Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!
please help the children

The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For October 2006 (schedules available after the 1st & 15th)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

******************************************************
To subscribe to a monthly email of this schedule, please visit http://www.HistoryChannel.com/mailinglist
For complete listings go to our site: www.historychannel.com/listings
******************************************************

Meet The History Channel's Featured Historians!
Go to: HistoryChannel.com/historians

History Channel Primetime Listings

10/01/2006

07:00 PM Test Lab. Journey into the world of product
testing with host Steve Natt. Not only do we see how
manufactures test their products, but with the help of
Eddie Paul, an engineer and special effects designer,
we go one step further with our own extreme tests.
Today, Steve looks at various Body Armor. We meet
Jeremiah Sullivan, inventor of the Neptunic Shark
Suit. Taking his cue from the chain mail armor worn by
knights in the past, Jeremiah has constructed a shark
suit out of the mail linked material. Next, Steve
meets Bob Weber, the principal designer of soft body
armor that is used by police forces worldwide. Unlike
soft body armor which "catches" a bullet, we'll also
test Murray Neal's Dragon Skin hard body armor which
actually causes the bullet to explode and repel itself
off of the armor. Finally, Steve is off to meet with
Gary McAvoy, who shows Steve the way in which fire
suits are being designed to withstand blazing heat,
helping to give firefighters a better chance for
survival. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Violent Earth. Nature's Fury: Storm of the
Century. On Labor Day Weekend 1935, the most intense
hurricane to ever make landfall on America's shores
hit the Florida Keys. The country was just starting to
recover from the Great Depression when the ferocious
beast with its 200 mile-an-hour winds and violent
storm surge overpowered nearly everything in its path.
World War I veterans, sent to the remote Keys to make
a better life for themselves and their families,
became the victims of a destructive force unlike
anything they had ever seen in battle. CC [TVPG]

10:00 PM Lost Worlds: The Pagans. In the late Stone
Age, the pagan people of the British Isles constructed
some of the greatest monuments of the ancient world.
Fabulous constructions of wood, earth, and stone
arose. In this hour, we enter the world of their
builders. We travel from the ancient stone villages of
the Orkney Islands, off the north coast of Scotland,
to Stonehenge, in Southern England. We reveal a
startling new theory about the role this extraordinary
structure played in the lives of the pagans. With
computer animation, we reconstruct the monument as it
appeared to them. We then trace a forgotten ancient
pathway to Stonehenge's lost twin -- Woodhenge, explore
the secrets of Silbury Hill, the world's largest
man-made mound, and visit Maiden Castle, a fortress
that witnessed the pagan world's end. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM Iran: The Next Iraq? For over 25 years,
"Death to America" has been the rallying cry of the
Iranian government, but it's only recently that the
threat has become chillingly real and the Islamic
Republic of Iran has emerged as perhaps the most clear
and present danger to American security. This special
will explore the once proud military tradition of
Iran, its recent decline in power, and the country's
struggle to gain a place among the world's super
powers. We will also examine evidence that shows Iran
is secretly pursuing a nuclear weapon and just may
intend to use on the United States or its allies. CC [TVPG V]

10/02/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels: Metal. They constitute the
very essence of the modern world; the cadence of our
progress sounds in the measured ring of the
blacksmith's hammer. From soaring skyscrapers and
sturdy bridges to jet planes and rockets, metals play
a key role. Our journey begins before the Bronze Age
and takes us into the shiny future when new metal
structures--engineered at a molecular level to be
stronger, lighter, and cheaper--shape human progress,
as they have since man first thrust copper into a fire
and forged a tool. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM  UFO Files: Texas' Roswell. In April 1897 --
50 years before the alleged UFO crash in Roswell, New
Mexico--a mysterious airship crash rocked the small
town of Aurora, Texas...or at least, that's how the
legend goes! The tale includes the wreckage from the
ship, a funeral for the dead "alien" pilot, and
thousands of witnesses from across the country. And
the Aurora crash allegedly took place five years
before the Wright Brothers flew at Kitty Hawk, so
whatever was in the air was not manmade. Eyewitness
accounts of the crash, mysterious metal found at the
site, and the hunt for the only known alien graveyard
are all combined into a story that has even the most
adamant debunkers baffled. Is this the case that
finally proves that UFOs are real? Join us as we
separate fact from fiction. CC [TVPG]

09:00 PM Lost Worlds: Knights Templar. They defended
the Holy Land through bloodshed and prayer. Founded in
the 12th century, these Christian warrior monks
reigned supreme for nearly 200 years before suffering
a spectacular fall from grace. Tried for heresy, they
were disbanded and their Grand Master burned at the
stake. We'll search behind the legend for their lost
world. We recreate the city they knew as Tortosa--now
hidden among modern homes in the Syrian city of
Tartus. We reveal secrets of their headquarters at
Temple Mount in Jerusalem, with magnificent
underground vaults that could stable 1,000 horses. And
we visit the circular church in London built to
resemble the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem
and the site of the Templar's mysterious initiation
rites. We bring to life the hilltop fortress that
Lawrence of Arabia called "the finest castle in the
world", and return to the Mediterranean island where
the Knights Templars made their last stand against
Moslem enemies. CC [TVPG]

10:00 PM Digging for the Truth: Giants of Patagonia.
Many explorers throughout the centuries, including the
great Ferdinand Magellan, visited the region in South
America now known as Patagonia and reported sighting
giants. From these accounts we get the name
"Patagonia"--Land of the Big Feet. But what exactly
did these explorers see? Now, some experts suggest
that the giant, upright-walking ground sloth, once
widespread throughout Patagonia, could have been the
source of these stories. Josh Bernstein accompanies
paleontologists, naturalists, and crypto-zoologists on
a search to determine whether the ground sloth could
have lived into the era of human habitation. He treks
across the glaciers of Patagonia, descends deep in the
mountain caves, accompanies a band of gauchos on
horseback, and joins a modern-day paleontology dig to
try to discover evidence that the ground sloth still
exists today. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM UFO Files: When UFOs Arrive. It's all
hush-hush as we track a secretive global paper trail,
delving into government plans on how to deal with
other-planet visitors. Searching historical records,
we find that protocols are in place--from the U.S.
military's JANAP-146 reporting requirements to
France's Cometa files, from Chapter 13 of the FEMA
Fire Officer's Guide to Disaster Control titled "Enemy
Attack and UFO Potential", to a now-repealed federal
law titled "Extraterrestrial Exposure". CC [TVPG]

10/03/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels: Water. It's nature's precious
elixir--so powerful it can carve our landscape, yet so
nurturing it can spawn life and support its intricate
matrix. And it's the only substance on Earth that can
exist in three separate forms at the same
temperature--liquid, solid, and gas. We take it for
granted, yet compared to other natural compounds, it's
a genuine oddity. We'll paint a vivid portrait of this
common entity that's anything but as we explore
water's multidimensional character--from its place in
the $10-billion bottled water industry to its critical
role in a Canadian nuclear reactor. We watch it flow
from huge irrigation machines that have revolutionized
American agriculture, blast 200 miles into space from
a newly discovered geyser on one of Saturn's moons
(via computer animation), coaxed from the clouds by
chemical injection, captured by innovative
"fog-catchers", and cascade with artistic flair from
compressed air jets at the Fountains of Bellagio in
Las Vegas. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Violent Earth. Unleashed Terror: Dam Breaks.
Though American dam builders have refined their skills
in their attempts to harness the awesome power, water
will always prove hazardous. We examine some of the
worst dam breaks and the destruction they caused,
including the largest U.S. dam ever to give way. On
June 5, 1976, the 305-foot-high Teton Dam gave way and
11 lives were lost. CC [TVPG]

09:00 PM Mega Disasters: Earthquake in the Heartland.
Could a killer earthquake strike America's heartland?
If history proves true, the answer is yes. The
1811-1812 New Madrid Earthquakes (centered in
southeast Missouri) rank as some of North America's
most catastrophic natural disasters. Stretching more
than 160 miles, a system of earthquake faults lurks
beneath the Mississippi River basin, loaded and ready
to erupt. And it's happened before. Pioneer residents
of New Madrid, Missouri were thrown from their beds in
the early hours of December 16, 1811 when an estimated
8-point earthquake hit. But it wasn't just one event.
Multiple shocks were experienced over the next three
months--the largest caused the Mississippi to flow
backwards. No earthquake sequence has lasted so long,
produced so many shocks, nor created such astonishing
phenomena on land and water. The New Madrid Fault
remains a seismically active area and experts expect a
repeat. The only question is when... CC [TVPG]

10:00 PM Mega Movers: Tower Crane. Whether it's at the
top of a towering skyscraper or at the bottom of the
ocean, if it's got to be moved, the Mega Movers are
always up to the challenge. In this episode, we look
at two very different moves in two extreme
environments. In California, the team must disassemble
and move a tower crane that soars 36-stories high in
the middle of downtown Los Angeles. And in North
Carolina they struggle to move a pre Civil War house.
See the unique methods and tools that these movers use
to get the job done. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM The Big Build: The Fort. Speed is the key
word for this down and dirty build--Lewis and Clark,
racing Oregon winter chill, built the 50 foot by 50
foot Fort Clatsop, a double-structure shelter with
seven rooms, a sentry box, and parade ground, in just
15 days. We'll build a scaled down, 2-cabin, 4-room
version, showcasing the tools and technology of the
frontier in 1805. We're building our fort in a dense
patch of forestland 30 miles outside of Manhattan,
Kansas, on land owned by Kris and Al Johnson. Our
builder is John McPherson, a specialist in log
structures and a master in frontier and wilderness
survival. In addition to the fascinating process
involved in building a frontier fort with minimal
tools under harsh conditions--open fire pits, rawhide
windows and doors, sloppy fits chinked and daubed with
stones and mud, rough-planked ceilings, dirt floors,
very few nails--host Nick Mystrom takes viewers
through the most compelling aspects of the incredible
Lewis and Clark saga. CC [TVPG]

10/04/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels: The Chunnel. The job of
joining Britain and France via a tunnel under the
English Channel was a challenge. Geologists tracked
the only safe route with satellite technology, and
French and British teams drilled towards each other
using two of the largest Tunnel Boring Machines ever
made. We'll explore the greatest underwater land-link
of all time. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Death Road. Travel high into the Andes to a
road that has more deaths per mile than any other
byway in the world. This steep and bumpy road plunges
almost 2.5 miles in the four hours it takes to drive
it, and those who choose to make the journey will
endure an often extremely narrow path that hugs the
mountain as it snakes through dramatic, verdant
scenery. Twisting between waterfalls and rocky
overhangs, the road is unprotected, making near death
an almost constant travel companion. A fatal accident
every two weeks is not uncommon, and by 1995, the road
was commonly referred to as world's most dangerous
road. Marsh Mokhtari is our guide, as we explore the
people and places along this treacherous path. CC
[TVPG V]

