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28 August 2006
[Testing] MR NEWS: DOUBLE ISSUE...NO COMMENTARY
Topic: August 2006
EDITOR'S NOTE: We've had some trouble posting to Angelfire (our blog service) so we have combined last Friday's and today's news blogs into one. Let's hope Angelfire will correct the problem before next Friday's WEEK IN REVIEW.

AUGUST BIRTHDAYS

8.25, Alvaro Mutis. 8.26, Julio Cortazar. 8.27, Jeanette Winterson. 8.28, Janet Frame.

JUST FOR FUN

Editor's note: I just love opening up the Boing-Boing blog everyday. You never know what you'll find there. Today, it's giant praying mantises. [Or is that mantii?] How very Kafkaesque!

INDUSTRY NEWS

[08.25.06]?Lipton Tea is celebrating its 100th anniversary in an artful way: they've commissioned Japanese design firm Nendo to create a cafe inspired by the Mad Hatter's Tea Party from Alice in Wonderland. You can visit the installation at the Ozone Living Design Center in Shinjuku, Tokyo.

[08.24.06]?It's widely understood how literary magical realism was likely birthed from a European fine arts movement led by Franz Roh. Lois Parkinson Zamora has written three new essays which address the relationship between the visual and the literary. [Source: Endicott Studio]

WRITING NEWS

[08.24.06]?The Burning Epiphanies blog offers a couple of great writing prompts which we think are of special interest to magical realist writers who aim to uncover Truth in their work.

CELEBRITY NEWS

[08.24.06]?Did you know that Jorge Luis Borges has some poetry and nonfiction?two editions of Bibliotheque de la Pleiade?yet unavailable to the reading public? His widow and estate-controller, Maria Kodama, won't allow reproductions of the two vast tomes. Learn about the scandal here

BOOKS

[08.27.06]?The Women in Cages: Collected Stories by Vilas Sarang.?Writes Prasenjit Chowdhury for Deccan Herald? "The art of the willing suspension of disbelief gave way to magic realism mainly in the hands of the Latin American writers and beyond, the tribe of Borges and Marquez. But if you had always wanted an Indian writer to take up the literary cudgel for the best of what is largely a continental literary tradition, read Vilas Sarang?s The Women in Cages, a collection of 26 short stories that represent 30 of his 40 years? work in English and Marathi." Penguin Books, 2006

[08.24.06]?Before I Wake by Robert J. Wiersema (Random House Canada: August 2006)?Writes Jacqueline Turner for Straight.com: "An accident puts a three-year-old girl in a coma, and her parents struggle to cope. Discovering subsequently that she is a source of miracles is only one part of the novel?s many twists. The driver who caused the accident tries to commit suicide but is left in a kind of magic-realist limbo seeking, you guessed it, redemption."

MIXED MEDIA

[08.24.06]?Komome Diner?Dylan Young for Hour writes that this film, showing at the World Film Festival is "a magic realist gem made by Japanese in Finland." Playing through Sept 4.

[08.23.06]?Inkheart, by Cornelia Funke, will be adapted into a film starring Brendan Fraser by New Line Cinema.

A LITTLE LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING?

YOU MAY NOTICE: We'll be experimenting with the format and frequency of this newsblog over the next few weeks. Let us know if something works well or doesn't work at all. We're here to serve you.

ESPECIALLY FOR WRITERS: Our reading period is closed, and all submissions have been processed. If you have not heard from us and you have a submissions that remains outstanding, chances are good it was lost in the mail. You can always check with us; we have sent you a reply, which could have been lost in the mail.

GET PINGED! If you are set up to read web feeds, simply Margin's MAGICAL REALISM NEWS RSS feed to your reader using your web reader's tools. You'll receive automated feeds whenever we update the Magical Realism Newsblog. If you haven't moved into the world of RSS, don't despair. It's easier than it looks. RSS means "really simple syndication." To download a freeware RSS web reader (which allows you to "get pinged"?that is, receive automatic updates of new content posted at all your favorite blogs), we recommend Active Web Reader 2.4. Set up is easy and the feed reader is customizable.

