Past Postings

Previous William Thomas Sherman Info Page postings, quotes, observations, etc.

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As promised, "By Appointment Only" with Lew Cody. The audio, unfortunately, is not as loud and clear as I would have liked it to be; unless, that is, you have very good PC speakers. But the film as soap opera is quite entertaining; as well being interesting as a period piece.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5I7rwzwZJXM

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Within the past week or so, I had my YouTube channel, after many years, now back in operation. Coming soon -- the 1933 Lew Cody talkie "By Appointment Only." (Stay tuned.)

["Thursday's Child (1943) - Sally Ann Howes"]

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I'm continuing to take a small vacation from my website while I work on more silent film transfers. In the meantime then, here's some more Motown. (Let's face it, couples don't come more beautiful than this.)

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["Tammi Terrell - All I Do Is Think About You" and "Marvin Gaye & Tammi Terrell "Ain't No Mountain High Enough"" -- filmed at what look like fair grounds; with Terrell wearing blue cap]

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["The Honey Cone - One Monkey Don't Stop No Show" -- from Sonny and Cher tv Show]

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["The Delfonics - Didn't I (Blow Your Mind This Time) - 1971" -- from "Soul Train" appearance.]

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One of my favorite epithets when dealing with haughty spirit people, like the magician, is (he is) "a chump of a character." By which I mean someone who ruins everything for everyone because he doesn't really know what he is doing, and despite his high opinion of his own intelligence.

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Giving new meaning to the word Funk-a-delic...

["Smiling Faces [by the] Undisputed Truth" -- live tv show version with white wigs and gold face paint]

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We hear from Yahoo news this morning (3/25/12), "'Hunger Games' stuns with $155 million opening." Wow! 31 million dollars per ticket -- that's some expensive movie. But then they can afford it.

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Excerpts from St. Augustine's epistles continued.

5...The fishermen of Galilee found pleasure not only in leaving their ships and their nets at the Lord's command, but also in declaring that they had left all and followed Him. [Matthew 19:27] And truly he despises all who despises not only all that he was able, but also all that he was desirous to possess. What may have been desired is seen only by the eyes of God; what was actually possessed is seen also by the eyes of men. Moreover, when things trivial and earthly are loved by us, we are somehow more firmly wedded to what we have than to what we desire to have. For whence was it that he who sought from the Lord counsel as to the way of eternal life, went away sorrowful upon hearing that, if he would be perfect, he must sell all, and distribute to the poor, and have treasure in heaven, unless because, as the Gospel tells us, he had great possessions? [Luke 18:22-23] For it is one thing to forbear from appropriating what is wanting to us; it is another thing to rend away that which has become a part of ourselves: the former action is like declining food, the latter is like cutting off a limb. How great and how full of wonder is the joy with which Christian charity beholds in our day a sacrifice cheerfully made in obedience to the Gospel of Christ, which that rich man grieved and refused to make at the bidding of Christ Himself!
~ Letter 31

1. As for my spirit, I am well, through the Lord's good pleasure, and the strength which He condescends to impart; but as for my body, I am confined to bed. I can neither walk, nor stand, nor sit, because of the pain and swelling of a boil or tumour. But even in such a case, since this is the will of the Lord, what else can I say than that I am well? For if we do not wish that which He is pleased to do, we ought rather to take blame to ourselves than to think that He could err in anything which He either does or suffers to be done. All this you know well; but what shall I more willingly say to you than the things which I say to myself, seeing that you are to me a second self? I commend therefore both my days and my nights to your pious intercessions. Pray for me, that I may not waste my days through want of self-control, and that I may bear my nights with patience: pray that, though I walk in the midst of the shadow of death, the Lord may so be with me that I shall fear no evil...
~ Letter 38

[To St. Jerome]
[ch. 3] 3. In your exposition of the Epistle of Paul to the Galatians I have found one thing which causes me much concern. For if it be the case that statements untrue in themselves, but made, as it were, out of a sense of duty in the interest of religion, have been admitted into the Holy Scriptures, what authority will be left to them? If this be conceded, what sentence can be produced from these Scriptures, by the weight of which the wicked obstinacy of error can be broken down? For as soon as you have produced it, if it be disliked by him who contends with you, he will reply that, in the passage alleged, the writer was uttering a falsehood under the pressure of some honourable sense of duty. And where will any one find this way of escape impossible, if it be possible for men to say and believe that, after introducing his narrative with these words, “The things which I write unto you, behold, before God, I lie not,” [Galatians 1:20] the apostle lied when he said of Peter and Barnabas, “I saw that they walked not uprightly, according to the truth of the gospel”? [Galatians 2:14] For if they did walk uprightly, Paul wrote what was false; and if he wrote what was false here, when did he say what was true? Shall he be supposed to say what is true when his teaching corresponds with the predilection of his reader, and shall everything which runs counter to the impressions of the reader be reckoned a falsehood uttered by him under a sense of duty? It will be impossible to prevent men from finding reasons for thinking that he not only might have uttered a falsehood, but was bound to do so, if we admit this canon of interpretation. There is no need for many words in pursuing this argument, especially in writing to you, for whose wisdom and prudence enough has already been said. I would by no means be so arrogant as to attempt to enrich by my small coppers your mind, which by the divine gift is golden; and none is more able than yourself to revise and correct that work to which I have referred.
[ch. 4] 7...incomparably more lovely than the Grecian Helen is Christian truth: In her defence, our martyrs have fought against Sodom with more courage than the heroes of Greece displayed against Troy for Helen's sake. I do not say this in order that you may recover the faculty of spiritual sight, — far be it from me to say that you have lost it!— but that, having eyes both clear and quick in discernment, you may turn them towards that from which, in unaccountable dissimulation, you have turned them away, refusing to see the calamitous consequences which would follow on our once admitting that a writer of the divine books could in any part of his work honourably and piously utter a falsehood.
~ Letter 40

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