letters of the Pelagians

Contra duas epistolas pelagianorum libri IV. c. 420. Dedicated to Pope Boniface, who had sent Augustine the two letters of Julain the bishops who with him had refused to sign the Tractoria of Pope Zosimus. Refutes the accusations that Catholics, and above all Augustine, denied free will, condemned matrimony, censured the saints, diminished the law, denigrated baptism, and were reviving Manichaeism. [PATRISTC ]


463. PNI6-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Our Lord's Sermon on the Mount De sermone Domini in monte libri II

Two books date from first years of his priesthood; exposition of the Sermon on the Mount, containing synthesis of moral doctrine, explanation of Beatitudes, Gifts of Holy Spirit (Retract. 1, 19).

[PATRISTC ]


464. PNI6-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 51-60

Benedictine edition 101-110. Sermons 101) Lk 10.2. 102) Lk 10.16. 103) Lk 10.38. 104) Lk 10.38. 105) Lk 11.5. 106) Lk 11.39. 107) Lk 12.15. 108) Lk 12.35, Ps 34.12. 109) Lk 12.56, 58. 110) Lk 13.6, Ps 9.19. [PATRISTC ]


465. PNI6-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 61-70

Benedictine edition 111-120. Sermons 111) Lk 13.21, 23. 112) Lk 14.16. 113) Lk 16.9. 114) Lk 17.3, touching the remission of sins. 115) Lk 18.1. 116) Lk 24.36. 117) Jn 1.1. Against the Arians. 118) Jn 1. 119) Jn 1. 120) Jn 1. [PATRISTC ]


466. PNI6-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 71-80

Benedictine edition 121-130. Sermons 121) Jn 1.10. 122) Jn 1.48. 123) Jn 2.2. 124) Jn 5.2. 125) Jn 5.2. 126) Jn 5.19. 127) Jn 5.25. 128) Jn 5.31, Gal 5.16. 129) Jn 5.39. Against the Donatists. 130) Jn 6.9. [PATRISTC ]


467. PNI6-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 81-90

Benedictine edition 131-140. Sermons 131) Jn 6.53; and the Psalms. 132) Jn 6.55. 133) Jn 7.6. 134) Jn 8.31. 135) Jn 9.4, 31. Against the Arians. 136) Jn 9. 137) Jn 10. 138) Jn 10.14. Against the Donatists 139) Jn 10.30. 140) Jn 12.44. Against an expression of Arian bishop Maximinus. [PATRISTC ]


468. PNI6-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 91-97

Benedictine edition 141-147. Sermons 141) Jn 14.6. 142) Jn 14.6. 143) Jn 16.7. 144) Jn 16.8. 145) Jn 16.24, Lk 10.17. 146) Jn 21.16. 147) Jn 21.15. [PATRISTC ]


469. PNI6-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, The Harmony of the Gospels, Book I De consensu Evangelistarum libri IV

Written c. 400 to refute those who accused Evangelists of contradictions. Proves their authority (vs. pagan philosopher who accused them of having falsely attributed divinity to Christ: book I) and historicity, harmony of their accounts. Valuable study on concordance of Gospels. Cf. PNI6-3, ...4,.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


470. PNI6-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, The Harmony of the Gospels, Book II De consensu Evangelistarum libri IV

Written c. 400 to refute those who accused Evangelists of contradictions. Proves their authority and the historicity, harmony of their accounts. Valuable study on concordance of Gospels. Cf. PNI6-2, ...4.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


471. PNI6-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, The Harmony of the Gospels, Book III-IV De consensu Evangelistarum libri IV

Written c. 400 to refute those who accused Evangelists of contradictions. Proves their authority and the historicity, harmony of their accounts. Valuable study on concordance of Gospels. Cf. PNI6-2, ...3.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


