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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available on or after the 1st & 15th)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Tuesday, May 1, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Tea
After water, tea is the second most popular drink in the world. It has
been around as a drink for 5000 years, and 6 billion pounds of tea are
harvested annually. We begin with a trip to the Lipton's plant in
Suffolk, VA., where state of the art machines crank out 24 million
teabags a day, and then its off to the only tea plantation in the US,
the 127 acre Charleston Plantation in South Carolina. We'll follow the
flow of tea from England to the Colonies, where a tea tax precipitated
the Boston Tea Party, and chronicle the brief but glorious age of the
Clipper Ships, speed craft that brought tea from China to London in
less than 100 days. Big news in the 20th century for the tea trade
includes the emergence of herbal, powdered, iced and decaf teas. Tour
the Celestial Seasonings plant in Boulder Colorado, and then visit a
boutique tea garden where expensive teas sell for upwards of $300 a
pot.

8-9pm -- Ancient Discoveries - 15 - Machines of The East
While the ancient Greeks had amazing engineers like Heron and
Ctesibius, the Islamic world had Al-Jazari--a prolific writer and a
talented craftsman. Working in what is now modern Turkey, he produced
books which featured fifty mechanical devices in six different
categories; including water clocks, hand washing devices, machines for
raising water and geared mechanisms. In 1976 The Science Museum in
London, reconstructed one of Al-Jazari's water clocks. It would take
the shape of an elephant with an intricate clock mechanism which would
chime automatically. For the first time watch as some of Al-Jarazi's
most important inventions are recreated and see how sophisticated the
inventors of the ancient Islamic world had become.

9-10pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Machines II.
How did the ancients harness power? Did Archimedes use solar power to
defeat the Romans? Was he the first to concentrate the power of the
sun? Early historical accounts of the battle of Syracuse in 212 BC
claim that Archimedes used polished shields to focus light onto the
sails of the invading Roman ships and set them ablaze. We investigate
this and other intriguing and incredible objects. An earthenware jar
about the size of a man's fist sits in the National Museum of Iraq.
Its existence could require history books throughout the world to be
rewritten. The jar appears to be an electric battery pre-dating
Christ. Did the ancient world master electricity nearly two millennia
before the modern world? A recent discovery of a flour mill in
Barbegal in southern France contained 16 waterwheels that operated the
mill. Is this one of the first examples of Roman industrial-revolution
technology--1,800 years before our own?

10-11pm -- Man, Moment, Machine - Hunting Bonnie & Clyde.
In the height of the Great Depression, legendary gangsters Clyde
Barrow and Bonnie Parker killed 14 people in a 2-year crime spree.
Their killing ground--the Midwest; their weapon of choice, the lethal
Browning Automatic Rifle. Clyde becomes known for his uncanny ability
to escape and his ruthless use of extreme firepower. Clyde uses his
BARs for robberies and to pull off a jailbreak at the state prison
where he has spent time. The highly publicized jailbreak draws out a
top manhunter--Texas Ranger Frank Hamer, who sets a trap for the
gangsters on a lonely country road...with Browning Automatic Rifles.
Bonnie and Clyde, inside their Ford V-8 with their BARs in the
backseat, don't have a chance on that day in 1934. They meet their
demise at the wrong end of dozens of 30.06 caliber armor-piercing
rounds fired from Browning Automatic Rifles; Clyde takes 25 hits and
Bonnie another 28 rounds. Fate's fusion of man, moment, and machine.

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Wednesday, May 2, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Leather.
Sometime at the dawn of civilization, animal hides were rubbed down
with animal fat, making them more flexible, durable, and malleable. By
the 5th Century BC, this "tanning" process expanded to include
vegetable and tree oil washes, creating what's now known as
"leather"--one of man's most reliable and versatile products. Without
advances in leather shoes, the Romans could never have marched to the
Tigris; nor could the Pilgrims have survived winters in Plymouth.
Today, leather is a staple of our daily lives. Modern tanners have
devised techniques to make leather more versatile, colorful, and
luxurious than ever. We visit modern tanneries of conventional cowhide
leather, and explore the more exotic leathers made from alligator,
snakes, and even sting-ray. And we'll examine the race of modern
science to create synthetic leathers that are supposedly more
convenient in today's fast-paced life. We'll see how leather binds us
to the past in an unparalleled way.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Dredging.
They dig, scoop, suck, and spew an ocean of silt and sediment.
Dredgers are the mechanical beasts that fuel the world's economic
engine by clearing and deepening ports for mega-container ships. The
roots of dredging go back as far as the Egyptians, who used their
hands to open channels on the Nile to keep crops watered. The Romans,
who used harbor dredging to keep a tight fist on Europe, pioneered the
"spoon and bag" dredge to speed up the process. Steam power brought
about the first large-scale dredges and helped create the Panama
Canal. We'll go aboard two of the largest US dredgers and see how they
keep waters moving. And in Holland, we meet the biggest players on the
dredging world and witness the launching of the largest dredge ever
built. From there, we head to Dubai in the Middle East, where 90
square miles of new islands was dredged from the sea and will now
create a pleasure world for the rich and powerful.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Commercial Fishing.
Battered and fried or simply raw--seafood is a popular dish, no matter
how you serve it. Americans consume more than 5-billion pounds yearly,
an order that takes more than a fishing rod to fill and worries
conservationists. We follow the fish, the fishermen, and the science
trying to preserve fisheries for future generations--from ancient
ships on the Nile to a modern technologically sophisticated factory
trawler on the Bering Sea to the University of New Hampshire's
open-ocean aquaculture research project. And we witness a wide variety
of fishing methods--from gillnetting and longlining to lobster
trapping. Hop aboard and sail through time and around the globe as we
explore the harsh conditions of life at sea and experience firsthand
one of history's deadliest jobs. Brace yourself and feel the ice-cold,
salt spray on your face as we explore commercial fishing!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Deep Sea Salvage
Driven by the need for deep sea rescue and salvage capabilities, the
US Navy Diving and Salvage Programs have gathered together a highly
skilled team of divers, scientists and engineers, who have been
involved in some of the most exciting and dangerous salvage operations
ever undertaken. Ride aboard the USS Salvor, which is equipped with
underwater remote operated robots and see how they were put to use
following the crash of TWA Flight 800. We'll examine the bomb locating
mini-sub Alvin and learn about "Saturation Diving" which allows divers
to stay below for days at a time.

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Thursday, May 3, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Torture Devices.
For more than 3,000 years, emperors and generals, dictators and
police, criminals, clerics, and even medical doctors have created and
used a vast array of torture devices--everything from the ancient
Greeks' Brazen Bull, which slowly barbecued the victim, to the
elaborate mechanical apparatuses of the Spanish Inquisition. A medical
doctor who specializes in victims of torture reveals how the human
body responds to their use--from the earliest excruciating
contrivances to the more modern.

8-9pm -- Spider-Man Tech -
The Marvel Comics creation of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, may be the
most amazing crime fighter of all time. Who wouldn't want to have his
amazing powers--but if Spider-Man's abilities are put to the test
using the rules of real-world science, exactly which of his skills are
possible and which are pure fantasy? Go on a thrill-ride of adventure
as top Hollywood filmmakers, and real-world scientists weigh in on
Spider-Man's dazzling powers. Using highlights from the blockbuster
Spider-Man movies, including scenes from the upcoming Spider-Man 3,
along with classic comic book images that leap off the screen thanks
to 3-D graphic effects, Spidey's secrets are unlocked.

9-10pm -- Mega Movers - Ships Moving Ships
Suppose the world's largest aircraft carrier, the 1,092 feet USS
Ronald Reagan, came under enemy attack and was crippled at sea.
There's not a ship big enough to rescue it and move it back to the
U.S. for repairs. Watch as engineering theorists design and build the
largest heavy-lift submersible vessel ever to lift it out of the water
and haul it halfway across the world. Then, as war rages in the Middle
East, the U.S. Naval fleet is at increasing danger of being destroyed
by enemy deep-sea mines. Orders are issued to move a 224-foot long,
1,300-ton minesweeper halfway around the world. It's a job that can
only be done by using an enormous heavy-lift ship to move this mighty
war ship.

10-12am -- Mega Movers - Moving the Impossible.
From the engineers of ancient Egypt to the architects of Renaissance
Rome and the modern era's moving miracles--the men, methods, and
machines of structural moving have pushed the limits of imagination
and technology for over 5,000 years. In this 2-hour chronicle, we'll
investigate the amazing feats of mega moving from primitive
civilization through the Industrial Revolution into the 21st
Century--including the evolution of technology that allows a 3,000-ton
building to be driven down the street by remote control! From the
granite blocks of Stonehenge to the awesome Vatican Obelisk and the
Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, see how ambition and ingenuity have
continued to defy convention, break records, and achieve the
unthinkable in moving!