GENTLE REMINDER: Margin's staff is on hiatus through mid-October 2006. Any e-mail we receive during this time will receive replies as necessary, but there may be delays due to pool parties, novel revision, rib festivals or stargazing.

MR NEWS: DOUBLE ISSUE/NO COMMENT: Magical realist birthdays, Kafkesque Mantii?, Tea Party Installation, Lois Parkinson Zamora, exercise: writing the Truth, Borges's Widow, Vilas Sarang, Before I Wake, Komome Diner, Branden Fraser in Inkheart

Posted by magicalrealismmaven@yahoo.com at 3:40 PM PDT
Updated: 28 August 2006 3:43 PM PDT
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23 August 2006
RE: MR News Extra + Commentary: In Defense of Gunter Grass
Topic: August 2006
NEWS EXTRA!

SPECIAL NOTICE

You can help Southern libraries restore collections devastated by last year's hurricanes. Scroll below for details.

CALENDAR

[8.24.06]—Birthdays: Jorge Luis Borges; AS Byatt; Jean Rhys

INDUSTRY NEWS

[08.22.06]—The Quill Award nominees have been announced, and among them, you'll find the following titles of interest to magical realism fans:

A Dirty Job: A Novel by Christopher Moore [for Best General Fiction]
Elsewhere by Gabrielle Zevin [for Best Young Adult/Teen Novel]
The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo [for Best Children's Chapter Book]
The Penultimate Peril by Lemony Snickett [for Best Children's Chapter Book]
The Stolen Child by Keith Donohue [for Best Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror Novel]

The Quill Award (via Reed Business Information and NBC) is an industry-qualified “consumers choice” awards program for books, honoring the best adult and children's books annually in 20 popular categories. You can vote for your favorite nominated titles here until September 30.

[08.16.06]—The Man Booker long list nominees have been announced. However, The Museum of Unconditional Surrender by Dubravka Ugresic, which we reported in the June edition of Margin as a People's Choice nominee, did not make this list.

CELEBRITY NEWS

[08.15.06]—Here's a fun interview from the Lit-Blog Co-op with fabulist writer Michael Martone, author of the book, Michael Martone. [No, there is not an echo in here!]
LBC Podcast
LBC discussion of Michael Martone

BOOKS

[08.22.06]—New out in hardback this week: Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman: 25 Stories by Haruki Murakami (Knopf) [source: Shelf Awareness]

[08.22.06]—New out in digital this week: Flashes Of The Other World by Julie Ann Shapiro (Pulp Bits) [source: The Open Press]

[08.22.06]—You can read an excerpt from An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter by Cesar Aira (Chris Andrews, translator) here.

[08.21.06]—DaVinci Code-aholics might want to check out Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose, if they haven't already. Here's a quick review by Ken at the blog Neth Space to get started.

MIXED MEDIA

[08.23.06]—South African director Teboho Mahlatsi's new short film Sekalli Sa Meokgo (Meokgo and the Stickfighter) will be screened at this year's Venice Film Festival [Aug 30-Sept 9]. Sekalli sa Meokgo is a magic realism story about Kgotso, a recluse stickfighter living high up in the Maluti Mountains outside Lesotho.

[08.21.06]—Oddities of interest at the consistently magical blog, BoingBoing.com include milk-drinking statues in India and chocolate drippings in the shape of the Virgin Mary in California.

[08.18.06]—Santa Barbara-based producer Susan Stewart Potter and writer-director Simon Monjack have raised $20 million to produce a film version of DM Thomas's challenging novel, The White Hotel. But Jeffrey Wells for the blog Hollywood Elsewhere asks: Can it be done? According to the blog, seven other producers, including David Lynch and Emir Kusturica, have not been able to do it themselves. Wells suggests the story is cursed.

COMMENTARY: IN DEFENSE OF GUNTER GRASS

For those who do not already know, magical realist author Gunter Grass recently confessed to serving briefly in the Nazi Waffen SS in 1945, which has raised a tremendous amount of controversy worldwide. ||| Read about it here

In Elizabeth Kiem's op-ed piece for The Morning News, she testifies on Grass's behalf. Below, you'll find my response to that piece, which was printed in the TMN letters section this morning.