472. PNI6-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 1-10

Benedictine edition 51-60. Sermons 51) Agreement of Mt and Lk on the generations of the Lord. 52) Mt 3.13. The Trinity. 53) Mt 5.3,8, esp. "Blessed are the pure in heart." 54) Mt 5.16, 6.1. 5) Mt 5.22. 56) On the Lord's Prayer in Mt 6.9. To the Competentes (the last class of the Catechumens). 57) To the Competentes on the Lord's prayer, Mt 6. 58) On the Lord's prayer in Mt 6. To the Competentes. 59) On the Lord's prayer in Mt 6. To the Competentes. 60) Mt 6.19. Exhortation to almsgiving. [PATRISTC ]


473. PNI6-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 11-20

Benedictine edition 61-70. Sermons 61) Mt. 7.7. Exhortation to almsgiving. 62) Mt 8.8, 1 Cor 8.10. 63) Mt 8.23. 64) Mt. 10.16. Given on a feast of martyrs. 65) Mt 10.28. Given on a feast of martyrs. 66) Mt 11.2. 67) Mt 11.25. 68) Mt 11.25. 69) Mt 11.28. 70) Mt 11.28. [PATRISTC ]


474. PNI6-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 21-30

Benedictine edition 71-80. Sermons 71) Mt 12.32. 72) Mt 12.33. 73) Mt 13.19. 74) Mt 13.52. 75) Mt 14.24. 76) Mt 14.25. 77) Mt 15.21. 78) Mt 17.1. 79) Mt 17. The Transfiguration. 80) Mt 17.19.

This description was present, but was labeled pni6-9.txt. The correct description for pni6-9.txt was in its proper place, with the correct file name.

[PATRISTC ]


475. PNI6-8.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 31-40

Benedictine edition 81-90. Sermons 81) Mt 18.7. 82) Mt 18.15, and of the words of Solomon, He that winketh with the eyes deceitfully, heapeth sorrow upon men: But he that reproveth openly, maketh peace. 83) Mt 18.21. 84) Mt 19.17. 85) Mt 19.17. 86) Mt 19.21. 87) Mt 20.1. 88) Mt 20.30. 89) Mt 21.19, Lk 24.28. 90) Mt 22.2. Against the Donatists: On Charity. [PATRISTC ]


476. PNI6-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Sermons on Selected Lessons of the New Testament 41-50

Benedictine edition 91-100. Sermons 91) Mt 22.42. 92) Mt 22.42. 93) Mt 29.1. 94) Mt 25.24. 95) Mk 8.5. 96) Mk 8.34, 1 Jn 2.15. 97) Mk 13.32. 98) Lk 7.2, on the three dead persons whom the Lord raised. 99) Lk 7.37. Against the Donatists: On the remission of sins. 100) Lk 9.57. [PATRISTC ]


477. PNI7-1.TXT -- 07/23/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Lectures or Tractates on the Gospel according to St. John, 1-10

Tractatus inevangelium Ioannis. 124 sermons, some given, others merely dictated; marked by a pastoral character but also rich in theological, philosophical and spiritual content. Divided into two groups: 1-54, 55=124. First group dated variously to 411, 413, 414 or 406-8 & 418. Second group 416, 418 or 419-20. Contents (chapter and verse): 1) 1.1-5; 2) 1.6-14; 3) 1.15-18; 4) 1.19-33; 5) 1.33; 6) 1.32-33; 7) 1.34-51; 8) 2.1-4; 9) 2.1-11; 10) 2.12-21. [PATRISTC ]


478. PNI7-2.TXT -- 07/23/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Lectures or Tractates on the Gospel according to St. John, 11-20

Tractatus inevangelium Ioannis. 124 sermons, some given, others merely dictated; marked by a pastoral character but also rich in theological, philosophical and spiritual content. Divided into two groups: 1-54, 55=124. First group dated variously to 411, 413, 414 or 406-8 & 418. Second group 416, 418 or 419-20. Contents (chapter and verse): 11) 2.23-5, 3.1-5; 12) 3.6-21; 13) 3.22-9; 14) 3.29-36; 15) 4.1-42; 16) 4.43-54; 17) 5.1-18; 18) 5.19; 19) 5.19-30; 20) 5.19. [PATRISTC ]


479. PNI7-3.TXT -- 07/23/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Lectures or Tractates on the Gospel according to St. John, 21-30

