Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!



Shields & Blades

Shields & Blades

Medireview& Dark Age Miniature Rules v11

by Eric Wood

Special Thanks to: Earl Upchurch, Jay Stribling, and Jim Pitts

 

 

NOTES:  WAR WAGONS, SIEGE EQUIPMENT (BATTERING RAMS, SAPPING, LADDERS (push away, climb rates), BOILING OIL, etc.), HISTORICAL DEPLOYMENTS, TACTICS FOR SOLO GAMES, STRATEGMS

 

OVERVIEW:

Time Period

                This rule set was begun as a medireview rule set, but can easily function for Dark Age.   With some modifications, one can adapt the rules for the Reformation period.

 

Overview

                This rule set is a squad-level scale using side move / countermove system.  The rule set has opportunity fire (with both standing and moving fire).  Since these rules are not skirmish level, the shield facing and facing of the castings is not a problem.

 

Squad Scale

                This rule set deals with each casting representing a squad of a fifteen men rather than tactical or grand tactical scales.  As a result the formation and movement rules are very fluid and the distance ranges might seem wrong to some one, until they realize that the battles are "zoomed in".  

                Since we are not skirmish level, shield facing and facing of the castings is not a problem.  One can do a skirmish level game with these rules easily by worrying about the shield facing and increasing the weapon 3” and movement ranges an additional d6”.

               

Scale

1:15 thus 1 casting represents 15 men.  1' = 120 yards, 1" = 10 yards.  Time frame is 1 minute.  2 fire phases.  Infantry unit has 180 men; cavalry has 90 riders and 90 horses.  Minute walk moves 1’ (12”).

Infantry base is 3/4" x 3/4".  Assume each infantryman wants 4' front x 7' back.  Fits 15 castings with 5 along the front and 3 ranks deep.

 

Supplies Required

                Enough six-sided dice for each player to have a set of 8-10 colored (for unit attack) and 2-3 white (for the bonus dice). No other dice are needed for this system.  Everywhere in this rule system, rolling high is considered good.

                A ruler or tape measure per player.

                A quantity of small colored rings or markers to denote morale states (yellow, green, blue, etc.) and usage this turn (black).

 

Unit Size

                A unit is a group of soldiers that are under the same leadership and have the same morale quality.  All figures in the unit should have a common weapon (whether a one-handed weapon, two-handed weapon, or a particular type of missile weapon).   All figures in the unit should have the same defense value (whether shielded or not, whether armored or not).  In the case of mixed armor or mixed weapons, treat the unit as whatever the majority of the castings have.

Referees need to decide the size of units.  There needs to be consistency on unit size to scale the game.  There are two methods for unit sizes:  large (consisting of 12 infantry castings, 12 riders and 12 horses for cavalry, or 2 to 12 castings for infantry skirmishers) and small (consisting of 6 infantry castings, 6 riders and 6 horses for cavalry, or 2 to 6 castings for infantry skirmishers).  Using small units allow players to field armies quickly, as there are less troops to paint. 

The rules only change slightly based on the size of units.  Using large units, one gets one attack dice per two castings (round up).  Small units get one attack dice per casting.  When damage occurs, large units lose a casting per kill.  Small units suffer a casting loss per two points of damage (round up).

Skirmishers units can break into any combination of pairs of figures (2, 4, 6 if small units) or (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12 if large units).  Field and siege weapons are manned according to the weapon.  Campaign rules allow for unusual size units (see the Buy Troops page of the campaign rules).  

 

Basing

                The suggested basing method of figures of a unit is individually based on steel bases and using magnetic movement stands.  Individually basing figures takes more time, but it is easy to see the unit’s strength and there is no need for casualty markers.

                However, any basing method is acceptable as long as all of the units have the same size frontage.

 

Troop Grades

                Expendables – Expendables include foreign conscripts, captives, human shields, prisoners, stampeding cattle, war dogs, and chained slaves.  Expendables are untrustworthy troops that are used because they might hinder enemy troops.  Mongols drove masses of refugees ahead of their army as human shields.  Muslims used chained slaves in a vain attempt to block Crusader knights.  Irish drove cattle stampedes to hinder their enemy.  Many armies used forced conscription or prisoners to fill the ranks that even the local troops did not trust.  Expendables are unarmored and have a pitiful morale.

                Peasants - All men (and boys) of a district armed with various standard infantry or improvised weapons.  Can carry short bows, light crossbows, javelins, or slings.  No mounted units.  Commonly referred to as general levy.

Soldiers - Able-bodied, semi-trained fighting men armed with standard infantry weapons.  Can carry short bows or heavy or light crossbows.  Can have mounted units armed with spears or single-handed melee weapons.  Sometimes referred to as yeomen or select levy.

                Veterans - Veterans are soldiers or professionally trained troops that have seen a lot of fighting. 

                Samurai / Knights  - See European Knights, Arab Knights, and Samurai entries in the special troop appendix.  Knight is called “caballero” in Spanish, “ritter” in German, and “cavaliere” in Italian.

Elites – The best of the knight units that are loyal and battle hardened.  Typically they were royal bodyguards or members of a religious military order.  Commonly called fanatics.

 

Leaders

                Unit Leaders - An integral part of a unit, such as a baron commanding his retinue.   They differ from army leaders, because they can never leave their unit.  Unit leaders fight like any other member of his unit.

                Army Leaders - Can attach or detach themselves to units of the army they command. They are treated as knights for combat purposes.

 

Markers Used  (use colored poker chips or rings or caps)

                Color      Effect                                      When Removed

                Black      No Movement                      Removed on Movement Phase.

                Blue        Reload Missile Weapons   Optionally removed if do not fire this turn.

If removed, then replaced with black marker.

                Yellow    Withdrawn Unit                   Removed on fleeing movement phase.

Red         Routed Unit                          Removed if pass courage on Rally or Rout Phase. 

(Also routed unit loses a morale rank, enemy unit increases in morale if it routed the unit from melee rather than missile fire)

                White     Casualty Marker                   Ring placed on individual casting if slain. 

Not needed for individually mounted troops because they just remove the casting.

Various  Promotion                              They designate the current morale.  They correspond in color to the morale unit markings listed below.

 

MORALE

 

Remembering the Colors

Remember that yellow is the worst grade because of the association of yellow with cowards.  If someone is “green”, he is a raw recruit, which is better than being a coward but worst than the rest.  Remember that the knights are “royal” blue.

 

Original Morale  (Denoted by Colored Circles on base of figures)

                Unit markings denote the unit's original morale and are the colored circles usually semi-permanently affixed to the base of the castings.  All the figures in the unit should have a common weapon and marked with certain colors:

 

                Double Yellow                      Expendables

Yellow                                    Peasants                (New, Unproven Troops Morale)

                Green                                      Soldiers                  (Proven Troops Morale)

                Red                                         Veterans and Byzantine Regulars

                Blue                                        Knights and Samurai

                Gold (or Double Blue)         Fanatics, Religious Orders, Royal Bodyguard, Elite Units

 

Mercenaries                          White and 2nd marking for how they are considered (i.e. Green…)

 

Unit Leaders = Orange and 2nd which matches the unit he is with.

Army Leaders = Orange and blue marker.

 

 

COMMAND AND ACTION CHIPS

 

Purpose

Command and action chips are used to advance units towards the enemy or fight.  Each player’s command and action chips are only usable on his own troops.  The exception to this is the overall army commander’s action chips can be used on any troops on his side.

 

Initial Command Chips

Each player is given a stack of command chips at the beginning of the game based on his overall army size and how well the historical commander and his command staff are rated.  I would suggest command chips equal to half of his army (omitting expendables).  If playing a historical scenario, these command chips should be adjusted +/- 3 chips for how good the particular historical commander was. 

 

Roll for Action Chips

Each turn of play, the player is given a random temporary action chips that function as command chips.  Players that are the overall army commander for one side get 2d6 action chips; everyone else gets d6 action chips.  These temporary action chips cannot be held over from turn to turn.

 

D6           Most players (usable only on their own troops)

2d6          Overall Army Commander (usable on any friendly troops)

 

Movement

Requires a Chip:                   Impetuous units, formation changes, unlimbering artillery, units moving, units charging.

No Chip Required:               Stationary units, units moving back, leaders moving or attaching, cavalry denying melee to infantry.

 

Firing & Fighting

Requires a Chip:                   Units firing.

No Chip Required:               Reloading, units fighting melees.

 

Lose Command Chips

Players lose command chips if something happens negatively to their own troops. 

 

-1 per unit routed this round under his command and is not expendables or peasants. 

-1 per unit destroyed and is not expendables this round under his command.

-1 per friendly leader killed or captured this round under his command.  

-2 if the enemy overran per your camp or baggage train this round.

 

The command is broken if a player has negative command chips.  The command is also broken In reply to: campaign games if player leader dies or is captured.  Broken “battles” (command groups) cannot advance towards enemy units.  Units in broken “battles” (command groups) can still melee in self-defense.

 


BEGINNING OF GAME:

The referee should declare:

                Scenario, Terrain Effects in Play, Impetuous Troops, Chivalrous Troops, Initial Command Chips, and “battles”.

 

TURN SEQUENCES:

                Opportunity Phases-

                Phase 1   - Standing Missile Fire [Simultaneous]

                Phase 2   - Damage Resolution (see below)

                Phase 3   - Morale Resolution (see below)

                Phase 4   - Moving Missile Fire (only by skirmishers & Asiatic horse archers) [Simultaneous]

                Phase 5   - Damage Resolution (see below)

                Phase 6   - Morale Resolution (see below)

 

                “Normal” Phases-

Phase 0   - Beginning of the Turn   < Remove black markers >

Phase 1   - Roll for action chips.

Phase 2   - Fleeing/Routed Movement - [Simultaneous] Opportunity fire available.

     <Move routed units> <Red to black if leader> <Move withdrawn units> <Yellow to black>

Phase 3   - Roll for Initiative.  Winner chooses to move his side 1st or 2nd.  < Winner draw card>

 

Impetuous Troops <Cost command chips>

Phase 4   - First Side’s Unit & Leader Movement and Charges - Opportunity fire available.

Phase 5   - Second Side’s Unit & Leader Movement and Charges - Opportunity fire available.

 

Normal Troops

Phase 6   - First Side’s Unit & Leader Movement and Charges. Opportunity fire available.