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Friday, May 4, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Super Guns of Today and Tomorrow.
An examination of guns that exist on the cutting edge of firearm
technology. Fighting battles on computers decades before an actual
shot is fired, these super guns may make the world safer...or more
dangerous than ever before.

8-9pm -- Julius Caesar's Greatest Battle -
In an 8-year campaign through what is now France, Julius Caesar killed
one-million people, took a million more hostage, and destroyed more
than 800 cities. Follow in the footsteps of Caesar and the leader of
the Gallic uprising, Vercingetorix, as the bloody conflict in Gaul
reaches its climax. In 52 BC at Alesia, Caesar and Vercingetorix lead
their armies into one of the greatest sieges in the history of
warfare: a battle that will decide the fate of Gaul and shape the
future of the entire Western World.

9-10pm -- Dogfights - 10 - Hunt for The Bismarck
May, 1941, the German battleship Bismarck, the most powerful warship
on earth breaks, out into the North Atlantic. It wields enough
firepower to crush vital British convoys! The British unleash every
weapon in their arsenal to hunt down this Nazi terror. Join the
greatest sea chase in history... fly with Swordfish torpedo-bomber
pilots desperately trying to the Bismarck. Rare archival footage and
original shooting will supplement the remarkable computer graphics and
make viewers will feel like they're in the battle, facing the enemy.

10-11pm -- Cities of the Underworld - 01 - Hitler's Underground Lair
Berlin, Germany was the battlefield of the 20th century, and today,
sealed up and forgotten beneath its streets are the remnants of a dark
past. Walk anywhere in the city and you could be walking directly on
top of one of the over 1000 Nazi bunkers engineered into Berlin's
sandy soil, lost remnants of Hitler's ill-fated Germania or even beer
brewing plants that inspired the Nazis' journey into the underground.
Join host Eric Geller as he travels through the dark and damp recesses
of Berlin's secretive soil.

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Saturday, May 5, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Deep Sea Salvage
Driven by the need for deep sea rescue and salvage capabilities, the
US Navy Diving and Salvage Programs have gathered together a highly
skilled team of divers, scientists and engineers, who have been
involved in some of the most exciting and dangerous salvage operations
ever undertaken. Ride aboard the USS Salvor, which is equipped with
underwater remote operated robots and see how they were put to use
following the crash of TWA Flight 800. We'll examine the bomb locating
mini-sub Alvin and learn about "Saturation Diving" which allows divers
to stay below for days at a time.

8-10pm -- Quest for Dragons -
A spirited exploration of the history, science, and legend of the
world's most notorious beast--the dragon, the best-known creature that
never was. Throughout history, dragons influenced wars, science, art,
and religion. They appear in almost every culture and many still
believe in dragons. How could different cultures, isolated by geology
and millennia, all invent the same creature? If the dragon is simply
the product of our imagination, how could distant peoples, with no
knowledge of each other, all invent the same beast? One of the reasons
dragons are a perennial favorite is that even though they are the
ultimate predator and antagonist, it's also fun to identify with them.
In the end, we want to be the dragon as much as we may want to slay
the dragon.

10-11pm -- The States - 03 - New York, Louisiana, Oregon, New Mexico, Vermont
Travel back to the origins of New York City at New Amsterdam, the 16th
century Dutch merchant colony. Discover how French Acadians fled
Canada in 1873 to settle in Louisiana, developing the "Cajun"
subculture. The Oregon Trail opened in 1843, bringing half a million
settlers to the west. Visit Los Alamos Laboratories in New Mexico's
remote high desert, the birthplace of the atomic bomb, and where today
research continues to advance science. Finally, learn how two friends
from Vermont opened an ice cream shop in 1977 and would go on to
become America's most famous entrepreneurs.

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Sunday, May 6, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Mega Movers - Ships Moving Ships
Suppose the world's largest aircraft carrier, the 1,092 feet USS
Ronald Reagan, came under enemy attack and was crippled at sea.
There's not a ship big enough to rescue it and move it back to the
U.S. for repairs. Watch as engineering theorists design and build the
largest heavy-lift submersible vessel ever to lift it out of the water
and haul it halfway across the world. Then, as war rages in the Middle
East, the U.S. Naval fleet is at increasing danger of being destroyed
by enemy deep-sea mines. Orders are issued to move a 224-foot long,
1,300-ton minesweeper halfway around the world. It's a job that can
only be done by using an enormous heavy-lift ship to move this mighty
war ship.

8-9pm -- Star Trek Tech -
For forty years Star Trek has engulfed our imagination and sent us on
voyages across the galaxy. We'll take a look at the technology behind
the gadgets used in the series such as phasers and communicators, and
tell their stories from the people who knew them best--the actors,
producers and prop men.

9-10pm -- Spider-Man Tech -
The Marvel Comics creation of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, may be the
most amazing crime fighter of all time. Who wouldn't want to have his
amazing powers--but if Spider-Man's abilities are put to the test
using the rules of real-world science, exactly which of his skills are
possible and which are pure fantasy? Go on a thrill-ride of adventure
as top Hollywood filmmakers, and real-world scientists weigh in on
Spider-Man's dazzling powers. Using highlights from the blockbuster
Spider-Man movies, including scenes from the upcoming Spider-Man 3,
along with classic comic book images that leap off the screen thanks
to 3-D graphic effects, Spidey's secrets are unlocked.

10-12am -- The Amazing Story of Superman -
Here's the story behind the phenomenon of Superman, the most
merchandised and imitated superhero of them all. Through interviews
with the key creative talents responsible for seven decades of
thrilling Superman adventures, we'll follow the Man of Steel's path
from Depression-era comic book hero to George Reeves's TV portrayal in
the 1950s, Christopher Reeve's movies in the '70s and '80s, and the TV
shows Lois and Clark and Smallville. There'll even be a sneak preview
of the new film, Superman Returns, to be released this summer.

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Monday, May 7, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Rubber.
The story of rubber is more than tires, toys, gloves, and gum--it's
imbedded in modern life, from the controversial Challenger O-rings to
seals on hydrogen fuel cells. A gigantic worldwide synthetic rubber
industry creates exotic elastomers for high-tech applications, while
China's rapid industrialization plays havoc with the world's natural
rubber supply. From the ancient Olmecs of Yucatán, who knew the secret
of vulcanization, to modern processing plants, we trace rubber's
history and future.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - The Pacific Bermuda Triangle.
While the Bermuda Triangle is a well-known area of strange phenomenon
in the Atlantic, there is another, more treacherous triangle in the
Pacific off the coast of Japan known as the "Dragon's Triangle". This
dangerous ocean triangle has reportedly claimed hundreds if not
thousands of ships, airplanes, and submarines since the first written
reports in the 13th century. Could these lost vessels be the result of
bad oceanic conditions or possibly something more mysterious? We'll
get to the bottom of this unsolved world mystery. Interviews include
Dr. Joann Stock, Caltech; Joseph Nagy, UCLA; Takuji Wasda, University
of Tokyo; and Japanese UFO experts Junichiro Nirasawa and Junichi
Yaoi.

9-10pm -- Cities of the Underworld - 06 - Rome's Hidden Empire
Rome is a city where the past meets the present on every corner. A
secret cult practiced right next to the Circus Maximus, and their
temple still remains beneath the street. The famous Piazza Navona sits
on top of Domitian's Stadium. Pieces of Trajan's Basilica can be found
under a gallery owned by fashion dynasty Fendi. Rome's underground is
filled with evidence of life during the Empire. Join host Eric Geller
as he discovers what life was like during Nero's tyranny and Augustus'
reforms and reveals the technological marvels that allowed the
construction of one city upon another--literally.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - New Maya Revelations
For nearly a century archaeologists place the height of the Maya
civilization during the First Millennium AD. However, revolutionary
discoveries in Guatemala are now challenging those views. When did
the Maya Civilization truly reach its peak? Join host Josh Bernstein
as he tracks the origins of the Maya throughout Mexico and the Central
American rainforest. He climbs the tallest Maya pyramid, shovels muck
from a jungle swamp, and reveals the known oldest mural in the Maya
world.