Tractatus inevangelium Ioannis. 124 sermons, some given, others merely dictated; marked by a pastoral character but also rich in theological, philosophical and spiritual content. Divided into two groups: 1-54, 55=124. First group dated variously to 411, 413, 414 or 406-8 & 418. Second group 416, 418 or 419-20. Contents (chapter and verse): 21) 5.20-3; 22) 5.24-30; 23) 5.19-40; 24) 6.1-14; 25) 6.15-44; 26) 6.41-59; 27) 6.60-72; 28) 7.1-13; 29) 7.14-8; 30) 7.19-24. [PATRISTC ]


480. PNI7-4.TXT -- 07/23/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Lectures or Tractates on the Gospel according to St. John, 31-44

Tractatus inevangelium Ioannis. 124 sermons, some given, others merely dictated; marked by a pastoral character but also rich in theological, philosophical and spiritual content. Divided into two groups: 1-54, 55=124. First group dated variously to 411, 413, 414 or 406-8 & 418. Second group 416, 418 or 419-20. Contents (chapter and verse): 31) 7.25-36; 32) 7.37-39; 33) 7.40-53, 8.1-11; 34) 8.12; 35) 8.13-4; 36) 8.15-8; 37) 8.19-20; 38) 8.21-5; 39) 8.26-7; 40) 8.28-32; 41) 8.31-6; 42) 8.37-47; 43) 8.48-59; [PATRISTC ]


481. PNI7-5.TXT -- 07/23/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Lectures or Tractates on the Gospel according to St. John, 45-60

Tractatus inevangelium Ioannis. 124 sermons, some given, others merely dictated; marked by a pastoral character but also rich in theological, philosophical and spiritual content. Divided into two groups: 1-54, 55=124. First group dated variously to 411, 413, 414 or 406-8 & 418. Second group 416, 418 or 419-20. Contents (chapter and verse): 45) 10.1-10; 46) 10.11-13; 47) 10.14-21; 48) 10.22-42; 49) 11.1-54; 50) 11.55-7, 12.1-11; 51) 12.12-26; 52) 12.27-36; 53) 12.37-43; 54) 12.44-50; 55) 13.1-5; 56) 13.6-10 [PATRISTC ]


482. PNI7-6.TXT -- 07/23/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Lectures or Tractates on the Gospel according to St. John, 61-98

Tractatus inevangelium Ioannis. 124 sermons, some given, others merely dictated; marked by a pastoral character but also rich in theological, philosophical and spiritual content. Divided into two groups: 1-54, 55=124. First group dated variously to 411, 413, 414 or 406-8 & 418. Second group 416, 418 or 419-20. Contents (chapter and verse): 61) 13.21-6; 62) 13.26-31; 63) 13.31-2; 64) 13.33; 65) 13.34-5; 66) 13.36-8; 67) 14.1-3; 68) 14.1-3; 69) 14.4-6; 70) 14.7-10; 71) 14.10-4; 72) 14.10-4; 73) 14.10-4; 74) [PATRISTC ]


483. PNI7-7.TXT -- 07/23/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Lectures or Tractates on the Gospel according to St. John, 99-124

Tractatus inevangelium Ioannis. 124 sermons, some given, others merely dictated; marked by a pastoral character but also rich in theological, philosophical and spiritual content. Divided into two groups: 1-54, 55=124. First group dated variously to 411, 413, 414 or 406-8 & 418. Second group 416, 418 or 419-20. Contents (chapter and verse): 99) 16.13; 100) 16.13-5; 101) 16.16-23; 102) 16.23-8; 103) 16.29-33; 104) 17.1; 105) 17.1-5; 106) 17.6-8; 107) 17.9-13; 108) 17.14-9; 109) 17.20; 110) 17.21-3; 111) 17.2 [PATRISTC ]


484. PNI7-8.TXT -- 07/23/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Homilies on the Epistle of St. John to the Parthians

Tractatus in epistolam Ioannis ad Parthos. 10 sermons on the St. John's comprehensive teaching on charity, given during the Easter festivities of a year between 413 and 418, thus interrupting the commentary on the Gospel. The most beautiful treatment of charity in patristic literature. Contents (chapter and verse): 1) 1.1-2.11; 2) 2.12-7; 3) 2.18-27; 4) 2.27-3.8; 5) 3.9-18; 6) 3.19-4.3; 7) 4.4-12; 8) 4.12-6; 9) 4.17-21; 10) 5.1-3. [PATRISTC ]


485. PNI7-9.TXT -- 07/23/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Soliloquies

Soliloquiorum libri II. 386-387; written at Cassiacum while preparing for baptism. Treat of the conditions of the quest for and possession of God; argue for the immortality of the soul from the presence in it of eternal truth.