Phase 7   - Second Side’s Unit & Leader Movement and Charges. Opportunity fire available

 

                Phase 8   - Melee  [Simultaneous]

                Phase 9   - There are two methods for unit sizes:  large (consisting of 12 infantry castings, 12 riders and 12 horses for cavalry, or 2 to 12 castings for infantry skirmishers) and small (consisting of 6 infantry castings, 6 riders and 6 horses for cavalry, or 2 to 6 castings for infantry skirmishers).  Using small units allow players to field armies quickly, as there are less troops to paint. 

The rules only change slightly based on the size of units.  Using large units, one gets one attack dice per two castings (round up).  Small units get one attack dice per casting.  When damage occurs, large units lose a casting per kill.  Small units suffer a casting loss per two points of damage (round up).

Skirmishers units can break into any combination of pairs of figures (2, 4, 6 if small units) or (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12 if large units).  Field and siege weapons are manned according to the weapon.  Campaign rules allow for unusual size units (see the Buy Troops page of the campaign rules).  

 

Basing

                The suggested basing method of figures of a unit is individually based on steel bases and using magnetic movement stands.  Individually basing figures takes more time, but it is easy to see the unit’s strength and there is no need for casualty markers.

                However, any basing method is acceptable as long as all of the units have the same size frontage.

 

Troop Grades

                Expendables – Expendables include foreign conscripts, captives, human shields, prisoners, stampeding cattle, war dogs, and chained slaves.  Expendables are untrustworthy troops that are used because they might hinder enemy troops.  Mongols drove masses of refugees ahead of their army as human shields.  Muslims used chained slaves in a vain attempt to block Crusader knights.  Irish drove cattle stampedes to hinder their enemy.  Many armies used forced conscription or prisoners to fill the ranks that even the local troops did not trust.  Expendables are unarmored and have a pitiful morale.

                Peasants - All men (and boys) of a district armed with various standard infantry or improvised weapons.  Can carry short bows, light crossbows, javelins, or slings.  No mounted units.  Commonly referred to as general levy.

Soldiers - Able-bodied, semi-trained fighting men armed with standard infantry weapons.  Can carry short bows or heavy or light crossbows.  Can have mounted units armed with spears or single-handed melee weapons.  Sometimes referred to as yeomen or select levy.

                Veterans - Veterans are soldiers or professionally trained troops that have seen a lot of fighting. 

                Samurai / Knights  - See European Knights, Arab Knights, and Samurai entries in the special troop appendix.  Knight is called “caballero” in Spanish, “ritter” in German, and “cavaliere” in Italian.

Elites – The best of the knight units that are loyal and battle hardened.  Typically they were royal bodyguards or members of a religious military order.  Commonly called fanatics.

 

Leaders

                Unit Leaders - An integral part of a unit, such as a baron commanding his retinue.   They differ from army leaders, because they can never leave their unit.  Unit leaders fight like any other member of his unit.

                Army Leaders - Can attach or detach themselves to units of the army they command. They are treated as knights for combat purposes.

 

Markers Used  (use colored poker chips or rings or caps)

                Color      Effect                                      When Removed

                Black      No Movement                      Removed on Movement Phase.

                Blue        Reload Missile Weapons   Optionally removed if do not fire this turn.

If removed, then replaced with black marker.

                Yellow    Withdrawn Unit                   Removed on fleeing movement phase.

Red         Routed Unit                          Removed if pass courage on Rally or Rout Phase. 

(Also routed unit loses a morale rank, enemy unit increases in morale if it routed the unit from melee rather than missile fire)

                White     Casualty Marker                   Ring placed on individual casting if slain. 

Not needed for individually mounted troops because they just remove the casting.

Various  Promotion                              They designate the current morale.  They correspond in color to the morale unit markings listed below.

 

MORALE

 

Remembering the Colors

Remember that yellow is the worst grade because of the association of yellow with cowards.  If someone is “green”, he is a raw recruit, which is better than being a coward but worst than the rest.  Remember that the knights are “royal” blue.

 

Original Morale  (Denoted by Colored Circles on base of figures)

                Unit markings denote the unit's original morale and are the colored circles usually semi-permanently affixed to the base of the castings.  All the figures in the unit should have a common weapon and marked with certain colors:

 

                Double Yellow                      Expendables

Yellow                                    Peasants                (New, Unproven Troops Morale)

                Green                                      Soldiers                  (Proven Troops Morale)

                Red                                         Veterans and Byzantine Regulars

                Blue                                        Knights and Samurai

                Gold (or Double Blue)         Fanatics, Religious Orders, Royal Bodyguard, Elite Units

 

Mercenaries                          White and 2nd marking for how they are considered (i.e. Green…)

 

Unit Leaders = Orange and 2nd which matches the unit he is with.

Army Leaders = Orange and blue marker.

 

 

COMMAND AND ACTION CHIPS

 

Purpose

Command and action chips are used to advance units towards the enemy or fight.  Each player’s command and action chips are only usable on his own troops.  The exception to this is the overall army commander’s action chips can be used on any troops on his side.

 

Initial Command Chips

Each player is given a stack of command chips at the beginning of the game based on his overall army size and how well the historical commander and his command staff are rated.  I would suggest command chips equal to half of his army (omitting expendables).  If playing a historical scenario, these command chips should be adjusted +/- 3 chips for how good the particular historical commander was. 

 

Roll for Action Chips

Each turn of play, the player is given a random temporary action chips that function as command chips.  Players that are the overall army commander for one side get 2d6 action chips; everyone else gets d6 action chips.  These temporary action chips cannot be held over from turn to turn.

 

D6           Most players (usable only on their own troops)

2d6          Overall Army Commander (usable on any friendly troops)

 

Movement

Requires a Chip:                   Impetuous units, formation changes, unlimbering artillery, units moving, units charging.

No Chip Required:               Stationary units, units moving back, leaders moving or attaching, cavalry denying melee to infantry.

 

Firing & Fighting

Requires a Chip:                   Units firing.

No Chip Required:               Reloading, units fighting melees.

 

Lose Command Chips

Players lose command chips if something happens negatively to their own troops. 

 

-1 per unit routed this round under his command and is not expendables or peasants. 

-1 per unit destroyed and is not expendables this round under his command.

-1 per friendly leader killed or captured this round under his command.  

-2 if the enemy overran per your camp or baggage train this round.

 

The command is broken if a player has negative command chips.  The command is also broken In reply to: campaign games if player leader dies or is captured.  Broken “battles” (command groups) cannot advance towards enemy units.  Units in broken “battles” (command groups) can still melee in self-defense.

 


BEGINNING OF GAME:

The referee should declare:

                Scenario, Terrain Effects in Play, Impetuous Troops, Chivalrous Troops, Initial Command Chips, and “battles”.

 

TURN SEQUENCES:

                Opportunity Phases-

                Phase 1   - Standing Missile Fire [Simultaneous]

                Phase 2   - Damage Resolution (see below)

                Phase 3   - Morale Resolution (see below)

                Phase 4   - Moving Missile Fire (only by skirmishers & Asiatic horse archers) [Simultaneous]

                Phase 5   - Damage Resolution (see below)

                Phase 6   - Morale Resolution (see below)

 

                “Normal” Phases-

Phase 0   - Beginning of the Turn   < Remove black markers >

Phase 1   - Roll for action chips.

Phase 2   - Fleeing/Routed Movement - [Simultaneous] Opportunity fire available.

     <Move routed units> <Red to black if leader> <Move withdrawn units> <Yellow to black>

Phase 3   - Roll for Initiative.  Winner chooses to move his side 1st or 2nd.  < Winner draw card>

 

Impetuous Troops <Cost command chips>

Phase 4   - First Side’s Unit & Leader Movement and Charges - Opportunity fire available.

Phase 5   - Second Side’s Unit & Leader Movement and Charges - Opportunity fire available.

 

Normal Troops

Phase 6   - First Side’s Unit & Leader Movement and Charges. Opportunity fire available.

Phase 7   - Second Side’s Unit & Leader Movement and Charges. Opportunity fire available

 

                Phase 8   - Melee  [Simultaneous]

                Phase 9   - Morale Resolution (see below)

 

                Phase 11   - Promote / Demote

                Phase 12   - Rally / Rout

                Phase 13   - Lose Command Chips

                Phase 14   - Regroup or Split / Mount or Dismount [Simultaneous]

 

Engage in Melee Resolution Phases

Phase 0 - Mark where the charge began

Phase 1 - Attacking unit must pass morale to charge into melee

Phase 2 - Defending unit must pass morale to have a choice of standing or voluntarily withdrawing.

Phase 3 - Move defending withdrawing / routing unit (if any)

Phase 4 - Move charging unit

 

Damage Resolution Phases (Only occurs for hit units)

                Phase 1  - Determine unit’s protection

                Phase 2  - Determine number of castings killed

                Phase 3  - See if killed castings include the attached or unit leader

 

Morale Resolution Phases  (Only occurs for damaged units)-

                Phase 1  - Morale Check for Troops (if attacking unit still exists)

Phase 2  - If Fail Morale, then troops get Yellow Ring

Phase 3  - If Fail the Roll Again, then Flees 

< Fleeing Units get Red Ring >< Promote melee winner if routed equal or greater unit >


MISSILE FIRE

                The primary advantage of a missile weapon over melee weapons is it allows attacking the enemy at a distance and first since the enemy must cover ground to engage the missile unit.  Thus, missile fire effects and the morale check done prior to the melee phase if target units have suffered losses.  However, missile units cannot fight effectively in melee since they fired their weapons as their action this turn. 

 

Opportunity Missile Fire

Missile fire doesn't have a dedicated phase, but rather takes place at any moment that the attacker wishes.  Thus the archer unit can wait until the knights (which began the turn outside of bow range) to ride in close and then fire at any point as they ride in. 

 

Move or Fire?

Most missile units cannot move and fire in the same turn.  Thus most units cannot move, if they fire.  If they decide to move, then they cannot fire.

Only skirmishers and Asiatic horse archers can move and fire.  If they fire before moving, their fire is considered like any other standing fire.  If they move first, then their fire is considered moving fire.  They may do this in either order because of opportunity fire.  However, the unit cannot fire in the midst of its movement (move, fire, and continue moving).  An Asiatic horse archer unit can ride up near an enemy unit and fire.  Then on the following turn if his side takes the initiative, it can fire then ride back out of range of the enemy forces.

 

Sequencing of Missile Fire

Standing fire is done; units damaged take casualties and test morale before any moving fire is done.  Moving fire that undergoes the same process - firing, units damaged takes casualties, and damaged units test morale.  Finally followed by non-firing troops' actions such as moving.

