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men who change diapers change the world


Thursday, 10 February 2005
A Quiet Dynasty
Topic: Stats

Like the New England Patriot's Defensive End Richard Seymour (pictured at left with his son by the Globes' Stan Grossfeld), working at-home dads have quietly taken the spotlight in the media in the last several years.  Also like the Pats they don't have a real spokesman either. Sure the reluctant Tom Brady  gets the GQ treatment but that's it. (Remember, Terrell Owens got more attention then the entire New England Team combined in one Ad.). In any case  the media seems to be enjoying putting together the terms  "working dad"  and the "at-home dad" qualifier in the same breath.  Reading through some "working dad" articles just in the past week I kept noticing sentences like...  "As the co-owner and chef of Three Oaks Chocolatier in Torrington, and a stay-at-home dad to three young boys.....or "He gets to schedule his work to spend as much time as possible with Joey, now 4 ?. He calls himself a stay-at-home dad"  or  "Being a stay-at-home dad three days a week, I've deep-six diapers, cut the crust off PB&J's, and made the ultimate sacrifice: sing along with Barney".  These dads seem to be emphasizing that, yes we do work, but we are still caring for their kids and we're proud of it.  The media isn't the only ones noticing, The Families and Work Institute  note in a 2004 report that Gen-X daddies (working dads between the ages of 23-37)  spend nearly an extra hour (or 3.4 hours/day) with their kids as compared to 25 years ago. What I found even more encouraging is that that the early returns (their samples were are too small to give out numbers) are showing Gen-Y dads (18-22 years old) are trumping the X-ers.  Look for this new generation of dynasty dads to be making more noise in the coming years.

Posted by athomedad at 12:42 PM EST
Updated: Thursday, 10 February 2005 4:41 PM EST
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Thursday, 16 December 2004
married adults are healthiest but dad might be fatter
Topic: Stats
Married Adults are Healthiest but

I have great respect for people like Charlotte Schoenborn, a 20 year Health statistician veteran who headed up this government report. When reading it, I felt like I was looking at the chart at left, it's cool, and straightforward, but didn't mean anything to me. That's why we need people like Charlotte to dig through the data and turn it into this user friendly report released yesterday from the National Center for Health Statistics. This dumbed down "E-Z report" knocked out the following bullets:

  • Married adults are less likely than other adults to be in fair or poor health, and are less likely to suffer from health conditions such as headaches and serious psychological distress.

  • Married adults are less likely be limited in various activities, including work and other activities of daily living.

  • Married adults are less likely to smoke, drink heavily or be physically inactive. However, married men are more likely to be overweight or obese than other men.

  • Adults who live in cohabiting relationships are more likely to have health problems than married adults and more closely resemble divorced and separated adults.

  • The association between marital status and health is most striking in the youngest age group although it persists throughout the age groups studied.

This morning I asked Charlotte the loaded question, "Why are married men were more likely to be overweight than "other men?". She wasn't allowed to give out her opinion and wanted to leave it to "us" to come up with any speculation. So I offered her just that, "Could it be that the married man tends to be around the house more, and has more time around the frig?" She paused a bit, then, commented, "Could be... a stable environment could mean a stable food supply".

Don't think I could have worded it any better...


Posted by athomedad at 1:50 PM EST
Updated: Saturday, 18 December 2004 4:24 PM EST
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