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Recent Headlines
a la Mod:

Domino is
a "disarmingly
straight-forward"
work that "pushes
us to reexamine our
relationship to images
and their consumption,
not only ethically
but metaphysically"
-Collin Brinkman

De Palma on Domino
"It was not recut.
I was not involved
in the ADR, the
musical recording
sessions, the final
mix or the color
timing of the
final print."

Listen to
Donaggio's full score
for Domino online

De Palma/Lehman
rapport at work
in Snakes

De Palma/Lehman
next novel is Terry

De Palma developing
Catch And Kill,
"a horror movie
based on real things
that have happened
in the news"

Supercut video
of De Palma's films
edited by Carl Rodrigue

Washington Post
review of Keesey book

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Exclusive Passion
Interviews:

Brian De Palma
Karoline Herfurth
Leila Rozario

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AV Club Review
of Dumas book

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Interviews...

De Palma interviewed
in Paris 2002

De Palma discusses
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The De Palma Touch

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Carrie...A Fan's Site

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No Harm In Charm

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Fly Rule

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The Filmmaker Who
Came In From The Cold

Jim Emerson on
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Scarface: Make Way
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The Big Dive
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Carrie: The Movie

Deborah Shelton
Official Web Site

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italkyoubored

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De Palma a la Mod
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Entries by Topic
A note about topics: Some blog posts have more than one topic, in which case only one main topic can be chosen to represent that post. This means that some topics may have been discussed in posts labeled otherwise. For instance, a post that discusses both The Boston Stranglers and The Demolished Man may only be labeled one or the other. Please keep this in mind as you navigate this list.
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Tuesday, September 7, 2021
'A DOMINO EFFECT WITH CATASTROPHIC CONSEQUENCES'
THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS IN DE PALMA'S 'SISTERS' FEEL AS RELEVANT AS EVER, WRITES URSULA MUNOZ-SCHAEFER
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/sisterswindowcouple55.jpg

At Neon Splatter last week, Ursula Muñoz-Schaefer wrote about Brian De Palma's Sisters in an "Added To Watchlist" column:
If you spend any amount of time online, you’ve probably engaged in — or, at the very least, come across — conversations about the supposed politicization of popular media. Whether it be meddling right-wingers or snooty leftists, everyone seems to be under the impression that, for better or worse, genre films have evolved to reflect the increasing awareness of environmental issues, economic inequality, and race and gender politics that characterize our turbulent times. The horror genre in particular has become the target of much discussion between recent remakes of existing IP such as this year’s CANDYMAN and last year’s THE INVISIBLE MAN, the widespread acclaim of diverse new creators like Jordan Peele, and the wave of less successful knockoffs his films seem to be inspiring. Although many of these themes have certainly become increasingly overt in recent years, horror media has always been rife with blistering social critique, and the 1970s were proof of that. Brian De Palma’s psychosexual horror-thriller SISTERS is proof of that too.

Released in 1972, four years prior to his meteoric success with CARRIE, SISTERS remains a somewhat underrated gem in De Palma’s filmography, which also includes SCARFACE, BLOW OUT, PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE, and the first MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE among its many hits. Taking place in Staten Island, the movie follows a woman who attempts to investigate a murder case that goes ignored by the police. Suspecting her neighbor of the crime, she falls into a tangled web of dark secrets concerning said woman’s medical history and her caustic relationship to a mysterious twin.

There are several reasons De Palma’s fourth-most-popular horror scratches an itch few films can satisfy for me. For starters, its social implications feel as relevant as ever. Spoiling as little as possible, the man (Lisle Wilson) whose murder our protagonist Grace (Jennifer Salt) witnesses, is black. A hard-hitting journalist who’d previously written about corruption in the local police force, her claims are brushed aside by the detective who does not make an attempt to properly search the neighbor’s apartment for a body. He constantly belittles Grace and threatens to have her arrested for petty charges if she doesn’t lay off. The man’s race is brought up many times over the course of the film, with Grace implying that the police are racist for not taking the murder seriously and instead siding with the white woman (Margot Kidder) she accused of deadly assault.