Thus a horse archer unit rides into range of a loaded crossbow unit that has not moved this round.  The crossbow unit can fire at the horse archer at any point and fires technically first (even if the horse archer’s owner moves and declares an attack).  The missile fire combat is resolved and if the horse archer takes casualties and falls back, then its move is spoiled.  The reason that standing fire is resolved first is the moving (say horse archer) unit traverses the ground, which takes time.

                Missile fire in the Middle Ages was not instantaneous like bullets.  Archers could see the incoming arrows and make a decision whether to return fire before the arrow barrage hit or fire at another target.  In regard to a standing missile unit firing at another standing missile unit, missile fire is considered simultaneous.  Thus both units get their shots off before casualties and morale is taken into account.  The same simultaneous fire applies to two moving missile units firing at each other.

 

Who can fire?

                Any missile unit that is not engaged in melee combat can fire its weapons at any single enemy unit in range.  

Any missile unit that has not reloaded (has a reload marker) cannot fire.  The unloaded missile unit can decide to move (usually retreating) or choose to reload (because units that reload cannot move as well).

 

Range

Distance is measured from the center of the firing unit to the center of target.  This yields a quick way to discover the average of the range. 

If it is thought this would not yield a fair result because of the situation, the referee can chose to do roll the dice for the specific range.  Thus say 3 green attack dice for the 6 castings in the 9 to 12” range requiring a 6 to hit and say 3 red attack dice for the 6 castings in the 6-9” range requiring a 5+ to hit.

 

Field of Fire

Missile fire by troops is allowed in a frontal 180-degree arc from the front of the stand.  Thus you could place a ruler touching the front of the unit and determine whom the missile unit can hit.  Units on the flank with no parts of unit touching the ruler or to the attacker’s rear cannot be hit by missile fire. 

Field and siege weapons have a frontal 45-degree arc. Thus you could place a ruler touching the corner of the base of the unit and by keeping the same angle determine who the missile unit can hit.

 

Line of Sight Adjustments

If the entire unit does not have clear line-of-sight, then the attack dice will be adjusted to the number of castings with a clear line-of-sight to any part of the enemy unit.   See Split Fire below.

 

Split Fire?

                A missile unit can split its fire amongst two enemy units within range.  Figure out the number of attackers that are firing at which enemy unit and adjust the attack dice accordingly.  Splitting fire must be declared before rolling the attack dice.

 

Shoot Horses or Riders?

                Missile units can choose to shoot the riders or the horses of mounted units.  Horses were commonly attacked by Arabic units in the Crusades or by English longbow archers to cause trampling and to slow the knights.  In many cases, the horses are less armored than the riders. 

Declaration must be made before rolling.  If horses are killed, then the riders are dismounted and function as a foot unit.

 

Firing Into a Melee

                If the unit is firing into a melee between two units, the damage is divided evenly.  Also, if friendly unit is damaged by friendly missiles while engaged in melee is downgraded a morale grade.

                All combat is simultaneous.  Casualties are not removed until combat is finished.  Units firing weapons cannot move in the movement phase with the exception of skirmishers and Asiatic horse archers.  This inability to move is usually denoted by a black marker placed beside the unit.

                A suggested strategy is concentrated fire because of the way protection is handled.

 

# of Unit Attack Dice

                Large unit rules: 1d6 per 2 men/riders (round up).  So a full strength 12-man unit would get 6 attack dice.  Attached army leaders are counted as a fighting man.  So a 12-man unit with a leader gets 7 attack dice (normal 6 + ½ rounded up).

                Small unit rules: 1d6 per man/rider.  So a full strength 6-man unit would get 6 attack dice.  Attached army leaders are counted as a fighting man.  So a 6-man unit with a leader gets 7 attack dice.

                Field weapons get 1d6 per two crew.

 

Attack Target Number

 

Gunpowder Weapons – Gunpowder weapons only existed in later part of the Middle Ages or Japanese battles after the Portuguese landed in 1542.  Handguns start in the Hundred Years War and are used extensively in the Swiss Rebellion against the Holy Roman Empire, Burgundian Wars, and the Hussite Wars.  Direct Fire Weapon.  Deploy unit in single line to fire.  All handguns of this period take a while to reload.  Spend a turn out of melee to reload. 

Handguns of this period are inferior to bows and crossbows.  Since handguns were subject to fouling due to the build up of powder that failed to burn in the barrel, the effective range of the handguns tended to decay after a few shots.  Handguns were also heavier than the crossbow or bow.  Shots from the handguns are slower and have less power (muzzle velocity) than crossbows or bows, except they are less likely to be deflected.  Handguns have a meager range in this period. 

However, handguns have a few advantages.  Handguns have the advantage of being cheaper since the handguns could be mass-produced by a foundry in cast iron instead of carved from yew (longbow) or requiring steel (heavy crossbows).  Also, the handgonnes and arquebus have the advantage of lighter ammunition resulting in a longer sustained fire.

 

                Pot de Fur / Vasi / Crakys – The earliest Western European gunpowder artillery shot metal arrows (bolts) [grands carreaux] from iron or cast bronze, vase-shaped 'guns', or called “pots de fer” by the French or “vasi” by the Italians.   The first image of these vase-configured guns was in the Milemete Manuscript of 1326 presented to Edward III of England.  Some accounts suggest that such guns were the 'crakys of war' used in Edward III's 1327 campaign in Scotland.  1338. French document described acquiring iron arrows and sulfur, with which to make powder to shoot the arrows.  French used pot-de-fer, *firing bolts with iron feathers, in a naval raid against Southampton.   In 1339, French used cannon [pot-de-fer] at Perigord and at Cambrai against Edward III.  French used pot-de-fer at Quesnoy in 1340.

 

                Handgonnes / Hand Cannon – In the late 1300s, handgonnes were used.  Handgonnes are primitive guns that one manually touches the match or brand to the hole to fire the gun.  Handgonnes are basically iron tubes with a wooden stock that fire round stone, lead, or iron balls that are fired buttressed against one’s chest.  Handgonnes are more inaccurate than the arquebus because one cannot use both hands to hold the gun while aiming.

 

Arquebus – Sometimes called harquebus or hackbut, an arquebus is an improved version of a handgonne.  An arquebus is a primitive gun that has a simple S-shaped matchlock device called the serpentine that lowered the burning wick to the hole firing the gun.  This improvement allowed using both hands to hold the gun while aiming.  But the quick loading an arquebus in the proper order (powder, wadding, ball, priming, and aiming while grasping the serpentine) without bringing the powder into unintended contact with the match was difficult. Sometimes the arquebus was rested on a forked staff to improve aim and catch some of the recoil. 

The arquebus was invented around 1450.  In 1525 at the battle of Pavia, 3,000 harquebusiers protected by pikemen killed 8,000 armored cavalrymen.  An arquebus pierces armor better than bows and have a longer range and only fire directly.  However, they are fairly inaccurate. 

 

Crossbow –Crossbows were so effective that Pope Innocent II outlawed crossbows by Christians against Christians in 1139.  Crossbows are better at piercing armor than bows, but take longer reloading.  Spend a turn out of melee to reload.  Europeans use the crossbow as a direct fire weapon requiring a unit to deploy in single line to fire.  Chinese fire crossbows at a 45-degree angle to get maximum range and can be deployed in double or single line to fire, but the indirect fire decreases accuracy.

 

Light Crossbow – Mounted crossbowmen were more mobile than infantry and used a lighter version of the crossbow that was easier to cock.  However, the light crossbow is not as effective at armor piercing as the heavy crossbow. 

 

Heavy Crossbow – The common crossbow used by infantry.  Heavy crossbows utilize wenches, cranks, or levers (such as a goat’s foot) to augment the crossbowman’s strength.  Quarrels or bolts fired from heavy crossbows have excellent penetration ability.

 

Lockbow - Lockbows are a primitive Dark Age version of the crossbow used by infantry.  Lockbows rely entirely on the person’s strength to pull back the string.  However, the lockbow does not have the armor piercing ability of the crossbow.  The first mention of lockbows I found was at the battle of Hjorungsvag in 986.  By the end of the 13th century the lock-bow was an anachronism.

 

Chu-Ko-Nu – Chu-Ko-Nu is a Chinese repeating crossbow used as late as the Chinese-Japanese war of 1894-1895.  The Chu-Ko-Nu is a version of the heavy crossbow.  The Chu-Ko-Nu has the advantage of not requiring a turn reloading.  Chu-Ko-Nus fired level are treated as heavy crossbows.

 

Bows - Bows are worse at piercing armor than crossbows, but have a better range and can fire indirectly.  Archers deploy in double or single line to fire.  Archers can fire over friendly troops in single line formation, but accuracy is one worse.  The number in the parenthesis denotes this loss of accuracy.  Archers cannot fire through a friendly single-line mounted unit if archer unit is infantry.

 

Long Bows

The word “long bow” is a modern word to designate an improvement in the bows.  Long bows only are used historically after 1100. Only the Welsh used long bows in the 11th Century.  During the 12th & 13th Century, English and Saxons armies used long bows.  Short bow is for any mounted or pre-long bow European units.                

 

Asiatic Recurve/Compound Bows

                Can be fired mounted or dismounted.  Has the armor piercing capability of a short bow, but has a longer range.  Late Crusader units called Turcopoles consisting of Syrian Christians and other Levant natives were armed with this type of bow.

 

Short Bows

                Short bows have less power and do less damage than long bow, but can be fired from horseback.

 

Mounted Archers

Western European mounted archer units acted more as hobilars, using the horse as purely as transportation and dismounting before battle.   Asiatic horse archers tended to shoot from the saddle and often when the horse was moving.

 

Skirmisher Missile Weapons – Skirmishers used javelins, slings, and staff slings.  Japanese skirmishers used shurikens and darts.  These weapons were less powerful than the short bow and almost obsolete during this period.  Skirmishers’ missile weapons are effective against unarmored opponents.  Indirect Fire.   Skirmishers can fire over friendly troops in single line formation, but accuracy is one worse.  The number in the parenthesis denotes this loss of accuracy.  Skirmishers cannot fire through friendly single-line mounted unit if skirmisher unit is foot.


MISSILE FIRE CHARTS

 

25mm Ranges:

 

 

 

Costs 1 turn

Killing Field

Short Range

Medium Range

Long Range

 

Gunpowder:

Ranks Deep?