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Tuesday, May 8, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Monster Trucks.
Ride shotgun in our rollicking history of the Monster Truck, and meet
the father of the mythic beast, Bob Chandler, whose Bigfoot gave birth
to the sport in a cornfield years ago! Weighing 10,000 pounds, the
behemoths entertain using brute force. Thrill to breathtaking stunts
in California, Indiana, and Florida, as mounted cameras demonstrate
the shakes, rattles, and rolls drivers experience; and meet the men
who race these mechanical mammoths in one of the world's
fastest-growing motorsports.

8-9pm -- Reign of Terror -
The bloody life and times of the Saudi terrorist who has been linked
to a number of deadly attacks against U.S. troops and citizens and who
called on Muslims to kill Americans everywhere in the world. Follow
Osama bin Laden's trail from his privileged childhood as the son of a
wealthy oil businessman to his battle against the Soviet Union in
Afghanistan and his involvement in the infamous 2001 World Trade
Center bombing.

9-12am -- The Spanish-American War: First Intervention -
On the night of February 12, 1898, 266 American lives were lost when
the battleship Maine was ripped in half by an explosion in Havana
Harbor. War with Spain followed. For the first time a war was covered
by members of the media creating an unprecedented impact at home. A
fascinating cast of characters emerge including Stephen Crane,
Frederick Remington, Admiral George Dewey and Clara Barton. Doctor
Walter Reed fought against the outbreak of tropical diseases in Cuba
and in the process discovered the cure for malaria. Theodore
Roosevelt, then Assistant Secretary of the Navy, felt America had
grown soft and vulnerable and was the central figure in all of motives
surrounding the war.

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Wednesday, May 9, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil.
From the first well in Pennsylvania to the gushing Spindletop and
modern supertankers, the story of oil is the story of civilization as
we know it. We'll take a look at the ingenious and outrageous men who
risked everything for "black gold" and unimaginable wealth.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Heavy Metals.
They are elements that occupy a select portion of the periodic table
and are so essential to America's economic and military might that
they are stored in the National Defense Stockpile in case of all-out
war. We plan a riveting visit. Some of the vital heavy metals that we
survey include copper, uranium, lead, zinc, and nickel. We also take a
look at superalloys--consisting of steel combined with chromium,
cobalt, and dozens of other heavy metals--that resist corrosion and
perform increasingly elaborate functions. From Earth to space, from
cosmetics to vitamins, in a million different ways, heavy metals are
here to stay!

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Magnets.
We played with them as children, but the world of magnets isn't kid's
stuff! The pervasive magnet serves as the underpinning for much of
modern technology. They can be found in computers, cars, phones, VCRs,
TVs, vacuum cleaners, the washer and dryer, the ubiquitous
refrigerator magnet, and even in an electric guitar! On the cutting
edge of technology, scientists experiment with a variety of magnets.
Magnets' amazing forces of attraction and repulsion may some day take
us to the far reaches of outer space.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Welding
It was a science first conjured amid the fiery ovens of ancient
blacksmiths; today more than 50% of all U.S. products require some
form of welding. Whether via electricity, flammable gases, sonic
waves, or sometimes just raw explosive power, welding creates powerful
bonds between metal unmatched by any other joining process. From high
atop emerging 60-story towers on the Las Vegas strip to oil platforms
hundreds of feet below the ocean, discover how welders forge the
backbone of civilization. Learn about exciting new applications: how
sound waves create bulletproof welds for contemporary body armor; the
technologies behind robotic welding systems; and the knee-rattling
impact of an explosion weld, the most powerful method of all.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, May 10, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Junkyard.
It's the place where one man's trash is truly another man's treasure.
Enter the strange and mysterious world of the junkyard, where many
pieces actually do add up to a whole. Uncover how junkyard operators
create order out of seemingly random piles of junk.

8-9pm -- Mega Movers - Ships Moving Ships
Suppose the world's largest aircraft carrier, the 1,092 feet USS
Ronald Reagan, came under enemy attack and was crippled at sea.
There's not a ship big enough to rescue it and move it back to the
U.S. for repairs. Watch as engineering theorists design and build the
largest heavy-lift submersible vessel ever to lift it out of the water
and haul it halfway across the world. Then, as war rages in the Middle
East, the U.S. Naval fleet is at increasing danger of being destroyed
by enemy deep-sea mines. Orders are issued to move a 224-foot long,
1,300-ton minesweeper halfway around the world. It's a job that can
only be done by using an enormous heavy-lift ship to move this mighty
war ship.

9-10pm -- Mega Movers - Really Big Bridges
Bridges have been pushed, airlifted and taken apart, but if needed,
can one of the world's longest and most famous suspension bridges be
moved? Experts say San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge can be relocated
and they'll show how. In Rhode Island, the team is challenged when
they take on the job to haul the world's widest network-arched bridge
15 miles up river and set it in place.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Pacific Coast Highway.
For 25 years, construction crews dug, blasted, tunneled, and bridged
their way up America's West Coast along the California, Oregon, and
Washington shoreline to build the Pacific Coast Highway. Historians,
road and bridge engineers, and experts relate this story of
perseverance, primal machines, convict labor, and engineering
brilliance as we tour its scenic route. And we look at the latest
technologies used to keeping it running despite floods, earthquakes,
tsunamis, and landslides.

____________________________________________________

Friday, May 11, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gas Tech.
Gas--it makes a balloon go up, cooks our food, and fills our lungs.
But this invisible state of matter does far more, and has a very
visible impact on the world. We follow natural gas from well tip to
stove top and trace its use from 3rd century BC Chinese salt producers
to modern appliances. Next, we investigate the most plentiful gas in
the universe--hydrogen--which may also prove to be the most powerful.
We also experience the cryogenic world of industrial gasses--what they
do and where they come from--as we travel to the British Oxygen
Company's Braddock Air Separation Plant to see how they freeze
millions of tons of oxygen and nitrogen. And at the Bush Dome Helium
Reserve in Texas, we learn why the US government sits atop 36-billion
cubic feet of the stuff. Finally, we look inside the colorful world of
gas and neon lights. So lay back, breathe deep, and count backwards
from 10...

8-9pm -- Brothers in Arms: The Untold Story of The 502 - Part 1: D-Day.
Regarded as the turning point of WWII, the daybreak invasion of
Normandy on June 6, 1944 actually began the night before. Shrouded in
darkness, 18,000 Allied paratroopers jumped into the fog and
flak-filled skies, landing behind enemy lines before the full
invasion. Among them, the 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, part of
the famed 101st Airborne Division. Although they became one of the
most decorated units in the D-Day operation, their story has never
been fully told. We illustrate how the 502nd earned distinction by
achieving vital objectives through acts of great personal bravery and
strong tactical leadership. The story travels from their final staging
in England to the massive confusion of that perilous night--when most
troops, under heavy enemy fire, missed their intended drop zones--to
their setting upon the intended targets.

9-10pm -- Dogfights - 02 - Air Ambush
Legendary fighter pilot, Colonel Robin Olds, sets an intricate trap
for the North Vietnamese MiG-21's. His Squadron, the Wolfpack,
disguise their lethal F-4 Phantoms as vulnerable bombers. The MiGs
scream in to challenge the Americans. The result is the most elaborate
air sting of the war... code-name... Operation Bolo. First-hand
accounts, rare archival footage and original shooting will supplement
the remarkable computer graphics.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Bombs.
Bombs...the most feared and powerful weapon in any nation's arsenal.
What began as incendiary devices in the 7th century has evolved into
weapons that can literally blow the human race off the face of the
earth! From the use of diseased carcasses flung over castle walls to
Greek Fire to today's smart bombs, we review the evolution of bombs.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, May 12, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Welding
It was a science first conjured amid the fiery ovens of ancient
blacksmiths; today more than 50% of all U.S. products require some
form of welding. Whether via electricity, flammable gases, sonic
waves, or sometimes just raw explosive power, welding creates powerful
bonds between metal unmatched by any other joining process. From high
atop emerging 60-story towers on the Las Vegas strip to oil platforms
hundreds of feet below the ocean, discover how welders forge the
backbone of civilization. Learn about exciting new applications: how
sound waves create bulletproof welds for contemporary body armor; the
technologies behind robotic welding systems; and the knee-rattling
impact of an explosion weld, the most powerful method of all.

8-10pm -- Nostradamus: 500 Years Later -
The life story of Nostradamus unfolds in medieval Europe at the time
of the Great Plague and the Inquisition. He lived in an age of
superstition and magic and believed that he could foretell the future.
For this he was labeled both a prophet and a heretic, and his cryptic
journals continue to inspire controversy just as they did in the 16th
century. In this two-hour examination of his life, we visit his
birthplace in France and trace his career as doctor, astrologer,
father, and seer.