"Dear TMN,

Today’s 'Not an Open Letter' by Elizabeth Kiem speaks for so many of us who understand how the world works in shades of gray.

I was sad and disappointed to learn about Grass’s secret when I first read about it. It was the same knee-jerk response that so many others continue to express. But I pulled myself back from that abyss; what we need in this world is more understanding and less rush to judgment, after all. The howling critics that remain rooted in their absolute positions clearly have forgotten all the horrible mistakes they also made when they were young and stupid.

Let me point out that “horrible” is not solely defined by the Holocaust, but by the many daily indiscretions we have all contributed to in the fall of our own collective humanity. A child born without a father but with a drug addiction. A careless lane change that sets off a chain-reaction car accident. A gambling challenge that puts an entire family into straits of financial despair. The signature on a business proposal, which lays to waste the livelihoods of thousands of working-class people. These are all horrible things, are they not?

So is one innocent if one didn’t do any of these things? Maybe the question should be this: Is one innocent if he or she didn’t try to prevent any of these things? Inaction is, in and of itself, another kind of crime against humanity. Only the youngest children are innocent. What have any of us done today to make the world a better place?

Writing The Tin Drum made the world a better place.

Who Grass is in the August of his life versus those months preceding April of 1945 needs to be remembered with perspective. Kiem has done so with a kind of raw compassion not normally expressed so publicly. I thank The Morning News for publishing her eloquent editorial in the same spirit that I honor Grass for his honesty.

Opening up dark matters means a little light can shine. I thank God for beacons.

Tamara Kaye Sellman"

Let me know what you think.

SPECIAL NOTICE: You can help Southern libraries restore collections devastated by last year's hurricanes

As reported in the August 9 edition of Shelf Awareness, Southern libraries are still in desperate need of books and funds to replenish collections ravaged by last fall's hurricane season. Many libraries in New Orleans were already underfunded, so the losses from Katrina have not been recovered fully; insurance and FEMA monies have been of limited help; and a reduced tax base (one understated and dismal effect of hurricane devastation) means local governments have fewer resources than ever for library support. This means that libraries in the South must rely on private and public efforts to aid in their restoration.

How can you help? Buy a copy of our anthology, Southern Revival: Deep Magic for Hurricane Relief.

For a $10 (or more) donation, you receive a handsome, collectible edition of an anthology of creative writings from authors who have some intrinsic tie to the South.

The writing is amazing and high in quality; the subject matter is compelling (lovelorn women transforming into oak trees, a creation myth of the Mississippi Delta, living kudzu, "widdershins," the mythic Ivory Bill woodpecker); and the artwork is stunning and evocative: block reliefs by award-winning artist Stephen Alcorn and images from dedicated Katrina photographer and chronicler Jack A. Neal of Mississippi.

Best of all, 100% of all donations collected for this anthology go directly to Book Relief.

Book Relief, the division of First Book which has made library recovery a priority in the hurricane-ravaged South since fall 2005, is the charity we chose to benefit when we released the anthology last April. We urge you to read their anniversary reflection on their commitment in "Looking Back on Book Relief: One Year Later".

The Book Relief initiative has distributed more than 2.5 million books to schools, libraries organizations and individuals throughout the Gulf Coast since September 2005. And yet, they are only halfway done. Their commitment is to distribute 5 million new books to the region.

As you've probably guessed, they've been one busy charity. Last June, they joined Lieutenant Governor Mitch Landrieu and civil rights activist Ruby Bridges to recognize the State Library of Louisiana for its tireless efforts in helping First Book to distribute 1 million new books, as part of their Book Relief initiative, to children and adults affected by the 2005 hurricanes in Louisiana. On that day alone, First Book distributed 70,000 new books, donated by Strictly By-The Book and YES Solutions across the Gulf Coast.

Next week, they'll be distributing 170,000 more books in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. [Volunteer to help with that distribution]

This month in particular will be a particularly busy time for the charity. Not only are they marking the anniversary of Katrina (and keeping their fingers crossed there won't be added devastation this fall), but they have played a key role in assisting in the reopening of many schools and libraries that remained closed for the entire 2005-2006 school year.