09:00 PM Modern Marvels: Paint. From the Impressionist
canvas to the Space Shuttle...from customized hotrods
to the brilliant orange hue of the Golden Gate Bridge
or tiny electronic devices--paint is one of our most
ubiquitous products. And paint adds more than just
pigmentation. It's a crucial engineering element,
protecting ships from water corrosion, stovetops from
heat, and the Stealth Bomber from radar detection. In
homes and businesses, it provides a balanced spectrum
of light and protects surfaces from wear. In this
colorful hour, we discover how this marvel of
chemistry and engineering is made, and how it is
applied. Come see what's beneath the surface as we
reveal one of man's most ingenious methods of
defeating the elements and adding spice to life! CC
[TVPG]

10:00 PM Modern Marvels: Ink. Invented by the Chinese
in about 3000BC, it spread the word of God and war. It
set us free and spelled out our rights. It tells
stories, sells products and solves crimes. It's ink
and it's everywhere! From squid to soybeans, from
ancient text to awesome tattoos, join us as we dip
into the well for the scoop on ink. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM Modern Marvels: Glue. It's Super! It's Krazy!
And it can be found in everything from carpet to
computers, books to boats, shoes to the Space Shuttle.
It's even used in surgery! Without it, our material
world would simply fall apart. In this episode, we'll
visit the stuck-up, tacky world of glue. Glue's sticky
trajectory spans human history and we'll cover it
all--from Neolithic cave dwellers who used animal glue
to decorate ceremonial skulls to modern everyday glues
and their uses, including Elmer's glue, 3M's masking
and Scotch tape, and the super glues. Remember the
Krazy Glue commercial in which a man held himself
suspended from a hard hat that had just been glued to
a beam? Well, that 1970s vintage ad understates the
power of glue. With the help of a crane, we're going
to hoist a 6,000-pound pickup truck off the ground by
a steel joint that's been bonded with glue! CC [TVPG]

10/05/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels: Levees. From collapsing
floodwalls in New Orleans to high-tech mechanical
storm surge barriers in Europe, we'll explore the
2,500-year history of keeping rivers and tides at bay
by erecting levees. To get a lesson on how levees are
built and why they fail, we'll climb atop Sacramento,
California's crumbling river levees to see evidence of
erosion that portends a New Orleans-level disaster. In
stark contrast are the ingeniously engineered levees
and dikes holding back tidal waters in the
Netherlands. Their success inspired other mechanized
flood barriers on both the River Thames outside London
and one currently under construction near the sinking
city of Venice, Italy. We'll also take a look at the
hard lessons learned when levees are breached. In New
Orleans, we'll see what the US Army Corps of Engineers
is doing to protect the Crescent City from future
hurricane seasons. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Where Did It Come From? Ancient Rome: The
Mobile Society. Travel to the heart of the Roman
Empire to examine it's remarkable civil engineering
project that resulted in a 53-thousand mile network of
highways. Host Michael Guillen takes us on a chariot
ride through ancient Rome and discovers that many of
the highway amenities that we imagine as modern
developments date back over 2000 years. It's an
amazing look at a travel network where so little has
changed after so many years. CC [TVPG]

09:00 PM Decoding the Past. The Templar Code: The
Quest for Templar Treasure. They were called The
Militia of Christ; God's Special Forces. But the
medieval Knights Templar were also brilliant
capitalists, traders, and bankers--creating a
hierarchy still followed by today's multi-national
super-powers. Then, in 1307, their leaders were
accused of high crimes; arrested; imprisoned; burned.
But the order's ships, gold, and records all
disappeared. What happened to the surviving Templars
and the treasure--both sacred and earthly--they were
said to possess? Did they hide gold in Nova Scotia,
conceal secrets at Scotland's Rosslyn Chapel, or use
their riches to establish the Swiss banking system?
This episode reveals why these warriors, dead for
seven centuries, and their treasure still populate
Hollywood blockbusters like National Treasure and The
Da Vinci Code. Ed Herrmann narrates. CC [TVPG V]

10:00 PM Modern Marvels: Snackfood Tech. Extruders,
molds, in-line conveyor belts. Are these machines
manufacturing adhesives, plastics, or parts for your
car? No, they're making treats for your mouth--and you
will see them doing their seductively tasty work in
this scrumptious episode. First, we visit Utz Quality
Foods in Hanover, Pennsylvania, that produces more
than one million pounds of chips per week, and
Snyder's of Hanover, the leading US pretzel
manufacturer. Next, we focus on the world's largest
candy manufacturer, Masterfoods USA, which makes Milky
Way, Snickers, Mars, and M&Ms, and take a lick at the
world's largest lollipop producer, Tootsie Roll
Industries. And at Flower Foods' Crossville, Tennessee
plant, an army of cupcakes rolls down a conveyer belt.
The final stop is Dreyer's Bakersfield, California
plant, where 20,000 ice cream bars and 9,600
drumsticks roll off the line in an hour. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM Test Lab: Journey into the world of product
testing with host Steve Natt. Not only do we see how
manufactures test their products, but with the help of
Eddie Paul, an engineer and special effects designer,
we go one step further with our own extreme tests.
Today, Steve looks at various Body Armor. We meet
Jeremiah Sullivan, inventor of the Neptunic Shark
Suit. Taking his cue from the chain mail armor worn by
knights in the past, Jeremiah has constructed a shark
suit out of the mail linked material. Next, Steve
meets Bob Weber, the principal designer of soft body
armor that is used by police forces worldwide. Unlike
soft body armor which "catches" a bullet, we'll also
test Murray Neal's Dragon Skin hard body armor which
actually causes the bullet to explode and repel itself
off of the armor. Finally, Steve is off to meet with
Gary McAvoy, who shows Steve the way in which fire
suits are being designed to withstand blazing heat,
helping to give firefighters a better chance for
survival. CC [TVPG]


10/06/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels: Failed Inventions. Join us
for a salute to the dreamers and schemers who brought
the world an odd assortment of flawed ideas--like
flying, swimming, and jet-powered automobiles, flying
rocket belts, and radium-filled clothes that promised
to inflate the owner's sagging love life! And we
explore the minds of the off-kilter geniuses who
thought up these off-the-mark concepts. Some
tinkerers' musings were merely ahead of their time and
deemed flops during the inventor's lifetime, but
others were just plain bad! CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM High Hitler! Adolf Hitler dreamt of creating
a master race, but achieved a Holocaust--the murder of
millions of Jews and those deemed physical or mental
defects. But the Führer, an appalling hypochondriac,
abused laxatives and suffered from stomach cramps and
embarrassing flatulence. And that was just the start!
When he committed suicide in 1945, the great dictator
was frail with tremors and a shuffling walk--a feeble
condition concealed from the world. We explore the
relationship between Hitler and his personal
physician, Dr. Theodore Morell. How did amphetamine
abuse, Parkinson's Disease, and tertiary syphilis
impact on his state of mind? CC [TVPG]

09:00 PM Night of the Long Knives. One of Adolf
Hitler's most brutal and dramatic exterminations came
half a decade before the sins of the Holocaust. The SA
was Hitler's army of thugs, but the head of the SA,
Ernst Roehm, was threatening Hitler's rule. On June
29th 1934, Hitler ordered the SA leadership to appear
for a meeting at the Hotel Hanselbauer. Without
warning, the SS burst in, beginning 48 hours of
bloodshed in which 1000 of the leading SA, including
Roehm, were rounded up and slaughtered. This murderous
deed became an ominous warning of what was to come. It
is the single most significant episode in Hitler's
rise to absolute power, and the set the stage for
World War and the Holocaust. CC [TVPG]

10:00 PM Hitler's Family. Nazi propaganda portrayed
Adolf Hitler as a man minus family or private life. As
a matter of fact, he kept in touch with his
family--mainly to control them. There was shady
half-brother Alois, a Berlin innkeeper who tried to
profit from his name, and half-sister Angela, in
charge of housekeeping at the Berghof retreat, who had
neighbors chased away. His niece Geli, who called her
uncle a "jailer", committed suicide. His "favorite
nephew" was educated at an elite Nazi school. His
sister Paula wanted to marry a surgeon and mass
murderer. And his English-born nephew William Patrick,
a playboy in Berlin, extorted money by threatening to
expose family secrets. We present previously unknown
documents and personal records and descendants of the
Hitler family talk about living in the shadow of a
dictator. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM Mail Call. Mortar/WWII GI's Personal
Items/Native-American Arrows: #6. 
11:30 PM Mail Call. Ninja Weapons/Flamethrower/Military Dogs: #10. 
R. Lee Ermey,
who portrayed the sergeant in Full Metal Jacket,
applies his gruff sense of humor in this half-hour
series that answers viewers' mail about what the armed
forces were, and really are, like! Shot on location,
Ermey reads the questions on air and then sends them
out to military experts in the field for answers and
brief demonstrations. Ermey learns about the weapons
of the Japanese Ninja, used since the 12th century;
how flamethrowers work; and what military dogs are
trained to do. CC [TVPG L]

10/07/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels: Ink. Invented by the Chinese
in about 3000BC, it spread the word of God and war. It
set us free and spelled out our rights. It tells
stories, sells products and solves crimes. It's ink
and it's everywhere! From squid to soybeans, from
ancient text to awesome tattoos, join us as we dip
into the well for the scoop on ink. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Hell: The Devil's Domain. Our in-depth
history of Hades begins with the story of a negative
near-death experience, in which a man thinks he went
to Hell after being declared clinically dead and
before resuscitation. Following Lucifer's trail from
cave paintings in France circa 6,000 BC to current
portrayals in popular culture, our 2-hour exploration
shows how Hell and the Devil remain powerful
forces--at a church in Texas, where souls are
delivered from Satan's grip; in talks with a survivor
of the 1980s recovered memory craze, who "recalled"
attending Witches' Sabbaths that practiced
cannibalism; and at the modern Church of Satan. We
review literary landmarks that expanded our ideas of
the Underworld, from Dante's Inferno and Milton's
Paradise Lost to Mark Twain's anti-hero, and trace
development of Christian, Moslem, Jewish, and Buddhist
conceptions of the afterlife. CC [TVPG V]

