other stuff (hourlong)

These are some shows I remember so barely that I'm not even going to give them their own pages. I've probably even deleted some shows before I thought of doing this, which I would wish I hadn't, if I could remember to regret deleting. But whatever, I could always think of things again someday, and add them in here. Then again, there are also shows I remember having watched, but now I'm like "meh, I won't even bother mentioning them anywhere." Oh, and probably most stuff I include here will have been from the 1990s or early 2000s. (Shows from the 80s I'll more likely include on pages for cartoon nostalgia, comedy nostalgia, or drama nostalgia.) See also other cartoons. Oh, and I should mention that this "other stuff" page eventually started getting too big, so I decided to split it into "hourlong shows" and "half hour shows." (You might call this "drama" and "comedy," but then again, shows don't always follow the "hour=drama / half-hour=comedy" general rule.)


2000 Malibu Road, CBS
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

The title is familiar, and some of the stars are familiar. I mean, obviously I knew who Drew Barrymore was, and I probably was vaguely aware of people like Jennifer Beals and Lisa Hartman. And Tuesday Knight sounds like a name of someone I must have seen in something- this is the only thing I could have seen her in- but I could also be confusing the name with Tuesday Weld (whom I've never seen in anything, but would like to). In any event, I don't remember anything about the show except the title and some names, but I must have watched it. I have no idea if I liked it, for anything other than having attractive women in it. But whatevs.


Angel Falls, CBS
IMDb; TV.com

A very short-lived prime time soap, which I had completely forgotten existed. But now that I've been reminded (by looking online for lists of old shows I may have forgotten), I think I must have liked it. It had a great cast (including a number of women who were easy on the eyes). And... I couldn't tell you anything about it.


Bull, TNT
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

This only lasted half a season, and I barely remember it, but I know I enjoyed it at the time it aired. A small group of investment bankers left the established firm where they worked to start their own investment firm. The head of this group was the grandson of the guy who had started the firm they originally worked for. That's all I remember about the plot. I'm sure I liked all the actors on the show, but the only ones I remember at all now are George Newbern and Elisabeth Röhm. Anyway, it's a shame the show didn't last longer.


Burke's Law, CBS
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

There was a series by this name on ABC in the 1960s, but I never saw it. I did however see the revival on CBS in the 90s. There was this rich guy named Amos Burke who worked as a police detective. In the revival, he was helped by his son, Peter, who was also a cop. Also, Amos had this guy named Vinnie who worked for him, played by Dom DeLuise. (I believe he was like a cook/butler/whatever.) And that's pretty much all I remember, but I know at the time, I found it a fairly amusing show. And I remember liking a lot of guest stars, who I knew from other things.


Capital City, ITV (UK)
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

This was set in the trading room of fictional London bank Shane-Longman. I don't remember the show as well as I'd like, but I do at least remember thinking it was a very interesting show. Lots of trading of stocks and such, which somehow always seemed terribly exciting. And we get to see the personal lives of the characters, mostly traders. Interesting people with interesting names. At least a couple pretty women. Um, I dunno what else to say. It was a good show, okay?


Central Park West, CBS
IMDb; TV.com; TV Tropes; Wikipedia

A prime time soap opera that lasted for two brief seasons. I don't really remember anything of the plot; when I think of the show at all, now, the only thing that ever occurs to me is that it starred Mädchen Amick. Looking it up now, I see that it also had Lauren Hutton, Mariel Hemingway, and Raquel Welch, and I can't believe I forgot about them. And I see it had some people I'd later get to know in other things, including Tom Verica and John Barrowman... and Gerald McRaney was in this? Now that I do not remember. Anyway, I dunno if the show was any good, but I must have liked it at least a little bit. Maybe more than a little. Wish I remembered it better.


Diagnosis Murder, CBS
IMDb; Retro Junk; Thrilling Detective; TV.com; TV Tropes; Wikipedia

This starred Dick Van Dyke (best known to me for Mary Poppins) as Dr. Mark Sloan, who became an amateur sleuth in homicide investigations, I guess. I don't remember the show well, but I'm sure I enjoyed it while it was on. Though even then I probably thought it was a little cheesy. Costars included Van Dyke's son, Barry, as Mark's son, police detective Steve Sloan; and Dr. Amanda Bentley (played by Victoria Rowell, who I knew from having watched a bit of "The Young & the Restless"); and Dr. Jack Stewart (Scott Baio, who I must have known from "Happy Days" and "Charles in Charge"). And, um, I don't know what else to say.