10-11pm -- The States - 04 - New Jersey, Arizona, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Alaska
Crossing the icy Delaware River on Christmas night, 1776, allowed
George Washington to surprise the British at Trenton, a critical
American victory in the Revolutionary War. One of the world's most
recognizable natural landmarks, the Grand Canyon, defies the
imaginations of the five million people who visit there annually.
Pioneer Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Trail through Kentucky in
1775 and tamed the wild frontier. The opening of "The Unassigned
Lands" in Oklahoma resulted in 50,000 settlers racing across the
prairie to grab a stake and claim ownership of a homestead. The
discovery of oil in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, in 1975 called for an
ingenious feat of engineering to transport fuel across 800 miles of
icy wilderness.

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Sunday, May 13, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Mysteries of the Garden of Eden -
The biblical Garden of Eden was taken away from man because of his
sins. The Bible says Eden was located east of Israel where four rivers
meet--The Tigris and Euphrates and the Pison and Gihon. The later two
have long been considered mythical; however recent satellite
photography suggests these rivers did exist in Iraq. Another theory
places Eden's location beneath the Black Sea. Do texts other than the
Bible reinforce the idea of Eden? Both the Babylonian Epic of
Gilgamesh and Ancient Greek texts speak of a paradise lost. Sift
through the evidence to decode an age-old mystery about how paradise
was lost, and where it might be found.

8-10pm -- Hippies -
The Hippie movement was the most controversial and influential of
modern times. Free love, the peace movement, drugs, Eastern religions
and communes are explored. Meet the figures whose words and actions
inspired it and destroyed it. See how the vibrations from that era are
still resonating today in almost every aspect of American life, from
the clothes we wear, to the Personal Computer and the Internet.
Finally, historic footage, stills and period graphics are interwoven
with expert commentary and eyewitness testimony.

10-11pm -- Cities of the Underworld - 04 - Scotland's Sin City
Edinburgh, Scotland is a thriving metropolis, but take a look into its
past, and you'll find it has led a double life. A sophisticated and
educated surface city evolved above while a darker, seedy world grew
below--from plague victims getting buried alive under the streets to
body snatchers, illegal distilleries and castle dungeons. Join host
Eric Geller as he investigates these stories, deciphering fact from
fiction, while uncovering the engineering marvel of Edinburgh's
underground--created when the city actually changed its street level.

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Monday, May 14, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Quarries.
Dynamite explodes hills to bits, drills divide sheer stone walls,
400,000-pound blocks are pulled from pits by giant cranes, and men
work around the clock to wrest rock out of the earth. Not diamonds or
gold...rock, the raw material of civilization! Without rock, modern
society wouldn't exist. Roads, sewers, dams, bridges, buildings,
paint, glue, make-up, antacids, and even chewing gum need crushed
stone. From ancient days to the present, we explore the evolution of
quarrying techniques.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - UFOs vs. The Government.
Looks at four reported sightings of UFOs in England, Belgium, Canada,
and southwestern Michigan, deemed by experts to be some of the best
evidence available on the existence of possible extraterrestrial
spacecraft. We tell the stories, then disbelievers present their best
guess of what witnesses really saw.

9-10pm -- Cities of the Underworld - 07 - Catacombs of Death
Beneath the hustle and bustle of Paris streets are a world of snaking
quarries, hidden catacombs, and mushroom-harvesting tunnels. Even
Paris' 10.5 million residents have no idea they live on top of nearly
20 centuries of history carved into the limestone foundation below.
From its Gallic beginnings to the Roman foundations of Lutetia,
today's Paris may be one of the world's most sophisticated cities
above the ground--but below ground it's a different story. Join host
Eric Geller as he reveals the secrets beneath Paris and the Notre Dame
church and what they reveal about a 2,000 year old civilization that
rests underneath it.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Da Vinci Code: Bloodlines.
Josh Bernstein searches for solid evidence behind the controversial
theory laid out in Dan Brown's book The Da Vinci Code. Brown's theory
claims that Jesus married Mary Magdalene and that she conceived a
child. It also suggests that the bloodline continues--unbroken--to
this day. Josh shows what's true and what's clearly make-believe in
Dan Brown's bestseller. From musty libraries to ancient churches,
Josh's unique quest leads him to seek the DNA evidence that might
prove or disprove one of the most sensational claims in modern
history. Most remarkably, he'll orchestrate the first ever DNA test on
a Merovingian royal to find out if the story of a divine bloodline
stretching back to Jesus and Mary Magdalene could possibly be true.

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Tuesday, May 15, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Mountain Roads.
Join our journey along monumental feats of engineering that preserved
America's natural wonders while paving the way towards her future.
Travel the Donner Pass in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, site of a dark
chapter in US history. Today, crews use the latest technology to keep
I-80 open during the worst winter storms. Enjoy the view while
traveling to the summit of Pike's Peak in Colorado, inspiration for
America the Beautiful. The "Going-to-the-Sun-Road" slices through
Montana's majestic Glacier National Park, crossing the Continental
Divide and allowing motorists unsurpassed views of mountain scenery.
Outside Denver, the Eisenhower Memorial Tunnel, carved through
mountain rock, united eastern and western Colorado. And the Blue Ridge
Parkway, which took 52 years to complete, snakes through large, scenic
swatches.

8-10pm -- Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History -
Kneeling before a flaming cross, Klansmen and women take part in their
sacred bonding, showing how secrecy and ritual aid the hooded order in
a campaign for white supremacy. From its birth in 1866's
Reconstruction South to a 1996 rally, this chronicle of hate talks to
Julian Bond, Morris Dees Jr., the Grand Dragon, and Imperial Wizard.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Harvesting.
Cutting, digging, picking, stripping, shaking, and raking--whatever
the crop, there's a custom machine to harvest it. It all began with
handpicking and today it's often one man and one machine harvesting
hundreds of acres in a single day. The farmer may even get a little
help from satellites. Far above the earth, high-resolution photography
is giving the grower more opportunities to cut costs and maximize the
harvest. From the debut of the sickle in ancient Egypt to McCormick's
famous Reaper to the field of ergonomics that assists human
harvesters, we'll dig into the past and future of the harvest.
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Wednesday, May 16, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Shovels.
From a prehistoric sharpened digging stick to today's $15-million
monster machines, our journey for the ultimate shovel begins in
California's borax mines, where the P&H 4100 uses advanced
electronics, brute strength, and savvy operators to excavate 170-ton
chunks in a single scoop. We travel back to 1835, when William Otis
set off an American digging frenzy with his patented steam shovel. And
at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, we kick the legs of NASA's latest
Mars Lander: Phoenix. This stationary probe has a robotic arm with a
shovel scoop designed to dig into the soil, locate ice, and analyze
its properties. Back on Earth, the Hitachi Corporation's 200-ton
hydraulic humanitarian shovel is designed to locate and explode
landmines in Third-World countries.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Freight Trains.
They are the life blood of the American Economy, transporting 1.8
billion tons of freight each year, carrying everything from crops, to
consumer electronics, cars to chemicals, not to mention coal and just
about any other item that you can think of. This program will take you
to what is considered the greatest freight transportation system in
the world, the Union Pacific's Bailey yard--a pit stop for much of the
nation's freight on its journey across the continent. We'll also
explore the history of freight transportation from its humble
beginnings as tramways in mines to complex system of rails that
stretches to every corner of the nation.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - 60's Tech
Take a groovy ride back to the freewheeling days of the 1960s and
recall the technological happenings that helped shape the decade.
Television went from black and white to color. Satellite broadcasting
made coast-to-coast live broadcasts possible. Transistors made radios
portable, computers downsized and telephones began switching from
rotary to touch-tone. The 60s also brought along the Ford Mustang and
other hot wheels. For fun, there was slot car racing, etch-a-sketch,
the superball, and lava lamps. The decade gave us quite a
technological rush, with the introduction of concert sound,
psychedelic light shows and the birth of the rock festival.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - It Came from Outer Space
Discover how essential space travel technologies have journeyed back
to Earth with surprising and indispensable commercial applications.
For example, paint that can withstand the heat of reentry now protects
our steel-framed high-rises from collapsing in a fire. Batteries that
can take a sports car from zero to 60 in four seconds also keep our
satellites in orbit. The oxygen tank used by firefighters to save
countless lives is just like the one used by our astronauts during the
Apollo missions. These and many ordinary objects are traced back to
their NASA roots, where they originally had the right stuff.