10:00 PM Roman Vice. The flowering of the Roman Empire
saw incomparable power and civilization - and at the
same time corruption, cruelty and depravity on an
unparalleled scale. Emperors from Augustus to Tiberius
and Nero built the biggest empire the world had ever
seen, while presiding over a way of life riddled with
violence, deviancy and excess. This special visits the
archaeological sites of ancient Rome, talks to leading
historians world-wide and uses stylish reconstructions
to describe and explain how good and evil went side by
side. CC [TV14 VSLD]

10/08/2006

07:00 PM The Search for Eternal Egypt. Combining
interviews with top Egyptologists, specially shot
location footage, dramatized reenactments, archive
images, and computer graphics, this special tells the
dramatic story of the development of Egyptology over
the last 200 years. Starting in 1798 with the arrival
of Napoleonic scholars, we reveal how their systematic
survey of the country became the cornerstone of modern
research into ancient Egypt. We also cover development
of modern archaeological techniques, featuring the
story of the "father of modern archaeology", Flinders
Petrie, and Howard Carter's discovery of Tutankhamun's
tomb in 1922. After bringing the story up to date,
highlighting some of the most fascinating discoveries
of the last 20 years, we explore the threat posed to
the remains of ancient Egypt by population growth,
pollution, and mass tourism. Find out about "Eternal
Egypt", an ambitious project to document Egypt's past
and make it available to a worldwide audience over the
Internet. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Flight 93 (movie). The stirring story of the
courageous passengers on hijacked United Airlines
Flight 93 who fought back against the terrorists on
9/11, preventing a probable attack on Washington, D.C.
This heart-pounding film includes the extraordinary
communications that took place between the passengers
and their loved ones on the ground, and between US
military and government officials as they prepared to
shoot the plane down, if necessary. The passengers'
actions prevented the plane from becoming a guided
missile that could have destroyed the US Capitol or
the White House. Stars Jeffrey Nordling, Ty Olsson,
Colin Glazer, and Brennan Elliott. (2005) CC [TVPG V]

10:00 PM The Antichrist, Part 1. How would you
recognize the most evil person on Earth? According to
many historical texts, you should look for a
brilliant, enigmatic public figure who transforms the
world for good--for a while. Basically, the last
person you'd tap as Satan's human emissary. While many
believe the Antichrist has come and gone, just as many
believe he will soon arrive, if he's not already in
our midst. Join us for harrowing look at an evil so
obscure that he answers only to Satan. Real? Our group
of prophecy believers and historical experts help sort
it out. We follow the emergence of the Antichrist from
pre-Judaic texts, through the Book of Daniel and
Revelation, into Christian writings of the Middle
Ages, and other religious traditions as well. Aided by
interviewees both religious and secular, comprised of
eminent clergy, scholars, historians, psychologists,
and culture makers, we'll examine the evil enigma from
every conceivable angle. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM The Antichrist: Zero Hour. From popes and
presidents to dictators, Antichrists have been
identified in all periods of recorded history and in
all walks of life. Even nations, movements, and
technologies have been thought by some to be the
agents of the Antichrist. Throughout history, people
have seen their own times as the most morally bankrupt
and have recognized signs of the coming of the
Apocalypse. If the end is near, what will it be like?
What is the Antichrist's agenda? How does he intend to
take over the world and wreak destruction? Is this
escapist fantasy or inescapable fate? CC [TVPG]

10/09/2006

07:00 PM Rome: Engineering an Empire. Part 1. For more
than 500 years, Rome was the most powerful and
advanced civilization the world had ever known, ruled
by visionaries and tyrants whose accomplishments
ranged from awe-inspiring to deplorable. One
characteristic linked them all--ambition--and the
thirst for power that all Roman emperors shared fueled
an unprecedented mastery of engineering and labor.
This 2-part special chronicles the spectacular and
sordid history of the Roman Empire, detailing the
remarkable engineering feats that set Rome apart from
the rest of the ancient world. Featuring extensive
state-of-the-art CGI animation, and exclusive
never-before-seen footage shot on a diving expedition
in the water channels underneath the Colosseum. CC
[TVPG]

08:00 PM Rome: Engineering an Empire, Part 2. In the
conclusion of our two-part documentary special
chronicling the spectacular and sordid history of the
Roman Empire, we continue our look at the remarkable
engineering feats that set Rome apart from the rest of
the ancient world. Features extensive state-of-the-art
CGI animation, and exclusive never-before-seen footage
shot on a diving expedition in the water channels
underneath the Colosseum. CC [TVPG]

09:00 PM Egypt: Engineering an Empire. Twenty-five
hundred years before the reign of Julius Caesar, the
ancient Egyptians were deftly harnessing the power of
engineering on an unprecedented scale. Egyptian
temples, fortresses, pyramids and palaces forever
redefined the limits of architectural possibility.
They also served as a warning to all of Egypt's
enemies-that the world's most advanced civilization
could accomplish anything. This two-hour special uses
cinematic recreations and cutting-edge CGI to profile
the greatest engineering achievements of ancient
Egypt, and the pharaohs and architects who were behind
them. Includes Djoser's Step Pyramid at Saqqara,
Senusret's Nubian Superfortresses, Hatshepsut's
Mortuary Temple at Dier el-Bahari, Akhenaten's city at
Amarna, and the temples of Ramesses the Great at Abu
Simbel. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM UFO Files. UFOs: Then and Now? The Innocent
Years. In a comprehensive series investigating the UFO
experience, we begin with a review of surprising
imagery from cave paintings to Medieval frescoes to
Renaissance art. But in the late 1940s, the modern era
of UFO sightings took off with the mysterious crash of
a flying object near Roswell, New Mexico. CC [TVPG]


10/10/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels. Horsepower. Buckle up for a
rip-roaring ride through the world of extreme
horsepower. Experience the fastest accelerating cars
on earth. Find out how horsepower was first coined as
a marketing tool for the steam engine in the early
1800s and meet the horsepower police--the Society of
Automotive Engineers who test today's most powerful
car engines. Feel the amazing power of Unlimited
Hydroplane racing as 3-ton boat-beasts careen across
water at speeds of over 200 miles per hour. Journey to
the bowels of an enormous container ship where the
world's most powerful diesel engine provides over
100,000 horsepower. At the Hoover Dam, watch as it
harnesses the enormous power of water. Explore the
80,000 horsepower pumping units at the Edmonston
Pumping Plant that delivers 2-billion gallons of water
a day to thirsty Californians. And sit behind the
steering wheel of a new generation of hybrid cars that
boast 400-horsepower yet get 42 miles per gallon of
gas. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Violent Earth. Tsunami 2004: Waves of Death.
The 2004 Tsunami, centered in the Indian Ocean, was
caused by a 9.3 earthquake--the second strongest quake
on record. Join us for a minute-by-minute look at
nature's fury at its worst, when the tsunami kills
more than 200,000 people in 14 countries. In this
special, we examine the tsunami as it moves from coast
to coast through the eyes of people who lived through
it and scientists now studying its path of
devastation. Drawing on the extraordinary volume of
amateur video that recorded the disaster, we take
viewers inside the world's deadliest tsunami. CC
[TVPG]

09:00 PM Mega Disasters. Yellowstone Eruption. The
world's largest, most active volcano system exists in
the western US. 6,000 years ago, the Yellowstone
Volcano erupted. Lava and pyroclastic flows covered
3,000-square miles with ash 3-feet thick. Fossils
discovered as far away as Nebraska were found to have
died from inhaling the Yellowstone debris. If--or
perhaps we should say when--it erupts again, the
Yellowstone "Mega-Volcano" will create a global
cataclysm beyond human comprehension. Everything
within 150 miles--including the cities of Cody,
Wyoming and Bozeman, Montana--will be hit by an
800-degree blast of heat and 200 miles-per-hour winds.
Thousands will be killed. That's just the local
effects. Half the US will be buried beneath a blanket
of volcanic ash. Crops in the Midwest--the world's
breadbasket--will be destroyed. And it will take years
before crops can grow again. Starvation, epidemics,
and social chaos won't be long in coming. CC [TVPG]

10:00 PM Mega Movers. Giant Structures. When it comes
to moving giant structures, few moves are as
impressive as those that take place at sea. These
types of moves require unique techniques and tools as
well as careful, detailed planning. In Canada, a team
of engineers will attempt to move a gigantic 702-ton
ship-loading device from the coast of Vancouver to a
small mining island 70 miles away. Meanwhile, off the
coast of Virginia, our movers will try to save an
endangered island house by loading the entire
structure onto a barge and sailing five miles to the
mainland. But there is little margin for error in this
chaotic environment, requiring all of the skill and
ingenuity that the movers can muster. Join us for this
mobile series in which we follow the relocation of the
biggest, heaviest, and least movable of historic
structures imaginable. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM Shootout! North Hollywood Shootout. This is
the story of the fiercest gun battle in US police
history. On February 28, 1997, a high-stakes bank
robbery went awry and devolved into an urban firefight
that became one of the most violent shootouts in law
enforcement history. With TV cameras capturing the
action from above, two paramilitary-style gunmen take
over a bank using terrorist technology. Donning full
body armor and automatic weapons, they charge out of a
Bank of America branch in North Hollywood, California,
and with brutal and brazen disregard, they fire
armor-piercing ammo at police and citizens, turning a
congested residential area into a combat zone that
ends with deaths and numerous injuries. Police on the
scene that day recount their ordeal that very
dangerous day. CC [TVPG V]

10/11/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels. Extreme Aircraft. Join us for
a supersonic look at some of the most cutting-edge
aircraft ever developed--from the X-1 that first broke
the sound barrier to the X-43 Scramjet that recently
flew at Mach 7. These extreme aircraft have made their
mark on aeronautical history, and sometimes on
political history as well. The U-2 and SR-71 spy
planes played a crucial role in the Cold War, and now
Lockheed Martin's top-secret "Skunkworks" division is
touting the new "air dominance" fighter plane-- the
F/A-22 Raptor. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Modern Marvels. Ben Franklin Tech. You may
know him as a man of great wit and wisdom, as the
oldest and wisest Founding Father. But now you'll get
to know Dr. Franklin as the late 18th Century's
foremost scientist, and one of the greatest inventors
of any era. From the humble Pennsylvania Stove to the
spectacular lightning rod--Franklin was concerned with
putting scientific principals to practical use. We'll
explore his many inventions, including: his unique
musical instrument, the glass armonica, for which both
Mozart and Beethoven wrote pieces; his crafty
anti-counterfeiting techniques, including
multi-colored inks, elaborate ornamentation, and the
use of "leaf printing"--when a metal engraving plate
is made from a plant's leaf, making it impossible to
copy; and bifocal glasses. And we'll see how
Franklin's inventive genius extended to entire
systems, including: the modern volunteer fire
department, first fire insurance company, Daylight
Savings Time, and America's first lending library. CC
[TVPG]