E.A.R.T.H. Force, CBS
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

This is a show I had completely forgotten existed, til I came across the title while looking up old shows online. It starred Gil Gerard (of Buck Rogers fame). There was this team that worked to provent environmental disasters. But I don't remember anything specific about it. Except maybe that my VCR failed to tape an episode, or something, which always bothered me.


FreakyLinks, FOX
IMDb; TV.com; TWoP; Wikipedia

A fairly decent show about this guy named Derek Barnes, who took up his seemingly dead brother's quest for all kinds of weird paranormal stuff. He and a few friends maintain a website about it. However, Derek took a less scientific, more adventurous approach to his investigations than his brother did. The show was kind of interesting and funny, but I don't remember anything about it very clearly. It might be nice to see it again sometime, but it's not really important.


Grand Slam, CBS
IMDb; TV.com

This premiered after the Super Bowl in 1990. It lasted less than a season. Perhaps it wasn't a great series, but I liked it. Anyway, comedian Paul Rodriguez played a bounty hunter named Pedro Gomez, and John Schneider (whom I knew from The Dukes of Hazzard, see drama nostalgia, and whom I'd later see in Smallville) played a bounty hunter named Dennis 'Hardball' Bakelenekoff. The two of them had very different styles and methods (Gomez's weapon of choice was a taser, and Hardball's was a baseball), but they were forced to work together for some reason (I forget why). They didn't really like each other, but I thought they were both pretty good. Anyway... it was kinda funny and stuff. I barely remember the show, but I wouldn't mind seeing it again. Which is terribly unlikely to ever happen. Oh, and I should say that I often think of the show as "Hardball and Gomez," rather than by its actual title. And Gomez drove a lowrider. And the show's theme song was War's "Low Rider."


MacGyver, ABC
Amazon Instant Video; IMDb; Retro Junk; TV.com; TV Tango; TV Tropes; Wikipedia

At the time that this aired (1985-92), I didn't get ABC. But it is something I was aware of, and kind of wanted to see. And at some point I'm sure I did see a bit of it, whether in syndication near the end of its run, or later in reruns on cable. But I don't remember anything very specific about it, beyond the fact that the title character is famous for improvising what would normally be incredibly complex devices out of a few incredibly simple, random parts (which no one else would ever think of using the way he did). Anyway, I must have enjoyed what little I saw of the show, and I wouldn't mind seeing more of it someday. But I probably never liked it quite as much as I thought I would, and now it's not really important to me. Still, it's definitely a show that bears mentioning.


Mann & Machine, NBC
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

Back when this aired in 1992, I didn't get NBC. But I'm sure I must've seen a least a few episodes (there were only nine, anyway), probably airing in a late night slot on my CBS affiliate. The only thing I really remember about it is Yancy Butler (whom I'd later see in Witchblade) playing an android cop. Her character's name was Eve Edison, and her partner was a human named Bobby Mann (hence the punny title). I guess it was the kind of show where robots can develop human emotions, and struggle with that, or whatever. And face prejudice from actual humans. And stuff. I don't really remember. It probably wasn't a great show, but it'd be nice to see it again, someday. Which will probably never happen.
summer series


Max Monroe: Loose Cannon, CBS
IMDb; TV.com

I don't remember much of anything about this show, except that Shadoe Stevens (probably best known as the host of the radio countdown "American Top 40") played a cop named Max Monroe... the kind of rule-breaking smart-aleck character who, you know, is called a "loose cannon." He seemed to enjoy this behavior, I think he really amused himself. And I liked the character, as well. But it probably wasn't really a good show, and it's not much of a shame that it didn't last long. But still... I thought I should at least mention that I watched it, and I liked it, at the time.


Middle Ages, CBS
IMDb; TV.com

This show was about people who were entering middle age. I don't remember much about it except that I liked the cast. A lot. I wish I could say more. It'd be great to see it again someday, but I very much doubt that'll ever happen.


