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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available on or after the 1st & 15th)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Thursday, March 1, 2007
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7-8pm -- History's Mysteries - Ship of Gold.
In 1857, en route to New York from California, the steamship Central
America vanished in a killer storm off North Carolina's coast, taking
with her 400 passengers and nearly 21 tons of gold bullion. Here is
the story of the worst US peacetime sea disaster, and how high-tech
treasure hunters recovered her fortune over 130 years later.

8-9pm -- Lost Worlds - Lost Worlds.
The world has been captivated by legends of ancient civilizations that
flourished only to vanish without a trace. Can Atlantis be found? Did
the ferocious Amazon women really exist? What mystery lies behind
Stonehenge or the giant heads of Easter Island? Modern science can
help us draw back the veils of time and, at last, give us answers to
the elusive mysteries of lost worlds.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Doomsday 2012: The End of Days
There are prophecies and oracles from around the world that all seem
to point to December 21, 2012 as doomsday. The ancient Mayan Calendar,
the medieval predictions of Merlin, the Book of Revelation and the
Chinese oracle of the I Ching all point to this specific date as the
end of civilization. A new technology called "The Web-Bot Project"
makes massive scans of the internet as a means of forecasting the
future... and has turned up the same dreaded date: 2012. Skeptics
point to a long history of "Failed Doomsdays", but many oracles of
doom throughout history have a disturbingly accurate track record. As
the year 2012 ticks ever closer we'll speculate if there are any
reasons to believe these doomsayers.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 19.
Examine one of the most mysterious maritime tragedies, when the sturdy
Edmund Fitzgerald suddenly sank on a stormy night in November 1975;
and unlock the mysteries of the rudder problems behind two Boeing 737
crashes--a 1991 United flight and 1994 US Air flight. Then, we take
viewers inside one of the most dangerous but least-known nuclear
disasters in US history--a meltdown at a secret government facility in
1959. We also travel to an oil storage facility where nearly 4-million
gallons of diesel fuel suddenly flowed out as the storage tank cracked
and catastrophically unzipped from top to bottom. Finally, we take a
"close look" at microscopic structures causing gigantic problems in
the electronics industry--tin whiskers, as they are known by
researchers, that spontaneously grow from pure tin coatings on
electronic boards and microchips.

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Friday, March 2, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Paving America.
The story of the construction of our grand national highway system,
from its beginnings in 1912 (it was conceived by auto and headlight
tycoons) to its completion in 1984 (when the last stoplight was
removed--and buried).

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Stealth and Beyond: Air Stealth.
They are the swarthy eagles of the sky, the sleek sharks of the sea,
the invisible warriors of the battlefield. Join us for a 3-part look
at the stealth aircraft, ships, and soldiers of today, yesterday, and
tomorrow. This hour highlights past, present, and future advances in
stealth military aircraft. Features footage of the F-117 Nighthawk,
B-2 Spirit Bomber, and the Air Force's newest fighters, the F/A-22
Raptor and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, and talks to test pilots and
flight engineers.

9-10pm -- Mail Call - Ermey's Biggest Bangs
A compilation of some of host R. Lee Ermey's favorite weapons and
biggest explosions.

10-11pm -- Dogfights - 02 - Air Ambush
Legendary fighter pilot, Colonel Robin Olds, sets an intricate trap
for the North Vietnamese MiG-21's. His Squadron, the Wolfpack,
disguise their lethal F-4 Phantoms as vulnerable bombers. The MiGs
scream in to challenge the Americans. The result is the most elaborate
air sting of the war... code-name... Operation Bolo. First-hand
accounts, rare archival footage and original shooting will supplement
the remarkable computer graphics.

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Saturday, March 3, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Pumps
Since 200 BC, when the Greek Philosopher Archimedes created a device
for lifting water, the pump has been synonymous with transporting
Earth's most precious resource. That principle still holds true today.
We'll visit the pumping stations of the Colorado Aqueduct and learn
what kinds of pumps are used to quench the thirst of over 16 million
residents of Southern California. Next we'll learn how electric and
diesel power has transformed the simple squirt bottle into a power
pump that can cut through steel. A visit to a dairy shows how a new
robotic milking pump is pushing the envelope of pump technology.
Finally, we'll examine one of the most sophisticated pumps in the
world--the one designed to save the human heart.

8-9pm -- The History of Sex - Ancient Civilizations.
In this hour, we study sex in the ancient world--from Mesopotamians,
who viewed adultery as a crime of theft, to Romans, who believed that
squatting and sneezing after sex was a reliable method birth control.
We also look at revealing Egyptian and Greek practices--from the
origins of dildos, to intimate relations between Egyptian gods and
goddesses, to the use of crocodile dung as a contraceptive.

9-10pm -- The History of Sex - The Eastern World.
An exploration of sex in China, Japan, India, and the Arab world that
offers an intriguing perspective on the interrelation of sexuality and
spirituality in eastern culture. Among the topics presented are the
ancient Chinese equivalent of Viagra, Japanese acceptance of
prostitutes and pornographic art, and tips from the Kama Sutra.

10-11pm -- The History of Sex - The Middle Ages.
In this steamy history, we trace the evolution of sexual beliefs and
practices from the fall of the Roman Empire through the Renaissance.
We'll also uncover the conflicting extremes of medieval romance and
sex--from the bawdy life of European city dwellers to the staid and
dangerous practice of courtly love. Medieval scholars offer humorous
and interesting carnal tales of lusty knights, bawdy widows, naughty
priests, and chaste maidens.

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Sunday, March 4, 2007
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6-8pm -- The Plague -
It began like the common cold. Then fever, baseball-sized black
swellings on the neck, coughing of blood. Few lived more than two
days. The year--1347. It was history's worst biological disaster and
almost half of Europe's population died within three years. Visit the
plague ships' rat-infested holds, witness the terror that swept
through the towns, and walk with the religious flagellants. Follow a
princess as she travels into the center of the plague, a doctor who
struggles to understand what is happening, and a Jewish merchant
caught up in violent attacks. Hear the actual words of the victims,
taken from diaries and journals. From the Pope's palace to the humble
huts of medieval peasants, watch as people live and die in the
unforgiving grip of fear and death, and wonder how we would act if
such a terrible event happened today.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Barbarian Battle Tech
Barbarians and technology, maybe they're not such a contradiction
after all. It's the bow that nearly brought down Rome, and the
suspension system that revolutionized the chariot. Barbarians built
the forts that held out invaders, and forged the axe that named a
country. We'll see inside the shop of one of the world's finest metal
workers as he shapes iron ore into a classic Celtic sword. With 21st
Century animation we'll rebuild a 1600 year-old hill fort--and show
that protecting a village was as easy as digging a ditch. Finally, the
designers of "Rome: Total War: Barbarian Invasion" reveal how they
devised a system that accurately recreates the great barbarian
battles. Which weapons scored best? The results may surprise you.

9-11pm -- The Dark Ages -
The Roman Empire, rotten to the core by the fifth century, lay open to
barbarian warriors. Europe was beset by famine, plague, persecutions,
and a state of war that was so persistent it was only rarely
interrupted by peace. These centuries are remembered today as the Dark
Ages. Beneath this cloak of darkness were people like Charlemagne, St.
Benedict and the Empress Theodora who helped to bridge the gap of
civilization between Rome and the Renaissance. Ultimately, these
points of light would illuminate the darkness, and Western Europe
would rise from the Dark Ages to a level of cultural and political
power unseen for a thousand years.

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Monday, March 5, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bricks.
The history of civilization has been built on the back of brick, and
it's been said that "architecture itself began when two bricks were
put together well." From great Egyptian temples to the Roman
aqueducts, the Great Wall of China, and the dome of the Hagia Sophia,
brick is one of the oldest, yet least celebrated, building materials
manufactured by man. In this hard-packed episode, we explore brick's
past, highlighting defining moments, such as the Great London Fire of
1666, the zenith years of brick in the New York Hudson River Valley,
and brick as an essential building block in infrastructure and
industry. We'll feature advancements through the ages as well as
construction techniques, trends, and the future of brick construction.
Essentially, brick is still just burnt clay...it has been around for
thousands of years, but continues to serve as the backdrop of the
modern age.