09:00 PM Modern Marvels. '80's Tech. Remember "brick"
cell phones, Pac-Man, Rubik's Cube, Sony Walkman, and
the first music CDs? Remember all the new and exciting
gadgets of the 1980s? Join us as we investigate the
transition from Industrial to Information Age--a
digital decade dedicated to ergonomics and
entertainment. The microchip ushered in an era that
revolutionized the way we work, play, and communicate.
And we tour Silicon Valley--birthplace of some of the
greatest inventions from an amazing time of change,
including the modern personal computer. Steve "Woz"
Wozniak tells us about the evolution of Apple
computers, and we talk to Sony--makers of the Walkman,
Betamax, and the first CD players. A visit to the
Computer History Museum shows fun technological
"artifacts", primitive by today's standards. At Intel,
makers of the first microchips, we learn why
technology moves at such a fast pace. We also take a
ride in a DeLorean DMC-12 sports car--few things moved
faster. CC [TVPG]

10:00 PM Modern Marvels. Distilleries 2. It's an art.
It's a science. It's a marriage of vapor and water.
From the elite to the illegal, the banned, to the
celebrated, the distillation of spirits is a 50
billion dollar a year business. We will visit brandy,
liqueur, moonshine, and absinthe distilleries to see
how this magic is done. A trip to the Christian
Brothers Distillery in northern California will reveal
the secrets of how brandy is made and in the Deep
South we observe a working moonshine still. Then it's
off to France, where we visit the Courvoisier Cognac
distillery and at the Jade Absinthe Distillery we see
how this controversial drink is made. Includes expert
commentary and historical perspective given by Bon
Appetit's Anthony Dias Blue. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM The ArchiTECHS. Skyscraper Firefighting and
Escape. Five geniuses, and a challenge: innovate fire
rescue and evacuation equipment and vehicles for use
in skyscraper disasters--and do it in 48 hours! A
high-tech think tank of engineers, designers, writers
and visionaries, strive to tackle the limitations of
today's technology--and by using just-over-the-horizon
thinking, develop radical new designs for the future.
With the unprecedented cooperation New York's regional
fire departments, it's a high-tech fire department
makeover as the design team reworks skyscraper
firefighting. For two high-pressure days on location
in the greater New York area, they will immerse
themselves in every aspect of firefighting, to assist
both occupants and firefighters with innovations not
yet imagined, culminating with a dramatic presentation
for Former FDNY Fire Commissioner Thomas Von Essen. He
will bring their ideas back to the International
Association of Fire Chiefs--but only if they're good
enough. CC [TVPG]

10/12/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels. Bible Tech. Arguably the most
influential book ever written, the Bible provides a
glimpse into the origins of ancient technology and its
use to withstand the elements, build great structures,
wage war, and conserve precious water. We examine the
technological plausibility of biblical structures and
machines--including the Tower of Babylon, the Temple
of Jerusalem, ancient bronze and iron forging, and
shipbuilding skills that might have been employed to
build Noah's Ark. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Where Did It Come From? Ancient Rome: The
Modern Stadium. First, a trip to Wembley, England to
examine the world's most technologically advanced
football stadium. When completed the new Wembley
Stadium will seat 90-thousand people, contain over
3-million cubic feet of concrete, and will be covered
by an eleven acre moveable roof. All quite state of
the art, but not exactly new technology. The ancient
Coliseum had many of the same features nearly two
thousand years earlier. So, we're off to Rome to build
and test a Roman crane and demonstrate how the ancient
Romans managed to erect the 16 story stadium in the
middle of a crowded city. We'll also see if the
Coliseum could empty its 55-thousand spectators in
under 15 minutes, as some historians claim. CC [TVPG]

09:00 PM Decoding the Past. Secrets of the Dollar
Bill. What do the symbols and numbers on the dollar
bill actually mean? We'll take a look at the shadier
and more intriguing threads of meaning and symbolism
at play in the bill's design. Extraordinary strands of
numerology are interwoven into the bill's structure,
which, on analysis, suggest surprising hidden
alignments. Why does it look the way it does and how
has it changed through the ages? We'll analyze the
significance of changes in the bill's appearance over
time and examine alternative designs. We'll also look
at the historical context of the bill's
conception--what the dollar bill set out to
represent--the patriotism and idealism of a young
republic; and go inside the Treasury's Department of
Printing and Engraving for exclusive access to the
presses and the people who process the millions upon
millions of dollars in circulation. CC [TVPG]

10:00 PM Modern Marvels. More Snackfood Tech. They
crunch; they ooze; they crackle; they pop--mmmmm,
yeah! Soft drinks, donuts, meat snacks, popcorn, and
gum. What's your weakness? From the handmade treats of
the earliest civilizations to hi-tech mass production,
these snacks are borne of man's need to feed his
cravings. Join us for an hour-long tasty treat as we
examine the history of snackfoods and check out how
they are made today. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM Shootout! Guadalcanal. A small island in the
southwestern Pacific, Guadalcanal was the place the US
chose to confront the Japanese on the ground for the
first time in WWII. Here, beginning in August 1942,
Americans and Japanese were brought face-to-face in
close-quarter shootouts that became a turning point of
the war. From the near-total annihilation of Colonel
Frank Goettge's intelligence patrol to the battles of
Bloody Ridge, both sides learned what the other was
made of. The Japanese were willing to fight to the
death, and the Americans were eager to offer them that
chance. The victory ultimately belonged to the US, but
in the man-on-man struggles that characterized the
campaign, winning or losing became personal and the
difference between survival and death. Experience the
thick of battle from the perspective of soldiers from
both sides. CC [TVPG V]

10/13/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels. Aswan Dam. In 1954, Gamal
Abdel Nasser, the Arab Republic of Egypt's first prime
minister, had a plan to bring his poor country into
the 20th century. To pull it off, he needed to harness
the flow of the world's longest river--the Nile. The
ambitious plan called for construction of a high dam
in southern Egypt at Aswan. But the builders of the
pyramids and the Suez Canal were no strangers to large
undertakings. We'll see how the Aswan High Dam
socially, politically, culturally, and agriculturally
affected Egypt. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Into the Fire. Firefighters' stories from
around the nation tell about the risks taken to keep
us safe. Academy and Emmy Award-winning documentary
filmmaker Bill Couturié breaks down the hero myth and
gives us a glimpse at the real people. From big cities
and small towns, we meet both volunteer and career
firefighters and see them portrayed in recent
historical events. With powerful music from Bruce
Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Dire Straits and others, we'll
take an emotional journey into the hearts of first
responders, that forever changes the way we think
about firefighters and the fire service. CC [TVPG]

09:30 PM Sex in The Bible. From erotic poetry to
sinful sex, we'll explore the uncensored Bible.
Discover scriptures brimming with lustful tales like
King Solomon's 700 concubines, Sodom and Gomorrah, and
Jesus and the adulteress. Dr. Ruth Westheimer and
other experts discuss a Bible where passion and sexual
deviancy live alongside the quest for the Holy.
(90-minute version) CC [TVPG S]

11:00 PM Mail Call. Refueling a Fighter Jet/Naval
Signal Flags/GI Chow: #7. R. Lee Ermey, who portrayed
the sergeant in Full Metal Jacket, applies his gruff
sense of humor in this half-hour series that answers
viewers' mail about what the armed forces were, and
really are, like! Shot on location, Ermey reads the
questions on air and then sends them out to military
experts in the field for answers and brief
demonstrations. Find out how to refuel a fighter jet
in midair, how ships send messages using signal flags,
and what soldiers eat on the battlefield. CC [TVPG L]

11:30 PM Mail Call. Deuce & A Half/Gun Truck/Household
Fat/Silo/C-17 Loadmaster/Kilt/Girls from Hell: #20.
What is a WWII "Deuce and a Half"? What's a "Vietnam
Gun Truck". Did the US really use household fat to
make explosives in WWII? How do missile silos work?
What's the latest transport aircraft? Did Scottish
soldiers really wear kilts in battle, and who did the
Germans call the "Girls from Hell" in WWI? R. Lee
Ermey dips into his viewers' mailbag and sends these
questions out to military experts in the field for
answers and brief demonstrations. CC [TVPG L]

10/14/2006

07:00 PM Modern Marvels. Distilleries 2. It's an art.
It's a science. It's a marriage of vapor and water.
From the elite to the illegal, the banned, to the
celebrated, the distillation of spirits is a 50
billion dollar a year business. We will visit brandy,
liqueur, moonshine, and absinthe distilleries to see
how this magic is done. A trip to the Christian
Brothers Distillery in northern California will reveal
the secrets of how brandy is made and in the Deep
South we observe a working moonshine still. Then it's
off to France, where we visit the Courvoisier Cognac
distillery and at the Jade Absinthe Distillery we see
how this controversial drink is made. Includes expert
commentary and historical perspective given by Bon
Appetit's Anthony Dias Blue. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM The Exodus Decoded. The story of the Exodus
invokes an epic tale--Pharaohs and Israelites, plagues
and miracles, splitting of the sea and drowning of an
army, and Moses. It's at the heart of Judaism,
Christianity, and Islam. After much research--working
with archaeologists, Egyptologists, geologists, and
theologians--filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici concluded
that the Exodus took place hundreds of years earlier
than thought. With a new timetable, Jacobovici
reexamined artifacts and discovered that the
traditional consensus on the date was reached without
reference to Judaic texts that record the oral
traditions. When Jacobovici consulted these texts,
they revealed names of people and places unknown to
researchers until recently when extensive excavations
in the Nile Delta took place. Teaming up with special
effects designers, he created a unique digital
experience of the Exodus. Blending archaeological
findings with eye-catching effects, Jacobovici creates
a virtual museum to showcase his discoveries. CC [TVPG
V]