Unbeknownst to the other characters, said white woman, Danielle, suffers from an undisclosed psychiatric illness, and lives under the medical and emotional care of her controlling husband, Emil (William Finley). Like in Alfred Hitchcock’s PSYCHO, the initial murder victim is followed closely during the film’s first act, which establishes him as a decent man unfazed by the microaggressions he undergoes in his day-to-day life until he is brutally killed off. As the story progresses, it becomes clear that the characters are being failed by what the film portrays as oppressive social and structural forces meant to protect them — resulting in a domino effect with catastrophic consequences.

SISTERS is also just a treat for movie and history buffs. As a big Hitchcock junkie, there are few things I love more than a good modern retelling of his work, from MANHATTAN MURDER MYSTERY (1993) to STOKER (2013). SISTERS is unique in that it pays homage to the revolutionary narrative and audiovisual techniques from the Master of Suspense’s entire career through obvious references to scenes from his most iconic films.


Read the rest at Neon Splatter.

Posted by Geoff at 11:50 PM CDT
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Monday, September 6, 2021
PODCAST WRESTLES WITH DE PALMA'S CINEMA
INTRIGUE, ANGER, RESPECT - LINGERING SUBSTANCE UNDERNEATH A SIGNATURE VISUAL STYLE
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/caitlinpodcast.jpg

"We take on Brian De Palma in this week’s episode of Through the Booth Window," Caitlin Stow posted on Instagram a few days ago. "I watched ELEVEN De Palma films to prepare for this and I gotta say I don’t regret a second of it…well, except for the seconds spent watching Redacted…but other than that! Available wherever pods are podding."

Stow's co-host, Joey Bauer, mistakenly tells special guest Craig Leman that De Palma has never written any of the screenplays to his movies, so you can see right away that while their discussion of De Palma's films seems thoughtful and intelligent, it is not exactly fully-informed, nor well-researched. Here's the episode description:

Brian De Palma has been called a genius and a hack, but you can't deny that he makes a memorable film. This week, joined by special guest Craig Leman, we dig into De Palma's filmography to talk about his sleazy atmospheres, signature visual style, and confounding depiction of women.

Spoiled in this episode: Blow Out, Dressed to Kill, Body Double, Redacted.


Posted by Geoff at 11:29 PM CDT
Updated: Tuesday, September 7, 2021 8:13 AM CDT
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Sunday, September 5, 2021
TARANTINO'S BIG ONGOING BOOK OF DE PALMA ESSAYS
"I DON'T THINK I'LL FINISH THEM - THEY'RE SITTING UNTYPED IN A DRAWER"
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/qtnovel1.jpg

As Quentin Tarantino's first novel is published, GQ's John Phipps has a profile piece in which some other QT writings are mentioned:
Once Upon A Time In Hollywood is, at its heart, a book about the sadness and excitement of expectation: Sharon Tate, the next-big-thing actor with her unborn child; Aldo Ray, a washed-up alcoholic with his own kind of dignity; even Manson feels more like a relatable kind of loser, trying to make it big as a hippie folk singer, than the electromagnetic pulse powering a murderous sex-and-bullshit cult. At one point the book quotes the film critic Pauline Kael: “In Hollywood you can die of encouragement.”

It’s the losers, I think, who have Tarantino’s heart. Maybe that’s why [Cliff] Booth’s education in cinema feels so real. “I think it’s the solitary experience he ends up liking,” says Tarantino, turning reflective. “Which, actually, is kind of interesting. I hadn’t thought about it before – but that was, for the most part, you know, me. From, like, 14 to 22 or 23, I saw so many movies. But it was rare, unless the movie was a huge hit, that I saw something other kids in school saw or my family saw. For the most part, I’m seeing a whole lot of movies and I’ve never talked to anybody about them.”

The man GQ is speaking to today sounds blissfully happy, revelling in the joys of new parenthood. (He says he does bath time, but not nappies.) It’s been a slow growth towards contentment from the “piss and vinegar”.

“I think that’s the goal,” he says, laughing, “and most of us more or less achieve it.” But the young Tarantino was alone in his obsession. “It was a completely solitary experience. Whatever I felt about it, and however much I liked it, it was unexpressed.”