8-9pm -- Barbarians II - Vandals
We join the Vandals as they infiltrate the Roman borders in northern
Gaul, and sweep into Spain, burning and pillaging everything in their
path. This ragged, homeless tribe launches the largest ever sea-borne
movement of the barbarian peoples making their name synonymous with
lawless destruction, looting and terror. As their great leader,
Gaiseric, and his blood-thirsty son, Huneric ravage North Africa, and
eventually Rome, itself, we see them face the crushing military of the
Roman Empire, the devious trickery of Roman General Aetius, and the
devout beliefs of the Holy Roman Church.

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - Machu Picchu: Lost City of the Inca
In 1911, Hiram Bingham, famed American explorer, stumbled across a
remote Inca city atop a high peak in the Andes. The site was called
Machu Picchu--perhaps the most famous ruin in the world. Was it, like
Bingham believed, a military fortress or did this glorious ruin have a
secret purpose? From the mountains of Peru, host Josh Bernstein will
follow in the footsteps of Hiram Bingham. He builds a log bridge
across a raging river, examines the stonework at the site, and reviews
ancient manuscripts to discover the "true" purpose of Machu Picchu.

10-11pm -- Barbarians - Huns.
The Huns were a mysterious people who fell upon the European continent
like the vengeance of God. Some say the Chinese built the Great Wall
to keep them out. In the 5th century, the Huns struck a divided and
decaying Roman Empire. The Romans tried to deal with them
diplomatically, even allowing children of Roman nobility to live as
guests (hostages) in Hun camps. One of these, Aetius, would become one
of Rome's greatest generals, and it was he who would face one of the
Huns' greatest rulers--Attila.

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Tuesday, March 6, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Taxidermy.
It began as a tool used by prehistoric man to attract animals to the
hunt. Over time it became an invaluable study aid for the natural
scientist and a popular hobby for hunters and fishermen. Join us for a
tantalizing look at the history of taxidermy, the craft of preserving
animal skins and using them to recreate a still life of the animal as
it appeared in life. We also check out fiberglass reproduction, which
is gaining popularity as fish and game regulations become stricter.
Finally, we examine human subjects in taxidermy. Using the very latest
process of plastination, the once taboo science and art of preserving
and displaying human corpses, now draws crowds in Europe, Asia, and
the US, proving the age-old practice continues to mesmerize us!

8-9pm -- Barbarians II - Saxons
Travel with the Saxon pirates as they ravage the British coast. In an
orgy of pagan worship, the early Saxon leaders sweep across Britain,
facing the Christians and their barbarian brothers in a bloody rivalry
for power and land. After witnessing the slaughter of his entire
family, Saxon prince, Edwin, flees across Britain, until he's strong
enough to face down his arch-enemy, Aethelfrith, to become one of the
greatest kings of his tribe. His power and fame are unparalleled until
the young king, Alfred, defends his people against the Viking
invaders, uniting his land, and defining what it means to be English.

9-10pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Chinese Warfare
Many of the modern military innovations we take for granted all stem
from ancient China. It was the Chinese who invented gunpowder, and in
the tenth century the Chinese created a substance that allegedly
powered flame throwers and ancient rockets. From automated crossbows
to siege machines able to fire over 3,000 yards, we uncover the
secrets of China's most awe-inspiring weaponry. Amongst many
fascinating stories, we uncover insights into the legendary rotating
crossbow and the Cloud Bridge Siege Engine that was used to transport
hundreds of troops to the battlefield. We will recreate some of
China's legendary battlefield creations to see how the designs would
have fared in combat.

10-11pm -- Barbarians - Mongols.
Shot in film on location, we examine "The Mongol Catastrophe"--the
invasion by nomadic warriors that swarmed out of the east overwhelming
the Ottoman Empire. At the greatest point in their conquest, the
Mongols controlled an empire that stretched from the Sea of Japan to
the Baltic, from Korea to East Germany, taking in most of Eurasia as
well. The Mongol warriors pioneered a style of warfare unparalleled in
cunning and cruelty--and so revolutionary that it still inspires
military strategists.

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Wednesday, March 7, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Biggest Machines 3.
Giant robots on the factory floor and in outer space. A floating
fortress that's home to 6,000 military personnel, which is almost as
long as the Empire State Building is tall. And a diesel engine with
108,000 horsepower. (You read that right.) These giants must be seen
to be believed! In this episode, we travel over land and sea to find
these and more of the biggest, baddest, most audacious feats of
engineering in the world.

8-9pm -- Barbarians II - Franks
We experience the birth of a barbarian empire in the Franks, as
Merovius, a legendary leader said to be half-man, half-monster
descends upon Gaul, setting the stage for his sons' conquest over both
Roman and Visigoth armies. His grandson, Clovis, will relinquish his
fierce pagan ways only when it seems that the Christian god grants him
greater victory in battle. It is Clovis who leads his people to
conquest over France, and builds the bridge between barbarian and
statesman that the future king, Charlemagne finally embodies.

9-10pm -- Barbarians II - Lombards
Explore the primal pagan rites of the Lombard's, as they fight for
land and for a barbarian bride. We travel with the brutal Lombard
leader, Alboin, as he breaks through the Roman defenses in Italy, and
forces his captured wife to drink from her murdered father's skull.
The skilled Lombard king Liutprand will face both Roman and Frankish
attacks, as he vies for supremacy on the crowded peninsula. He will
create laws, linking bloody barbarian rites with ancient Roman justice
and establishing a new culture in the former center of the fallen
Roman Empire that will last for centuries.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Barbarian Battle Tech
Barbarians and technology, maybe they're not such a contradiction
after all. It's the bow that nearly brought down Rome, and the
suspension system that revolutionized the chariot. Barbarians built
the forts that held out invaders, and forged the axe that named a
country. We'll see inside the shop of one of the world's finest metal
workers as he shapes iron ore into a classic Celtic sword. With 21st
Century animation we'll rebuild a 1600 year-old hill fort--and show
that protecting a village was as easy as digging a ditch. Finally, the
designers of "Rome: Total War: Barbarian Invasion" reveal how they
devised a system that accurately recreates the great barbarian
battles. Which weapons scored best? The results may surprise you.

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Thursday, March 8, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bunkers.
From the earliest bunkers of WWI through the ultra-futuristic ones of
tomorrow's wars, we trace the story of defensive fortifications. In
the constant struggle to hold off ever more potent forms of attack,
bunkers function in a variety of forms. Three mammoth block structures
comprise a submarine bunker at Lorient, France, able to house 20 subs.
We visit Churchill's Cabinet War Room and Hitler's Berlin bunker, as
well as backyard Cold War bunkers and those that protect nuclear
weapons themselves.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The Colosseum.
Nothing symbolizes the Roman Empire at its height or Rome in
magnificent ruins more than the Colosseum. Built in 70 AD, it seated
80,000 people, boasted a retractable roof, underground staging
devices, marble seating, and lavish decorations. It still serves as
the prototype for the modern stadium. The complexity of its
construction, the beauty of its architecture, and the functionality of
its design made it the perfect place for massive crowds to congregate
for the bloody spectacles it contained.

9-11pm -- Last Stand of The 300 -
After Custer, Thermopylae is the most famous last stand in history. In
a narrow pass in Northern Greece, seven thousand Greek soldiers await
an onslaught of epic proportions. They will soon face the largest
fighting force ever assembled--the war machine of the mighty Persian
Empire, estimated at over a million men. The Greeks are led by three
hundred of the most ferocious warriors of the ancient world--the
Spartans. Their leader is the fearless King Leonidas, who after this
battle would be catapulted into legend. When it is over, every Spartan
in the pass will have sacrificed his life for freedom. Creating a
fresh visual style and using new technologies we will dramatically
recreate the significant events that lead to Thermopylae and the clash
of arms.

