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Fruits


Apricots

"I brushed away two sellers of apricots and spices."
Tribesmen of Gor (pg 45)




Apricots can be served fresh, baked, or made into various cookies and cakes. Apricot can also be served as a liqueur or cordial, and as jellies, jams and preserves. Apricots, either halved or as preserves, can be used to decorate or as filling for small pastries.


Berries

"I felt the pull of a strap on my throat, and opened my eyes. By a long leather strap, some ten feet in length, I was fastened by the neck to Ute. We were picking berries."
Captive of Gor (pg 208)




Berries, of course, are a wonderful accompaniment to many meals. They are often too small to be served on a fruit tray, though tartlets and cakes filled with berry preserves are often suitable to trays like that. In addition, berries make a fine dessert, served with clotted cream, fresh sweet cream, or whipped, sweetened cream.


Cherries

"It reminds me of the cherries of Tyros," I said.
Beasts of Gor (page unknown)




Cherries are like the fruit of the same name on Earth. They may be used for tarts, pies, candy, jelly, or served fresh. On Gor this sweet fruit is commonly grown in Tyros.


Dates

"The principal export of the oases are dates, or pressed-date bricks."
Tribesmen of Gor (pg 37)




Dates are grown in the oases of the Tahari and are wonderful served fresh on a fruit platter. The pressed-date bricks can be used to make cookies or tarts.


Larma

"I took a slice of hard larma from the tray. This is a firm, single-seeded applelike fruit. It is quite unlike the segmented, juicy larma. It is sometimes called, perhaps more aptly, the pit fruit, because of its large single stone."
Players of Gor (pg 267)




"The larma is luscious. It has a rather hard shell but the shell is brittle and easily broken. Within, the fleshy endocarp, the fruit, is delicious and very juicy."
Renegades of Gor (pg 437)




"Another bit of larma, Master?" asked the slave, kneeling behind me and to my left. I turned and, from where I sat cross-legged behind the low table, removed a small, crisp disk of fried larma, with a browned-honey sauce, from the silver tray."
Guardsman of Gor (pg 231)




"On Gor, the female slave, desiring her master, yet sometimes fearing to speak to him, frightened that she may be struck, has recourse upon occasion, to certain devices, the meaning of which is generally established and culturally well understood. Another device, common in Port Kar, is for the girl to kneel before the master and put her head down and lift her arms, offering him fruit, usually a larma or a yellow Gorean peach, ripe and fresh."
Tribesmen of Gor (pgs 27-28)




"The slave boy, Fish, had emerged from the kitchen, holding over his head on a large silver platter a whole roasted tarsk, steaming and crisped, basted, shining under the torch light, a larma in its mouth, garnished with suls and Tur-Pah."
Raiders of Gor (pg 219)




There are two types of larma fruit. One is a single-seeded, apple-like fruit. The other is segmented and juicy with a hard, brittle shell on the outside. A slave girl who desires the touch of a Master may kneel before him, offering a larma as her unspoken message of need. Larma is an interesting fruit. Two vastly different appearing fruits are called larma, and the way that they may be used depends on the version chosen. The hard larma is applelike in texture, and apparently in taste, as it is used to stuff the mouth of the pork-like tarsk. It is this larma that is served fried, with a browned-honey sauce, or perhaps with a honey-butter sauce. The second version of larma is more like an orange, with a hard, removable brittle shell. This version of larma is extremely juicy and sweet, and is meant to be eaten fresh. It is this version of the larma that is often offered to a Master as an unspoken plea to be used. Each segment of the larma may be separated from the others, the succulent sections fed by hand, dripping with juices.


Melons

"Buy melons!" called a fellow next to her, lifting one of the yellowish, red-striped spheres toward me."
Tribesmen of Gor (pg 45)




Melons seem to have an incredible amount of variety in shape and size and flavor. The one thing that is pretty consistent about melons though, is that they are rarely any good served any way but fresh cut. If a melon is to be served, cut the melon and unseed it as close to serving time as possible. Melons stuffed with brown-betty and ice cream make a wonderful and very special end to a meal, and fresh melon, served with sa-tarna and cheese, or black bread, butter and honey make an exceptional breakfast.