After that electric loneliness in the dark theatre, Tarantino would cut out magazine clips from his favourite music and movie critics and stick them into organised scrapbooks. “So I’d have my Pauline Kael books, my Stanley Kauffmann book, my Michael Ventura book.” Kael remains a guiding light. He not only owns all her books, but he also buys every different edition he sees. Fans have long wondered if Tarantino would ever get round to some of the projects he’s teased: a movie about the Vega brothers; a Silver Surfer film; a third Kill Bill. There are a few ideas today – the most surprising being that he’d like to write a novelisation of someone else’s movie – but the great forthcoming Tarantino work, for my money, will be a book of film reviews, slated for release in the next few years. Who wouldn’t want to read that?

Beyond that, there are big books of essays that he has been adding to for decades and which he can never seem to finish, on the work of filmmakers such as Brian De Palma, Sergio Corbucci, Don Siegel and Robert Aldrich. “I don’t think I’ll finish them,” he says, laughing. “They’re sitting un-typed in a drawer.” He has other plans – not settled yet, but vague, floating enticements that might grab him. He says he can see himself doing a novelisation of True Romance or Reservoir Dogs. What about – it seems so obvious – making Pulp Fiction into pulp fiction? A pause. “Nah, that doesn’t interest me.”

The answer is immediate. Because he knows instinctively, by this point, how to listen to his instincts, the ones that took him to where he is today. Before the mountain of paper, the one-handed typing, the rewrites and edits and inevitable accommodations with practicality, every project starts with an idea, an interior excitement, something he’s wanted to do for a long time, something that sparks the same sense of momentum he felt as a young guy adding dialogue to other people’s movies – that pregnant sense of direction and certainty. So he sits down to write. Very quickly, almost immediately, he knows if he’s on to something.

“I know within the first couple of scenes: I’m gonna finish this. This is it. This is the next one I’m doing. I started doing it and I was right.”


Posted by Geoff at 11:42 AM CDT
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Sunday, August 29, 2021
'IT FEELS LIKE IT COULD HAPPEN TO YOU'
PODCAST DELVES INTO IDENTIFYING WITH GRACE - DISCUSSION OF 'SISTERS'
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/cleaningsplit045.jpg

On the latest episode of I Know Movies And You Don't, host Kyle Bruehl is joined by Ben McGinley and Galen Howard "to discuss Brian De Palma's unnerving and stylish ode to Alfred Hitchcock, the spiral into horror voyeurism, racial subtext, and female gaslighting in Sisters."

Posted by Geoff at 6:40 PM CDT
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Saturday, August 28, 2021
DETAILS - CARLITO'S WAY COLLECTOR'S STEELBOOK
ZAVVI EXCLUSIVE, 32-PAGE BOOKLET, ART CARDS, POSTCARD, 4K ULTRA HD, OCTOBER 25TH
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/carlito4ksteelbook1.jpg

Posted by Geoff at 5:14 PM CDT
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Friday, August 27, 2021
'76 EBERT - 'OBSESSION IS AN OVERWROUGHT MELODRAMA'
"AND THAT'S WHAT I LIKE BEST ABOUT IT" - REVIEW PUBLISHED 45 YEARS AGO TODAY
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/obsessiondreamhaze.jpg

After opening in New York City in early August of 1976, Brian De Palma's Obsession began to open in more cities in the weeks that followed. In Chicago, Obsession opened 45 years ago this weekend, and Roger Ebert's 3-star review was published in the August 27, 1976 edition of the Chicago Sun-Times - it's archived now at RogerEbert.com:
Brian De Palma's "Obsession" is an overwrought melodrama, and that's what I like best about it. There's no doing this sort of thing halfway, and De Palma knows it: We get gloomy vistas down wet Italian streets, and characters running toward each other in slow motion, and low-angle shots of tombs, and romantic music breaking suddenly into discordant warnings, and -- best of all -- a surprise ending which manages at the same time to be totally implausible and totally satisfying.