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Friday, March 9, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Chrysler Building.
The 1,046-foot Chrysler Building in New York City, erected between
1928 and 1930, was the world's tallest edifice--until the Empire State
Building eclipsed it in 1931! Since then, this Art Deco masterpiece
has become one of the most beloved skyscrapers on the city skyline.
Financed by auto tycoon Walter P. Chrysler and designed by architect
William Van Alen, the private office building was constructed by more
than 2,000 men. Find out why it was the first--and last--skyscraper
Van Alen designed.

8-9pm -- Shootout - The Big Red One
The First Infantry Division, a.k.a. Big Red One, is the oldest and
best division in the U.S. Army. These warriors fought more campaigns
than any other U.S. division in World War Two. Elements of the
division experienced action during the War of 1812, the Mexican War,
and the Civil War and fired the first American shots in World War I.
Decorated veterans of World War II will take the viewer back to the
tense battlefields of El Guettar, North Africa, Troina, Sicily,
Normandy (Omaha beach) France and their final shootout at the Falkenau
concentration camp in Czechoslovakia.

9-10pm -- Mail Call - Ermey's Hottest Rides
A compilation of some of host R. Lee Ermey's favorite military vehicles.

10-11pm -- Dogfights - 04 - Flying Tigers
Two weeks after Pearl Harbor... A courageous, rag-tag band of
American mercenaries dare to challenge the over-whelming might of the
Japanese Air Force. The legendary "Flying Tigers" slash through the
skies of China, and help vanquish the unstoppable Japanese. Follow
leading Tiger aces Tex Hill and John Alison as their P-40 Tomahawks
fight to the death against the agile Japanese 1-97 Nate. First-hand
accounts, rare archival footage and original shooting will supplement
the remarkable computer graphics.

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Saturday, March 10, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Weapons of Mass Destruction
From the unimaginable power of nuclear bombs to microscopic anthrax
spores, we reveal who possesses these nightmare weapons and explore
the danger posed by terrorists with deadly technologies. Using the
latest computer technology we see an on-screen representation of the
radioactive plume that would result from a mock dirty bomb attack in
Seattle. We will learn how bio-agents are discovered and understand
the technology currently used to identify and prevent suicide
bombings. Weapons of mass destruction have made the world a dangerous
place but we will find out how technology can assist us as we strive
for lasting solutions.

8-10pm -- The Dark Ages -
The Roman Empire, rotten to the core by the fifth century, lay open to
barbarian warriors. Europe was beset by famine, plague, persecutions,
and a state of war that was so persistent it was only rarely
interrupted by peace. These centuries are remembered today as the Dark
Ages. Beneath this cloak of darkness were people like Charlemagne, St.
Benedict and the Empress Theodora who helped to bridge the gap of
civilization between Rome and the Renaissance. Ultimately, these
points of light would illuminate the darkness, and Western Europe
would rise from the Dark Ages to a level of cultural and political
power unseen for a thousand years.

10-11pm -- Caligula: Reign of Madness -
Caligula ruled the Roman Empire fewer than four years, and was only 28
when assassinated by officers of his guard in 41 AD. His reign was a
legendary frenzy of lunacy, murder, and lust. Between executions, he
staged spectacular orgies, made love to his sister, and declared
himself a living god. Join us for a look at this devoted son,
murderer, pervert, and loving father whose anguished life was far more
bizarre than the myth that surrounds him.

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Sunday, March 11, 2007
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7-8pm -- Secret Societies -
Some of the world's most powerful individuals belong to secret
organizations. The Skull & Bones, the Bilderbergs, and the Tri-Lateral
Commission are just a few of the groups that many suspect are
conspiring to take over the world. Others believe they already have.
What fuels such rampant conspiracy paranoia? We examine a number of
these clandestine organizations, past and present, and reveal why so
many people fear their nefarious agendas.

8-10pm -- Jonestown Paradise Lost -
Framed by recently released, U.S. Government information and eye
witness accounts, this special follows Congressman Leo Ryan's fatal
journey into "Jonestown", a community carved out of the jungles of
Guyana by the followers of messianic/charismatic pastor, Jim Jones.
Using extensive and fact backed dramatic re-enactments, as well as
archival footage, and heart-rending interviews, we go beyond "official
reality" and deep into the inner workings of this tragic cult and its
apocalyptic end.

10-12am -- Decoding The Past - Cults: Dangerous Devotion
From the bizarre prophecies of Charles Manson to the desperate
paranoia of Jim Jones, cult leaders draw us into worlds of power,
paranoia, and death. Through interviews with world-renowned scholars
and the survivors of cultic tragedy, we will unmask the mystery of
cults. From Jim Jones' pursuit of a socialist paradise to Warren
Jeffs' Yearning for Zion ranch, cult leaders have twisted the quest
for purity into an obsession with madness and murder.

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Monday, March 12, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Fire.
Fire--we have learned to create and control it, but have yet to tame
it? It's alive--it breathes, feeds, and grows. Fire is behind
essentially every component of the modern world and has spawned entire
industries. We'll feature great feats in pyrotechnology, or the
intentional use and control of fire by humans--from the massive
8-story fire-breathing boilers that create steam heat for downtown
Philadelphia, to the nearly 2,000 degree flames that create
electricity at a biomass plant. From the massive coal-fired
locomotives that powered us across the continent, to the rocket
engines that took us to the moon, we'll cover what fire is, how we
have learned to create and harness it, and its behavior with various
fuel sources. At a match factory, we see how the seeds of fire are
made and explore the significance of this seemingly simple innovation.
We also take a look at the important role that fire has played in
technological advances as well as warfare.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - The Day after Roswell.
Delve into the aftermath and repercussions of the 1947 Roswell
incident, when many believe an alien spacecraft crashed in New Mexico.
Based on The Day after Roswell by Lt. Col. Philip J. Corso and William
Birnes, we explore if technologies like the laser, fiber optics, the
integrated circuit, super-strong fibers, and night vision were
developed with the aid of aliens. Career officer Corso claims his
first alien encounter came on July 6, `47, while on late-night
security rounds at Ft. Riley, Kansas, where he saw bodies of EBEs
(Extraterrestrial Biological Entities) inside shipping crates. In
1961, as Chief of Foreign Technology in the Army's department of
Research and Development, his job included analyzing alien technology
from Roswell, then introducing it into America's technological
mainstream--thus, reverse-engineering alien artifacts. And we talk to
many scientists involved at the time, who credit hard work, not alien
contact, with these technological advances.

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - Secrets of the Mummies
For over 3,000 years, ancient Egyptians preserved their dead in the
desert sands. Today the secrets of the Egyptian afterlife are being
revealed! Join host Josh Bernstein as he enters a realm of temples,
tombs, and mummies. How did the Egyptians prepare the dead for the
afterlife and why did these sacred practices disappear? On his
exploration, Josh explores the royal tombs at Giza, mines the key
ingredient used to preserve the dead, and uncovers a secret cache of
golden mummies!

10-11pm -- Engineering an Empire - China.
For over 4000 years, the world's greatest empires have come and
gone--only China has survived the test of time. Century after century,
China's regal emperors mobilized immense peasant armies to accomplish
engineering feats unparalleled in human history. Among the
groundbreaking innovations were the world's longest canal and a naval
fleet mightier than all those of Europe combined. However, none can
compare to the colossal 4,000-mile wall that stands as the most
ambitious construction project ever built. From such heights came
spectacular death spirals, as dynasty after dynasty, consumed by
vanity and greed was stripped of power by the people it had ruled.
Peter Weller hosts.