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Thursday, May 17, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Colosseum.
Nothing symbolizes the Roman Empire at its height or Rome in
magnificent ruins more than the Colosseum. Built in 70 AD, it seated
80,000 people, boasted a retractable roof, underground staging
devices, marble seating, and lavish decorations. It still serves as
the prototype for the modern stadium. The complexity of its
construction, the beauty of its architecture, and the functionality of
its design made it the perfect place for massive crowds to congregate
for the bloody spectacles it contained.

8-9pm -- Cities of the Underworld - 07 - Catacombs of Death
Beneath the hustle and bustle of Paris streets are a world of snaking
quarries, hidden catacombs, and mushroom-harvesting tunnels. Even
Paris' 10.5 million residents have no idea they live on top of nearly
20 centuries of history carved into the limestone foundation below.
From its Gallic beginnings to the Roman foundations of Lutetia,
today's Paris may be one of the world's most sophisticated cities
above the ground--but below ground it's a different story. Join host
Eric Geller as he reveals the secrets beneath Paris and the Notre Dame
church and what they reveal about a 2,000 year old civilization that
rests underneath it.

9-10pm -- Mega Movers - Ancient Mystery Moves
The towering 80-ton statues on Easter Island and the 800-ton trilithon
stones of the Roman God of Thunder's Temple are examples of ancient
engineering miracles that would appear to be too heavy to move.
Scientists and engineers search for clues and set out to solve the
mysteries of how primitive man pushed the limits of ingenuity and
pulled off the impossible.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Snackfood Tech.
Extruders, molds, in-line conveyor belts. Are these machines
manufacturing adhesives, plastics, or parts for your car? No, they're
making treats for your mouth--and you will see them doing their
seductively tasty work in this scrumptious episode. First, we visit
Utz Quality Foods in Hanover, Pennsylvania, that produces more than
one million pounds of chips per week, and Snyder's of Hanover, the
leading US pretzel manufacturer. Next, we focus on the world's largest
candy manufacturer, Masterfoods USA, which makes Milky Way, Snickers,
Mars, and M&Ms, and take a lick at the world's largest lollipop
producer, Tootsie Roll Industries. And at Flower Foods' Crossville,
Tennessee plant, an army of cupcakes rolls down a conveyer belt. The
final stop is Dreyer's Bakersfield, California plant, where 20,000 ice
cream bars and 9,600 drumsticks roll off the line in an hour.

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Friday, May 18, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 18.
We look at a 1999 tragedy, when three ironworkers plunged 200 feet
when the basket in which they were working was struck by debris during
construction of Milwaukee's Brewers Baseball Stadium. Next, we travel
to a deadly explosion in China's Sunjiwan coal mine--antiquated
equipment, minimal safety standards, and a rush to overproduce left
the mines susceptible to fires, floods, and explosions. From the 1920s
through the `50s, US shoe stores featured the fluoroscope. Based on an
early Edison machine, the fluoroscope took x-rays to determine a
customer's size--while emitting high doses of radiation. In
California, we visit the Salton Sea, an unnatural body of water with
no drainage that grows more salty and less hospitable to life daily.
In the 1950s Soviet leaders embarked on a massive irrigation project
that diverted water from the Aral Sea. Over time, the coastline
receded 100 miles, killing off many species of fish and a once
thriving fishing industry.

8-10pm -- Warrior Queen Boudica -
Wife, mother, queen...and leader of one of the most violent rebellions
against Roman domination in British history. This we know about
Boudica, Queen of the Iceni. Her story and her tribe's have been
recorded by Roman historians, pondered by scholars, and examined by
archaeologists who continue to dig for clues about this warrior whose
army set fear in the hearts of Romans. When King Prasutagus died, the
Iceni tribe, which once lived in peace with Rome, were brutally set
upon by Romans--they beat Queen Boudica and raped her daughters.
Seething with revenge, Boudica's forces attacked Roman settlements
including London, a thriving Roman merchant center, which was
destroyed. Here, we uncover the remarkable story of Boudica, who led
her tribe in a revolt never seen before or since in British history.
Her struggle--to free Briton's tribes from Roman domination; at
stake--the freedom and independence of all Briton's tribes and their
unique Celtic culture.

10-11pm -- Dogfights - 04 - Flying Tigers
Two weeks after Pearl Harbor... A courageous, rag-tag band of
American mercenaries dare to challenge the over-whelming might of the
Japanese Air Force. The legendary "Flying Tigers" slash through the
skies of China, and help vanquish the unstoppable Japanese. Follow
leading Tiger aces Tex Hill and John Alison as their P-40 Tomahawks
fight to the death against the agile Japanese 1-97 Nate. First-hand
accounts, rare archival footage and original shooting will supplement
the remarkable computer graphics.

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Saturday, May 19, 2007
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7-8pm -- Act of Honor -
On November 15, 2004, Sgt. Rafael Peralta died while fighting to
secure a key insurgent stronghold in Iraq. Peralta and fellow Marines
were ambushed by guerillas who then lobbed a grenade at them. Already
seriously wounded, Peralta shielded his companions by covering the
explosive device with his body, saving their lives and sacrificing his
own. Watch Peralta's extraordinary journey from Tijuana, Mexico to San
Diego to the streets of Iraq. Included are interviews with his widowed
mother and three siblings in San Diego.

8-10pm -- The Templar Code -
For nearly two centuries, the Knights Templar were the medieval
world's most powerful order, a fearsome and unstoppable Crusader
militia. Then came accusations of unspeakable crimes. Who were the
Templars, really? How did they become so powerful, so fast, and why
did they fall just as quickly? Evidence hints that the Templars
excavated under Jerusalem's Temple of Solomon. What did they find
there? Was it, as The Da Vinci Code suggests, the true identity of the
Holy Grail--the bloodline of Christ? Or an unimaginable treasure,
documented in the Dead Sea Scrolls, buried 1,000 years before Christ's
birth? We explore the Templar's origin, how they lived, trained,
fought and became a medieval world power, and the suspicious
circumstances behind their sudden downfall. Plus, we reveal why these
warriors, dead for seven centuries, and their treasure still populate
Hollywood blockbusters. Narrated by Ed Herrmann and featuring
preeminent Templar authors.

10-11pm -- The States - 05 - Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Hawaii, South
Carolina, Montana
Ground Hog Day in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, dates back to 1886 and
an ancient European holiday called Candlemass Day. Garrison Keeler and
his A Prairie Home Companion radio program export a comic, down-home
image of Minnesota to a weekly worldwide audience of over four million
listeners. Hawaii is the only state that was once a kingdom and had
its throne toppled in 1893 by a handful of meddling foreigners with
the aid of the U.S. Navy. Following the world's first submarine attack
in 1864, the Confederate sub The Hunley sank mysteriously in
Charleston Harbor, but was discovered and raised 131 years later.
Montana has long been the world's best source for dinosaur fossils and
a recent discovery is shedding new light.

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Sunday, May 20, 2007
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7-8pm -- Rogue Waves -
Join us for the amazing story of one of nature's most terrifying
forces. With striking visuals from ships in storm-tossed seas, the
special presents dramatic tales of rogue wave disasters throughout
history, and explores the astonishing scientific discoveries
surrounding this deadly phenomenon. Aided by mind-blowing CGI footage
from the motion picture Poseidon by Wolfgang Petersen, director of The
Perfect Storm, we reveal the awesome power of this ocean menace as it
really is--a monster rising from the deep!

8-9pm -- Decoding The Past - Doomsday 2012: The End of Days
There are prophecies and oracles from around the world that all seem
to point to December 21, 2012 as doomsday. The ancient Mayan Calendar,
the medieval predictions of Merlin, the Book of Revelation and the
Chinese oracle of the I Ching all point to this specific date as the
end of civilization. A new technology called "The Web-Bot Project"
makes massive scans of the internet as a means of forecasting the
future... and has turned up the same dreaded date: 2012. Skeptics
point to a long history of "Failed Doomsdays", but many oracles of
doom throughout history have a disturbingly accurate track record. As
the year 2012 ticks ever closer we'll speculate if there are any
reasons to believe these doomsayers.

9-10pm -- Earth's Black Hole -
Explore with us the wonders and mysteries of the Black Holes in our
universe. Is it possible that areas on earth might, in fact, show
black hole like tendencies? We take a hard scientific look at an area
known as the Bermuda Triangle to see if there are indeed any
similarities between the supposed forces in the triangle and the
destructive force of a black hole. From a research boat trip through
the triangle to interviews with scientists at the US Geological
Survey, Harvard University, and the UK's Cardiff University, we go far
beyond the event horizon to explore the dangers in this area and what
relation they might indeed have with its counterpoint in space.