Move & Fire?

Must Reload?

(3+)

 (4+)

 (5+)

(6)

Ignore Armor?

Arquebus

1

NO

YES

N/A

0”-6”

6”-15”

15”-24”

ALL

Pot de Fur

1

NO

YES

N/A

0”-4”

4”-9”

9”-12”

1 point

Handgonne

1

NO

YES

N/A

0”-4”

4”-9”

9”-12”

1 point

Crossbow:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heavy Crossbow

1

NO

YES

0”-4”

4”-9”

9”-12”

12”-18”

2 points

Light Crossbow

1

NO

YES

N/A

0”-4”

4”-9”

9”-12”

1 point

Lockbow

1

NO

YES

N/A

0”-4”

4”-9”

9”-12”

1 point

Chu-No-Ku crossbow

1

NO

NO

0”-4”

4”-9”

9”-12”

12”-18”

2 points

Chinese Heavy (fired at angle)

1

NO

YES

N/A

0”-6”

6”-15”

15”-21”

1 point

Bow:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long Bow

2

NO

NO

0”-6”

6”-9”

9”-15”

15”-21”

N/A

Asiatic Horse Archers

2

YES

NO

N/A

0”-6”

6”-15”

15”-21”

N/A

Short Bow

2

NO

NO

N/A

0”-6”

6”-9”

9”-15”

N/A

Miscellaneous:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skirmishers

2

YES

NO

N/A

N/A

0”-6”

6”-9”

N/A

 

Roll Modifiers based on Formation:

+1            Target is in Dense or “march column” formation

-1             Bow or skirmisher firing unit is shooting from behind a single line of friendly troops.

 

Roll Modifiers based on Weather:

-1             Firing against a strong wind

-1             Firing into the rising or setting sun

-1             Sleeting

 

Special Weather Rules:

Rain - If firing when it is raining, the missile unit gets a single volley and then useless for the rest of the game.

 

Fog, Sleet, or Moonlight - Roll a d6 for the visibility for fog or sleet.  Take lowest of 3d6 for roll if moonlight.  The max missile range is 6” x the roll.  Thus a roll of a 2 means no one can see or fire over 12”.

 


NORMAL PHASES: -

 

BEGINNING OF THE TURN

 

Remove No-Movement Markers

At the beginning of every turn, all players remove the no-movement markers from the playing field.

 

ROLL FOR ACTION CHIPS

Each player rolls for this turn’s action chips.

 

 

FLEEING MOVEMENT

 

Move Routed Units

Retreat the routed troop one standard move away from the attacker(s).  They are fleeing to safety off the board.  They will avoid enemy troops and move towards friendly units if possible.  If possible, the fleeing unit stays inside of any castle or city walls unless the enemy unit has entered the city or castle.  Surrounded routed units (no clear 2" gap), completely surrender and are removed from the game.  If the routed unit exits the table edge, then the unit is considered to have left the battle and its figures are counted as killed.

 

Routed Rallies?

After moving the routed unit, remove the red ring if the unit has an attached leader and place one or two black no-movement markers instead based rally time.  It takes two turns for a leader or colors to rally the unit (or one if both the colors and a leader are present).  Each turn that it continues not to have a leader or colors, it continues fleeing in the fleeing movement phase away from the battlefield and continues to cost a command chip from routing.

 

Move Withdrawn Units

Retreat the withdrawn troop one standard move away from the attacker(s). 

 

Yellow Rings become Black

After moving the withdrawing unit, remove the yellow ring and place black no movement marker instead.

 

INITIATIVE ROLL

This rule set is move/countermove.  Roll a single six-sided dice for initiative.  The high d6 roll chooses either for his side to move first or second. After the first side has completely moved all of its miniatures, the second side moves.  

                The advantage to moving first is getting to decide who fights whom in melee first.  You can choose what units to engage and it spoils his movement, because once a unit is engaged in melee the unit cannot move.   Although his units turn to face your unit, you can decide which unit will engage his front and what unit will engage his flank or rear.

                The advantage of moving last is you get to see what he does and then plan your attack accordingly.

 

Draw Battle Card (Optional)

Winner of the initiative draws a battle card from their pile for use this turn.  If the player fails to use the card this turn, the card is discarded.

 

EACH SIDE’S IMPETUOUS MOVEMENT

                Impetuous troops are (by definition) motivated troops moving first if possible.  Impetuous troops attempt to seize the moment, but signal their movements and often over extend themselves.  They often focus on the fleeing troops ahead of them, suffering tunnel vision of the effects of pursuit on the rest of the battle.  These impetuous units are often European knights or poorly trained, but motivated militia. 

                Impetuous troops count against the command chips used for movement this turn.  Impetuous troops advance towards enemy units.   If any enemy unit was routed from melee with them and the impetuous unit is not engaged in melee, the impetuous unit will pursue the fleeing unit if there are no intervening enemy units to fight.  If the impetuous unit ever contacts a routing unit in melee, the impetuous attackers gain two bonus dice.

 

EACH SIDE’S MOVEMENT

 

                These rules have one side conducts all of its charges, then move all of its troops.  Then afterwards the other side conducts all of its charges, then move all of its troops.

 

Can the Unit Move?

All units can move except those:

·         Units that already moved (units that are impetuous or fleeing). 

·         Units that fell back or routed because of morale failure from missile fire.

·         Missile units that intend to fire this turn, with the exception of Asiatic & Byzantine mounted archers and skirmishers.

·         Reloading Missile / Siege Weapon units.

·         Completely encircled units (no 2" gap) (see below)

 

                Units cannot move through other enemy or friendly units (except skirmishers or unless both units are special integrated units) or terrain deemed by the referee impassable.  One can move through friendly skirmishers and integrated units, while enemy skirmishers in the open are immediately considered killed and removed from play and do not slow the moving unit.  A unit needs at least 2" of space between units to move between two other units.

 

Where Must Move?

                Knights with Chivalry (which is most European knights) must fight other knight units or unattached army leaders or command stands if possible ignoring "lesser" units.  They will move to engage any visible enemy knight unit or enemy leader within two turn's movement, rather than fight enemy levy units.  The only exception is a knight unit that "failed" its morale due to missile fire and is charging the offending missile unit.

                Unit leaders always stay with the unit they are commanding, while army leaders do not have to remain with the unit.

 

Who Can Move?

                You can advance towards enemy the number of units equal to the number of command chips. 

 

Requires a Chip:                   Impetuous units, formation changes, unlimbering artillery, units moving, units charging.

Don’t Requires a Chip:        Stationary units, units moving back, leaders moving or attaching, cavalry denying melee to infantry.

 

Army Leaders

Army leaders are treated as any other similarly equipped troop type.  Thus an armored foot leaders moves at the same rate as any other armored infantry.

 

Unfired Mounted:

Mounted troops are faster if charging in a relatively straight line.  Thus in this rule system, mounted units can charge directly forward and gain a greater overall movement.   The more armored the horse and riders are, the slower and the less agile the unit is overall.

 

Special Movement Rules

Move Army Leaders & Attach or Detach Leaders

                Unit leaders must move with the unit they are part of, while army leaders are overall commanders not tied to a specific unit and thus can move freely about. 

                If you want to attach an army leader, the unit gains the benefit of another casting attacking and another bonus dice from leadership and better morale.  Another reason leaders are attached is to rally routed units.  However, when the leader is attached is vulnerable to attack.  If you attach a leader to a unit, that unit can only move the slowest of the leader’s or unit’s remaining movement.  This prevents getting extra movement for the leader.

If you want to detach an army leader from a unit that is not in melee, then announce now that he is unattached and he can move and attach to a different unit or stay unattached.  Leaders attached to routing units or units in melee that detach reduce the current morale of that unit one rank as the unit sees the leader’s cowardice.

 

Limbering/Unlimbering Artillery

                Takes an entire unit’s movement to deploy artillery so the artillery can fire (unlimbering) or packing artillery up for transport (limbering).  Limbered artillery should be shown as pointing away from the enemy.  Unlimbered artillery point towards the enemy.

 

Formations

                The Dark Ages and Medireview period armies are not known for “dressing its lines”, marching, and drilling.  Battles involved usually smaller armies than later periods or earlier Roman periods, so they tend to be more responsive to formation changes.  There are few formations in this period and only a few formations that impact the game.  Units in columns (the narrower than long) and lines (wider than long) fight and move the same.

                There is no movement penalty per se for changing formations.  The cost of changing formations is only the cost of the movement of moving the piece who must move the farthest.  Thus the cost for going from column to line is the length of the casting that must move the most.

 

Infantry Formations:

Shield Wall  - Any infantry unit with shields can form a shield wall formation.  While it is barely mobile, it increases the unit's frontal protection  (see Unit Protection - Defense).  Usually only European forces formed shield walls.

 

Dense Protective Formations (Stationary Schiltron, Square, Crown, or Circle)

Because of the threat of English knights, Scottish infantry armed with polearms commonly deployed in the “schiltron” formation.  The schiltron formation is square or circular in shape with the men standing shoulder to shoulder in deep ranks and facing toward the circumference of the circle, with their polearms slanted outward at an oblique angle.  The Swiss Cantons deployed their troops armed with pikes and spears square formation when defending open ground.  The Flemish and Swiss defended hilltops using a circular formation.  Flemish are said to defend in the “manner of a crown”.

These formations were used against the more mobile cavalry. In game terms, attackers cannot get flank or rear bonuses attacking defenders in a stationary schiltron, square, or circle formations.  However, Missile fire accuracy improves by one when firing at units in a dense formation. (see the battle of Falkirk in 1298).  Also, dense protective units cannot charge (start melee) enemy units.

 

Dense Aggressive Formations (Mobile Schiltron or Phalanx)

At Bannockburn in 1314, William Wallace turns the traditionally static “schiltron” into a mobile formation (the schiltron turns into more of an oval shape while the troops move).  The Swiss used phalanxes (sometimes called a “hedgehog”) of men wielding polearms (halberds and pikes) to attack enemy troops.

These formations were good in melee against infantry or cavalry.  These formations had flanks of course.  Missile fire accuracy improves by one when firing at units in a dense formation.  (see the battle of Falkirk in 1298).

 

Cavalry Formations:

Wedge - European mounted knights fought in a wedge formation.

 

Formations for Cavalry or Infantry:

Single Line  - Single line formation is useful to allow archer units to fire overhead this unit.  Single line is required for crossbow unit attacks.