10:00 PM Caligula: Reign of Madness. Caligula ruled
the Roman Empire fewer than four years, and was only
28 when assassinated by officers of his guard in 41
AD. His reign was a legendary frenzy of lunacy,
murder, and lust. Between executions, he staged
spectacular orgies, made love to his sister, and
declared himself a living god. Join us for a look at
this devoted son, murderer, pervert, and loving father
whose anguished life was far more bizarre than the
myth that surrounds him. CC [TVPG]

11:00 PM Decoding the Past. Heaven and Hell. From the
beginning of recorded history, people from all over
the world have believed in an afterlife. In
Christianity, the powerful images of heaven and
hell--fire and brimstone, harps and halos--have shaped
Western thought for thousands of years. What does the
Bible tell us about everlasting punishment and eternal
life? Join us on a biblical journey as we explore the
origins of heaven and hell and the symbols that
represent them. CC [TVPG]

10/15/2006

07:00 PM Lost Worlds. Knights Templar. They defended
the Holy Land through bloodshed and prayer. Founded in
the 12th century, these Christian warrior monks
reigned supreme for nearly 200 years before suffering
a spectacular fall from grace. Tried for heresy, they
were disbanded and their Grand Master burned at the
stake. We'll search behind the legend for their lost
world. We recreate the city they knew as Tortosa--now
hidden among modern homes in the Syrian city of
Tartus. We reveal secrets of their headquarters at
Temple Mount in Jerusalem, with magnificent
underground vaults that could stable 1,000 horses. And
we visit the circular church in London built to
resemble the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem
and the site of the Templar's mysterious initiation
rites. We bring to life the hilltop fortress that
Lawrence of Arabia called "the finest castle in the
world", and return to the Mediterranean island where
the Knights Templars made their last stand against
Moslem enemies. CC [TVPG]

08:00 PM Egypt: Engineering an Empire. Twenty-five
hundred years before the reign of Julius Caesar, the
ancient Egyptians were deftly harnessing the power of
engineering on an unprecedented scale. Egyptian
temples, fortresses, pyramids and palaces forever
redefined the limits of architectural possibility.
They also served as a warning to all of Egypt's
enemies-that the world's most advanced civilization
could accomplish anything. This two-hour special uses
cinematic recreations and cutting-edge CGI to profile
the greatest engineering achievements of ancient
Egypt, and the pharaohs and architects who were behind
them. Includes Djoser's Step Pyramid at Saqqara,
Senusret's Nubian Superfortresses, Hatshepsut's
Mortuary Temple at Dier el-Bahari, Akhenaten's city at
Amarna, and the temples of Ramesses the Great at Abu
Simbel. CC [TVPG]

10:00 PM Strange Egypt. We all know the Egypt of the
pyramids and King Tut's tomb. But there's much, much
more. The daily life of ancient Egyptians was filled
with magic, mystery, and sex. We'll take a closer look
at the beliefs and habits of one of the world's oldest
cultures. There was incest in the royal palace, divine
cats, and an entire industry devoted to ushering the
dead into the next world. Spells, potions, and
incantations ruled every aspect of life. Yet even in
these unusual customs, we'll find the human face of
the ancient people of Egypt. CC [TV14]

11:00 PM Modern Marvels. Mummy Tech. After thousands
of years, Egyptian mummies are speaking from the
grave. With the use of state-of-the-art computer
tomography scanning, known as CT-scanning, we explore
inside a 2,000-year-old mummified body of an Egyptian
child. With today's technology, mummies are studied
without being unwrapped. Researchers travel around
inside the mummy's head and body with 3-D imagery. We
meet Dr. Robert Brier, a renowned Egyptologist. Dr.
Brier reveals secrets of Mummification--it took up to
70 days to preserve the dead. Aided by new technology,
we investigate the death of one of the most famous
mummies, King Tut. Was he murdered or did he die from
an illness? We also uncover the case of the Mummy who
lay in obscurity for over a hundred years, until
modern science unlocked the secrets of his identity as
an Egyptian pharaoh. And we join a team of
conservationists as they build a nitrogen-filled glass
display case to provide a safe sanctuary to prevent
mummies from decay. CC [TVPG]
____________________________________________________

Monday, October 16, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Apollo 11.
As mankind's greatest achievement of the 20th century,
Apollo 11 stood as the apogee of science, exploration,
flight, and technological prowess. In scarcely 10
years, America went from rocketing monkeys to landing
a man on the moon. Leaving Earth on July 16, 1969,
Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin, and Mike Collins pushed
the limits of skill and endurance. See and experience
the flight of Apollo 11 through the eyes of the
astronauts, mission controllers, engineers, and
designers who made it happen.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Alien Engineering, Part 1.
Prepare for an exercise in imagination. Suppose that
an alien spacecraft crashed in the desert and we
humans recovered it. What could we learn from its
engineers? Using data gleaned from years of UFO
sightings, we recreate a typical ship using
cutting-edge animation, discover why aliens choose the
craft shapes they do, learn how they overcome the
effects of Earth's atmosphere, defy gravity, cancel
inertia, and travel faster than the speed of light!
Our experts--reverse engineers--show us what's "under
the hood" of alien craft. We explore the technology
that makes other-world visitations possible, what
distance-shrinking device or wormhole excavator
permits ships to travel space's expanse in minutes,
and how the semi-transparent spacecraft skin
functions. At first inspection, the technology seems
crazy, but according to our experts, nothing is beyond
the realm of possibility.

9-10pm -- Engineering an Empire - Greece.
Western Civilization has been influenced by many
cultures, but it was born in Ancient Greece. The
Ancient Greeks laid a foundation that has supported
nearly 3000 years of European history. Philosophers
like Aristotle and Socrates, Olympian gods, the
beginnings of democracy and great conquering armies
can be attributed to the Ancient Greeks. This strong
and charismatic people strategically harnessed the
materials and people around them to create the most
advanced technological feats the world had ever seen.
From The Tunnel of Samos: a mile-long aqueduct dug
through a large mountain of solid limestone, to
Agamemnon's Tomb, to The Parthenon, we will examine
the architecture and infrastructure engineered by the
Greek Empire. Peter Weller hosts. 

10-11pm -- Lost Worlds - Atlantis.
Field investigators using the latest research, expert
analysis, and cutting-edge technology take us back to
ancient Greece, to a peaceful island that exploded
with devastating force. But, at the dawn of the 20th
Century, the remains of a palace were discovered on
the island of Crete, preserved beneath volcanic ash.
Could the ruins be home to the ancient civilization of
Atlantis? Our investigators find that a Cretan palace
and a town on Santorini are linked by unique
engineering of their buildings. Rebuilding towns,
temples, and the palace of Atlantis as described by
Plato, we reveal the majesty and mystery of this lost
world. The builders of the original palace achieved a
level of engineering excellence not matched for
centuries. With its massive scale, complex
water-management systems, and sparkling gypsum walls,
the engineering of this extraordinary palace connects
it to Plato's descriptions of Atlantis.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, October 17, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Apollo 13.
The Apollo 13 mission was intended to be a "routine"
trip to the moon. But when an oxygen tank exploded,
the spacecraft was crippled and its 3-man crew placed
in mortal danger. The Lunar Module, intended for
deployment on the moon's surface, instead became a
lifeboat. Scientists and engineers on earth fought a
race against time to save the crew. We'll examine the
mission, which nearly ended in tragedy, but instead
was a resounding success, and in some ways became
NASA's finest hour.

8-9pm -- Violent Earth - Asteroids!
Asteroids have been colliding with earth since the
beginning of time. The effect can be enormous--from
killing of the dinosaurs to scarring of the planet's
surface. Through computer recreations and interviews
with the world's foremost asteroid authorities, we
explore the long history of these rocks from space and
what future threats they pose.

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - East Coast Tsunami.
Hurricanes. Earthquakes. Floods. Blizzards.
Frightening but all too familiar natural disasters.
But what about a tsunami wave hitting the east coast
of the United States? In this hour, we look at such an
event that could be caused by a massive island
landslide triggered by a volcano off the coast of
Africa. We explore the awesome tsunami recorded by
German colonists in New Guinea triggered by a volcanic
explosion on Ritter Island in 1888. Leaping forward,
we hear from leading scientists about the possibility
of a potentially catastrophic collapse of the
west-facing façade of a volcano located in the Canary
Islands. Potentially 500 times the size of the
collapse at Ritter Island, it could trigger a tsunami
with initial waves over 900 meters high. A North
American city on the eastern seaboard, such as
Charleston, South Carolina, would have no more than
nine hours to evacuate before waves as high as 40 feet
inundated the city, leaving a huge wake of destruction
and damage.

10-11pm -- Man, Moment, Machine - Apollo 13: Triumph
on the Dark Side.
April 1970--the Apollo 13 mission is 178,000 miles
from Earth, just two days away from a lunar landing,
when an explosion rips the spacecraft apart and puts
the crew's lives on the line. Captain Jim Lovell has
to work quickly and decisively to save his crew and
what's left of his ship. After struggling to stay
alive for four days in a freezing cold spacecraft, no
one knows if the command module carrying the
astronauts can survive a fiery re-entry into the
Earth's atmosphere. Only the leadership of Jim Lovell,
the ingenuity of the NASA team in space and on the
ground, and the robust systems of the spacecraft offer
a chance for survival.

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, October 18, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - ET Tech.
In 2003, with Mars closer to Earth than it had been in
60,000 years, scientists launched three life-seeking
planetary landers. If the long journeys prove
successful, all should be hard at work on the Red
Planet's surface by January 2004. NASA's Spirit and
Opportunity and the European Space Agency's Beagle 2
represent the pinnacle in the history of the search
for extraterrestrial life. Leading scientists, who
believe life may exist beyond Earth, explain
skepticism about ETs having visited Earth.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The World's Fastest.
Perhaps no field has experienced the revolution in
velocity more acutely than transportation. We look at
five blazingly fast technological marvels that have
pushed the speed limits to the very edge, each with
its own unique and dramatic history: the world's
fastest production car (Sweden's Koenigsegg CCR); the
world's fastest train (the Maglev in Shanghai); the
world's fastest boat (The Spirit of Australia); the
world's fastest roller coaster (the Kingda Ka) and the
fastest thing on earth (the Holloman High Speed Test
Track), used to test highly sensitive equipment for
many branches of the government and commercial
clients.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Biggest Machines 3.
Giant robots on the factory floor and in outer space. 
A floating fortress that's home to 6,000 military
personnel, which is almost as long as the Empire State
Building is tall. And a diesel engine with 108,000
horsepower. (You read that right.) These giants must
be seen to be believed! In this episode, we travel
over land and sea to find these and more of the
biggest, baddest, most audacious feats of engineering
in the world.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Strongest.
Strength...A powerful word, but what does it mean? How
is it measured? Why are some things simply stronger
than others. How strong is a rope, a tractor, a
diamond, a tugboat or even plastic. From Spectra fibre
to Lexan learn where, how and why strength matters to
us every day.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, October 19, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Space Shuttle.
Considered by many to be the most astounding machine
ever built, this reusable spaceship is the apex of
flight technology. This program recounts the
challenges and the critical issues that led to NASA's
decision to create an "airplane" to navigate space.