10-11pm -- Siberian Apocalypse -
At 7:15AM on June 30, 1908, a giant fireball, as bright the Sun,
explodes in the Siberian sky with a force a thousand times greater
than the Hiroshima bomb. It decimates 1,000 square miles of
forest--over half the size of Rhode Island, and was the biggest cosmic
disaster in the history of civilization. What caused the apocalyptic
fire in the sky? Over a hundred theories surround what is called the
Tunguska event, varying from asteroids and comets to black holes and
alien spaceships. Most scientists agree the Tunguska event will happen
again, and next time, the human toll could be unimaginable. Now, NASA
and other organizations race against time to stop the next planet
killer before it ignites Armageddon.

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Monday, May 21, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Howard Hughes Tech.
An in-depth look at the technology conceived or developed by America's
first billionaire. A passionate aviator, Howard Hughes built and flew
planes that broke speed records, and developed war machines, spy
aircraft, and commercial airliners. Despite the impressive heights
reached by his technological empire, his health and mental well-being
were fragile. During his last years, he wasn't seen publicly or
photographed, rarely left the hotel suites he occupied, and was
terrified of germs. But when Hughes died in 1976, he left a huge
legacy in aviation and technology. When we board an airliner, view TV
via satellite, or marvel at America's military might, we might do well
to remember the risk-taker who flew faster than his peers and was at
heart an aviator obsessively dedicated to both the art and science of
flight.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - UFO Hot Spots.
For those who study the UFO phenomenon, "UFO Hot Spots" are places
around the globe known for a long history of UFO sightings and
reports. From Brazil to Mexico, from Washington State to Florida,
multiple witnesses, including air traffic controllers and even
military personnel, confirm that something unexplained is repeatedly
happening in the night sky. Tales of alien abductions, bizarre and
chilling photographs of UFOs, and hours of videotape all abound as we
search for UFO Hot Spots.

9-10pm -- Cities of the Underworld - 02 - City of Caves
Discover an ancient secret that dates back to the dawn of time lurking
beneath the city of Budapest, Hungary. The caves beneath Budapest were
formed during the Ice Age and everyone from the cavemen to the
communists has moved their city into the depths of this parallel
world. Join host Eric Geller as he gains special access into this
sealed-up time capsule where he'll uncover a top secret World War II
hospital, find the source of the boiling healing water used by both
the Romans and the Turks, and see the layers of support added
throughout the centuries to keep today's world from falling into the
one buried below. Watch as the technological marvels that allowed
construction of one city upon another are revealed.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - Secrets of the Nasca Lines.
Etched into the driest desert in the world, the mysterious lines and
figures of Nasca in Southern Peru are invisible from the ground.
Thought to have been made by the Nasca people, who flourished between
200 BC and 600 AD, in fact, these huge drawings were not discovered
until the 1930s--and only then by commercial airline pilots who
happened to over-fly them. Ever since, they have intrigued the world.
Who built them, and why? Host, explorer, and survival expert Josh
Bernstein takes on the secrets of the Nasca Lines, while flying
micro-lites and powered para-gliders, clambering through thousand-year
old irrigation tunnels, and even recreating rituals with contemporary
Native Americans.

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Tuesday, May 22, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Metal.
They constitute the very essence of the modern world; the cadence of
our progress sounds in the measured ring of the blacksmith's hammer.
From soaring skyscrapers and sturdy bridges to jet planes and rockets,
metals play a key role. Our journey begins before the Bronze Age and
takes us into the shiny future when new metal structures--engineered
at a molecular level to be stronger, lighter, and cheaper--shape human
progress, as they have since man first thrust copper into a fire and
forged a tool.

8-9pm -- Hooked: Illegal Drugs and How They Got That Way - Cocaine.
Derived from South America's coca leaf, cocaine was touted as a
cure-all in the late 19th century and was the secret ingredient in
many medicines and elixirs such as Coca-Cola. But cocaine's allure
quickly diminished as racism entered the picture--the concept of the
"cocaine-crazed Negro" even led police to strengthen the caliber of
their guns from .32 to .38. We'll see how, though it was outlawed in
1914, its popularity soared in the 1980s and '90s and gave birth to a
deadlier form--crack.

9-10pm -- Hooked: Illegal Drugs and How They Got That Way - Marijuana.
In a series investigating the history of drug use, we begin our trip
tracing the rise of marijuana and synthetic amphetamines. Marijuana,
from the Indian hemp plant, has been used worldwide as a source of
rope, cloth, and paper; its medicinal qualities were first documented
4,000 years ago in China. But it's best known as the drug of choice of
the 1960s. During WWII, US troops were given an estimated 200 million
amphetamines to fight drowsiness and battle fatigue, and they're still
used to fight depression.

10-11pm -- Hooked: Illegal Drugs and How They Got That Way - Opium,
Morphine, and Heroin.
An examination of the history of the poppy plant and three of its
deadliest derivatives. In ancient times, the poppy was considered
divine, but in the 19th and 20th centuries, its addicting and lethal
qualities caused unprecedented national outrage, social upheaval, and
even sparked two wars. Used by the upper classes as patent medicines,
heroin became the bane of society when the working class began to use
it. In 1914, Federal law banned heroin and opium, and restricted
morphine to medicinal use.

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Wednesday, May 23, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bulletproof.
How do you stop a speeding bullet? From body armor to armored cars and
trucks, we review the history of the race between the bullet and a
successful way to stop it. It's not exactly easy to design material
that can catch gunfire traveling up to 3,000 feet per second. We'll
look at little-known advances like bulletproof layering hidden in
walls, futuristic smart materials that "remember" how to stop a
bullet, and a system that deploys a shield within milliseconds when it
detects an oncoming round.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The World's Fastest.
Perhaps no field has experienced the revolution in velocity more
acutely than transportation. We look at five blazingly fast
technological marvels that have pushed the speed limits to the very
edge, each with its own unique and dramatic history: the world's
fastest production car (Sweden's Koenigsegg CCR); the world's fastest
train (the Maglev in Shanghai); the world's fastest boat (The Spirit
of Australia); the world's fastest roller coaster (the Kingda Ka) and
the fastest thing on earth (the Holloman High Speed Test Track), used
to test highly sensitive equipment for many branches of the government
and commercial clients.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Strongest.
Strength...A powerful word, but what does it mean? How is it measured?
Why are some things simply stronger than others. How strong is a rope,
a tractor, a diamond, a tugboat or even plastic. From Spectra fibre to
Lexan learn where, how and why strength matters to us every day.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Strongest II
What does it take to rate as "the world's strongest"? Watch as
life-saving boron carbide body armor, strong enough to stop 9mm
machine gun bullets at point-blank range, is put to the test. Visit
the world of Monster Trucks and watch BigFoot in car-crushing action.
For a demonstration of lifting might, head dockside with a
super-strong mobile crane capable of hoisting a 600-ton mega-yacht and
toting it through a boat yard without a scratch. The Super-Shredder is
a metal recycling monster that can gobble up 200 junked cars a minute.
Finally, is there really a super-strong pogo stick that would be able
to "bo-ing" over cars?

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Thursday, May 24, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Nordhausen.
It was the world's largest underground factory--seven miles of tunnels
built to manufacture Hitler's secret weapons, primarily the V-2
rocket. But Nordhausen kept more than one secret. Technology and
torture went hand-in-hand--25,000 concentration camp workers died
there--and some of those associated with Nordhausen later helped take
America to the moon.

8-9pm -- Cities of the Underworld - 02 - City of Caves
Discover an ancient secret that dates back to the dawn of time lurking
beneath the city of Budapest, Hungary. The caves beneath Budapest were
formed during the Ice Age and everyone from the cavemen to the
communists has moved their city into the depths of this parallel
world. Join host Eric Geller as he gains special access into this
sealed-up time capsule where he'll uncover a top secret World War II
hospital, find the source of the boiling healing water used by both
the Romans and the Turks, and see the layers of support added
throughout the centuries to keep today's world from falling into the
one buried below. Watch as the technological marvels that allowed
construction of one city upon another are revealed.