 

Double Line - The preferred formation of archer units.

 

March Column – March column formation improves movement (an extra d6” movement) assuming enemy troops are not within 12”.  Missile fire accuracy improves by one when firing at units in a “march column” formation and “march column” units are more prone to retreating (-1 to standing morale rolls).  March column units cannot charge (start melee) other units.

 

Missile Unit Movement Clarification

                Just as a rules clarification, missile units (non-skirmishers and non-Asian horse archer units) that fired this turn in the earlier missile phase cannot move.  Missile units can make "offensive" moves such as sweep aside enemy skirmishers in the open killing them without battle as any other formed unit does. 

 

Movement Causes Contact Creating Melee

                Movement ends if a unit touches an enemy unit.  This contact begins melee.  However, one must roll to engage in melee (see Engaging in Melee Resolution).

                The contacted unit turns automatically to face its opponent unless it is already in melee.  Thus all first contact melees are always to the front of the unit.

                A suggested strategy is concentrated attacks on a single enemy unit if possible because of the way protection is handled (a few games will demonstrate this).

 

Leaving a Melee

Leaving a melee voluntarily results in the loss of a single casting.  This casting represents a few men holding off the attackers so the others can regroup.

 

Cavalry Deny Combat Option

                Cavalry can deny combat to infantry if the cavalry unit is currently not locked in melee and not surrounded (must be a 2" gap escape gap).  A mounted unit that has already moved this turn and wants to deny combat moves away from the advancing foot unit back along the same path it moved this turn.  If moving the cavalry back along the same path results in a collision with enemy forces, then the cavalry can either melee the enemy unit in front or the enemy unit in the retreat path.  A mounted unit that has not moved this turn is moved out-of-sequence (a little early) back away form the infantry and then on its normal movement the evasion movement is counted against the unit leaving a remaining number of inches of movement.  The mounted unit evading combat maintains at least a 1" gap between them.

 


Distances:

Weather Effects:

Ploughed, snow-covered, or muddy ground slows all troops.  All troops treat 6s as 1s.

Fog and moonlight - Roll a d6 for the visibility for fog.  Roll 3d6 and take lowest one for moonlight.  The roll indicates the maximum number of 6-sided dice that troops can roll for movement. 

 

Formation Effects:

                March column moves an extra d6” if enemy troops are not within 12”.

 

25mm Variable Movement:

Cavalry:                                                                                 Fired Cavalry:

Light Cavalry                                        4d6" (5d6" straight)             Horse Archers 3d6”

Medium Cavalry                                   3d6" (4d6" straight)             Mounted Skirmishers 3d6"

Heavy Cavalry & Camel Troops        2d6” (3d6" straight)

       

Non-fired Infantry:                                                                                              Fired Infantry:

·         Unarmored infantry                     3d6"                                                        Skirmishers            2d6”

·         Armored infantry                         2d6”                                                        Other                      NO MOVE

·         Dense aggressive formations    3” slow march (2d6” straight charge)

·         Shield wall or dense protective 3" slow march

 

Other:

·         Supply Wagons, Carroccio, War Wagons              2d6” on road / d6” off road

·         Limbered field artillery (i.e. light catapult, ballista)  -              mule or oxen drawn d6” / horse drawn 2d6"

·         Limbered siege pieces (i.e. siege towers, battering rams)      d6" on road / 2” off road

·         Unlimbered field artillery or siege pieces                                 NO MOVE

·         Stampeding Cattle or War Dogs                3d6”

 

15mm Variable Movement:

Same as 25mm, except drop “LOW d6” if total movement is over 6”.

 


MELEE

Melee is the hand-to-hand combat between units.  Melee occurs when a unit moves into contact with a rival unit.  The first two units that contact each other in melee are always turned face-to-face each other. 

                Once melee has begun, neither unit can move until one is eliminated or routed.  Additional units can be moved to touch the flank (side) or rear of the unit.  Flank and rear attackers cannot be attacked until the front unit is slain or routed.  Once the front unit is slain, the defending unit can turn to face either of the opposing units.

                All combat is simultaneous.  Casualties are not removed until combat is finished.

 

All Castings Fight

                All castings in the unit and portions of a unit fight in melee regardless of formations or portions of the unit in direct contact.  Attack dice are based on all of the castings in the unit.

 

Withdrawing Units Contacted by Enemy Units

                If a unit is withdrawing and an enemy unit contacts it, melee proceeds as normal, except the withdrawing unit fights at half of its normal attack dice.

 

Routed Units Contacted by Enemy Units

                If a unit is routed and an enemy unit contacts it, melee proceeds as normal, except the routed unit cannot fight back.

 

Skirmishers in Melee

                Skirmishers in open are outright killed if enemy non-skirmisher unit melees them.   Skirmishers combat the same way other troops do if the skirmishers are in thick terrain.

 

Attack Horses or Riders?

Non-European knight units can choose to shoot the riders or the horses of mounted units.  European knights units don't attack the horses.  Horses were commonly attacked by Arabic units in the Crusades or by English longbow archers to cause trampling and to slow the knights.  In many cases, the horses are less armored than the riders.   Declaration must be made before rolling.  If horses are killed, then the riders are dismounted and function as a foot unit.

 

# of Unit Attack Dice

                Large unit rules: 1d6 per 2 men/riders (round up).  Bonus dice are added depending on circumstances.  I recommend that players use colored dice to represent the combat dice, then the bonus dice will be white ones.  For example, a full strength knight unit with two-handed swords gets 6d6 and hits on any 2 or better.  Each successful attack roll results in a hit.

                Small unit rules: 1d6 per man/rider.  So a full strength 6-man unit gets 6 attack dice.  Attached army leaders are counted as a fighting man.  So a 6-man unit with a leader gets 7 attack dice.

               

Attack Dice Reductions

                It is rare that attack dice are reduced.  Attack dice are halved (round up in favor of more dice) if:

Unit is fighting while wading in water and opposing unit is not.

Unit is fighting while on icy terrain and opposing unit is not.

 

Command Stand Clarification

                Command stands and attached leaders are treated as any other troop.  Don’t forget to count them in the determination of attack dice.  Remember they are treated as knights for their effectiveness.

 

Bonus Dice 

Bonus dice only score hits on a 4, 5, or 6 on the d6.  Bonus dice are used for special situations to inflict more casualties than the usual unit attack inflicts.  There can be multiple bonus dice applicable to a situation and the number of dice rolled is cumulative.   For example, a charging knight unit hits a group in the flank with some charging ability results in 3d6 of bonus dice where every 4, 5, or 6 rolled equals another hit.

 

Melee Continuation

Melee continues from turn to turn, unit one or both are eliminated or withdraws.

 

Units with Shields and Long or Two-handed Weapons

Typically some units are depicted having long or two-handed weapons and shields.  For example, mounted knights with lances commonly have shields or Viking units with two-handed axes have slung shields.  The problem is when the unit gets the shield bonus. 

These units get shield bonus against missile fire.  When in melee, units that have shields and two-handed or long weapons can choose to either focus on defense (use the shield) or on the attack (not use the shield).  If the unit uses their shields, they get the armor protection of the shield, but attack as a one-handed weapons units do.  If the unit does not use their shield and focuses on the attack, they get the two-handed weapon melee attack numbers.


 

MELEE ATTACK TARGET NUMBER  (Based on Original Morale and not Current Morale)

Unit                                                                                                       (Using long weapon and not shield)

Command Stands, Knights, or Samurai            3+                            (2+)

Soldiers or Veteran                                              4+                            (3+)

Peasants                                                                                5+                            (4+)

Expendables (war dogs, cattle stampede)        6

 

Unfired Missile or Artillerist unit                                      6

ANY unit that has fired this turn                                      NONE

 

Bonus Dice  (*** ONLY HIT ON 4, 5, OR 6 ***)

 

Cavalry Bonuses   (Only if not in “thick” terrain or in River or Dismounted)

+4d6       Couched Lances w/ full charge (10"+ downhill or open) (Only on first contact.) OR

+2d6       Couched Lances w/ some charging (Only on first contact.) OR

+1d6       Melee or Non-European spear-armed cavalry

 

Weapon Bonuses

+2d6       Infantry with Polearms in a “dense” formation

+1d6       Infantry in Shield Wall formation vs. Cavalry

 

Positioning Bonuses

+1d6       Attacking a Flank OR   +2d6   Attacking a Rear 

+2d6       Defending advantageous position FOR EACH advantageous position.  Thus a unit defending a castle wall on a hill overlooking a river gets a total of +6d6 bonus dice.  (See Terrain Effects in Phase 4).  Units in a war wagon are counted as being in an advantageous position.

+1d6       1-HD melee infantry unit in “thick” terrain.

               

Unit Effectiveness Bonuses

+1d6       Attached Leader  (Multiple leaders give no extra bonus.)

+1d6       Double Blue or Gold Current Morale Unit       (reflecting superior fighting skill and élan)

+2d6       Impetuous Unit attacking a fleeing/routing unit.

+1d6/grade difference         Bonus dice for each original moral grade higher quality than opponent.


MELEE MORALE RESOLUTION

 

Rally, Fall Back, or Rout?

Who Must Check?

·         Only damaged units must check. 

·         Units not below half do not have to check.

·         Only units who still have existing attacking units must check morale. 

·         Double gold ring units do not have to check morale. 

·         Mounted troops that lost only horses this turn do not check morale. 

·         Leaders never check morale for themselves individually. 

 

Success / Failure

                Units get two chances to stand against missile fire.  If they fail the first time, roll again.

                If pass (roll over or equal to the unit's current morale), then have a choice to stand or voluntarily withdraw. 

                If fail (less than to the unit's current morale), roll a second time.  If the unit passes the second time, it only withdraws.  If the unit fails on the both tries, it routs.  

 

Effects

Do not move the unit yet.  Fleeing units move first on the following round.

 

Voluntary Withdraws

These are units that have yielded ground, but have regrouped ready for more battle. If you voluntarily withdraw from melee then you lose a single casting, as a few men remain behind to slow the advance of the enemy.  You do not lose a casting if your unit was not engaged by any other enemy unit and was attacking the enemy unit’s flank or rear.  The unit that withdraws faces towards the enemy.  The unit is NOT marked.

 

Withdraws

These are beaten units that have regrouped ready for more battle. The unit that withdraws faces towards the enemy.  The unit is marked with a yellow marker.