But their work doesn't end there. Upcoming distributions are schedule for Bernice, LA and New Orleans, and Book Relief expects to extend its efforts well into 2007.

Please consider purchasing a copy of Southern Revival to help out this outstanding, hardworking charity. There are yet a handful of copies left and we'd really like to sell every one of them. Click here to start the process. It's that simple. You'll be glad you did.

At this time, we'd like to take a moment to thank all the good people who have helped to put these anthologies before the reading public. We at MARGIN could not have done this on our own. We'd also like to thank The Georgia Review and The North American Review for their generous donation of advertising space so that we could get the word out, as well as Eagle Harbor Books in Bainbridge Island, WA for keeping SOUTHERN REVIVAL stocked on their shelves. And thanks go out to so many of our readers, who have, by buying copies of the anthology, significantly helped to distribute First Aid to the hearts and minds of our Southern neighbors. This is perhaps the best reason of all for buying your copy of SOUTHERN REVIVAL.


Posted by magicalrealismmaven@yahoo.com at 10:20 AM PDT
Updated: 23 August 2006 10:33 AM PDT
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21 August 2006
MAGICAL REALISM NEWS
Topic: August 2006
NOTE:

We're cutting over new hardware today, which means that today's news aggregate is a little abbreviated. We'll post a News Extra on Wed Aug 23, featuring MR news in the blogosphere, to make up for it. See you then!

CELEBRITY NEWS

[08.21.06]—The Chicago Tribune Literary Prize was announced this week. Louise Erdrich's The Painted Drum earned kudos for the fiction category, and Kate DiCamillo's Because of Winn-Dixie captured the children's literature award.

BOOKS

[08.13.06]—Wizard of the Crow by Ngugi wa Thiong'o—Writes Stuart Kelly for Scotsman.com—"I have every expectation that his new novel, Wizard of the Crow, will be seen in years to come as the equal of Midnight's Children, The Tin Drum or One Hundred Years of Solitude; a magisterial magic realist account of 20th-century African history. It is unreservedly a masterpiece." This review was written in conjunction with the recent Edinburgh International Book Festival. Pantheon, 2006

[08.12.06]—The Whale Caller by Zakes Mda—Writes James Smart for The Guardian—"With its likable mix of the mundane and the improbable, this new novel by academic and playwright Zakes Mda fits effortlessly into the magic realist tradition." Penguin, 2006

MIXED MEDIA

[08.18.06]—The Illusionist—Writes Ann Hornaday for the Washington Post—"As the intrigue builds, The Illusionist becomes not only a love story infused with the captivating romance of magic realism, but also a subtle, eerie augury of the cataclysm that lies ahead for Austria. Eisenheim, as befits Norton's solemn characterization, uses his sleights of hand not simply to divert his audiences, but to comment on such weighty matters as time, the soul and the nature of power itself." Directed by Neil Burger, who adapted the film from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Steven Millhauser's short story of the same title. Starring Edward Norton, Jessica Biel and Paul Giamatti.

[08.18.06]—House of Sand—Writes James Verniere for the TownOnline.com—"Largely allegorical, House of Sand is an example of magical realism at its most minimalist, an at-times thin tale about the passage of time and the way we lay down roots almost involuntarily." Directed by Andrucha Waddington, who adapted, with Elena Soarez and Luiz Carlos Barreto, the 1964 classic novel, Woman of the Dunes, written by Hiroshi Teshigahara.

[08.15.06]—5 Cups of Coffee—Writes James Hebert for the San Diego Union Tribune—"In Gillette Elvgren's play… java doesn't just mark the days; it also becomes a catalyst for time warps and all sorts of supernatural happenings. " Showings through September 17 at Lamb's Players Theatre in Coronado, Ca. For tickets and information

[08.11.06]—The Bird People in China—Writes Mark Hinson for the Tallahassee Democrat—"Miike's tale plays around with magical realism - turtles power a boat like horses on a stagecoach, there's a school that teaches people how to fly with cloth wings—to come up with one strange "Bird" of a movie." With director Takashi Miike; in Japanese and Chinese with English subtitles.