The movie opens in New Orleans at a party celebrating a 10th wedding anniversary: Michael and Elizabeth Courtland are still deeply in love, so right away we know they're in trouble. A butler moves through the room with drinks on a tray, and as he walks toward the camera his jacket hitches up and we get a huge close-up of a gun tucked into his belt. There's ominous music on the soundtrack and no wonder -- Michael's wife and daughter are about to be kidnapped.

A ransom note demands $500,000, but Courtland allows himself to be talked into a harebrained scheme by the police. They spike the money with a little radio transmitter and follow the signals back to the house where the kidnappers are holed up. There's a confused escape, the police chase the getaway car, it crashes into a gasoline truck and in the resulting explosion, the wife and daughter are killed. At least that's what Michael Courtland believes for 18 long years, during which he erects an enormous monument in an otherwise empty cemetery.

But then, during a business trip to Italy, he visits the church in Florence where he first met his wife. And there on a scaffold, mixing some paint and helping with a restoration project, is his wife! She looks exactly the same as she did 18 years ago. There is a courtship, a romance, plans for marriage and a return to New Orleans. And then Paul Schrader's screenplay starts a series of incredible double-reverses and shocking revelations, which of course it wouldn't be fair for me to reveal.

The ending, as I've suggested, is totally implausible -- we can think of at least a dozen questions in the last five minutes alone -- but who cares? De Palma and Schrader, and Bernard Herrmann with his beautifully overdone music, and Cliff Robertson and Genevieve Bujold with their mutual obsession, are all playing this material as broadly as possible. This is a 1940s melodrama out of the CBS Radio Mystery Theater by way of a gothic novel. If you want realism, go to another movie.

Material like this needs a certain tone, and De Palma finds it. He starts with two of the most romantically decadent cities on earth (New Orleans and Florence - although Venice would have been better), and then he lets his sound track drip with portentous music and his characters roam through deserted and vaguely menacing locations. The photography, by Vilmos Zsigmond, is darkly, richly sinister: as two men sit talking in a Florentine cafe, the camera changes focus as it sweeps from one to the other so that we're forced to look beyond them into a square and wonder who we'll see there.

Robertson's first visit to the church, in which the camera's deep focus makes him seem to climb those stairs forever, is another nicely disturbing visual moment. And, in a movie that owes a lot to the Hitchcock style, there are a few well-chosen exact quotations from the Master (as when Genevieve Bujold tells the housekeeper: "There's a door upstairs that's locked. Where is the key?" And then . . . well, You know how these things develop.)

The movie's been criticized as implausible and unsubtle, but that's exactly missing the point. Of course the ending is out of a lurid novel, and of course the music edges toward hysteria, and of course Robertson goes from mad to worse (wouldn't you, if you saw a ghost?). I don't just like movies like this; I relish them. Sometimes overwrought excess can be its own reward. If "Obsession" had been even a little more subtle, had made even a little more sense on some boring logical plane, it wouldn't have worked at all.


Posted by Geoff at 8:05 PM CDT
Updated: Friday, August 27, 2021 8:06 PM CDT
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Thursday, August 26, 2021
BETTER COVER ART REVEALED FOR 4k 'CARLITO'S WAY'
TRIED & TRUE WITH NICE VARIATION ON THE ORIGINAL POSTER ART - THE STREET IS WATCHING, OCT 12
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/4kcarlitosway.jpg

Previously:
Carlito's Way 4K Blu-ray coming in October

Posted by Geoff at 12:01 AM CDT
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Wednesday, August 25, 2021
FRIGHTFEST FOUNDER RECALLS SEEING THE FURY IN '78
AFTERWARD, SHOCKED TO DISCOVER THAT AMY IRVING WAS SITTING IN FRONT OF HIM
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/closemyeyes0.jpg

Alan Jones, co-director of the London FrightFest Film Festival, tweeted a fun story earlier this month:
Today in 1978 I saw a favourite Brian De Palma, THE FURY, at the Century Preview Theatre. It was at this screening I sat behind Amy Irving, didn't know, raved about her performance, and she turned to me to say thanks. Classic!