 

Routs

Spin it around so the unit faces away from the enemy.  Place a red marker on the unit. The routed unit can only rally now with the presence of a leader or the colors.  It takes two turns to rally the unit (or one if both the colors and a leader are present). 

 

Melee Morale Demotions?

Routed units drop a current morale grade.

 

Melee Morale Promotions?

Who Can Check?

·         Units that destroyed an enemy unit through causalities by melee.

·         Units that force the enemy unit to route by melee. 

·         Only units that defeated an equal or superior ranked (current morale) opponent unit. 

 

Effect

Promotion results in the current morale of the victor unit improving one rank.


 

PROMOTE / DEMOTE TROOPS IN MELEE

 

Mark promoted troops that won melees against equal or better ranked opponent unit.  Demote routed units.

 

 

LOSE COMMAND CHIPS

 

Players lose command chips if something happens negatively to their own troops. 

 

-1 per routing unit under his command that routed this round and is not expendables or peasants. 

-1 per unit destroyed this round under his command.

-1 per friendly leader killed or captured this round under his command.  

-2 if the enemy overran per your camp or baggage train this round.

 

The command is broken if a player has negative command chips.  The command is also broken in campaign games if player leader dies or is captured.  Broken “battles” (command groups) cannot advance towards enemy units.  Units in broken “battles” (command groups) can still melee in self-defense.

 

 

 REGROUP OR SPLIT / MOUNT OR DISMOUNT

 

Regroup

One can consolidate any number of damaged units together to form new full-strength or partial-strength units.  The following restrictions apply:

·         All units must be similar in unit grade and unit type - i.e. mounted melee knights.

·         One of the damaged units must have an attached leader.

·         The new-formed unit cannot have more men than a full-strength unit (12-men).

·         All the consolidating units must be adjacent to each other. (Within an 1" of each other)

·         All of the consolidating units are not engaged in melee currently.

 

Split

One can divide a unit into new partial-strength units.  The following restrictions apply:

·         The unit dividing is not engaged in melee currently.

·         No unit cannot split into smaller than 2-man groups.

·         Cavalry cannot split into smaller than 6-man groups.

 

Dismount or Mount

                It was common to have hobilars or knights dismount prior to battle.  Hobilars are mounted troops that dismount to fight enemy troops.  Many times leaders got their knights to dismount in an effort to curb their impetuousness.

The riders of a cavalry unit can voluntarily dismount or mount.  Show dismounted troops with infantry of the correct weapon if the castings are available.  If the horses are being retained and not run off, then the unit must leave two castings holding the horses unless the riders dismount directly in front of the horses and never leave them.  Use horse castings without riders if owned and they are similar to artillery limbers because they get in people’s way.

 


 DAMAGE RESOLUTION PHASE

 

Unit Protection

                Protection reduces the number of hits against the unit each phase by 1 per defense point. All hits are cumulative, and then protection factors are used to reduce the hits.  Note:  These protection factors can be reduced or eliminated by fire from crossbows or field weapons.

 

Defense                                                                                 Horse Defense (if attacking the horses)

+1 Shield                                                                                +1 If chain mail, lamellar, or quilted horse barding

+1 Shield wall or dense protective formations                +2 If plate mail barding

+1 Chain mail, lamellar, or quilted armor

+2 Plate mail armor                                                               Missile Fire Defense

+2 Behind wall defenses, war wagon, or fieldworks       +1 If behind mantlets or pavises

+2 If in woods or in buildings

+1 Silk shirts (Mongols)

 

                Shield bonuses are ignored in skirmish games if attacked from weapon flank or rear.

                The unit's protection is not counted multiple times against different units in a given round.   For example, a peasant unit and a soldier unit on the flank attack a knight unit with 3 points of protection frontally.  Let's say the peasants inflict 2 hits and the soldiers 3 hits in the melee.   The knights would lose 2 castings.  For example, the knight unit is shot in the missile fire phase for 2 hits and takes 3 hits in the melee phase. The knights lose 2 castings.

 

Hits - Protection = Damage

Each successful attack roll results in a hit.  The hits reduced by the unit's protection and the remainder is the damage to the unit.  A unit is not considered damaged if no casting was removed from the unit.

 

Damage = Casting Loss

Large unit rules:

Each hit above the protection amount kills a normal casting from the unit, unless there happens to be a leader death that removes a leader casting instead.   

 

Small unit rules:

For each two hits (round up) above the protection amount, kills a casting from the unit.  So a single hit, kills a casting.

 

Attached/Unit Leader Death Check

In some rare instances, attached or unit leader death is automatic. If there the damaged unit was only composed of leaders, then the killed figures are automatically leader figures.  If the damaged unit suffered casualties beyond the number of non-leader figures, then attached leaders castings would automatically compose the excess casualties.

If a damaged unit contains an attached or unit leader, then check to see if the leader was killed.  Roll a d6 for each leader where each 6 indicates that someone on the command stand dies and results in a 2nd roll.  On the second roll, 1 = musician killed, 2 = standard-bearer killed but colors transferred to another figure (so keep standard-bearer casting and remove musician), 3 = standard-bearer killed and enemy unit now has captured the colors, 4 = leader captured (no effect if by missile fire), 5 = leader wounded and must leave the field, 6 = leader killed.   If a leader or other command stand figure is killed, remove it instead of removing a normal casting.  Reduce the unit’s current morale one rank as the unit as it sees the leader’s death or capture and considers they might be next.  Units with a wounded leader suffer the current morale one rank lower if the leader leaves and the unit is routed or is engaged in melee.

 


ENGAGE IN MELEE RESOLUTION

               

BASIC RULES

                No unit has to roll to engage other units in melee.  No unit has to roll to stand when being charged.

Units in March Column or Dense Protective formations cannot charge into melee.  Artillery, Supply Wagon, Carroccio, or War Wagon units cannot charge into melee.

 

ADVANCED RULES

Mark the Charge’s Origins

                The original spot is needed to know if the final charge distance has been reached.

 

Charge or Halt?

Who Must Check?

·  Units inferior in current morale rank than their opponent must check. 

·  Automatically successful if the unit has an attached leader or unit leader.

 

                Success / Failure

If successful, the unit can move towards the enemy.

If they fail, they halt and are considered to have moved for the turn.

 

Stand or Flee?

Who Must Check?

·  Units inferior in current morale rank than their opponent must check. 

·  Automatically successful if the unit has an attached leader or unit leader.

 

                Success / Failure

                                If they to pass, they can stand or voluntarily pull back (if they have not moved).

If they fail, they withdraw or rout depending on morale resolution.

 

Defender Movement

                If the defending unit has not moved, move the unit away that is voluntarily pulling back.  This is counted as their movement for the round.  Also, it is at the cost of a casting as a few men cover the retreat.

                If the defending unit has not moved, move the withdrawing or routing unit away.  This is counted as their movement for the round. 

If the withdrawing or routing unit has moved, then they cannot move and suffer the melee. 

If they defender moves back, remember this might “uncover” defending units in the charge path that might have to make morale rolls as well.

 

Move Charging Unit

                Remember that charging units may have bonus movement if charging in a roughly straight line (see movement rules).  The charging unit is moved its full movement and cannot “pull up” short.

 

Repeat for Multiple Charged Units

Repeat the process for the next defending unit in the charge path, until the charger halts because it is nervous about the higher morale defender, the full charge movement is exhausted, or the charging unit engages a defender in melee.

 


MORALE RESOLUTION PHASES

 

Current Morale   (Shown by Colored Rings or Chips)

                The current morale begins the game at the original morale.  However, it can change if the unit is promoted from victory in melee or downgraded from routing.  The current morale of a unit is shown by colored rings or chips placed on the unit.  The goal is to roll over the modified current morale.

 

6              Double Yellow

5              Yellow

4              Green

3              Red

2              Blue

1              Gold (or Double Blue)

0              Double Gold (Only attainable from melee combat morale promotions.  They never fail morale.)

 

Roll d6 (where natural 6 = automatic success regardless of other factors).

 

Morale Roll Modifiers:

Universal

Crusade/Jihad:    +1

Elite Unit:              +1

 

After Missile   (*** GET TWO CHANCES **)

Leader/Colors:    +1

Casualties:           Single casting left: -2

Positioning:          +1 per Advantageous Position Defended (so castle on hill = +2, in war wagon = +1)

 

Charge (Advanced rules)

Formation:            In March Column or Dense Protective formations – CANNOT CHARGE

Troop Type:          Artillery, Supply Wagon, Carroccio, or War Wagon – CANNOT CHARGE

Leader/Colors:    AUTO

Opponent:             Charging an inferior quality (original morale) unit - AUTO

Opponent:             Charging an Already Withdrawing:  +2 OR Routing Unit - AUTO

Opponent:             Charging a Single Casting Unit or Missile Unit - AUTO

Opponent:             Charging a Camel Unit while Mounted on Unaccustomed Horse –2

Opponent:             Charging a Elephant Unit while Mounted on Horse -4

Positioning:          Flank    +1 OR       Rear +2

 

Stand (Advanced rules)

Formation:            In March Column Formation –1 OR Dense Protective Formations +2

Leader/Colors:    AUTO

Fighting:               Engaged in Melee Already - AUTO

Opponent:             Being charged by an inferior quality (original morale) unit - AUTO

Opponent:             Being charged by a Missile Unit or Single Casting Unit - AUTO

Opponent:             Being charged by a Camel Unit while Mounted on Unaccustomed Horse –1

Opponent:             Being charged by a Elephant Unit -2

Positioning:          Flank    -1 OR        Rear -2

Positioning:          +1 per Advantageous Position Defended (so castle on hill = +2, in war wagon = +1)

 

After Melee

Leader/Colors:    +1

Casualties:           Single casting left: -2

Positioning:          Attacked in Flank   -1 OR    Rear -2 

Positioning:          +1 per Advantageous Position Defended (so castle on hill = +2, in war wagon = +1)

Opponent:             Facing Missile Unit   AUTO OR   Mounted Melee Unit -1


 

APPENDIX A – TERRAIN

 

MINOR OBSTACLES

 

STAKES - Cavalry move up to it and lose any excess movement.  Dismount half of the cavalry going through it.  Ignore stakes if there is only a single casting cavalry.  Defender has an advantageous position.  Units can destroy stakes by spending one turn, unmolested by fire or melee, in the staked area.  Infantry move up to it and any excess movement penalty is lost.  Then next turn they may proceed on with no movement penalty assuming they are not locked in combat.