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Tuesday, March 13, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Dynamite.
Join us for a highly charged hour as we see why Alfred Nobel's
invention of dynamite took on earthshattering dimensions as his
product blasted out the natural resources that built our modern world.
We also examine its impact on construction of the roads, tunnels, and
dams that provide us with energy and transportation.

8-9pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Egyptian Warfare
Egyptian monuments and great works of art still astound us today. We
will reveal another surprising aspect of Egyptian life--their weapons
of war, and their great might on the battlefield. A common perception
of the Egyptians is of a cultured civilization, yet there is
fascinating evidence which reveals they were also a war faring people,
who developed advanced weapon making techniques. Some of these
techniques would be used for the very first time in history and some
of the battles they fought were on a truly massive scale.

9-10pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Warfare.
Warfare was a way of life in the ancient world. The technology of war
drove ancient inventors and engineers to ever-greater lengths to
defeat their enemies. They were, perhaps, the greatest masterminds of
the battlefield-- yet who were they, and how did they make their
sophisticated lethal machines more than 2,000 years ago? Ancient
warfare was every bit as technical and lethal as today's warfare. Just
witness the colossal and lethal Helepolis ("city taker"), history's
most sophisticated siege machine. From the sinister machines that
could bring a city's wall crashing down to Greek Fire, the napalm of
the ancient world--warfare was as terrible then as now. The sheer
ingenuity and complexity with which these war machines were created
proves that the people of the ancient world were great inventors,
mathematicians, and engineers.

10-11pm -- Man, Moment, Machine - Al Capone & the Machine Gun Massacre.
Prohibition Chicago in 1929 is a city erupting in gang-fueled anarchy.
Crime boss Al Capone is about to raise the violence to a new level
with gangland's weapon of choice--the Thompson Submachine Gun. Seven
men are about to taste Capone's vengeance from the muzzle of this new
messenger of death. The St. Valentine's Day Massacre will become one
of the most famous mass murders in history.

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Wednesday, March 14, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil Fire Fighting.
When a burning gusher shoots flames into the air, only a handful of
men know how to snuff out the monster. Fighting fire with fire, they
place explosives around the flames to blow it out, or douse it with
tons of water. The modern world depends on these risk takers, yet
their industry began less than 100 years ago. Join us for a scorching
hour as we review the rich history of this "breed apart", and look at
modern heat-resistant clothing, new technology, and regulations that
protect the oilfield hellfighters.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Sugar.
The sugar industry came of age on the backs of slaves toiling in
Caribbean fields, and British desire to control production of sugar
and its byproduct, rum. Sugar also played a surprisingly critical part
in America's battle for independence. Tour a sugar plantation on Maui,
Hawaii to get an inside look at how cane sugar is produced today and
learn how the sugar stalks are put through an extensive process of
extraction and purification--and how a ton of harvested cane results
in 200 pounds of raw sugar. Learn the technology behind creating the
sweetener in all of its permutations, including corn syrup, brown
sugar, powdered sugar, and cube sugar, and how it's used in candies,
soda, and sauces as well as more exotic uses such as in pipe tobacco
and processed meat.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Coffee.
Traces the origins of this tasty drink from Ethiopia over 1,000 years
ago to the espresso-fueled explosion of specialty coffee stores like
Starbucks today. Along the way, we'll see how American companies like
Hills Brothers, Maxwell House, Folgers, and MJB grew to be giants.
Discover how billions of coffee beans make their journey from coffee
farms and plantations, and are processed in gigantic roasting and
packaging plants before showing up in coffee cups all over the world.
Details the invention and production of instant coffee, decaffeinated
coffee, freeze-dried coffee, and the espresso machine. Also, we
explain how coffee made shift work in factories possible, while
coffeehouses provided a creative cauldron that brewed political and
artistic progress in the 18th and 19th centuries. And, we also provide
tips on how to make a better cup at home!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Distilleries.
From water and grain...to mash...still...vat...barrel and bottle--the
distilling of alcoholic spirits is a big business and near-sacred
religion. Its acolytes eye the color, swirl the glass, inhale the
bouquet, sip, and then ponder their ambrosia. What's your pleasure?
Bourbon, Scotch, Rum, Gin, Vodka, or Tequila? We trace the history of
distilling from the one-man/one-still tradition to the Voldstead Act
of 1920 that devastated American distilleries to the mega-sales and
high-volume distillery of today.

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Thursday, March 15, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Dangerous Cargo.
Toxic traffic is everywhere! An average of 800,000 shipments of
hazardous materials hit our highways and railways daily. From Wild
West wooden crates filled with explosives to HAZMAT containers of
nuclear waste, we shadow dangerous cargo. We ride shotgun on a
hazardous material shipment that's tracked by satellites; hunt down
the hush-hush "ghost fleet"--trucks carrying classified government
materials; and board a Con-Air flight moving another kind of nasty
stuff--dangerous felons!

8-9pm -- Lost Worlds - Knights Templar.
They defended the Holy Land through bloodshed and prayer. Founded in
the 12th century, these Christian warrior monks reigned supreme for
nearly 200 years before suffering a spectacular fall from grace. Tried
for heresy, they were disbanded and their Grand Master burned at the
stake. We'll search behind the legend for their lost world. We
recreate the city they knew as Tortosa--now hidden among modern homes
in the Syrian city of Tartus. We reveal secrets of their headquarters
at Temple Mount in Jerusalem, with magnificent underground vaults that
could stable 1,000 horses. And we visit the circular church in London
built to resemble the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem and
the site of the Templar's mysterious initiation rites. We bring to
life the hilltop fortress that Lawrence of Arabia called "the finest
castle in the world", and return to the Mediterranean island where the
Knights Templars made their last stand against Moslem enemies.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Earth's Black Hole
Explore with us the wonders and mysteries of the Black Holes in our
universe. Is it possible that areas on earth might, in fact, show
black hole like tendencies? We take a hard scientific look at an area
known as the Bermuda Triangle to see if there are indeed any
similarities between the supposed forces in the triangle and the
destructive force of a black hole. From a research boat trip through
the triangle to interviews with scientists at the US Geological
Survey, Harvard University, and the UK's Cardiff University, we go far
beyond the event horizon to explore the dangers in this area and what
relation they might indeed have with its counterpoint in space.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Metal.
They constitute the very essence of the modern world; the cadence of
our progress sounds in the measured ring of the blacksmith's hammer.
From soaring skyscrapers and sturdy bridges to jet planes and rockets,
metals play a key role. Our journey begins before the Bronze Age and
takes us into the shiny future when new metal structures--engineered
at a molecular level to be stronger, lighter, and cheaper--shape human
progress, as they have since man first thrust copper into a fire and
forged a tool.
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Sorry, no listings received for 2nd half of March until the 20th
Tuesday, March 20, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Proving Grounds.
Where can you fire a missile without scaring the neighbors? Or lift
millions of pounds in pursuit of a couple of ounces of gold? On a
proving ground, of course, where performance is the only thing that
matters. Because in the heat of battle or head-to-head competition, no
excuses can be given. We'll visit the US military's Cold Regions
Testing Center in Alaska and desert proving grounds in Arizona, the
Olympic Complex in Colorado, and the now-defunct Packard proving
grounds in Michigan.

8-9pm -- Lost Worlds - Palenque.
Today we venture to Palenque, a great Mayan city deep in the Mexican
jungle, abandoned for over a thousand years. Mysterious tombs,
palaces, and temples covered by creepers have remained hidden from the
world for centuries. But how was this gigantic metropolis built and
what purpose did the temples and palaces serve? As the clues are
gathered, we reveal the Mayan obsession with astronomy, sacrifice and
shamanism and how this influenced the building of their structures and
discover how their unique stone carvings documented their civilization
more thoroughly than any other Mesoamerican culture. We also explore
the secret tombs of their kings that have remained hidden for more
than 1,500 years. As we rebuild the city, wall by wall, building by
building, the result is an historically accurate and stunningly
beautiful vision of an ancient city.