COMMENTARY

Due to today's hardware cutover we'll be postponing this feature until later in the week. Thanks for your patience!

Posted by magicalrealismmaven@yahoo.com at 8:16 AM PDT
Updated: 21 August 2006 8:17 AM PDT
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10 August 2006
MR NEWS WEEK IN REVIEW [8.07.06-8.11.06]: vacation notice, Disappearances, Ishiguro, The Stolen Child, Water & Power
Topic: August 2006
NOTE FROM EDITOR

[8.11.06]—Magical Realism News will be taking a vacation from Aug 11 through Aug 20. We'll post again on Aug 21.

CALENDAR

[8.11.06 through 8.21.06]—Showings of Disappearances throughout New England include:

Fri, Aug 11: Barrett Hall in South Strafford, VT and Town Hall in Hinesburg, VT
Sat, Aug 12: Tracy Hall in Norwich, VT
Sun, Aug 13: Lafayette Regional School in Franconia, NH and Windsor Recreation Center in Windsor, VT
Mon, Aug 14: Katherine Cornell Theater in Martha's Vineyard, MA
Tues, Aug 15: Okemo Mountain Resort in Ludlow, VT
Wed, Aug 16: Katherine Cornell Theater in Martha's Vineyard, MA and Lyndon Institute Auditorium in Lyndonville, VT
Thurs, Aug 17: Thetford Academy Theater in Thetford, VT
Fri, Aug 18: Town Hall in both Shelburne, VT and Lancaster, NH
Fri-Thurs, Aug 18 – 24: Big Picture Theater in Waitsfield, VT
Sat, Aug 19: Town Hall in Lancaster, NH
Sun, Aug 20: Chester Town Hall in Chester, VT
Mon, Aug 21: Peacham Library in Peacham, VT and Otter Valley School in Brandon, VT

From the website: "Based on the award-winning novel by Howard Frank Mosher. Legendary actor/songwriter Kris Kristofferson … stars as schemer and dreamer Quebec Bill Bonhomme—in a spellbinding tale of high-stakes whiskey-smuggling, a family's mysterious past, and a young boy's rite of passage. … Quebec Bill, desperate to raise money to preserve his endangered cattle herd through a long winter, resorts to whiskey smuggling, a traditional family occupation. He takes his son, Wild Bill, on an unforgettable trip that will long remain etched in the viewer's mind: a journey through vast reaches of the Canadian wilderness and into a haunted and elusive past. What they find is the stuff of genuine legend."

[8.15.06]—Book Discussion of Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go at The Elliot Bay Book Company, 101 South Main Street, Seattle, at 6:30 pm. Free admission. More info: [206]624.6600.

[8.21.06]—Reading from The Stolen Child by the author, Keith Donohue, at The Elliot Bay Book Company, 101 South Main Street, Seattle, at 7:30 pm. Free admission. More info: [206]624.6600.

MIXED MEDIA

[08.11.06]—Water & Power—Writes Don Shirley for Los Angeles City Beat—"…At least for the moment, Water & Power is not only topically jokey, but its saga of brotherly love is also somewhat moving. It helps that the script is adorned with a little magical realism. A boy (Moises Arias) plays a graceful, antler-wearing symbol of death—when he isn’t playing the young Water and Power in flashbacks or the underage waiter who serves The Fixer. The play’s final note, in which the boy is released from his grimmer duties, offers a moment of hope to this otherwise dark tale." Showing at Mark Taper Forum, Music Center, in downtown L.A. through Sept 17. More info: [213]628.2772 or contact the Center Theatre Group.

A LITTLE LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING…

YOU MAY NOTICE: We'll be experimenting with the format and frequency of this newsblog over the next few weeks. Let us know if something works well or doesn't work at all. We're here to serve you.

ESPECIALLY FOR WRITERS: Our reading period is closed, and all submissions have been processed. If you have not heard from us and you have a submissions that remains outstanding, chances are good it was lost in the mail. You can always check with us; we have sent you a reply, which could have been lost in the mail.