 

CALTROPS or POTHOLES – Caltrops are 4 iron prong spikes welded together that land with a single spike facing upward.  The purpose of the caltrop is to pierce the hoof or boot of a person.  Sometimes called “wolf traps” or “trou-de-loup”, hidden potholes broke up enemy cavalry charges by catching the horse’s legs.  Both are treated the same and are commonly used in conjunction with ditches.

Mounted units cross at 2d6” penalty and must roll one d6 per unit.  A 1-3 disables one horse while a 4-5 disables two horses and a 6 disables three horses.  Dismounting occurs regardless of horses’ armor.  Riders are dismounted and form a temporary unit until they can combine similar units.  Foot units cross at “LOW d6” penalty.

 

FENCE or VERY LOW WALL or HEDGE - These are obstacles 4’ tall or shorter.  Infantry crossing lose a “LOW d6” of movement.  Cavalry cannot cross obstacles over 4' high. Cavalry crossing a very low wall or hedge or fence lose 1 figure to stumbling on a roll of 5-6 on a d6. Cavalry flatten hedges when they cross.  Defenders get no advantageous position bonus dice on attacks and no defense bonus.  Does not obstruct line of sight.

 

PLOUGHED GROUND– This category is ploughed ground that has no or low crops.  Low crops are considered less than chest-high.  If it has tall wheat or corn, then see “thick” terrain.  Ploughed ground slows all troops.  All troops treat 6s as 1s. 

 

CAMPS – Games usually have one camp per side.  Cavalry loses “LOW d6” when moving through a campground. 

 

WATER OBSTACLES

 

UNFROZEN CREEK or STREAM or MOAT- First turn stop in water on the far side of the water obstacle.  Next turn proceed on as normal.  Remember the defender on the obstacle's edge is considered in a very advantageous position (bonus 2d6 for defending hilly bank and opponent suffers halved attack dice fighting while on wading).  Cavalry loses mounted bonus while in the water obstacle.

 

UNFROZEN RIVER - Stop on near bank still on land.  Next turn stops in water at far bank of the river.  Third turn, the unit moves normally.  Remember the defender on the river's edge is considered in a very advantageous position (bonus 2d6 for defending hilly bank and opponent suffers halved attack dice fighting while on wading).  Cavalry loses mounted bonus while in river.

 

FROZEN WATER OBSTACLE- All units move at d6” because of the slippery surface.  Units on the ice can charge or be charged.  Remember the defender gets a bonus 2d6 for advantageous position – defending hilly bank and opponent suffers halved attack dice fighting while on ice.  Remember charge of the Teutonic knights on the frozen surface of Lake Piepus in 1242?  Also, the Mongols used the frozen rivers in Russia as highways.

 

SEA or FJORD or LOCH or INLET – Seas, fjords, lochs, and inlets are treated as impassable terrain.  Only can be placed on the edge of the board.

 

TERRAIN THAT BLOCKS LINE-OF-SIGHT

 

Obstructed line of sight allows for hidden troops (see Games Appendix - Ambush).  Troops may be concealed on other side of elevated or thick terrain.  Troops can be concealed inside thick or depressed terrain.  Troops that are “on the edge” of thick terrain, on the forward slope of elevated terrain, or on the top of the elevated terrain are visible. 

One cannot shoot what one cannot see.  Blocked “line of sight” prevents shooting units outside or being shot by external missile fire.  Troops inside thick terrain or on the other side of the terrain cannot shoot at or be shot by enemy troops on the outside.   Troops inside thick terrain can shoot only targets inside the same terrain piece. 

Don’t forget that units that are “on-the-edge” or on the wall get missile defense protection.

Remember that missile units fire with partial attack dice if the target unit is only partially screened by the terrain piece.  Missile units fire at the standard dice per two castings that can see the target. 

Charging enemy troops also requires visibility.  Troops inside thick terrain or on the other side of the terrain cannot charge enemy troops outside or be charged by them.  Troops inside thick terrain can only charge other units within the same terrain piece.

 

The following are types of terrain that obstruct “line of sight”:

 

A) THICK TERRAIN

                Units can be “on the edge”, inside the thick terrain, or behind the terrain. 

                Units “on the edge” can charge out or be charged.   Units inside cannot charge out or be charged, except by other units inside.

                Units “on the edge” can fire out or be shot.  Units “on the edge” get missile defense protection.   Units in the thick terrain cannot fire out or be shot, except by other units inside.

                Skirmishers fight as normally as other troops do if the skirmishers are in thick terrain.  Melee infantry units with one-handed weapons and skirmishers get combat bonuses while in the thick terrain.  Mounted units lose mounted bonus when fighting units in the thick terrain.

                Units in “shield wall”, “march column”, or dense formations cannot enter thick terrain.  They must disband their formation to enter the terrain. 

 

HEAVY WOOD – Woods obstruct movement.  Cavalry, wagons, and limbered artillery move only d6”.  All armored infantry lose “LOW d6”.  Skirmishers and unarmored infantry suffer no movement penalty.

 

SWAMP – Basically considered wooded and marshy ground.  Swamp is treated exactly like HEAVY WOOD, except armored infantry units only move d6”. 

 

TOWNS – All cavalry lose 2d6 movement.  Missile units will suffer line-of-sight problems based on the location building models. 

 

WHEAT or CORN FIELDS or LARGE ROCKS or THICKETS or TALL GRASS – The rough ground is covered with chest-high obstructions.  All troop types drops “LOW d6”. 

 

B) ELEVATED TERRAIN

                Units can be on the forward slope, on top, the reverse slope, or behind the elevated terrain.  Troops are considered visible on top or the forward slope, but not on the reverse slope or behind the elevated terrain. 

                Elevated terrain also helps missile fire troops.  Troops on the higher elevation can fire over friendly troops if the friendly troops are closer to the firing unit than the enemy.

 

HILL - All infantry, wagons, and limbered artillery units lose “LOW d6” moving uphill.  All cavalry units lose “HIGH d6” moving uphill.  Remember the defender uphill is considered in an advantageous position. 

 

SAND DUNE – Sand dunes are treated exactly like HILL, except camel units suffer no movement penalty.

 

LOW WALLS or TALL HEDGEROWS or FIELDWORKS - Troops on the wall are visible, while troops can concealed on other side of the wall.    These are obstacles between 4’ and 10’ tall.  Infantry must stop at the base of the wall losing any excess movement.  Infantry crossing loses 2" for every 5' high the wall or hedge is as the soldiers climb over.  Cavalry cannot cross these obstacles.  Defenders get an advantageous position bonus dice on attacks, but no defense bonus. Obstructs line of sight unless unit is attacking from one top of the wall.

 

CITY or CASTLE WALLS - Troops on the wall are visible, while troops may be concealed on other side of the wall.  These are obstacles over 10’ tall.  Infantry require ladders or ropes to cross this obstacle.  Infantry must stop at the base of the wall losing any excess movement. Infantry crossing loses d6 for every 5' high the wall or hedge is as the soldiers climb over.  Note that attacking units might take a full turn or more climbing, while archers on the walls might fire down on them.  Cavalry cannot cross these obstacles.  Defenders get an advantageous position bonus dice on attacks and a defense bonus.  Obstructs line of sight unless unit is attacking from one top of the wall.

 

C) DEPRESSED TERRAIN

 

DITCHES or DRY CREEK BED or GULLY or DRY MOAT- Ditches were commonly dug to breakup against enemy cavalry charges.  Think about the use of ditches at battles of Bannockburn or Courtai.  First turn stop on the far side of the obstacle.  Next turn proceed on as normal.  Remember the defender gets bonus 2d6 for defending hilly bank. 

 

RAVINE or CHASM - Stop on near bank.  Next turn stops inside ravine at bottom of far bank.  Third turn, the unit moves normally.  Remember the defender gets bonus 2d6 for defending hilly bank.

 

COUNTER TERRAIN

BRIDGE - Negates any water obstacles.  Unit defending one end of the bridge get the advantageous position bonus dice.

 

PONTOON BRIDGE - Negates any water obstacles.  However, infantry incurs a “LOW d6” penalty and cavalry a “HIGH d6” penalty because of the instability of the bridge. Unit defending one end of the bridge get the advantageous position bonus dice.

 

ROAD - Negate any land obstacles, except hills and walls.  Cavalry or infantry units starting and ending their movement on the road travel an extra d6”.

 

OPEN GATE - Negate any wall obstacles.

 

SIEGE TOWER - Negates any wall defender’s defense or multiple advantageous position bonus dice.  The defender still gets a single advantageous position bonus dice because they are basically defending the end of a bridge.  A siege tower only can hold one attacking unit in the tower at a time.

 


 

APPENDIX B – FIELD AND SIEGE WEAPONS

 

Field Weapons

                Armies used field weapons in sieges and only very rarely in medireview battles.  These weapons are able to inflict minor structural damage.  Limbering or unlimbering takes a full round.  No unlimbered or prolonging movement is allowed.  Roll dice equal to half the crew (round up).  If any of the dice hit, then the field weapon inflicts a single casualty figure regardless of armor and number of dice that hit.

 

Chinese Rocket Artillery

Occasionally used by the Mongols, rocket fire is inaccurate and not very deadly, but disconcerting to troops. The damage is only a morale check for the hit unit. Hit 5+ under 6" otherwise, hits on a 6 out to the max range of 30".  Must spend a round out of melee reloading if manned by 3 castings or two rounds if a single casting.  1 to 3 man crew.

 

Siege Arbalest

Siege arbalests were extra heavy crossbows used in sieges mounted on tripods or battlements. Accurate and powerful siege arbalests were ineffective against structures.  Must spend a round out of melee reloading if manned by 2 castings or two rounds if a single casting.  1 to 2-man crew.

 

Ballista & Scorpions & Bombards

The ballista and scorpion are direct fire weapons like crossbows.   Must spend a round out of melee reloading if manned by 4 castings or two rounds if 2 castings.  2 to 4 man crew.  Bombards were commonly pulled by on a sled to a site.  Edward III reportedly used 22 cannon in his campaign in France at the battle of Crecy, although some historians dispute this.

 

Light Catapults & Onagers

Must spend two rounds out of melee reloading.  Fires freely over any friendly or enemy troops in any formation.  4 to 6 man crew.