[PATRISTC ]


486. PNI8-1.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 1-30

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


487. PNI8-10.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 107-118

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


488. PNI8-11.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 119-124

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


489. PNI8-12.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 125-139

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


490. PNI8-13.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 140-150

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


491. PNI8-2.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 31-41

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


492. PNI8-3.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 42-50

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


493. PNI8-4.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 51-59

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


494. PNI8-5.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 60-68

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


495. PNI8-6.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 69-75

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


496. PNI8-7.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 76-85

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


497. PNI8-8.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 86-94

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


498. PNI8-9.TXT -- 07/24/96 -- | VIEW

Augustine, Expositions on the Book of Psalms, 95-106

Ennarationes in Psalmos. Written from 392 until 416, perhaps. 422. A.'s longest work, richest in spiritual doctrine. Only complete treatise on Psalms in Fathers. Divided: those dictated and those preached. Former: brief exegetical notes (1-31, with few exceptions), longer expositions (67, 71, 77 etc.), homilies to be read to people (32 homilies on Ps 119 (Vulg. 118)). Latter: sermons given mostly in Carthage. Theological-spiritual interpretation based on doctrine of "whole Christ": Psalms convey voice of Christ, Church, individual Christians. Important doctrinal themes; philosophy, theology, spiritual doctrine, mysticism. Esp. develops themes of mystical body, two cities, ascent of soul to God. Based on Latin translation of Septuagint revised by A. Cf. PNI8-1, 8-2, etc. to PNI8-13.TXT. [PATRISTC ]


499. PNI9-1.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, On the Priesthood De sacerdotio

Classic on priesthood, one of finest treastures of Patristic literature. Priesthood requires lack of ambition, great virtue, charity, knowledge, wisdom, patience, etc. Fate of those who are ordained knowing their unworthiness. Preaching--aim to please God, convert audience. Preference for the active life, which requires greater generosity, fortitude. Dialogue setting a literary fiction. [PATRISTC ]


500. PNI9-10.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homily to those who had not attended the assembly

prob. at Constantinople, 399 or after. C. castigates his flock because so many of their brethren do not come to church except on feast days, reminding those present of their duty to bring others to Christ; also an exposition on Rom. 12.20ff, on being reconciled to ones enemies. [PATRISTC ]


501. PNI9-11.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homily against publishing the errors of the brethren

Chrysostom explains the advantage of not publicly exposing the sinner, and the necessity of forgiving one's enemies. The Church as source of spiritual health, the birth of Christ, prayer, devil. [PATRISTC ]


502. PNI9-12.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Two Homilies on Eutropius

After fall from power early 399, Eutropius escaped death by claiming right of asylum at the cathedral; hom. 1 preached 17 Jan 399 on transitoriness of worldly glory as E. clung to the altar. hom. 2, after E.'s banishment to Cyprus, denies rumor that E. was betrayed by ecclesiastical authorities, speaks of the vanity of riches. [PATRISTC ]


503. PNI9-13.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Treatise that no one injured except by himself Quod nemo laeditur nisi a se ipso

A.D. 405-6. It is always in a man's own free will to avoid that which alone can harm him. Sin, virtue, devil, wealth. [PATRISTC ]


504. PNI9-14.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Letters to Olympias

5 of the 17 letters to the wealthy widow and deaconess Olympias, who never tired of looking after C.'s physical health. Also an affectionate letter to 4 presbyters of Antioch. [PATRISTC ]