GET PINGED! If you are set up to read web feeds, simply Margin's MAGICAL REALISM NEWS RSS feed to your reader using your web reader's tools. You'll receive automated feeds whenever we update the Magical Realism Newsblog. If you haven't moved into the world of RSS, don't despair. It's easier than it looks. RSS means "really simple syndication." To download a freeware RSS web reader (which allows you to "get pinged"—that is, receive automatic updates of new content posted at all your favorite blogs), we recommend Active Web Reader 2.4. Set up is easy and the feed reader is customizable.

GENTLE REMINDER: Margin's staff is on hiatus through mid-October 2006. Any e-mail we receive during this time will receive replies as necessary, but there may be delays due to pool parties, novel revision, rib festivals or stargazing.


Posted by magicalrealismmaven@yahoo.com at 1:10 PM PDT
Updated: 10 August 2006 12:10 PM PDT
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7 August 2006
MR OVER THE WEEKEND + COMMENTARY: Why did Hollywood label 'NANNY MCPHEE' magical realism?
Topic: August 2006
CALENDAR

[8.10.06]—Opening this Thursday, running through August 20: Amphibian Stage Productions version of the play, Icarus. Showtimes are 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays, at Texas Christian University, Hays Theater, 2800 S. University Drive, Fort Worth. Admission: $20. Info: 817-923-3012.

[8.14.06]—Reading for Keith Donohue, author of The Stolen Child. To be held 12:30p at Stacey's Bookstore, 581 Market Street, San Francisco. Free admission. Info: 415-421-4687

INDUSTRY NEWS

[08.07.06]—Bookslut offers this wonderful interview with small press editor extraordinaire Gina Frangello, who has been a strong proponent of magical realist writing within the literary world.

BOOKS

[8.07.06]—The Longest Pregnancy by Melissa Fraterrigo—In a review column from the Associated Press—"…Fraterrigo's stories have been called 'blue collar magic realism,' and she likes that description." Swallow's Tale/Livingston Press, 2006

[08.06.06]—Salamanca by Dean Francis Alfar—Writes Sylvia L. Mayuga for INQ7: "Salamanca makes a good case for magical realism a la Pinoy, although it gives pause for thought on English as the medium for Filipino magical realist literature. Strange, when you consider that our first exposure to this variety of storytelling from the marvelous Latin American writers led by Gabriel Garcia Marquez was in books originally written in demotic Spanish."

COMMENTARY: WHY DID HOLLYWOOD LABEL 'NANNY MCPHEE' MAGICAL REALISM?

Hmmm. I finally saw the movie last weekend on DVD. It was charming, with a perfect cast, terrific sets and a delightful (if perhaps predictable?) plot.

I guess I should have predicted this as well: It's definitely not magical realism. Once again, Hollywood gets it wrong.

Why do they do this? It's ridiculous to say that 'Nanny McPhee' is magical realism when it's clearly fantasy from the get go. A mysterious title character with an untraceable background arrives (either by miracle or prayer) at the home of a man who needs quality childcare for his atrocious children. The new nanny has a magical cane through which she delivers her 'lessons' in the form of implicit spells. The fairy-tale like quality of the storyline is supported systemically in both plot and script when a household servant girl, Evangeline, shares in the grim delights of reading and telling actual fairy tales to the children. Likewise, Nanny McPhee herself suggests to Evangeline in the "happily ever after" scene how the girl is, in fact, the ending to the story.

Folks, fantasy tropes run rampant in this film. The arrival and magical workings of the new nanny is never for once expected to be believed by the audience; this is pure fairy tale.

I suspected as much when I first commented on 'Nanny McPhee' in the MarginNewsBlog [01.30.06]. Reagen Sulewski, commenting for the Monday Morning Quarterback series at Box Office Prophets declared "It's tough to go wrong with magical realism these days—Harry Potter really opened things up," to which I replied, "Oh, don't get me started. Harry Potter is not MR. Harry Potter is not MR. Repeat after me… ."

Let's all try to remember that magical realism wears concrete shoes made out of realism. Maybe Hollywood will catch on.

Let me know what you think.