Midnight Caller, NBC
Gary Cole Archives; IMDb; Retro Junk; TV.com; TV Tango; Wikipedia

This aired for three seasons, from 1988 to 1991. I didn't have access to NBC at the time, but it's entirely possible the show was syndicated to a channel I did get, because I vaguely remember watching this (if it's the show I'm thinking of, which it probably is). Then again, I feel like it's something I might have seen a few years after it ended, on satellite or something. I'm not sure. Anyway, all I'd be able to tell you from memory is that a late night radio talk show host tried to help people who called his show with their problems. And I don't just mean by giving them advice on the air, but actually by leaving the studio after the show and getting personally involved. Looking it up online now, I see that it starred Gary Cole, which is something I didn't remember... though I was fairly sure it starred someone I knew from other things, so I guess it's not surprising that it was him. Anyway, I don't know how much of the show I even saw (surely not three seasons worth). And I don't think I was ever particularly into it, but I felt like mentioning it, anyway.


Miracles, ABC
fansite; IMDb; Shout! Factory; TV.com; TWoP; Wikipedia

This was cancelled pretty quickly, and I don't know if I even saw all the episodes. Heck, I don't remember for sure if I saw more than the pilot. Nor do I remember how interested I was; I barely remember that the show existed. But I do find the premise potentially interesting. There was this priest (I think) named Paul Callan, who was an investigator for the Catholic Church, who debunked supposed miracles as having mundane explanations. However, in the pilot he discovered there were real miracles after all, and joined some group that was... investigating... such things. A secular group, I guess. The only thing I really remember about the plot is that there was a message in blood that said "God is now here," but which could also be read "God is nowhere," which I always thought was kind of neat. I dunno, maybe I'll try to watch it again someday. Or not.


Mutant X, syndicated
IMDb; TV.com; TV Tropes; Wikipedia

I have only the vaguest recollection of watching this. I don't know if I saw a few episodes, or a bunch of episodes, or even all three seasons (though that seems quite unlikely). One of the stars was John Shea, whom I knew from Lois & Clark, but I don't think I really know any of the other stars from anything else. Um... so, it was about mutants, which means the entire series had a sort of "X-Men" vibe (which caused a lawsuit, apparently, even though the show was made by Marvel, at least partly). I'm sure I couldn't have thought it was very good, but it must have been at least okay. And of course the girls were easy on the eyes. Anyway, I just thought I should mention that I saw at least a little bit of the show, if not more. But I don't find it memorable.


Mysterious Ways, CTV (Canada) / PAX / NBC
IMDb; TV.com; TV Tropes; Wikipedia

I watched very little of this, and now I can't remember for sure if I saw it on PAX or NBC. Or both. Anyway, it starred Adrian Pasdar, who was familiar to me from Profit, and whom I'd later become more familiar with on Heroes. He played an anthropology professor named Declan Dunn, who investigated "miraculous pheneomena." He worked with a psychiatrist named Dr. Peggy Fowler, though I don't remember her as well as his research assistant, a physics grad student named Miranda Feigelsteen. There isn't really any more I can say about the show. I don't think I was ever big into it, but it was okay, and I'm sure I always thought I maybe should've tried to watch a bit more of it. Or not.


One West Waikiki, CBS
IMDb; Retro Junk; TV.com; Wikipedia

All I remember about this is the title, but I probably liked it, at the time.


The Others, NBC
IMDb; TV.com; TV Tropes; TWoP; Wikipedia

Not to be confused with the movie The Others.

A decent show about a group of people with different sorts of psychic abilities. Not really one of my favorite shows, but I did like it and wished it would've lasted longer. I don't really even remember it well enough to describe it, though. Kevin J. O'Connor was in it, whose work I enjoyed in at least a couple of movies. Also John Billingsley was in it, whom I'd later see in Enterprise. Anyway, there were some evil forces working against the Others, I guess. But they didn't get too much into that until the end of the show, which only lasted 13 episodes. I'd probably like to see it again someday, but then again... that might just refresh my frustration at its having ended too soon. Also, it would mean writing a better review, which would mean moving the show off the "other stuff" page, and I kind of like having it here, just because I'm a fan of bad puns.


Over My Dead Body, CBS
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

This starred Edward Woodward (of whom I was a fan from "The Equalizer" (see drama nostalgia) and Jessica Lundy (who I think I'd previously seen in an episode of Northern Exposure). Woodward played an aging mystery novelist who teamed up with a reporter named Nikki Page (Lundy) to solve real crimes. It didn't last long and I don't remember it hardly at all, though I'm sure I enjoyed it at the time, and I'd be happy to see it again someday.