505. PNI9-15.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Correspondence with Pope Innocent I

1. C. to I., spring 404 before second exile, reporting disturbances at capital after arrival of Theophilus; 2) C. to I., from Cucusus during exile. 3. I. to C. during exile. 4. I. to Christians in Constantinople who had remained loyal to C., during the exile. [PATRISTC ]


506. PNI9-16.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 1-5

Statues of Emperor Theodosius at Antioch destroyed by mob in 387, after imposition of an extraordinary tax. T. considered destroying city, so bishop Flavian went to beg forgivenss. C. delivered 21 homilies during F.'s absence, consoling the crowds yet castigating the vices which brought down God's wrath. Final homily, on Easter, announces F.'s success, complete pardon from T. These made C. famous as an orator. 1-5: The beginnings of the disturbances, exhortation to fortitude. [PATRISTC ]


507. PNI9-17.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 6-14

Statues of Emperor Theodosius at Antioch destroyed by mob in 387, after imposition of an extraordinary tax. T. considered destroying city, so bishop Flavian went to beg forgivenss. C. delivered 21 homilies during F.'s absence, consoling the crowds yet castigating the vices which brought down God's wrath. Final homily, on Easter, announces F.'s success, complete pardon from T. These made C. famous as an orator. 6-14: Respect for government, creation, sin, avoiding oaths, thankgiving for avoidance of evils, further disturbance. [PATRISTC ]


508. PNI9-18.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 15-21

Statues of Emperor Theodosius at Antioch destroyed by mob in 387, after imposition of an extraordinary tax. T. considered destroying city, so bishop Flavian went to beg forgivenss. C. delivered 21 homilies during F.'s absence, consoling the crowds yet castigating the vices which brought down God's wrath. Final homily, on Easter, announces F.'s success, complete pardon from T. These made C. famous as an orator. 15-21: fear, oaths, pilgrims from the country, Lenten fast, reconciliation with Emperor. [PATRISTC ]


509. PNI9-2.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Letters to the fallen Theodore Paraeneses ad Theodorum lapsum

From his period as an anochorite. Exhortations in defense of ascetic life to friend Theodore, who had left monastic life, hoped to marry. T. later returned, was ordained, became bishop of Mopsuestia. 1st work has form of treatise; 2nd that of epistle. [PATRISTC ]


510. PNI9-3.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, To a Young Widow Ad viduam iuniorem

Brief treatise, prob. ca. 380, seeks to console a young widow for the loss of her spouse Therasius. [PATRISTC ]


511. PNI9-4.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homilies on St. Ignatius and St. Babylas

Sermons given at Antioch on St. Ignatius, bishop of Antioch martyred 110. A.D., and St. Babylas, bishop of Antioch c. 237-250. martyr. [PATRISTC ]


512. PNI9-5.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homily on 'Lowliness of Mind'

A.D. 386-7. Against some who explained Phil 1.18 as meaning that provided Christ was preached, it mattered not whether the actual doctrines taught were true or heretical. [PATRISTC ]


513. PNI9-6.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Instructions to Catechumens Baptismal Catecheses. Catecheses ad illuminandos

Lent 388. During his 12 years of preaching at Antioch, C. was responsible for preparing the catechumens for Baptism. Until 1909, only these two were extant. [PATRISTC ]


514. PNI9-7.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Three Homilies on the Devil Homiliae tres de diabolo

A.D. 386-98 at Antioch. 1: that demons do not govern the world; 2-3: Resiting the temptations of the Devil. Human nature, evil, providence, demons, Devil, perseverance, despair, repentance, theatre, Eve, Job, temptation. [PATRISTC ]


515. PNI9-8.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homily against Marcionites and Manichaeans

Homily on the words of Christ, Mt 26.29, "Father if it be possible let this cut pass from me...." Incarnation, cross, crucifixion, will of Christ, prayer. [PATRISTC ]


516. PNI9-9.TXT -- 06/19/96 -- | VIEW

John Chrysostom, Homily on the Paralytic Let Down through the Roof

A.D. 398 ? On Matthe 9, cf. Mark 22. Paralytic, forgiveness of sins, patience, fortitude. [PATRISTC ]


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