9-10pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Ancient Computer?
Journey back in time for an eye-opening look at the amazing ancient
roots of technologies we like to think of as modern. New research
suggests that many of the inventions of the last 200 years may, in
fact, have already been known to the ancients. In this hour, we
explore the Antikythera mechanism, an ancient machine that was
discovered deep in the Aegean Sea. Could it perhaps have been an
ancient computer? Could Archimedes have had a hand in its creation?

10-11pm -- Man, Moment, Machine - Saddam Hussein & The Nerve Gas Atrocity.
March 16th, 1988: In the Iraqi city of Halabja thousands unknowingly
face a hellish death. The man responsible for this unspeakable horror
is notorious Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. In an act of brutality he
unleashes a massive chemical weapons attack designed to wipe-out an
entire city of innocent civilians.

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Wednesday, March 21, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Castles & Dungeons.
Some of the most imposing structures ever built, medieval castles
withstood both bloody assaults and the test of time. Designed like
machines with nearly every architectural detail devoted to defense,
castles represented the perfect fusion of form and function. Journey
back to that unruly era as we examine the complexity of their
construction and the multipurpose they served--homes to kings and
nobles, economic centers, courthouses, treasuries, prisons, and
torture chambers.

8-9pm -- Super Tools - Tunnel.
Dig deep into the workings, history, and technology of the superstar
tools that enable us to burrow beneath the earth.
Tunnels--underground, through mountains, beneath oceans and
rivers--are among engineering's great achievements. Workers must
create a seamless and waterproof space where only unforgiving rock
existed before. We'll visit one of America's biggest tunnel projects,
Atlanta's CSO (Combined Sewage Overflow). To help manage waste water
during torrential rains, two four and a half mile long tunnels are
being constructed under the city to channel storm water overflow to a
pumping station. We'll watch the action of the five superstar tools of
tunnel construction--the rock drill, explosives, the tunnel boring
machine, the gas detector, and the shotcrete gun. What began as
backbreaking labor with a simple hammer and chisel is today a
state-of-the-art hi-tech industry thanks to the ever-improving
technology of these five essential tools.

9-10pm -- Super Tools - Skyscraper.
Skyscrapers are an extraordinary feat of human engineering: exposing
millions of pounds of concrete and steel to the enemy forces of wind
and gravity. Starting with the foundation and on through the support
structures and concrete flooring, every piece of these superstructures
has to be super-strong. We'll soar high to spotlight the construction
of three new buildings: a 30-story hotel tower for the Palms Casino in
Las Vegas; a 52-story office building in Manhattan, the new
headquarters of The New York Times; and a 92-story residential and
commercial building in Chicago, the Trump International Hotel and
Tower. Along the way, we go behind the scenes with the five tools that
make these buildings possible: the foundation drill rig, the tower
crane, the impact wrench, the power trowel, and the total station.
Each of these tools has evolved over the 100-plus year history of the
skyscraper era.

10-11pm -- Super Tools - Ship.
A modern-day aircraft carrier is like a floating city: with 5,000
crewmembers, 80 aircraft, and a four-and-a-half acre big flight deck.
It's nearly as long as the Empire State Building is tall, and has its
very own 20-story skyscraper balanced on top of it. Constructing one
of these is as much a marvel as the ship itself. We take viewers to
the Newport News Shipyard in Virginia, where the George H. W.
Bush--the latest Nimitz-class aircraft carrier--is inching closer to
completion. Gone are the hammers, nails, and even rivets of the old
shipyards, replaced with plasma, lasers, and robots that are pressed
into service building the largest warship afloat. We go deep inside
the guts of this warship-in-the-making to get up close to the tools
that rule the shipbuilding world: the plasma beveling cutter, robotic
welder, shafting lathe, laser tracker, and pneumatic drill.

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Thursday, March 22, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Ink.
Invented by the Chinese in about 3000BC, it spread the word of God and
war. It set us free and spelled out our rights. It tells stories,
sells products and solves crimes. It's ink and it's everywhere! From
squid to soybeans, from ancient text to awesome tattoos, join us as we
dip into the well for the scoop on ink.

8-10pm -- Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History -
Kneeling before a flaming cross, Klansmen and women take part in their
sacred bonding, showing how secrecy and ritual aid the hooded order in
a campaign for white supremacy. From its birth in 1866's
Reconstruction South to a 1996 rally, this chronicle of hate talks to
Julian Bond, Morris Dees Jr., the Grand Dragon, and Imperial Wizard.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Tobacco.
Discovered around 18,000 years ago, tobacco was first cultivated in
the Andes between 5000 and 3000 B.C. At a modern tobacco farm in North
Carolina, a farmer will show us how the crop is harvested and cured
and we'll visit the Fuente cigar plantation in the Dominican Republic.
While tobacco has brought pleasure to countless smokers the world
over--it has sent millions to an early grave. In an interview with the
Surgeon General, we will explore this leading public health issue. The
show will also look at smokeless methods of consumption as well as
explore the use of nicotine replacement therapy.

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Friday, March 23, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Hardware Stores.
Join us for a nuts-and-bolts look at the history and evolution of
those places that hold our world together. From the local blacksmith
to Home Depot, it's the story of nails, screws, mollybolts, duct tape,
and superglue. We visit one of the oldest hardware stores in America,
Placerville True Value, and wander the aisles of the mega-giants. As
we chronicle the rise of the hardware "Big Box" superstores, we also
see how the mom-and-pop local hardware stores still manage to survive.

8-9pm -- Shootout - Afghanistan's Deadliest Snipers
For five years, heroic U.S. Servicemen and their allies have hunted
Al-Qaeda and Taliban extremists who caused the deaths of 3,000
Americans in a single day. Special Forces Captain Jason Amerine
orchestrates a bombing campaign that forces the Taliban to surrender
Kandahar and escape into the hills. 10th Mountain Division and 101st
Airborne Division soldiers kill or capture hundreds of Al-Qaeda and
Taliban fighters. Dozens more are rooted out in the birthplace of the
Taliban, the Oruzgan Province in south-central Afghanistan. The
on-going search for enemy combatants in the mountains of Afghanistan
has brought both battlefield successes, and heartbreaking tragedies.
This is the story of the gun battles from that search--harrowing,
deadly shootouts.

9-10pm -- Dogfights - 09 - Hell Over Hanoi
You're in the cockpit with some of the fiercest dog fighting ever seen
in Vietnam! These pilots fight in a supersonic world, and split second
decisions determine life or death. American F4 Phantom pilots Fred
Olmsted and Dan Cherry take on the famed MiG-21--the most feared
threat in the sky. Steve Ritchie, becomes a dog fighting legend as an
Air Force Ace. First-hand accounts, rare archival footage and original
shooting will supplement the remarkable computer graphics.

10-11pm -- Mail Call - 94 - Mail Call
Shot on location at Hurlburt Field, Florida, R. Lee Ermey answers
viewer questions about this historic piece of real estate with a focus
on Air Force Special Operations and hardware. Lee tours the Air Force
Base and gets a taste of what the officer candidates call "Hell Week";
then, Gunny goes to school and trains in car bomb and explosives
detection and fires assault rifles used by terrorists. Finally, Lee
takes off in the meanest gunship in the Air Force, the AC-130 and
squeezes off a few rounds with its 105 mm cannon.

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Saturday, March 24, 2007
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7-8pm -- Full Metal Corset -
In April 1861, the newly inaugurated President Lincoln calls for
75,000 men to fight for the Federal cause. What he does not anticipate
is the shared desire by hundreds of women to fight for their country.
Forbidden by laws of society, these determined women become the
"Secret Soldiers of the Civil War." Travel back in time and hear the
story of two of the Civil War's most interesting female
soldiers--Sarah Emma Edmonds and Loreta Janeta Velazquez. Hear their
tales of passion, recounting the sacrifice of identity, fear of
discovery, and constant need for duplicity...even under fire.