Pasadena, FOX
IMDb; TV.com; TWoP; Wikipedia

This only lasted four episodes (of 13 produced), but it was critically acclaimed, I guess. I don't even remember anything about the plot, or whether I liked it much, but I remember wanting to like it. And I think it may have disappointed me that it was cancelled so soon... or I might have stopped watching before that happened, I just don't remember. Anyway, it had a good cast, even if the only person I remember now is Dana Delany. In retrospect I do wish the series had lasted longer, and I might like to check it out again, sometime.


A Peaceable Kingdom, CBS
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

This only lasted 7 episodes, and I don't even know if I saw all of them. Lindsay Wagner played a recently widowed woman who was raising her kids alone and running a zoo. I don't really recall anything specific about it, but it's a title that always comes to mind when I try to think of old shows I may have seen and forgotten. (Though I don't remember the "A" in the title.) Anyway, just thought I'd mention it.


P.S.I. Luv U, CBS
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

This show didn't last long and I don't remember it well, but I do remember finding it quirky and amusing. There was this cop played by Greg Evigan (who I may have still remembered at the time from "BJ and the Bear," a show I used to watch a long time ago). He was involved in a sting operation, working with a con woman played by Connie Sellecca. They were trying to take down a mafia guy, but it didn't work out, so they had to go into witness protection. They posed as a married couple named Cody and Dani Powell, and were given jobs at Palm Security and Investigations, in Palm Springs (hence the "P.S.I." of the title). So... the premise was kind of redonkulous, these two people who didn't really like each other much, having to pretend to be married and do private investigating work together. But whatever, I really liked it and it'd be cool to see it again sometime. Which I probably never will. (And if I did, I might like it less than I did originally. Or not.)


Reasonable Doubts, NBC
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

Marlee Matlin played Tess Kaufman, an Assistant District Attorney who was passionate about defending her clients. She worked closely with a cop named Dicky Cobb (played by Mark Harmon). I also vaguely recall some characters like District Attorney Arthur Gold, and Tess's husband, Bruce, and Dicky's girlfriend, Kay. I dunno, there were a bunch of characters, I suppose. I don't really remember any of them well, and I don't remember any specific episodes or a whole lot about the general plot, but I know the show was important to me, for a while.


Relativity, ABC
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

This was a short-lived but critically-acclaimed series. I vaguely recall enjoying the show while it was on, but now the only thing about it that I remember is that it starred Kimberly Williams. There were other people in it who I either already knew from other stuff or would later see in other things, but I have no memory of them from this. Anyway, it might be nice to see it again someday, to refresh my memory.


The Road Home, CBS
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

A very short-lived show, which I don't remember anything about. But I think I kind of liked it. It starred Karen Allen (who I must have known from some other things) and Jessica Bowman (who I knew from Dr. Quinn), Terence Knox (who I knew from Tour of Duty, and Christopher Masterson (who I'd later see on Malcolm in the Middle). I suppose it's a shame the show didn't last longer, but... I dunno. Maybe I don't care so much.


Route 66, NBC
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

There was a series on CBS in the 60s (which is what the Wikipedia entry is for), but I never saw that, what with being born in 1975, and all. However, there was a remake (or a sequel) in 1993, which ran for only four episodes on NBC. It was about a couple of guys who got ahold of this classic sports car or whatever, and decided to start traveling cross country, having adventures or whatever. I dunno. I feel like I probably kind of liked the show, but I don't actually remember anything specific about it except that one of the stars was Dan Cortese (who I would later see in some other shows that lasted longer than this). But I knew him before this show mainly for appearing in a series of Burger King commercials. I think he was vaguely famous even before that, though probably not for anything with which I was familiar. Maybe he was on MTV or something. Anyway, I remember in the early 90s thinking he was pretty cool, probably largely because of the "BK TeeVee" commercials. Which you are quite justified in laughing about, but... do some research on YouTube, okay? And try to remember I was in my early teens. And it was the 90s. None of this has anything to do with "Route 66," but who cares? The BK ads were more memorable, anyway. (Though I probably also thought Cortese was cool in the show.)
summer series


Sisters, NBC
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

When this aired in the early 90s, I didn't get NBC. But I think my local CBS station played it... maybe on Saturday nights, or something. (It might have been some weeknight at 7, the channel used to do that with other networks' shows, mainly sitcoms, though.) Anyway, I'm sure I couldn't have seen anywhere near the whole series (it ran for six seasons, but I doubt I saw more than one or two, and probably not many episodes even then). Actually, I must have had NBC for the last season or two; maybe that's what I saw. I dunno. Honestly, I don't remember anything about the show except that it was about four sisters, two of whom were played by Swoosie Kurtz and Sela Ward. But I'm sure I must have at least somewhat enjoyed the series whenever I managed to catch it, and it'd probably be nice to see it again, someday. From the beginning.