8-9pm -- Where Did It Come From? - Ancient China: The
Personal Weapon.
Today's modern armies employ missiles, machine guns,
smart weapons and clever strategies to use on the
battlefield. These weapons may seem like cutting edge
technology, but the ancient Chinese invented these
weapons--in some cases thousands of years ago. Host
Michael Guillen will demonstrate how the ancient
Chinese repeating crossbow was a clear precursor to
the machine gun and we'll see how, more than a
thousand years earlier, the Chinese invented a weapon
that rivaled the European cannon. Explore how ancient
Chinese armies developed battlefield strategies that
shape how we go to war today.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Giganto: The Real King
Kong.
An exploration of the Giganto (King Kong) legend using
modern science, technology, and historic eyewitness
accounts. Gigantopithecus (the Latin term for "Giant
Ape") is believed to have existed 9 to 5-million years
ago and supposedly was around 10-feet tall. Some
fossil evidence shows that it may have lived in China
or India. Scientists of varying fields will attempt to
genetically connect Giganto to modern-day creatures
from around the world. Could Bigfoot be a relative?
Forensic testing, extensive scientific research, 3-D
animation, and body reconstruction will help determine
the true mystery behind this prehistoric ape.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Candy.
It pulls, stretches, bubbles, hardens, crunches, and
melts! We eat about 7-billion tons of it yearly. We're
talking about Candy--loved by kids and savored by
adults. Candy-making evolved from a handmade operation
to high-tech mass production. Nowhere is that more
apparent than at Hershey's. On a tour of their newest
production facility, we learn how they process the
cocoa bean. At See's Candy, we see how they make their
famous boxed chocolates--on a slightly smaller scale
than Hershey's. We get a sweet history lesson at
Schimpff's Confectionery, where they still use small
kettles, natural flavors, and hand-operated equipment.
Then, we visit Jelly Belly, purveyors of the original
gourmet jellybean. Saltwater-taffy pullers hypnotize
us on our sweet-tooth tour; we gaze at extruders
making miles of licorice rope; and watch as nostalgia
candy bars Abba-Zaba and Big Hunk get packaged. And in
this sugary hour, we digest the latest
sensations--gourmet chocolates and scorpion on a
stick!

____________________________________________________

Friday, October 20, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Satellites.
Strong enough to survive their fiery launch into
orbit, sophisticated enough to provide life-saving
images or relay tens of thousands of phone calls at
the same time. By monitoring weapons systems and troop
movements, these "eyes in the sky" may be the
difference between security and annihilation. From the
futuristic visions of a British sci-fi writer to
creations of a German rocket designer for the Nazi war
machine to the Cold War technological race, we review
the satellites that link our world.

8-10pm -- How William Shatner Changed the World - 
You've got a cell phone at one ear, an iPod at the
other. You know that Blackberry is now a verb and Spam
is not only canned meat. But just how did we get here?
Blame William Shatner--yes, that William
Shatner--Captain Kirk. We'll boldly go where few have
gone before to reveal how scientists, inspired by the
series, would revolutionize medicine and are
surpassing the far-out vision of the future
foreshadowed in Star Trek in the 1960s. From cell
phones to computers to even leading-edge medical
advancements, this 2-hour special explores how those
sci-fi inventions have now permeated everyday life as
we know it. Hosted and narrated by Shatner and based
on his book, I'm Working on That, we'll meet the
brightest minds of Silicon Valley and the
Trek-inspired inventions that have help change the
world.

10-11pm -- Pacific: The Lost Evidence - Iwo Jima.
On February 19, 1945, men of the US Marine Corps
invaded Iwo Jima. Over the next 36 days, the island
became the site of a titanic struggle of sheer bloody
will and determination. The Marines had to expel over
21,000 tenacious Japanese troops from a labyrinth of
fortifications dug into the very bowels of this
sulphurous island. Aerial photographs taken of the
island during the war have now been layered over a 3-D
contour map to create a CGI "model" of the island. But
this is no computer game--it's a model of the actual
island as the battle raged. The original
high-resolution images allow viewers to track the
conquest of the island, step by step, from the air.
Individual stories of courage and heroism can be
placed in the exact spot on the island where they took
place. The Marines eventually secured the island, but
half of the land combatants were killed or maimed. The
battle assumed legendary status and earned its place
in the collective consciousness of the American
people.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, October 21, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Da Vinci Tech.
Nearly 500 years after his death, Leonardo da Vinci
still intrigues us. Most people think of him as a
great artist, but he was also a remarkable scientist
and inventor. His love of mechanics was unparalleled
and he filled his notebooks with pages of incredible
machines--from weapons of war to "Ships of the Skies",
from submarines and scuba suits to robots and an
analogue computer...even contact lenses and alarm
clocks! How did a 15th-century man envision such
modern innovations? If we follow his plans, would any
of his designs work? We need wonder no more. With
recent technological advances and new materials, we're
the first generation able to bring Leonardo's drawings
to life--to learn whether his "mechanical dreams" were
workable plans. We explore the fascinating
intersection of his art, science, and engineering
marvels, and use them to offer insight into this
"Genius of Geniuses", who remains as elusive as Mona
Lisa's smile.

8-10pm -- Nuremberg: Goering's Last Stand - 
The dramatic and largely untold story of the year-long
psychological duel between U.S. Colonel Burton Andrus,
Commandant of the Nuremberg Jail and the
Rechsmarschall of Nazi Germany and Hitler's heir,
Hermann Goering. Goering came to prison a drug-addled
man weighing 264-pounds, accompanied by a valet and 16
pieces of matching luggage. Three months later, drug
free and 65-pounds thinner, he regained the mental
acuity that made him a formidable political foe.
Andrus, on the other hand, was a devotee of General
George Patton, and a strict disciplinarian. He had
been entrusted with a vital task direct from General
Eisenhower himself -- to clean up Goering and get him
ready for trial. 

10-11pm -- Standing Tall at Auschwitz - 
They were the largest family of dwarfs in recorded
history. In the 1930s and 1940s, seven Jewish siblings
toured Transylvania and neighboring lands enchanting
enthusiastic crowds with their unique musical
performances. Imprisoned at Auschwitz, they became
endlessly appealing to Dr. Josef Mengele, who
tormented them in the name of genetic research. In
inescapable irony, the Nazi doctor of death became
their protector--and only hope for survival. We follow
the Ovitz family from their beginnings in Transylvania
and incarceration at Auschwitz, to their liberation
from the camp and eventual settling in Israel. This
story of survival unfolds through firsthand accounts
from residents of Rozavlea in Transylvania (now
Romania), where the Ovitz family grew up, and from
fellow Auschwitz survivors that remember them from the
camp. Highlights include an interview with Perla, the
youngest Ovitz, taped before her death in 2001.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, October 22, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Robo-Warriors - 
The U.S. military has made a major commitment to
deploying and developing robots for use on the
battlefield--from the highly successful bomb disposal
robots, to the unmanned aerial vehicles. We'll 
preview the latest armed robot, with aim so accurate
and deadly that it virtually never misses its target
and look at the difficulties of making military
vehicles driverless. The use of robots in warfare fits
into some of the basic tenets of American fighting: to
reduce manpower with material and to kill the enemy
either at a distance or with a surrogate soldier. In
the future, the Pentagon hopes to have a ratio of 4-6
robots to every human soldier. It will be the human
soldiers, not the robots, according to the Department
of Defense, who will continue to make decisions of
life and death... at least in our lifetime. 

8-10pm -- The Flag-Raisers of Iwo Jima - 
The story of two photos taken during the brutal WWII
Battle of Iwo Jima--one, the famous photo of five U.S.
Marines and one Navy corpsman raising the flag atop
Mt. Suribachi; the other also shows flag-raisers, but
is largely forgotten. Battle veterans tell the story
through letters, interviews, and poignant
recollections, and what they say may surprise viewers.
To the men of Iwo Jima, the Mt. Suribachi photo, which
stirs feelings of pride in many Americans, has been
tainted by decades of distortion.

10-11pm -- Inside the Great Battles - 
Mixing real-life locations, archival battle footage,
and 21st-century animation, we tell the story of
history's greatest conflicts. Viewers are taken inside
the tunnels of Iwo Jima to tell the story of this
pivotal WWII battle from both the US and Japanese
soldiers' viewpoint.

____________________________________________________

Monday, October 23, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Autobahn.
Imagine a superhighway designed for speed...thousands
of miles of roadway unhindered by limits of any kind.
Buckle up for safety as we take you for the ride of
your life when we explore the fascinating history and
current reality of the world's fastest freeway. The
number-one works project of the Third Reich, the
Autobahn was known as Adolf Hitler's Road until
Germany's defeat in WWII. Reconstructed and extended
to more than four times its original size, it became a
symbol of the New Germany.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Deep Sea UFOs: Red Alert.
In this hour, we'll dive deeper into the ongoing
mystery of USOs--Underwater Submerged Objects--UFOs
that have reportedly been witnessed going into and out
of Earth's oceans. The show features a dive into the
Santa Catalina Channel near Los Angeles to search for
trace evidence of a 1992 USO event--a detailed account
of the USS FDR, a magnet for USO and UFOs from the
early 1950s until its decommissioning in the 1970s,
with at least eight major sightings. Australia's
famous Tully Water-Crop Circle Case is explored, as
well as many other astounding and recent USO cases
from the US and the world. Interviews include USS FDR
veterans Chet Gruisinsky and Harry Jordan, USO
researcher Dr. Stephen Greer, and Australian UFO
expert Bill Chaulker.

9-10pm -- Engineering an Empire - Greece: Age of
Alexander.
438 BC. The Parthenon is complete. This masterpiece is
the crowning achievement for the Greek people. Without
Alexander the Great, it is possible Greece's Golden
Era would have been just a footnote in history. Tens
of thousands would die during Alexander's relentless
attacks on Persia and Egypt, yet, his armies carried
Greek life, culture and values far abroad and this
empire became known as the "Hellenistic" world.
Greece's amazing engineering achievements and ideas
are still with us today.