Peaches

"On Gor, the female slave, desiring her master, yet sometimes fearing to speak to him, frightened that she may be struck, has recourse upon occasion, to certain devices, the meaning of which is generally established and culturally well understood.Another device, common in Port Kar, is for the girl to kneel before the master and put her head down and lift her arms, offering him fruit, usually a larma or a yellow Gorean peach, ripe and fresh."
Tribesmen of Gor (pgs 27-28)




"At my father's insistence, I began to eat, reluctantly, never taking my eyes from him, hardly tasting the food, which was simple but excellent. The meat reminded me of venison; it was not the meat of an animal raised on domestic grains. It had been roasted over an open flame. The bread was still hot from the oven. The fruit - - grapes and peaches of some sort - - was fresh and cold as mountain snow."
Tarnsman of Gor (pg 22)




Pretty much self-explanatory, peaches can be used to make pies, tarts, jellies, served fresh, sliced on fruit trays or in fruit salads. Additionally, they may be used by slaves as a silent plea for slave-rape, when served whole, ripe and fresh to a Master.


Plums

"I had nearly stepped into a basket of plums."
Tarnsman of Gor (pg 45)




Plums are best served fresh, on fruit trays or sliced and pitted in fruit salads. As an option, when baked in brandy, the resulting sauce can be spooned over rich meats like tarsk or over poultry, especially gamey poultry like tumit.


Raisins

"vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions, and honey."
Tarnsman of Gor (pg 45)




Raisins can brighten everything from breads to cereals. As noted in the quote, they can be added to stews, especially poultry or verr stews, where the sweetness, combined with the proper spices, can offset the gamey taste of the meat.


Ram-berries

"A guard was with us, and we were charged with filling our leather buckets with ram-berries, a small reddish fruit with edible seeds, not unlike plums save for the many small seeds."
Captive of Gor (pg 305)




Small reddish fruit, plumlike, but with edible seeds. Ram-berries are a great favorite among the girls. Among the many options for serving ram-berry are as Tarts, jellies, served fresh with cream, crushed and added to juice blends, served over shortcakes or slices of sa-tarna soaked in milk and sugar.


Ta-grapes

"and others, from goblets, gave us of wines, Turian wines, thick and sweet, Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes, from the terraces of Cos"
Tribesmenof Gor (pg 213)




"The grapes were purple and, I suppose, Ta-grapes from the lower vine-yards of the terraced island of Cos..."
Priest Kings of Gor (pg 45)




Ta grapes are a particular style of grape, grown in Cos. Smaller and deep purple, they are used to make Ta wine. Like most wine-grapes, they are rather tart and work well on a fruit tray, when combined with mild cheeses and bread.


Tospit

"I was mildly surprised that the boy had been eating the tospit raw, for they are quite bitter"
Tribesmen of Gor (pg 46)




"Larma and tospit are also grown at the oases, in small orchards."
Tribesmen of Gor (pg 37)




"She had been carrying tospits and vegetables to the deck locker, to fill it."
Marauders of Gor (pg 289)




"He looked at me shrewdly and, to my surprise, drew a tospit out of his pouch, that yellowish-white, bitter fruit, looking something like a peach, but about the size of a plum."
Nomad of Gor (pg 149)




"The common tospit almost invariably has an odd number of seeds. On the other hand, the rare, long-stemmed tospit usually has an even number of seeds."
Nomads of Gor (pg 149)




Tospit is a bitter, smallish fruit. Among the Nomads of the Plains, and even occasionally in the Cities it is used to make wagers on the number of seeds ( the number of odd seeds, since most tospits have and odd number of seeds). The most common variety of tospit is a short-stemmed version. In the serveries of V/T Gor, it has been common to treat tospit like lemons, serving a juice from them that is similar to lemonade, though it must assuredly be sweetened and diluted before serving, as it is, in its natural state, extremely bitter. Tospit, sliced thin or as juice, may also be combined with butter, or lightly sauteed in butter to be served atop vegetables or fish, especially nice over fish to cut the oily taste of some of the smaller Gorean fish.


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