8-11pm -- A Few Good Men -
Movie. Tom Cruise and Demi Moore star as Navy lawyers defending two
naive sailors charged with the hazing death of another sailor in this
tense courtroom drama. Jack Nicholson adds to the star-studded cast as
the tough-as-nails Navy officer who famously tells Cruise that "you
can't handle the truth!" With Kevin Bacon, Kiefer Sutherland, and
Kevin Pollak, and directed by Rob Reiner. (1992)

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Sunday, March 25, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Coffee.
Traces the origins of this tasty drink from Ethiopia over 1,000 years
ago to the espresso-fueled explosion of specialty coffee stores like
Starbucks today. Along the way, we'll see how American companies like
Hills Brothers, Maxwell House, Folgers, and MJB grew to be giants.
Discover how billions of coffee beans make their journey from coffee
farms and plantations, and are processed in gigantic roasting and
packaging plants before showing up in coffee cups all over the world.
Details the invention and production of instant coffee, decaffeinated
coffee, freeze-dried coffee, and the espresso machine. Also, we
explain how coffee made shift work in factories possible, while
coffeehouses provided a creative cauldron that brewed political and
artistic progress in the 18th and 19th centuries. And, we also provide
tips on how to make a better cup at home!

8-9pm -- Ancient Discoveries - 11 - Siege of Troy
For 3000 years the Siege of Troy has remained steeped in mystery.
Journey with us to the site in Turkey believed to be the location of
the real Troy, as we analyze one of the world's greatest historical
battlegrounds for new clues. This program takes us behind the Troy
celebrated by Hollywood to uncover fascinating evidence in regard to
Achilles' duel against Hector, the sailing of the vast Mycenaean fleet
and the wooden ship of Troy. Watch as we apply modern technology,
archaeology and engineering to uncover the real story behind the
legend of Troy.

9-10pm -- Ancient Discoveries - 16 - Superships
In recent years there have been a number of extraordinary discoveries
of ships from the ancient world. But what do these finds say about the
societies which created them, and the techniques they used in their
construction? Travel back to ancient Egypt and learn about the "Khufu
Boat" which had not one metal nail in its construction, and uncover
huge sailing vessels, dating from 3000 B.C., in Abydos near the Nile.
Some of the most exciting discoveries that have been made include the
warship, and one carried as many as 7000 crewman.

10-11pm -- Ancient Discoveries - 09 - Mega Machines
In 2004 the American School of Classical Studies in Greece made a
surprising discovery of two limestone coffins which dated back 3000
years. Archaeologist Guy Sanders was not only surprised by the quality
of the sarcophagi but shocked by their size and weight. The coffins
weighed 3 tons, and he concluded that the people of the Geometric
Period must have used massive machines to move them. From the Pharos
of Alexandria to the Parthenon on the Acropolis we will delve into the
world of the ancient heavy engineers, and discover how their machines
were used to build and transport some of the most amazing structures
in Antiquity.

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Monday, March 26, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Lube Job.
From chariot wheels of ancient Egypt to hard disks in a computer to
the wheels on a Mars rover, machinery can't function without
lubricants. And in today's technology, there are a mind-boggling
number of friction points that must be lubed, and a staggering number
of lubricants-- petroleum motor oils that keep car engines from
burning up, synthetic greases that stay put in the zero gravity of
space, and solid coatings that prevent eggs from sticking to a pan.
We'll see how this marvel of chemistry works and how it's used.
Peering into the future, we'll behold a power generator that employs
air as a lubricant, trains using magnetic levitation, which eliminates
any need for lubrication, and bio-engineered vegetable oils that
promise to take humanity back to one of its very first lubricants.
From helping medieval windmills spin, to allowing robotic arms on
planetary rovers to move, lubricants are crucial to the advance of
technology and literally keep the wheels of progress turning.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - UFO Hunters.
They look to the stars, to Earth, and within the human body. They are
the UFO research elite that seek answers to the mysteries of the UFO
phenomenon. Their determination, attitude, and methodologies stand
strong against ridicule and disbelief. In the end, UFO hunters exhibit
scientific evidence that pushes the boundary of modern-day thinking.
At annual conferences, they share findings and are often stunned by
the commonality of their cases. Follow UFO hunters as they search for
UFOs and investigate crash sites. Their hunts for physical evidence of
UFOs and alien life forms sometimes end up as global wild goose
chases, but there are other times, when what they find is just too
intriguing....and might just prove that it is possible that we are not
alone in the universe.

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - Stonehenge of The Americas
In the Bolivian Andes, a sprawling ancient city rests 13,000 feet
above sea level. With its giant, freestanding monoliths and grand
design, Tiwanaku has long been compared to Stonehenge. The two sites
were built on opposite sides of the globe, but they both share a
design that pays tribute to the sun. What's the "real" connection
between Stonehenge and Tiwanaku? Flying out from La Paz, host Josh
Bernstein tours Tiwanaku from both the air and ground. He harvests and
transports the very stone used to build Tiwanaku and, he dives Lake
Titicaca to explore evidence of a lost civilization.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The World's Biggest Machines.
Join us for a look at the biggest, heaviest, tallest, longest, meanest
machines on the planet! We'll see what these monsters do and how they
operate, and how they're designed and assembled. Machines investigated
include the largest draglines, excavators used in mining; the biggest
dump truck; a front-end loader with an 80-ton bucket and the largest
tires of any vehicle; the cruise ship, the Voyager of the Seas; a
240-foot tall wind generator; and a fusion reaction machine the size
of a football field.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engines.
Story of the development of engines and motors, with particular
emphasis on the ones that have profoundly changed society. Beginning
with the steam engine, we see how it was created, how it works, and
how it led to the Industrial Revolution. We review the electric motor,
internal combustion engine, jet engine, and rocket engine, and
conclude with a look at futuristic engine technologies, including
hydrogen-powered cars and microtechnology engines so small that they
fit on the tip of a finger.

8-9pm -- Lost Worlds - Atlantis.
Field investigators using the latest research, expert analysis, and
cutting-edge technology take us back to ancient Greece, to a peaceful
island that exploded with devastating force. But, at the dawn of the
20th Century, the remains of a palace were discovered on the island of
Crete, preserved beneath volcanic ash. Could the ruins be home to the
ancient civilization of Atlantis? Our investigators find that a Cretan
palace and a town on Santorini are linked by unique engineering of
their buildings. Rebuilding towns, temples, and the palace of Atlantis
as described by Plato, we reveal the majesty and mystery of this lost
world. The builders of the original palace achieved a level of
engineering excellence not matched for centuries. With its massive
scale, complex water-management systems, and sparkling gypsum walls,
the engineering of this extraordinary palace connects it to Plato's
descriptions of Atlantis.

9-10pm -- Ancient Discoveries - 14 - Machines III
One thousand years ago, when Europe was still in the dark ages, China
was at the forefront of technology. We unveil the remarkable story of
how China created a myriad of ingenious devices including cosmic
machines able to collect data on the stars, hydraulic hammers,
water-controlled clocks, and mass production plants powered by water.
We visit a reconstruction of an ancient Chinese iron furnace to
unravel how the Chinese created a forty-ton iron artifact five
centuries before the West discovered cast-iron technology. Meet the
leading clay expert Professor Ye Hongming who has spent a lifetime
seeking to discover the secrets of how the ancient Chinese created
their vast terracotta army.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The Lumberyard.
At the center of the American Dream is the home--and at the center of
its creation or renovation is the lumberyard. We'll explore the
options lumberyards provide for builders and renovators--from natural
to engineered woods. We'll show how plywood and pressed woods are
made, trace exotic woods to jungle and desert, visit a special
lumberyard that deals in recycled and antique woods, and go on an
underwater expedition as divers locate ancient logs buried in the
Great Lakes and New Zealand. We'll see how 50,000-year-old ancient
Kauri wood is "mined" from a bog and is now all the rage among those
who live in mansions and travel on yachts. From the lowly 2-by-4 used
to build a tract home, to a reclaimed set of historic planks used to
make a million-dollar bar in a 5-star hotel, this eye-opening program
hits the nail right on the head.