10-11pm -- Lost Worlds - The Real Dracula.
In a country torn by bloody civil war, a young man
seizes power. In his native tongue, he is called
Dracula. This is not the vampire, Count Dracula, but a
real historical figure: a Romanian prince. Dracula was
a warlord who became known all across Europe for both
his breathtaking courage and his terrifying cruelty.
But he also left an enduring legacy. Not just in
blood, but also in brick, mortar, and stone. He
constructed palaces. He founded the city that was to
become his country's capital. He also built one of
Eastern Europe's most breathtaking mountaintop
castles. Now, with state-of-the-art computer
animation, we'll bring Dracula's lost world back to
life: his birthplace in the fortified town of
Sighisoara; the gothic splendor of Transylvania's Bran
Castle; the sumptuous palace of Targoviste; and the
real castle Dracula, Poenari.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, October 24, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Biggest Machines 4.
From a giant machine press that stamps out an entire
car body to a 125-ton chainsaw that cuts through the
world's hardest rock; from a huge telescope that
glimpses the ends of the known universe to the world's
largest rock crusher. Join us for a workout of the
world's largest machines, and take a long look through
the lens of the world's biggest optical telescope, the
Keck Observatory, atop 13,800-foot Mauna Kea in
Hawaii.

8-9pm -- Fear Files - 
Throughout history there have been strange and
frightening tales that continue to capture the
imagination of cultures throughout the world. But is
there truth and fact behind these tales? This special
will delve into the unknown world of Zombies. By
definition, a "zombie" is a dead person who is brought
back to life through a curse (voodoo, necromancy) or a
mutation, and has recovered some vital functions like
movement. Voodoo, found primarily in Haiti but
practiced by over 60 million people worldwide, was
established in the 17th century by slaves captured
largely from the kingdom of Dahomey, in West Africa.
Through interviews with experts, victims, witnesses
and researchers, we'll take a critical look at the
science and the psychology behind this diabolical
mythology.

9-10pm -- Lost Worlds - 
The world has been captivated by legends of ancient
civilizations that flourished only to vanish without a
trace. Can Atlantis be found? Did the ferocious Amazon
women really exist? What mystery lies behind
Stonehenge or the giant heads of Easter Island? Modern
science can help us draw back the veils of time and,
at last, give us answers to the elusive mysteries of
lost worlds.

10-11pm -- Man, Moment, Machine - Patton and the
Desperate Tank Attack.
The tide has suddenly turned in the war in Europe on
December 16, 1944. The hard-hit German Army has
secretly assembled a massive force. They slam through
woods in Belgium-Luxemburg and hit the Allies with a
steel fist. In the middle of one of the coldest
winters in history, the front line is buckling. The
enormous bulge in Allied lines gives the battle its
name. The 101st Airborne Division and elements of
Patton's 10th Armored Division are rushed to stop the
onslaught. In the town of Bastogne, the Germans
surround the Americans and begin to tighten the noose.
It looks like no one can relieve them until the
Americans send in their most aggressive
warrior--George S. Patton--to beat back the enemy
assault with the best machine in his arsenal--the M-4
Sherman tank.

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, October 25, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Copper Kings.
More than a century ago, two men controlled nearly all
of U.S. copper production, transforming Butte, Montana
from a washed-up gold-mining camp into a global
powerhouse. William Clark, a ruthless banker known for
preying on the misfortune of miners, and Marcus Daly,
a self-made man with a knack for knowing where to dig,
created huge empires and lived like kings, while
fighting a ferocious, personal, battle that lasted
nearly 25 years. We follow the rivalry between these
giants of American industry.

8-9pm -- Mysteries on the High Seas - Mysteries on the
High Seas.
Unexplained happenings on the water have baffled
scientists and historians alike. Why does the Bermuda
Triangle have such a frightening reputation for
travelers' disappearances? What can account for ships
mysteriously meeting their doom on the Great Lakes,
and planes vanishing over Alaska's icy waters? What
lies behind classic ghost-ship stories like the Flying
Dutchman and the Mary Celeste? And what once made New
Jersey's shoreline a hunting ground for killer sharks?

9-10pm -- Miracles, Mystics, & Prophecies - 
Throughout the ages, thousands of prophets have come
forward with visions of the future...many warning of
death, destruction...even Armageddon. But is it
possible that any of the people who've made such
predictions actually possessed some uncanny ability to
see into the future? From the predictions of
Nostradamus and Rasputin to the Secrets of Fatima, we
investigate history's most compelling prophecies,
miracles and mystics.

10-11pm -- American Eats - Chocolate
With approximately 380 known chemicals, scientists are
still struggling to learn how chocolate affects our
brains. We do know that it mimics the way our brains
react to marijuana, amphetamines, and the drug we call
"love"! How did this little pod from a little tree
become a global obsession? Enjoyed as a drink by the
Mayans and Aztecs, it was Europeans who added sugar.
But in 1847, chocolate became edible as well as
drinkable and Milton S. Hershey made it popular in the
US. And during WWII, the chocolate bar became an
internationally recognized American symbol. GIs used
chocolate bars as barter, and the little candies known
as M&Ms became a favorite. Recent studies show health
benefits to chocolate, especially dark chocolate that
contains some of the same antioxidant potential as red
wine. So now you can have your chocolate and eat it,
too!

____________________________________________________

Thursday, October 26, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Secret Allied Aircraft of
WWII.
At WWII's outset, US and UK military aircraft designs
were woefully behind Germany's and Japan's
technologically superior planes. But the genius and
ingenuity of innovators on both sides of the Atlantic
closed the gap. For America, it was a handful of
visionaries and their teams; for Great Britain, a
creative and thoughtful spirit emanated from the top
leadership on down. In this hour, we recount the
untold stories of their cutting-edge designs and
solutions, some of which proved decades ahead of their
time.

8-9pm -- Monsters - 
For centuries, tales of monsters have piqued our
curiosity. Legendary beasts from folklore, literature
and film have captivated audiences around the world.
But some say monsters are not confined to just our
imaginations. Stories of the Abominable Snowman,
Bigfoot, and the Loch Ness Monster have triggered
worldwide investigations...and continue to enthrall
believers and skeptics alike.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - In Search of the Real
Frankenstein
The fascinating story of Johann Konrad Dipple, a
brilliant scientist caught up in the dark world of
alchemy and body snatching. This is the true tale of
the original mad scientist, born in 1673, in the
famous gothic Frankenstein Castle that overlooked
Germany's Rhine Valley. His pioneering work would lead
to electric shock therapy used in modern medicine. It
was at Frankenstein Castle that Dipple would carry out
his search to brew a secret elixir of life. He began
to dig up fresh corpses from the nearby
Nieder-Beerbach cemetery and dragged them to his
laboratory in Castle Frankenstein to test out his
formulas. Ironically, it was his potions that finally
killed him. 

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Death Devices.
The hangman, guillotine, gas chamber, firing squad,
and electric chair are just a few of the ways in which
societies have rid themselves of those who committed
capital crimes. And throughout history, a select few
have developed the devices that have carried out the
mandate of the people. This is the dark story of those
inventors and the macabre history of execution
mechanics--from the first "stone" of antiquity, the
dungeons of the Inquisition, and Nazi death camps to
today's sterile injection chambers--with a peek at the
future of death technology.

____________________________________________________

Friday, October 27, 2006
____________________________________________________

8-9pm -- The Haunted History of Halloween - 
On October 31, when pint-sized ghouls and goblins
trick or treat, they're upholding an ancient northern
European ritual dating back thousands of years. From
the Celtic festival of Samhain to the mumming
tradition and the Christian feast day All Hallows'
Eve, we find out why this night is the scariest of the
year!

9-10pm -- Mysteries of the Bible - Bible Mysteries.
The Bible has been studied by millions of people over
thousands of years-but it continues to mystify us even
today. Did Noah's Ark really exist-and is it trapped
in the snow and ice on a mountaintop in Turkey? Have
archeologists found the remains of the evil cities of
Sodom and Gomorrah? Was the Shroud of Turin really the
burial cloth of Jesus Christ-or just a medieval
forgery? And are there secret messages and codes
hidden within the text of the Old Testament?

10-11pm -- Pacific: The Lost Evidence - Pearl Harbor.
December 7, 1941--"a date which will live in infamy".
The unprovoked attack on the US Pacific Fleet moored
at Pearl Harbor is one of the key moments in modern
history, signaling the US entry into WWII, turning the
war into a global conflict, and marking America's
emergence as a military superpower. In this hour, we
offer an unprecedented viewpoint of the attack. Aerial
photographs taken of Pearl Harbor and the Hawaiian
Island of Oahu are layered over a 3-D contour map to
create a CGI "model". But, this isn't a computer game.
Rather, a facsimile of Pearl Harbor as the battle
raged. These original high-resolution images allow the
viewer to track the attack from the air. Individual
stories of courage and heroism are explored in the
exact spots where they took place. Using cutting-edge
techniques, rare archive film, reenactments, and
extraordinary interviews with men who were there, we
tell, in a totally new way, the story of WWII's
greatest surprise attack.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, October 28, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 18.
We look at a 1999 tragedy, when three ironworkers
plunged 200 feet when the basket in which they were
working was struck by debris during construction of
Milwaukee's Brewers Baseball Stadium. Next, we travel
to a deadly explosion in China's Sunjiwan coal
mine--antiquated equipment, minimal safety standards,
and a rush to overproduce left the mines susceptible
to fires, floods, and explosions. From the 1920s
through the `50s, US shoe stores featured the
fluoroscope. Based on an early Edison machine, the
fluoroscope took x-rays to determine a customer's
size--while emitting high doses of radiation. In
California, we visit the Salton Sea, an unnatural body
of water with no drainage that grows more salty and
less hospitable to life daily. In the 1950s Soviet
leaders embarked on a massive irrigation project that
diverted water from the Aral Sea. Over time, the
coastline receded 100 miles, killing off many species
of fish and a once thriving fishing industry.

8-10pm -- Skeletons on the Sahara - 
In 1815, a Connecticut merchant ship is run aground
off the west coast of Africa. Captured by Arab nomads,
Captain James Riley and his crew are sold into brutal
slavery and marched across the Sahara Desert, where
skin boils, lips blacken and men shrivel to less than
90 pounds. Along the way the Americans will encounter
everything that could possibly test them, but Riley
and his men will also discover ancient cities, secret
oases and a culture largely unknown to the modern
world. We'll take viewers inside the adventure, with
realistic recreations shot on location and compelling
interviews with descendants of Riley, his crew and the
Arabs who held them captive. Includes expert
commentary from Dean King, author of the bestselling
book of the same name.