Space Rangers, CBS
Great but Forgotten; IMDb; Mill Creek Entertainment; Sonar Entertainment; TV.com; Wikipedia

A sci-fi series that ran for just six episodes in 1993. My memory of the show is so vague that I'm surprised it's not from the 80s. The only thing I really remember about it is that Linda Hunt was in it. It seems to me that at the time this premiered, I was excited because I had so little access to sci-fi, and it was my favorite genre. I suppose it was surprising that CBS, pretty much the only American network I got (other than PBS), would put on a show like this. But then... I ended up not liking it. I don't know why, because as I said, I don't remember anything specific about it. It's entirely possible that if I saw it now, I'd have a greater appreciation for it. Or, maybe not. In any event, I very much doubt that I'll ever see it again, and I don't really care.


Spy Game, ABC
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

The only thing I really remember about his is it was about a pair of spies, and one of them was played by Allison Smith, of whom I was a fan from Kate & Allie (see comedy nostalgia). The show didn't last long, but I liked it. It was about spies, and it was amusing. What's not to like?


Tarzan, The WB
IMDb; TV.com; TWoP; Wikipedia

Okay, so, John Clayton and his parents were lost in a plane crash when he was a little kid, and presumed dead. Meanwhile, John's uncle Richard Clayton (played by Mitch Pileggi of The X-Files) and aunt Kathleen Clayton (played by Lucy Lawless of Xena: Warrior Princess) fought for control of John's trust fund and Greystoke Industries, or whatever. Flash forward to the present, and Richard has secretly found John, all grown-up, having been raised by apes, right, and he brings him back to New York. Now there's this police detective, Jane Porter, who finds out about this. And then everything gets complicated, and I don't feel like saying much except John (who calls himself Tarzan) likes Jane, and Jane... well, she doesn't even want to think about what she might feel for him. Although she does find him somewhat helpful in some of her cases, but this is balanced by her having to keep secrets from pretty much everyone, especially John's uncle. The show didn't last long, and I missed the last couple episodes. And now basically the only thing I actually remember about the show is that Pileggi and Lawless were in it.


That Was Then, ABC
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

(Around the time this premiered on ABC, there was similar new show on the CW called "Do Over," see other half.)

We meet Travis Glass on his 30th birthday. He's been in love with this girl Claudia like forever, and they've always been good friends... but she's married to his brother Gregg. I suppose he's got plenty of other problems with his life, but that's the big one. Anyway, he goes to bed that night, listening to some music with like some of those big headphones on or whatever. And like I guess lightning strikes and goes down the cord from the stereo to his head and he wakes up the next morning and he's 16 again. And he wants to fix his life. The only person who knows he's from the future is his friend Donnie Pinkus (played by Tyler Labine, who I always find entertaining). Anyway, Travis wants to prevent Claudia from getting together with Gregg, and hopefully get together with her himself, instead. But just when it looks like it's gonna happen, he remembers his old friend Timmy Robinson died that night, so he goes to prevent that... and by the time he gets back, Claudia has gone off with Gregg. Um... and then later he wakes up in the present again, so that's like a huge departure from "Do Over," and one which should make the show a lot more interesting, if it happens at the end of every episode. (I think I only saw one ep; apparently two aired before the show was cancelled.) Anyway, his whole life has changed, though of course he doesn't remember the new intervening years, so it all seems very wrong to him. He's mayor, and running against Timmy in an election I think. And Pinkus hates him now cuz he's married to this girl Pinkus was interested in, and has a couple of kids with her. And stuff. It's weird. So he wants to get back and change things again. I don't know how I missed the second episode (if I did), but anyway... I do wish the series would have lasted longer.


The Trials of Rosie O'Neill, CBS
IMDb; TV.com; Wikipedia

This starred Sharon Gless (with whom I must have been somewhat familiar from Cagney & Lacey) as a lawyer named Rosie O'Neill. I'm afraid I don't remember anything specific about the show, but I'm sure I liked it while it was on. It might be nice to see it again someday, but that seems terribly unlikely.



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