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Wednesday, March 28, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Custom Cars.
For most of us, cars are an ordinary fixture of daily life. But then
there are custom cars--literal labors of love. Supercharged hot rods,
sublimely sculpted classics, flashy tricked-out lowriders, neon-bright
"import tuners"--an eye-popping blend of fine art and mechanical
know-how. In this episode, we trace the history, technology, and
cultural connections between successive generations who have turned
the common car into an American art form. We'll ride with hot rodders
and lowriders and visit the speed shops and paint shops where ordinary
cars become art.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Bathroom Tech.
From tub to toilet to toothpaste, here's everything you ever wanted to
know about the most used and least discussed room in the house. From
the first home bathrooms in ancient India, Roman latrines, and bizarre
Victorian-era bath contraptions, to modern luxurious master bathroom
suites, we trace the history of bathing, showering, and oral hygiene.
And we reveal the messy truth about what was used before toilet
paper--brainchild of the Scott Brothers of Philadelphia--and why
astronauts wear diapers.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Water.
It's nature's precious elixir--so powerful it can carve our landscape,
yet so nurturing it can spawn life and support its intricate matrix.
And it's the only substance on Earth that can exist in three separate
forms at the same temperature--liquid, solid, and gas. We take it for
granted, yet compared to other natural compounds, it's a genuine
oddity. We'll paint a vivid portrait of this common entity that's
anything but as we explore water's multidimensional character--from
its place in the $10-billion bottled water industry to its critical
role in a Canadian nuclear reactor. We watch it flow from huge
irrigation machines that have revolutionized American agriculture,
blast 200 miles into space from a newly discovered geyser on one of
Saturn's moons (via computer animation), coaxed from the clouds by
chemical injection, captured by innovative "fog-catchers", and cascade
with artistic flair from compressed air jets at the Fountains of
Bellagio in Las Vegas.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Dams
They block the force of a river, produce enough electricity to power
cities, move water over hundreds of miles and irrigate fertile
valleys. Dams prevent floods and produce "green" energy. We'll visit a
hydroelectric dam, the most technologically advanced type of dam, and
a dam in Brazil that is five times the size of the Hoover Dam. At the
Utah State University Water Research Laboratory Hydraulics Lab in
Logan, Utah, we watch a model of a dam crumble beneath tons of water
and discuss how future dam failures can be averted. We will learn how
dams adversely affect river systems and as a result, there are many
proponents of dam removal.

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Thursday, March 29, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Assembly Lines.
Its efficiency has produced billions of products, from toys to Boeing
747s, cheaply and quickly. Follow the evolution of the assembly line,
including its sometimes troubled relationship with the human beings
who make it work. We'll see how Americans eventually overcame
prejudices toward blacks and women in the factories during World War
II. And we'll follow a family of four generations of Detroit auto
assembly workers as they tell us how they dealt with the relentless
pace of production. During the 1930s, assembly lines' frantic pace led
to widespread labor unrest; and in the 1970s, it was a symptom of a
greater concern for quantity than quality.

8-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Vampires Secrets
Since Bram Stoker first published his novel Dracula in 1897, the
world's most popular vampire has made his appearance in 44 languages.
The vampire myth however, is much older than Count Dracula, popping up
from Athens to Beijing almost 1000 years before the Transylvanian
legend. Vampire legends have two things in common: drinking blood and
returning from the dead. Long before Jesus urged his followers to
drink his blood and eat his flesh, prehistoric man held similar
rituals. From the Bible and ancient Mesopotamian history to blood
drinking societies in New York, we reveal the amazing truth behind one
of the most terrifying legends in history.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Icebreakers.
They are the toughest ships in the water, plowing headlong into one of
nature's hardest obstacles. Modern icebreakers can smash through
10-foot thick ice sheets without stopping, allowing scientists and
commercial shipping access to some of Earth's most inhospitable spots.
Join our blustery journey as we patrol the Great Lakes on the USCG
Cutter Mackinaw and traverse the infamous Northwest Passage on the
maiden voyage of the USCG Healy, the newest Polar Class Icebreaker in
the US Fleet.

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Friday, March 30, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Jet Engines.
Strap on a parachute and soar through the saga of jet propulsion,
which radically transformed our world since inception in WWII--from
the Nazi's first jet-powered aircraft to the US F-22 jet fighter, from
the Concorde to tomorrow's scram-jet, a hypersonic transport plane
that switches to rocket power outside earth's atmosphere!

8-9pm -- Mail Call - 97 - Mail Call
Gunnery Sergeant R. Lee Ermey is on location at Fort Knox Kentucky to
visit the United States Armor Center and check out our armored
arsenal. We go along on a Recon Officer training course with Special
Ops Army scouts; and then, Gunny goes for a flight on an Apache Attack
Helicopter. View a profile of George S. Patton, hear the story of
George S. Patton's ivory-handled revolver and see other historic
relics from the Patton museum. Gunny gets to drive and fire the cannon
of the only working vintage Vietnam-era M40 Ontos Tank shredder known
as the Road Runner. Then we'll take a trip to the assembly plant to
see the tank built from the ground up.

9-10pm -- Dogfights - 07 - The Zero Killer
It's 1943 and the skies over the Pacific are filled with the infamous
Japanese Zero fighter. They are decimating all American aircraft; no
allied plane can match Japan's deadliest fighter plane. The American
Navy rushes to deploy a new fighter to take on the unstoppable
Zero...the F6F Hellcat. The Zero has met its match. Now, you're in the
cockpit with legendary dogfighters Robert Duncan, Hamilton McWhorter
and Alex Vraciu, whose epic dogfights blazed a new chapter in the
annals of aerial warfare. We recreate famous battles using state of
the art computer graphics. Viewers will feel like they're in the
battle, facing the enemy. Rare archival footage, first-hand accounts
and original shooting will supplement the remarkable computer
graphics.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Salt Mines.
It's in our blood, sweat, and tears. Join us as we dig up salt
mining's history--from the "white gold" on the table to the oceanic
and underground deposits whence it came. Though today we take salt for
granted, most life depends on it. Roman soldiers were sometimes paid
in it--hence the word salary. And many slaves died procuring it.

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Saturday, March 31, 2007
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Dams
They block the force of a river, produce enough electricity to power
cities, move water over hundreds of miles and irrigate fertile
valleys. Dams prevent floods and produce "green" energy. We'll visit a
hydroelectric dam, the most technologically advanced type of dam, and
a dam in Brazil that is five times the size of the Hoover Dam. At the
Utah State University Water Research Laboratory Hydraulics Lab in
Logan, Utah, we watch a model of a dam crumble beneath tons of water
and discuss how future dam failures can be averted. We will learn how
dams adversely affect river systems and as a result, there are many
proponents of dam removal.