9-10pm -- Mega Movers - Tall Structures
Their soaring height is imposing. Their narrow design makes them some
of the most difficult and dangerous structures to move -- from the
100-foot-tall obelisks of Ancient Egypt to the 1,483 foot tall
Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur. Those that dare try to move these
tall structures face almost certain defeat. Yet, despite the risks our
team proves it can be done -- first by peering into the future to move
two of the world's tallest skyscrapers, and then taking on a
present-day challenge never before attempted -- simultaneously moving
two towering silos connected by a common wall.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Pirate Tech.
Bold, cunning, and audacious, pirates are a breed of fighting men and
women who have terrorized the high seas since before recorded history.
At the height of their power in the 1700s they literally influenced
the fate of nations when they became embroiled in the rivalry between
England and Spain. This special will visit maritime museums and
shipwreck sites, utilize walk-and-talk demonstrations of fire arms,
swords, and navigation instruments to help spotlight the innovations
pirates brought to maritime technology. Includes a look at how many
pirates modified their ships to make them faster and more powerful.

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Friday, May 25, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Hunting Gear.
They are lethal tools that ensured our survival, altered our
evolution, and maintained our dominion over other animals. Though
hunting technology is the backbone of a multi-billion-dollar sports
industry, current cutting-edge gear is a far cry from prehistoric
man's rudimentary tools. From the crude knife to 24-hour digital
cameras that monitor animal movement and earmuffs with microphones to
amplify outside noise while blocking gunshot sound, we examine the
development of hunting weapons and gear.

8-9pm -- Save Our History - Sherman's Total War Tactics
During his march through Georgia and the Carolinas in 1864-65, General
William Tecumseh Sherman's army destroyed towns, decimated the land
and broke the spirit of the rebels. He is still the most hated man in
Georgia. Join Steve Thomas as he travels the entire route of the
march, investigating the destructive tactics, tools, and technologies
used by Sherman's 62,000 Union troops. Discover how Sherman's brutal
but highly innovative march moved fast and effectively.

9-11pm -- Dogfights: The Greatest Air Battles -
Ever imagine what it would be like to participate in the most historic
air battles of all time? Imagine no more. This special puts viewers in
the cockpit to recreate four famous air battles, using computer
graphics, animation, firsthand accounts, and archival footage to make
these thrilling and dangerous dogfights all too real. Each segment
begins with an introduction to a pilot as we learn of the conflict he
is engaged in, the history and technology of the aircraft that he
flies, and the mortal enemy he must face. Then comes the moment of
contact with the enemy--the fight begins! Experience a
computer-generated recreation of the aerial battle as the voice of the
pilot plays out this life and death combat.

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Saturday, May 26, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - 60's Tech
Take a groovy ride back to the freewheeling days of the 1960s and
recall the technological happenings that helped shape the decade.
Television went from black and white to color. Satellite broadcasting
made coast-to-coast live broadcasts possible. Transistors made radios
portable, computers downsized and telephones began switching from
rotary to touch-tone. The 60s also brought along the Ford Mustang and
other hot wheels. For fun, there was slot car racing, etch-a-sketch,
the superball, and lava lamps. The decade gave us quite a
technological rush, with the introduction of concert sound,
psychedelic light shows and the birth of the rock festival.

8-10:30pm -- Planet of the Apes
Movie. The year is 3978 and a spaceship with a crew of four crashes
down on a distant planet. One of the crew members had died in space
and the other three head out to explore the planet. The planet is much
like their own; however, it is inhabited by intelligent apes. One of
the men is shot and killed and the others are taken to the apes' city.
There, one undergoes brain surgery and is put into a state of living
death. The other (Charlton Heston) befriends some of the apes but is
feared by most. After being put through ape trial he escapes with a
female human native to the planet. He then learns the planet might not
be so distant after all... Roddy McDowall and Kim Hunter co-star in
this film classic. (1968)

10:30-11:30pm -- The States - 06 - Florida, Indiana, Washington, Utah,
Rhode Island
Hurricanes, lightening and alligator-filled swamps made Florida an
unwelcome candidate for statehood, yet it continues to draw more and
more people annually. In 1900, Indianapolis, not Detroit, was the
center of the auto industry, and endurance tests there resulted in the
establishment of the Indy 500 in 1911. On May 18, 1980, America's most
economically destructive volcanic erupts at Mt. St. Helens and rocks
Washington State. Escaping religious persecution, Brigham Young leads
twelve thousand Mormons on an exodus into the Utah desert in search of
paradise. Roger Williams fled Massachusetts in the 16th century and
founded a colony of religious tolerance in Rhode Island.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, May 27, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Pirate Tech.
Bold, cunning, and audacious, pirates are a breed of fighting men and
women who have terrorized the high seas since before recorded history.
At the height of their power in the 1700s they literally influenced
the fate of nations when they became embroiled in the rivalry between
England and Spain. This special will visit maritime museums and
shipwreck sites, utilize walk-and-talk demonstrations of fire arms,
swords, and navigation instruments to help spotlight the innovations
pirates brought to maritime technology. Includes a look at how many
pirates modified their ships to make them faster and more powerful

8-10pm -- True Caribbean Pirates -
Blackbeard. Ann Bonny. Henry Jennings. Calico Jack. Henry Morgan.
Black Bart Roberts. During the mid to late 17th and early 18th
centuries, they were feared criminals. The Caribbean was their domain,
the parade of treasure and cargo to Europe their target. The origins
of Caribbean piracy began when Columbus made landfall in the Bahamas.
Two years later, the Pope granted Spain the exclusive right to the
Caribbean and most of the New World. The Spanish reaped an immense
fortune in gold and silver, but with a price. England, France, and
Holland all desired a portion of this wealth and each established
Caribbean bases and used privateers--private sailors fighting for
profit--to protect their interests and steal Spanish treasure. The
line between privateering and piracy became blurred. We'll examine
this Golden Age of Piracy and the true stories of the infamous
pirates, how they operated, and their successes and failures in this
dark and deadly profession.

10-12am -- Star Trek: Beyond the Final Frontier -
For forty years Star Trek has engrossed our imaginations and sent us
on voyages across the galaxy. Through ten films and five series this
entertainment juggernaut has become a pop culture icon and a window to
our society. We will look at the impact that Star Trek has had on fans
around the world. From the conventions in Europe and Las Vegas to the
billionaire collector who scours the world for memorabilia, we will
try to find out just what it is about this supposedly "silly" series
that has meant so much to so many. Leonard Nimoy hosts.

____________________________________________________

Monday, May 28, 2007
____________________________________________________

6:40-8pm -- Band of Brothers - Points.
Major Winters (Damian Lewis) leads Easy Company into the Bavarian town
of Berchtesgaden--once home to top Nazi officers--and receives orders
to take the abandoned Eagle's Nest, Hitler's mountaintop fortress. As
German officers hand over their weapons, soldiers raid wine cellars
and snap up souvenirs. But their elation is short-lived--most of the
division faces redeployment to the Pacific Theater. A closing vignette
tells what happened to the men of Easy Company after they returned
home.

8-9pm -- Star Wars Tech -
Take a look at the technology shown throughout the six Star Wars films
and examine their viability through the eyes of cold hard science.
Could a Death Star really be built? Can you build an army of clones?
What is 3-D imaging, and where the can you get a Light Saber? Travel
to a galaxy far, far away to answer all of these questions and more.

9-11pm -- Star Wars: The Legacy Revealed -
The story of Anakin Skywalker's descent into darkness and his son
Luke's quest to conquer evil has spellbound audiences for 30 years.
The reason for this is simple: the saga of Star Wars is universal and
firmly rooted in the mythology and the political history of the entire
planet. May 2007 will mark the 30th anniversary of George Lucas' space
fantasy that grossed billions worldwide. For the first time take a
profound look at the serious subtext behind Lucas' six film milestone.
The influence of ancient mythology from Greek legends to King Arthur
is visible; but also more recent historical influences, from the
political rise of Napoleon to the machinations of Adolf Hitler can be
seen.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, May 29, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-9pm -- Star Wars: The Legacy Revealed -
(repeated from 9pm yesterday)

9-10pm -- The Universe - Secrets of the Sun
It is a fireball in the sky, a bubbling, boiling, kinetic sphere of
white hot plasma, exploding and erupting. Its size is almost
unimaginable--one million Earths would fit within its boundaries. In
this violence is born almost all the energy that makes existence on
Earth possible, yet, its full mysteries are only now beginning to be
understood. From Sun spots to solar eclipses, solar flares to solar
storms, the birth of the sun to its potential death, discover the
science and history behind this celestial object that makes life on
Earth exist.

10-11pm -- UFO Files - UFOs of the 70's
The 1970s were one of the most active periods of UFO sightings. The
most famous sightings of the decade are recalled and up-to-date
information on the closest of encounters is provided. From Delphos,
Kansas to Roswell, New Mexico, explore the mysterious and the unknown,
and meet those who claim to have seen UFOs, or were even abducted by
aliens. Is the truth out there?