10-12am -- Quest for Dragons - 
A spirited exploration of the history, science, and
legend of the world's most notorious beast--the
dragon, the best-known creature that never was.
Throughout history, dragons influenced wars, science,
art, and religion. They appear in almost every culture
and many still believe in dragons. How could different
cultures, isolated by geology and millennia, all
invent the same creature? If the dragon is simply the
product of our imagination, how could distant peoples,
with no knowledge of each other, all invent the same
beast? One of the reasons dragons are a perennial
favorite is that even though they are the ultimate
predator and antagonist, it's also fun to identify
with them. In the end, we want to be the dragon as
much as we may want to slay the dragon.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, October 29, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- The Haunted History of Halloween - 
On October 31, when pint-sized ghouls and goblins
trick or treat, they're upholding an ancient northern
European ritual dating back thousands of years. From
the Celtic festival of Samhain to the mumming
tradition and the Christian feast day All Hallows'
Eve, we find out why this night is the scariest of the
year!

8-10pm -- Vampires Secrets - 
Since Bram Stoker first published his novel Dracula in
1897, the world's most popular vampire has made his
appearance in 44 languages. The vampire myth however,
is much older than Count Dracula, popping up from
Athens to Beijing almost 1000 years before the
Transylvanian legend. Vampire legends have two things
in common: drinking blood and returning from the dead.
Long before Jesus urged his followers to drink his
blood and eat his flesh, prehistoric man held similar
rituals. From the Bible and ancient Mesopotamian
history to blood drinking societies in New York, we
reveal the amazing truth behind one of the most
terrifying legends in history. 

10-11pm -- Bloodlines: The Dracula Family Tree - 
When a team of Dracula hunters, notably members of a
family linked to the real-life Prince Vlad Dracul,
tries to unearth the truth about the tyrant, they are
haunted by mystifying events, misfortune, and tragedy
500 years after the 15th-century prince died.

____________________________________________________

Monday, October 30, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Mummy Tech.
After thousands of years, Egyptian mummies are
speaking from the grave. With the use of
state-of-the-art computer tomography scanning, known
as CT-scanning, we explore inside a 2,000-year-old
mummified body of an Egyptian child. With today's
technology, mummies are studied without being
unwrapped. Researchers travel around inside the
mummy's head and body with 3-D imagery. We meet Dr.
Robert Brier, a renowned Egyptologist. Dr. Brier
reveals secrets of Mummification--it took up to 70
days to preserve the dead. Aided by new technology, we
investigate the death of one of the most famous
mummies, King Tut. Was he murdered or did he die from
an illness? We also uncover the case of the Mummy who
lay in obscurity for over a hundred years, until
modern science unlocked the secrets of his identity as
an Egyptian pharaoh. And we join a team of
conservationists as they build a nitrogen-filled glass
display case to provide a safe sanctuary to prevent
mummies from decay.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Alien Engineering, Part 2.
If an alien spaceship crash-lands on Earth, the first
thing we'll want to do is take it apart and learn how
it works. Maybe go for a tour inside and learn what
kind of options it has--like an anti-matter reactor,
laser weapons, and even a teletransporter. Amazingly,
many of these "science fiction" devises are based on
real science. And many have human-designed
counterparts right here on Earth. Super-powerful laser
weapons can be found on our own prototype weapons.
We're even researching ways to hide vehicles behind
plasma-generated "invisibility cloaks". Cutting-edge
animation and live-action recreations help us
"imagine" an alien spacecraft and learn how many
amazing devices and mechanisms are really possible,
and likely to be available in a few years. 

9-10pm -- Engineering an Empire - The Aztecs.
In less than 200 years the Aztec's transformed
themselves from a band of wandering nomads to the
greatest civilization the New World had ever known.
What records remain of this amazing feat indicate they
did it through brilliant military campaigns and by
ingeniously applying technology to master the harsh
environment they faced. They built their capital city
where no city should have been possible: in the middle
of a lake. The Aztec also practiced human sacrifice on
an unprecedented scale and made many enemies. By the
time the Spaniards landed they had no trouble
recruiting tribal allies to destroy the Aztecs. Watch
with host Peter Weller as we examine the architecture
and infrastructure behind the New World's greatest,
and last, indigenous society.

10-11pm -- Lost Worlds - Ramses' Egyptian Empire
1300 BC. The mighty Egyptian civilization is in its
golden age. Its ruler is Ramses II, a man who intends
to be the greatest of the Pharaohs. He will make his
mark by building: vast statues; towering obelisks;
temples carved from the living rock. Ramses is a giant
of a man, dominating his kingdom for 67 years, pushing
it on to ever greater glory. The ruins of what he
built still stand, and with the aid of new research
and cutting edge graphics technology, the true scale
of his ambition can now be fully revealed. We
reconstruct the grand hypostyle hall at Karnak;
explore the technical innovation and engineering skill
that produced the temple at Abu Simbel; we rebuild the
Ramesseum as he would have seen it, and uncover how
the extraordinary tomb that Ramses built for himself
would have looked when his body was finally laid
there.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, October 31, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- The Haunted History of Halloween - 
On October 31, when pint-sized ghouls and goblins
trick or treat, they're upholding an ancient northern
European ritual dating back thousands of years. From
the Celtic festival of Samhain to the mumming
tradition and the Christian feast day All Hallows'
Eve, we find out why this night is the scariest of the
year!

8-10pm -- Exorcism: Driving Out the Devil - 
For as long as humans have existed, so too has the
belief in evil. Are there malevolent supernatural
forces in the world at work against us? Can a demonic
force actually overtake a human soul? And, if so, is
an exorcism the only way to free someone from the
devil's grasp? This two-hour special traces the
history of the mysterious ritual of exorcism. It
explores how the practice has evolved with the
changing times--from a simple rite, to a political
tool, to a form of modern-day therapy. Through
dramatic recreations we recount several harrowing
tales of the demonically possessed and the subsequent
struggle by exorcists to save them. We'll also look at
the medical and social perspectives. Can episodes of
demonic-like behavior be explained by brain disorders
or psychological factors? Includes interviews with
experts in the fields of theology, history, medicine
and the supernatural.

10-11pm -- Man Moment Machine - Alexander the Great
and the Devastating Catapult
Only Alexander the Great would have the audacity to
attempt such a daring siege--the fortified island city
of Tyre seems invincible, but his Macedonian troops
are inspired and determined, and the young Alexander
has a secret weapon--a machine created for the
destruction of cities: the catapult. If Tyre falls, it
will be a pivotal victory in Alexander's quest for a
new empire--a key stop on a march that will cover more
than 10,000 miles and span three continents.
FREE Work At Home GUIDE for our visitors!
3000 names from September 11, 2001
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Note: Wild West Tech hosted by David Carradine, some episodes narrated by Keith Carradine:

Wild West Tech marathon:
Deadwood Tech.
Saturday September 2 10:00 AM
Saloons.
                     11:00 AM
Freak Shows 2.
                     12:00 PM
Biggest Machines in the West.
                     01:00 PM
Execution Tech.
                     02:00 PM
The Gunslingers.
                     03:00 PM
Revenge Tech
                     10:30 PM
Vices.
                     @ 11pm 


Mail Call:
Bren Gun & Carrier/Special Forces Final Exam/Beasts of Burden/Predator/1st RPV: #52
Tuesday September 05 12pm & 6pm
R. Lee Ermey rolls up to HQ toting a WWII light machine gun, the Bren Gun, and rides in a "Tankette", the armored vehicle that carried the Bren and its 2-man team. At the Army's Special Warfare Center and School, he checks out "Operation Robin Sage", the final exam--a 14-day "war" waged in North Carolina. Lee learns that Green Berets are training to handle pack beasts like camels and donkeys, and looks at the leading remote-powered vehicle, the Predator, and the first RPV, WWII's Weary Willy.

MK-19 Grenade Launcher/PPSH-41/WWII Weasel/Vertijet: # 79
Tuesday September 05 12:30 PM & 6:30 PM
R. Lee Ermey, is back at HQ for a new season of shows jam-packed with gear, gun and guts. First, the Gunny is pitching horseshoes and because "close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades," it's the perfect introduction to Lee's trip to Camp Pendleton where he gets some trigger time with the MK-19 grenade launcher. Next, the focus is on Russian tactics and weapons of WWII. Lee shows us the Russian sub machine gun of choice during the campaign, the PPSH-41. Then, it's time for a test drive when a WWII Weasel shows up at HQ. Finally, it's time to dip into the Gunny's Fabulous Flops file for a segment about the Vertijet, America's first vertical take-off jet aircraft.

M-1 Garand Rifle/First Assault Rifle/Jato/Golden Knights Parachute Team/Barrage Balloons
Saturday September 09 11am & Wednesday September 20 12pm
R. Lee Ermey answers viewer questions about the M-1 Garand, the rifle General Patton called "the greatest battle implement ever devised", and demonstrates the world's first assault rifle, the German MP-44. He takes to the sky to explain jet assisted take-off (JATO); offers an eye-popping look at the stunts performed by the Golden Knights, the Army's precision freefall parachute team; explains how barrage balloons protected London during the Blitz; and goes through the alphabet--military style!

Revolutionary War Musket/Jousting/Foxholes: #8
Saturday September 16 11am
Find out how fast a Revolutionary War soldier could fire a musket, the ins and outs of jousting, and how to dig a foxhole.

For info on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket
(movie available on video and DVD)

Previous History Channel primetime listings:

September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January 2006 Hellcats of the Navy

See if your favorite person, TV series or
motion picture is available on DVD:

Search:
Keywords:
In Association with Amazon.com


From the invention of the electric battery in 1800 to the murdered remains of missing Washington intern Chandra Levy being discovered in a Washington D.C. park*, find out what happened when with our exclusive History of the World Timeline!
GO TO: HistoryChannel.com/worldtimeline

You might also check out A&E Prime Time listings for this month

Official HistoryChannel.com Homepage
Find out more about any topic any time, including this day in history (your choice of decade), with our Best Search in History: www.HistoryChannel.com

* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

Visit Amazon.com's Jame Bond store!
Or
Our James Bond movies page

MonsterVision's Movies Recommendations on TV & Cable for today

"Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle" - Abraham Lincoln