 

Siege Weapons

Decide your destination point.  Roll a d6 attack dice for each two crew.  If any hit, then roll a d6 because inaccurate - 1) 3” short, 2) 3” long, 3) 3” to right, 4) 3” to left, 5-6) on target.  Inflicts a single casualty figure regardless of armor if a hit is scored.  Must spend three rounds out of melee reloading.  Immobile.  Usually built on the spot with the metal pieces transported.  Siege weapons fire freely over any friendly or enemy troops in any formation.

 

Heavy Catapults

(***  6 to 10 man crew. ***)

 

Trebuchets

(***  8 to 12 man crew.  ***)

 

Range                     Siege Arbalest

15”-21”                   6   (Ignore 2 defense)

12"-15"                   5+ (Ignore 2 defense)

6"-12"                     4+ (Ignore 2 defense)

under 6"                 3+ (Ignore 2 defense)

 

Range                     Ballistas                 Light Catapults

18"-24”                                                                                                                                                                 6                                6

12"-18"                                                                                                                                                              5+                                5+

under 12”                                                             4+                                                                                                              <NOT POSSIBLE>

 

                Range                     Heavy Catapults                  Range                     Trebuchets            Bombards

21"-30"                   6                                              27"-36"                   6                                              6

                12"-21"                   5+                                            18"-27"                   5+                                            5+

                under 12"               <NOT POSSIBLE>               under 18"               <NOT POSSIBLE>               4+

 

 


 

APPENDIX H – GAMES

 

OVERALL
Baggage Train

                There may be a baggage train per side in a game.   Losing the camp to the enemy results in a loss of command chips.  Baggage trains allow players to field more troops in campaign games (see campaign rule set).  Baggage trains usually move at supply wagon speed, unless specified otherwise in the scenario.  An interesting example of a battle for a baggage train is the Battle of the Herrings in 1429 where an encircled wagon lager is attacked by troops attempting to starve a city. 

 
Camps

                There should be a camp per side in a game.   Losing the camp to the enemy results in a loss of command chips.  Camps allow players to field more troops in campaign games (see campaign rule set).

 

Ambush  (Hidden Units)

Meeting engagements scenarios only allow ambushes placed anywhere within 24” (16” for 15mms) of their side’s base line.  Invasion scenarios allow defenders to place ambushes anywhere on the board, while invaders can only ambush within 24” (16” for 15mms) of their side’s base line.  Historical games vary on what ambushes are allowed. 

 

HISTORICAL GAME

                Historical games are historical battle recreations.  Historical games allow players to have a truly historical game, but perhaps make non-historical troop movements and the dice rolls might generate a non-historical result.  Players are given historical troop types, troop numbers, and “battles” (command groups).  Terrain used is typically as close as possible to the actual battlefield.  The players might be constrained by historical deployment or limitations. 

 

HYPOTHETICAL GAME

1-3           Invasion

4-6           Meeting Engagement (Neutral ground)

 

Hypothetical - Invasion Game

1-3           Invader

4-6           Defender

 

Retreat

Siege

Encampment Ambush  - Doryaleum, 1097 – Turks led by Kilij Arslan attack the camp at dawn as Crusaders awakening.

Encircled

Movement             – Crossing board

- Crossing terrain  (river or exit mountain pass)  - Edgecote, 1469 (river crossing)

Cravant, 1423 (river crossing) 

Bauge, 1421 (river crossing)

 

CAMPAIGN GAME

                Campaign games fit into an interlinked multi-session campaign of hypothetical or historical games.  The campaign rule set used dictate how games are set up.

 

 

GOALS

 

 

Attacker / Defender Determination

                Invasion Path

 

Random Weather Generation

               

 


 

APPENDIX I – STRATEGIES

 

Crusader Games

                Crusader conflicts have a whole different feel and strategy than the European vs. European fights.   Crusade battles generally take longer than the European mainland battles because the Arab player often avoids direct conflict attempting to wear his opponent down.

                The crusader forces are often run with multiple players and the forces divided into nationalities.  They are usually given a single crusader general and numerous national leaders.  The national leaders are restricted to rallying only those of the same nationality, while the crusader general can rally any crusader unit.  Generally the crusader players can talk only before the game begins, while the Arab players can discuss freely their options.

                Arab players are generally given few leaders, but they can rally any of their forces.

                It is critical that players not measure until the moment they fire.  Because measuring the range before firing gives the Arab player a huge advantage. 

                It helps if you allow the Arab players to hide some of their units.

 

Arab Players

                Remember that Arabs are opportunistic fighters.  Your troops are quick and can exploit opportunities when they present themselves.   Your troops are hit-and-run fighters.  The Arab forces generally lose head-to-head offensive games.  Since you are generally giving up ground, you placement and use of the board is critical.  Your leader placement is critical since troops can move the same rate as your leader.  If the routing unit gets a head start or retreat at an angle, you may not be able to catch them to rally them.  Concentrating your missile fire helps.

 

Crusader Players

                  You want to melee or contain him if it is ever possible.  Often you go beyond the enemy to surround him to eliminate possible escapes.  Timing is critical because if a horse archer comes into bow range and you advance a cavalry unit towards him.  If you win the roll and your side moves first, you might be able to catch his horse archer before he escapes.  Good use of your integrated crossbow and spear units are essential.  If you can push him towards the edge of the board, it helps reducing his maneuverability and routing units cannot be rallied because they left the table’s edge.  Use shield walls to your advantage.

 


 

APPENDIX J – OPTIONAL RULES

 

Static Movement – 25mms (Optional):

Cavalry:                                                                                                 Fired Cavalry:

Light Cavalry                                        12" (16" straight)                  Horse Archers or Mounted Skirmishers 10"

Medium Cavalry                                   10" (14" straight)                 

Heavy Cavalry & Camel Troops        9” (12" straight)

       

Non-fired Infantry:                                                                                              Fired Infantry:

·         Unarmored infantry                     10" (12” straight charge)                     Skirmishers                            8”

·         Armored infantry                         6” (8” straight charge)                         Other                                      NONE

·         Shield Wall Units                         3" 

 

Other:

·         Supply Wagons                                                                           6" on road or unloaded / 3” off road and loaded

·         Limbered field artillery (i.e. light catapult, ballista)  -              mule or oxen drawn 6" / horse drawn 9"

·         Limbered siege pieces (i.e. siege towers, battering rams)      4" on road / 2” off road

·         Unlimbered field artillery or siege pieces                                 NONE

 

25mm Ranges:

Range                     Arquebus

15"-24"                   6   (Ignore armor)

6"-15"                     5+ (Ignore armor)

under 6"                 4+ (Ignore armor)

 

Range                     Heavy Crossbow                                 Light Crossbow / Lockbow / Pot de Fur / Handgonne

12"-18"                   6   (Ignore 2 defense)                           -                                              

9"-12"                     5+ (Ignore 2 defense)                          6   (Ignore 1 defense)          

4"-9"                       4+ (Ignore 2 defense)                          5+ (Ignore 1 defense)         

under 4"                 3+ (Ignore 2 defense)                          4+ (Ignore 1 defense)         

 

Range                     Long Bow              Asiatic Bows                        Short Bow             Skirmishers           

15"-21"                   6                              6                                              -                               -              

9"-15"                     5+                            5+                                            6                              -              

6”-9”                       4+                            5+                                            5+                            6             

under 6"                 3+                            4+                                            4+                            5+

 

15mm Ranges:    (2/3rds of 25mm)

Effectiveness

Killing Field

Short Range

Medium Range

Long Range

Weapon

(Roll 3+)

 (Roll 4+)

 (Roll 5+)

(Roll 6)

Gunpowder:

 

 

 

 

Arquebus (ignore armor)

N/A

Under 4”

4”-10”

10”-16”

Pot de Fur (ignore 1 defense)

N/A

Under 2”

2”-6”

6”-9”

Handgonne (ignore 1 defense)

N/A

Under 2”

2”-6”

6”-9”

Crossbow:

 

 

 

 

Heavy Crossbow (ignore 2 defense)

Under 2”

2”-6”

6”-9”

9”-12”

Light Crossbow (ignore 1 defense)

N/A

Under 2”

2”-6”

6”-9”

Lockbow (ignore 1 defense)

N/A

Under 2”

2”-6”

6”-9”

Chinese Heavy Crossbow (fired at angle) (ignore 1 defense)

N/A

Under 4”

4”-10”

10”-14”

Bow:

 

 

 

 

Long Bow

Under 4”

4”-6”

6”-10”

10”-14”

Asiatic Bow

N/A

Under 4”

4”-10”

10”-14”

Short Bow

N/A

Under 4”

4”-6”

6”-10”

Miscellaneous:

 

 

 

 

Skirmishers

N/A

N/A

Under 4”

4”-6”

 

15mm Ranges:    (2/3rds of 25mm)

Range                     Arquebus

10"-16"                   6   (Ignore armor)

4"-10"                     5+ (Ignore armor)

under 4"                 4+ (Ignore armor)

 

Range                     Heavy Crossbow                                 Light Crossbow / Lockbow / Pot de Fur / Handgonne

9"-12"                     6   (Ignore 2 defense)                           -                                              

6"-9"                       5+ (Ignore 2 defense)                          6   (Ignore 1 defense)          

2"-6"                       4+ (Ignore 2 defense)                          5+ (Ignore 1 defense)         

under 2"                 3+ (Ignore 2 defense)                          4+ (Ignore 1 defense)         

 

Range                     Long Bow              Asiatic Bows                        Short Bow             Skirmishers

10"-14"                   6                              6                                              -                               -              

6"-10"                     5+                            5+                                            6                              -              

4”-6”                       4+                            5+                                            5+                            6             

under 4"                 3+                            4+                                            4+                            5+           

 

COMMAND CHIPS – CHIP LOSS (Optional)

 

Count Each Side’s Damage Inflicted

+1 per enemy non-general levy unit to withdraw or rout this round

+1 per enemy killed non-general levy unit this round

+1 per enemy unit leader or army leader killed this round            

-1 per friendly unit damaged from friendly fire this round

 

Loser Suffers Loss

Compare totals.  Loser is the one with the least damage inflicted.  Loser suffers the loss of command chips equal to the difference of the two totals. 

 

 

THOUGHTS

Improve missile fire by veteran troops?


Return to the Jackson Gamers' Home Rules

Return to the Jackson Gamers' Homepage


Angelfire - Free Home Pages
Free Web Building Help
Angelfire HTML Library
htmlGEAR - free polls, guestbooks, and more!

Thank you for visiting The Jackson Gamers' pages at Angelfire. Please come back and visit again!