Posted by magicalrealismmaven@yahoo.com at 1:02 PM PDT
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4 August 2006
MR WEEK IN REVIEW [7.31-8.04]
Topic: August 2006
INDUSTRY NEWS

[08.05.06]—Here's an easy and inexpensive way to get little doses of mostly magical realist fiction in your e-mail inbox on a regular basis: a ShortShortShort subscription offered by Margin contributor Bruce Holland Rogers. Not only does he have a handle of magical realist writing (he publishes widely across mainstream and genre markets), but he also has a terrific handle on the short-short form, which lends itself especially to magical realist and other forms of "unreal" writing. Subscriptions are $10 (USD) annually payable through PayPal and include 36 stories a year delivered at a rate of 3 per month.

CELEBRITY NEWS

[08.02.06]—Fun and Games: Check out the entry for "Gabriel Garcia Marquez" on The Literature Map.

CONTRIBUTORS' NEWS

[08.02.06]—Work from one of Margin's most frequent poetry contributors, Maureen Tolman Flannery, will appear in the upcoming anthology, Collections, Fetishes and Obsessions (ed. Stephen Powers & Michalene Mogensen, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee). She joins Margin editor Tamara Kaye Sellman, whose work will also appear in the anthology.

BOOKS

[07.31.06]—On the Northern California Independent Booksellers Association list for the week of July 30: FOR HARDCOVER FICTION: #8, The Devil and Miss Prym by Paulo Coelho (HarperCollins). FOR TRADE PAPERBACK FICTION: #4, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro (Vintage); #9, The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon (Penguin); #10, The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd (Penguin); #11, The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho (HarperSanFrancisco); #14, The Zahir by Paulo Coelho (Harper Perennial)

[07.26.06]—Pedro Paramo by Juan Rulfo (University of Texas Press) was recently featured in The New York Sun's "Readings" section by Eric Ormsby, whose take on the story, about a son in search of his father, serves to demystify an otherwise complicated text. Widely categorized as magical realism, the book "nevertheless stands in a category all its own," writes Ormsby. [He's right.]

MIXED MEDIA

[08.03.06]—Writes Nellie Andreeva for Reuters—"Fox is adding a sci-fi flavor to its development slate by committing to drama pilots about an undead attorney and a young cop who happens to be centuries old." Hmmm…I'm not sure how an undead attorney and an ageless cop are specifically sci-fi by definition, but we'll take it as a good sign that encounters with realism's secret varietals will continue into the next prime time television season.

[07.26.06]—The Fiery Angel (The Bolshoi Opera)—Writes Fiona Maddocks for The Evening Standard (sourced here for This is London—"…[E]ven a director of Francesca Zambella's ingenuity could not find an easy path through this episodic piece, where the magic-realist narrative leads us into bizarre territory, as in the sudden encounter with Mephistopheles and a Fortune Teller."

A LITTLE LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING…

YOU MAY NOTICE: We've changed our frequency to Mondays and Fridays. Mondays will feature MR News over the weekend and commentary, and Fridays will feature the week in review. Let us know if something works well or doesn't work at all. We're here to serve you.

ESPECIALLY FOR WRITERS: Our reading period is closed, and all submissions have been processed. If you have not heard from us and you have a submissions that remains outstanding, chances are good it was lost in the mail. You can always check with us; we have sent you a reply, which could have been lost in the mail.

GET PINGED! If you are set up to read web feeds, simply Margin's MAGICAL REALISM NEWS RSS feed to your reader using your web reader's tools. You'll receive automated feeds whenever we update the Magical Realism Newsblog. If you haven't moved into the world of RSS, don't despair. It's easier than it looks. RSS means "really simple syndication." To download a freeware RSS web reader (which allows you to "get pinged"—that is, receive automatic updates of new content posted at all your favorite blogs), we recommend Active Web Reader 2.4. Set up is easy and the feed reader is customizable.

GENTLE REMINDER: Margin's staff is on hiatus through mid-October 2006. Any e-mail we receive during this time will receive replies as necessary, but there may be delays due to pool parties, novel revision, rib festivals or stargazing.


Posted by magicalrealismmaven@yahoo.com at 8:28 AM PDT
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