In response, Neil Irving tweeted, "Played at the Time Out Film Festival on 22 Sep 1978, before opening at the Leicester Sq Theatre a week later. Here are some Ads..." Irving's tweet included the ads seen above and below in this post. In response to that tweet, this brief exchange followed:
Perpetual room tone: Gate Notting Hill IIRC. Pipe-smoking lunatic in the audience challenged De Palma.

Neil Irving: Yes, it was an 11.15pm screening. That must have been a very late-night Q&A?!

Perpetual room tone: De Palma was ultra-patient with dumb/fawning/rambling "questions" (mine included)



Posted by Geoff at 8:08 PM CDT
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Tuesday, August 24, 2021
SAM IRVIN REMEMBERS MEETING DE NIRO IN 1970
"I'M JUST AN ACTOR, KID. SHELLEY WINTERS IS THE STAR."
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/bloodymama.jpg

In a Facebook post today, Sam Irvin tells a story about meeting Robert De Niro in 1970:
When BLOODY MAMA opened at my dad’s Plaza Theater in Asheville, NC, in March 1970, AIP sent a 26-year-old actor who played one of Shelley Winters’ sons in the movie. He drove a vintage 1930’s car like the one in the film. He parked the car out in front of the theater, right under the marquee, for photo ops with the local newspaper and TV station. He signed autographs but nobody knew who he was. At age 13, I said to him, “It’s so cool to have a real-live movie star at my dad’s theater.” He smiled sardonically and said, “I’m just an actor, kid. Shelley Winters is the star.” My father and I took him to lunch and I was riveted as he talked about working for director Roger Corman — whom I idolized for all his Vincent Price / Edgar Allan Poe movies. I wanted to ride off into the sunset with this guy but after lunch, he left me in the dust. Five years later, in 1975, this same guy won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in THE GODFATHER: PART II. His name was Robert De Niro.

Note that a month after that Drive-In experience, Hi, Mom! was released in theaters.

Posted by Geoff at 7:34 PM CDT
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Monday, August 23, 2021
DE PALMA RETROSPECTIVE SEPT 4-30 IN FRANCE
AT INSTITUT DE L'IMAGE - NATHAN RERA TO PRESENT 'CASUALTIES OF WAR' ON SEPT. 11
https://www.angelfire.com/de/palma/limagesept2021.jpg

Nathan Réra, whose book about Casualties Of War (Outrages) was released earlier this year, will present a screening of that film at L'Institut de l'image on September 11, which is Brian De Palma's birthday. The screening will be part of a 13-film De Palma retrospective at L'Institut de l'image, which runs from September 4th through the 30th. Two more special presentations will happen on the opening day of the series: Guy Astic, director of editions Rouge Profond (which published Outrages), will presnt De Palma's Carrie, and Jean-Michel Durafour, author of the book Brian De Palma - Effusions: blood, perception, theory, will present De Palma's similarly-'70s Carlito's Way. Here's a Google-assisted translation of the description of the series:
Among the great American film-lovers of his generation (Scorsese, Coppola, Spielberg…), Brian De Palma is the one whose relationship to image is the most complex. Working from pre-existing images to create his own, he himself has dissected the films of his masters, starting with Hitchcock of course, whose sequences, narratives and motifs (visual, sound, musical) come back tirelessly in his work, like obsessions that haunt him and give it all its depth and originality. Here, the image is more than a simple reference, and the filmmaker never ceases to reaffirm its cogency, its powers, its potentialities (aesthetic, political, moral). The image for De Palma is a source of pleasure, but also of horror. It is vital, but funeral. Luminous, or twilight. Obsession, Phantom of the Paradise, Blow Out, Casualties of War, Carlito's Way, Mission: Impossible ... films populated by ghosts and dead on borrowed time. The hero, in De Palma, is a tightrope walker ready to fall into the void at any moment, like the young Vietnamese girl from Casualties of War, whose tortured body could single-handedly embody the tragic dimension of her cinema. Casualties of War and the representation of the war at De Palma will be at the heart of this retrospective with a day hosted by Nathan Réra, on the occasion of the release at Rouge Profond of his book, "Outrages, from Daniel Lang to Brian De Palma".

Posted by Geoff at 11:34 PM CDT
Updated: Monday, August 23, 2021 11:35 PM CDT
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