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, May 30, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - More Doomsday Tech.
The second deadly hour examines more threats--both natural and
manmade--that may endanger civilization. From the far reaches of space
to tiny viruses, doomsday sources are many. But so are technologies
used to keep doomsday at bay. Asteroids of significant size have hit
our planet before and likely will again. Asteroid hunters demonstrate
the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking (NEAT) program and methods being
developed to destroy earth-aimed asteroids. Then, it's onto
bioterrorism's sinister technologies--how highly virulent agents like
smallpox and plague can be weaponized. Next, an ex-hacker turned
cyber-security expert shows how vulnerable the nation's computers are
to cyberterror. Finally, we visit the controversial world of
biotechnology. Could genetically engineered crops backfire? Does a
brave new world of genetically selected beings loom in our
not-so-distant future?

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters of the 70's.
To err is human... But when the error results in the loss of life,
it's a disaster. Learn about one of the most mysterious maritime
disasters of the decade--the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. Was it
possible that the nation was on the brink of war due to a faulty
circuit board? What caused the Buffalo Creek Dam disaster in West
Virginia? Finally, delve into the explosion of a super tanker in Los
Angeles harbor. With the aid of 3-D animation, forensic engineering
experts, and footage of the actual disasters, an in-depth look can be
taken of what went wrong, and how the disasters have led to industry
improvements.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - 70's Tech
The 1970s were a decade of excess. Dust off your mirror ball, put on
your leisure suit, and rediscover the gadgets of the era. Play PONG
with its inventor and learn how this simple game created a billion
dollar empire. Texas Instruments engineers explain how the technology
behind the Speak & Spell ended up in our cell phones. Discover how Mr.
Coffee became America's favorite breakfast buddy, and how Polaroid
engineered a film that magically developed right before your eyes.
Climb aboard the Concorde and learn how Britain and France trumped the
Soviet Union and the United States in a race for supersonic air
supremacy.

10-11pm -- History Rocks: The 70's - Part 1
Take a whirlwind look at the 1970s through the music, footage and
personalities from the time. Unforgettable news stories are paired
with blockbuster songs from the same era. The thrills of a music video
are combined with the power of a documentary to create an engaging
visual experience of a truly transformative decade in American
history. Music featured in this first part include songs by Blue
Oyster Cult, Bachman Turner Overdrive, Styx, Elton John and The Allman
Brothers.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, May 31, 2007
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The M-16.
The most powerful assault rifle ever used in combat, the M-16 became
the symbol of our lost war--Vietnam--and can easily be called
America's most unloved gun. Yet, 30 years after its introduction, it
stands as a potent icon of U.S. military strength worldwide. We'll
explain how it almost ended up on the scrap heap!

8-9pm -- Man, Moment, Machine - Apollo 13: Triumph on the Dark Side.
April 1970--the Apollo 13 mission is 178,000 miles from Earth, just
two days away from a lunar landing, when an explosion rips the
spacecraft apart and puts the crew's lives on the line. Captain Jim
Lovell has to work quickly and decisively to save his crew and what's
left of his ship. After struggling to stay alive for four days in a
freezing cold spacecraft, no one knows if the command module carrying
the astronauts can survive a fiery re-entry into the Earth's
atmosphere. Only the leadership of Jim Lovell, the ingenuity of the
NASA team in space and on the ground, and the robust systems of the
spacecraft offer a chance for survival. Houston, we have a problem

9-10pm -- Mega Movers - Lock, Stock, & Barrel
It's a scenario right out of a science fiction movie. What if in the
future the Pentagon -- the world's largest office building -- had to
be moved, while operating at full-capacity? That's 3.7 million square
feet of office space and nearly a million tons of weight. Could it be
done? One Mega Mover theorist lays out his plan for this extraordinary
move. Then these same principles are put to the test when two thriving
businesses -- a general store and a funeral home -- must be moved with
all its contents inside. For the general store, that means moving
priceless antiques. For the funeral home, it's keeping caskets and
embalming equipment from being destroyed. Will it be celebration or
sorrow for the owners?

10-11pm -- History Rocks: The 70's - Part 2
Take a whirlwind look at the 1970s through the music, footage and
personalities from the time. Unforgettable news stories are paired
with blockbuster songs from the same era. The thrills of a music video
are combined with the power of a documentary to create an engaging
visual experience of a truly transformative decade in American
history. Music featured in this second part include songs by Blondie,
Supertramp, Foreigner, The Police and Lynard Skynard.

                  Current History Channel listings
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All 3000 names from September 11, 2001
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wild West Tech hosted by David Carradine, some episodes narrated by Keith Carradine:
Saturday, May 19
 8am  Wild West Tech: Revenge Tech (TVPG V-L | cc) 
Friday, May 25
 3pm  Wild West Tech: Native American Tech (TVPG V-L | cc) 
Mail Call (rated TVPG-L, cc) in 2007, all 60-minute unless noted:
Friday May 4 11:00 PM & 3am
Mail Call : 99 - Mail Call
Join host R. Lee Ermey as he checks out the latest in gung ho gear and guns. He test drives the Polaris MV and the Textron M1117 and test fires the M4 carbine and the Beretta M9. Next, Ermey puts gear from Spec Ops, Blackhawk, Oakley, CamelBak, and Camillus through its paces. Then he torture tests flashlights from Surefire and the rugged laptop from VT Miltope as only the Gunny can!
Saturday May 5 08:00 AM
Mail Call : 93 - Mail Call
Shot on location in San Diego, California at the Strategic Operations Training Center, R. Lee Ermey answers viewer questions about the military with practical demonstrations in the field. Lee gets in a little trigger time training with a group of "insurgents" in an "Iraqi Village" at the most realistic training facility used by the U.S. Marine Corps. Then witness the guns and gear used by the British Red Coats against the American rebels during our War of Independence. Go with Lee on an in-depth tour of the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, dedicated to finding and the remains of all missing and unidentified service men and women. Finally, take a trip to Fort MacArthur in Long Beach, California to re-enact the great L.A. Air Raid of 1942.
Wednesday May 9 11:00 PM
Mail Call # 100
Join the Gunny "via satellite" for one-on-one chats with troops in Iraq. At the Atlanta, Georgia headquarters of the Digital Video and Imagery Distribution System, host R. Lee Ermey gets the scoop on the fight against the insurgency. Run by the US Army, DVIDS receives via satellite the combat camera and public affairs videotape of all operations involving the US armed forces. He also meets civil affairs specialists and engineers installing a water purification system for a remote village. Finally, the Gunny pays tribute to an Army Corporal who was recently killed while serving in Iraq.
Saturday, May 19 7am Mail Call # 99
Join host R. Lee Ermey as he checks out the latest in gung ho gear and guns. He test drives the Polaris MV and the Textron M1117 and test fires the M4 carbine and the Beretta M9. Next, Ermey puts gear from Spec Ops, Blackhawk, Oakley, CamelBak, and Camillus through its paces. Then he torture tests flashlights from Surefire and the rugged laptop from VT Miltope
Saturday, May 26 2am Mail Call # 98
R. Lee Ermey is flying high with P-51s and P-47s, ace war birds from the Tennessee Museum of aviation's collection. Then, it's a trip back in time to see just what kind of gear the WW2 Marines carried into battle. Next, it's back to the skies for a one-of-a-kind ride in the Marine Corps' V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor. Even the Gunny makes mistakes, so R. Lee shows off a few of his most famous SNAFUs. Finally, the Gunny gives a fond farewell to the venerable Navy F-14 Tomcat.
Saturday, May 26 7am Mail Call # 95
Ermey roars into HQ in the M8 Armored car, a WWII scout car nicknamed the "greyhound." He takes it for a test drive and fires off the M8's 37mm cannon; then, Gunny features the Mauser C96 pistol (the pistol of choice for everyone from Winston Churchill to Star Wars' Han Solo) in a live fire demonstration. Gunny gives the gear geeks in the audience a field day with an overview of all the weapons, gear and gadgets used by the average German soldier during World War II. Finally, see the most adorable soldiers in history--the illustrious war dogs, a survey of canine warriors in history including rare WWI footage and dogs working in Afghanistan right now clearing land mines near Bagram air base
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
R. Lee Ermey (Mail Call) has decided to play something other than a tough drill sgt. (Full Metal Jacket). His latest movie is a prequel to Texas Chainsaw Massacre called "Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning" as the head of a very strange & lethal family of mutants

For info on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket
(movie available on video and DVD)

Previous History Channel primetime listings:

April

March

February

January 2007

December 2006

Hellcats of the Navy

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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