8-10pm -- Flight 93 -
Movie. The stirring story of the courageous passengers on hijacked
United Airlines Flight 93 who fought back against the terrorists on
9/11, preventing a probable attack on Washington, D.C. This
heart-pounding film includes the extraordinary communications that
took place between the passengers and their loved ones on the ground,
and between US military and government officials as they prepared to
shoot the plane down, if necessary. The passengers' actions prevented
the plane from becoming a guided missile that could have destroyed the
US Capitol or the White House. Stars Jeffrey Nordling, Ty Olsson,
Colin Glazer, and Brennan Elliott. (2005)
All 3000 names from September 11, 2001

10-12am -- Titanic's Final Moments: Missing Pieces -
In August 2005, John Chatterton and Richie Kohler, hosts of Deep Sea
Detectives, led an expedition to the wreck of RMS Titanic. Diving 2
miles down in Russian submersibles, they searched outside the known
debris field for new evidence. On their final dive they made an
extraordinary find: two large intact sections of the bottom hull of
the Titanic in pristine condition with the red bottom paint still on
them. For four months, a team of historians, marine architects, and
engineers has been conducting a forensic analysis of this find. All
agree that it's the most significant new discovery since the wreck was
located in 1985. Analysis is ongoing, but preliminary indications are
that these bottom sections will change our understanding of how the
ship broke apart, and rewrite the story of the final moments of the
Titanic.
Let them choose their own gift: Amazon.com Gift Certificates

Download & watch your favorite TV-shows online from episodes of "24" to Star Trek, whether they're available on video/DVD or not!
Or your choice of over 3000 movies online

FREE Work At Home GUIDE for our visitors!
All 3000 names from September 11, 2001
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Wild West Tech hosted by David Carradine, some episodes narrated by Keith Carradine:
Saturday, March 3
 9am  Wild West Tech: The Unexplained (TVPG-V, cc)
Saturday, March 10
 9am  Wild West Tech: Outlaw Tech (TVPG, cc) 
Saturday, March 17
 9am  Wild West Tech: Massacre Tech (TVPG V, cc) 
Saturday, March 24
 9am  Wild West Tech: Vigilante Tech (TVPG V, cc, repeated April 11 @ 11am & 5pm) 
Saturday, March 31
 9am  Wild West Tech: Deadwood Tech (TVPG V, cc) 

Mail Call (rated TVPG-L, cc) in 2007, all 60-minute unless noted:

Friday, March 2
 12pm  Mail Call: # 66 (TVPG-L, cc)
Friday, March 2
 9pm  Mail Call: Ermey's Biggest Bangs (see primetime descriptions above, TVPG-L, cc)
Saturday, March 3
 8am  Mail Call: Rapid Fielding Initiative/Anti-Tank and Anti-Anti-Tank/Blimp Sub-hunters/Cloud Car: #63 (TVPG-L, cc)
Friday, March 9
 12pm  Mail Call: NORAD: #67 (TVPG-L, cc) 
Saturday, March 10
 8am  Mail Call: Zoaves/Flying Wing/ICBM/Swift Boats: #64 (TVPG-L, cc) 
Saturday, March 10
 2pm  Mail Call: D-Day Special (TVPG-L, cc) 
Saturday, March 10
 3pm  Mail Call: Ermey's Biggest Bangs (see March 2 for description) 
Friday, March 16
 9pm  Mail Call: #96 (TVPG L, cc) 
Saturday, March 17
 7am  Mail Call: #66 (TVPG L, cc) 
Friday, March 23
12pm & 6pm Mail Call: Afghanistan: #68 (TVPG L, cc) Ermey returns to Afghanistan and 
Bagram AFB devoted to the hard-charging Marines stationed there. The Gunny goes on foot 
patrol into the rural villages surrounding Kabul. With his armed Marine Corps escorts, he 
shows what it's like to gather intelligence and promote goodwill among the Afghanis. 
Next, Lee goes for a ride in the Ch-53 Super Stallion, gets a little trigger time on a 
helicopter gunship--the Cobra attack helicopter, and test drives the Marine Corps' newest 
heavy duty truck, the MTVR. Finally, Lee spends time with the lifeline for the Marines in 
Afghanistan, the Medical Corpsman, and finds out how they treat injuries on base and on 
the battlefield (repeated Sat 31st @ 8:30am)
Friday, March 23
10pm  Mail Call: #94 (TVPG L, cc) at Hurlburt Field, Florida, R. Lee Ermey answers viewer 
questions about this historic piece of real estate with a focus on Air Force Special 
Operations and hardware. Lee  tours the Air Force Base and gets a taste of what the 
officer candidates call "Hell Week";  then, Gunny goes to school and trains in car bomb 
and explosives detection and fires assault rifles used by terrorists. Finally, Lee takes 
off in the meanest gunship in the Air Force, the AC-130 and squeezes off a few rounds 
with its 105 mm cannon (repeated Sat 31st @ 2pm)
Saturday, March 24
 8am  Mail Call: NORAD: #67 (TVPG L, cc) Ermey hits the road to give us an inside look at 
one of the most secure and super-secret facilities in the world--NORAD. Lee gets through 
tight security to enter Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center, America's eye in the sky 
where everything that flies is monitored 24/7. During a tour of the Battle Management 
Center, an incident of concern puts the center on alert and we see how NORAD operates 
under pressure. We also tour the Missile Command Center and find out what keeps the 800 
military personnel inside on their toes. And Brigadier General Jim Hunter unlocks the 
door for Lee to the most secret part of Cheyenne Mountain--the Command Center, or what a 
lot of people call the War Room. We see how the men and women who work here monitor 
planes, missiles, and even space junk to make sure North America stays safe. The General 
and Lee talk about how NORAD's mission has changed since September 11th and we get a 
sneak peak at the new command center. 30 minute episode
Friday, March 30
12pm & 6pm Mail Call: SS Lane Victory: #70 (TVPG L, cc) Ermey is underway in San Pedro, 
California on board the SS Lane Victory--the only fully operational WWII-era victory ship 
in the world. Lee highlights the role of the Merchant Marine and Navy Armed Guard in WWII 
and how they formed the vital link between "Rosie the Riveter" and "GI Joe"--shipping 
millions of tons of materiel and supplies across the Atlantic and Pacific. To demonstrate 
the ship's role, Lee and his jeep are sealifted by a WWII-era crane from shore onto the 
ship. From the anti-aircraft gun mount on the SS Lane Victory, the Gunny introduces a 
story about SWORDS, the military's new fully-armed robot warrior that is being deployed 
on the battlefield right now. And Lee takes a look back to the Navajo Code Talkers--
Native Americans who developed an unbreakable secret code to keep radio communications 
safe during WWII.
Friday, March 30
 8pm  Mail Call: #97 (TVPG L, cc) Gunnery Sergeant R. Lee Ermey is on location at Fort 
Knox Kentucky to visit the United States Armor Center and check out our armored arsenal. 
We go along on a Recon Officer training course with Special Ops Army scouts; and then, 
Gunny goes for a flight on an Apache Attack Helicopter. View a profile of George S. 
Patton, hear the story of George S. Patton's ivory-handled revolver and see other 
historic relics from the Patton museum. Gunny gets to drive and fire the cannon of the 
only working vintage Vietnam-era M40 Ontos Tank shredder known as the Road Runner. Then 
we'll take a trip to the assembly plant to see the tank built from the ground up.
(repeated 12am & Sat @ 4pm)
Saturday, March 31
 7am  Mail Call: Afghanistan: #68 (see Friday 3/23) 
Saturday, March 31
 1pm  Mail Call: 94 (see Friday 3/23) 
Saturday, March 31
 3pm  Mail Call: #96 (TVPG L, cc) Ermey is on location at the National Museum of the 
United States Air Force at historic Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. 
First, Lee tours the museum and he reveals the fascinating story (and rare footage) of 
the highest bailout in history from an American aircraft. Then he tells the history of 
the Lockheed Starlifter, the Vietnam-era cargo plane made famous when one was 
designated "The Hanoi Taxi". Lee also attends a reunion of the surviving POWs who flew on 
the Hanoi Taxi; then, he reveals the truth about UFOs and the Air Force's top secret 
Project Bluebook. Finally, Lee gets to take the controls for some real stick time in a 
vintage B-25 Mitchell Bomber.
(repeated 12am & Sat @ 4pm)
Friday, April 06
 9pm & 3am Mail Call: 92 - Mail Call (see reg. listings above)  
R. Lee Ermey (Mail Call) has decided to play something other than a tough drill sgt. (Full Metal Jacket). His latest movie is a prequel to Texas Chainsaw Massacre called "Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning" as the head of a very strange & lethal family of mutants

For info on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket
(movie available on video and DVD)

Previous History Channel primetime listings:

February

January 2007

December 2006

November

October

September Hellcats of the Navy

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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