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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st & 15th)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Thursday, November 16, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Paving America.
The story of the construction of our grand national
highway system, from its beginnings in 1912 (it was
conceived by auto and headlight tycoons) to its
completion in 1984 (when the last stoplight was
removed--and buried).

8-9pm -- Engineering an Empire - Carthage.
Carthage, a remarkable city-state that dominated the
Mediterranean for over 600 years, harnessed their
extensive resources to develop some of the ancient
world's most groundbreaking technology. For
generations, Carthage defined power, strength and
ingenuity, but by the third century B.C., the empire's
existence was threatened by another emerging
superpower, Rome. However, when the Romans engineered
their empire, they were only following the lead of the
Carthaginians. From the city's grand harbor to the
rise of one of history's greatest generals, Hannibal
Barca, we will examine the architecture and
infrastructure that enabled the rise and fall of the
Carthaginian Empire.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - The Real Sorcerer's
Stone.
Today, the sorcerer's stone is seen as fiction off the
pages of Harry Potter, but in the Middle Ages the
quest for the sorcerer's stone was second only to that
of the Holy Grail. The stone was actually said to have
the power to transform base metals into gold and grant
long life--even immortality. The ingredients were
hidden in bizarrely coded manuscripts by alchemists
who lived within their own secret society. The
processes needed to combine them could be
dangerous--even deadly. Today, we owe most of our
modern lab equipment and experimental techniques to
the efforts of these alchemists. Was their search for
immortality really on sound scientific ground and did
some, as is still rumored, actually succeed?

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Metal.
They constitute the very essence of the modern world;
the cadence of our progress sounds in the measured
ring of the blacksmith's hammer. From soaring
skyscrapers and sturdy bridges to jet planes and
rockets, metals play a key role. Our journey begins
before the Bronze Age and takes us into the shiny
future when new metal structures--engineered at a
molecular level to be stronger, lighter, and
cheaper--shape human progress, as they have since man
first thrust copper into a fire and forged a tool.

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Friday, November 17, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-7:30pm -- Our Generation - Three Mile Island
In 1979 we came closer to a nuclear melt-down than we
had ever come before. The nuclear accident at Three
Mile Island became a metaphor for our treatment of the
environment and ultimately the consequences we would
all have to deal with. Our resident historian Steve
Gillon tells the stories of the unforgettable events
that defined the Baby Boomer generation and changed
the world. 

7:30-8pm -- Mail Call - Army's National Training
Center.
This week host R. Lee Ermey is on location at Fort
Irwin, California, home of the US Army's National
Training Center [NTC], a world class training center
for America's soldiers, known for its desert training
capability. Ermey gives us the 411 on the Army's primo
armored transport, the M2A3, better known as the
Bradley Fighting Vehicle. After the Gunny puts the
Bradley Fighting Vehicle through its pace, he answer
an email about who the transport was named after -
General Omar Bradley. Next Lee gives us all the dirt
on the M9 combat Earthmover. It's a combination of a
tank, truck, and dump truck that the Army uses to
prepare firing positions on the hottest front lines.
Finally, the Gunny finds dozens of Iraqis living in
the desert, plotting suicide bombings. Not to
worry--these Iraqis work for the US Army and their
plot is part of an enormous role-playing exercise to
train US soldiers in counter-insurgency tactics.

8-9pm -- Shootout - Iraq's Most Wanted: Terror at the
Border
In the summer of 2005, Muslim jihadists are spilling
over the Syrian border to swell the ranks of al Qaeda
in Iraq. Before setting out for Baghdad, they're
stopping at a terrorist training facility to arm,
equip, build car bombs and IED's and learn the fine
art of hostage taking. They're also oppressing and
brutalizing peaceful local citizens. Now, a task force
of 1,000 U.S. Marines has come to wipe out the
jihadist nerve center. It's history in the making as
3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines move in to exterminate the
terrorists and smash their base of operations. Unique
visual graphics and untold stories by the men who were
there make this a compelling hour.

9-10pm -- The Lost Evidence - 21 - Alamein
October 23rd 1942, in the remote North African desert,
British and Allied troops face off against the feared
German Afrika Korps and their Italian Allies. The
British have been pushed back nearly 1000 miles from
Libya, to a little known Egyptian railway stop called
El Alamein. Over the following nine days, this battle
will become a personal duel between General Bernard
Montgomery and General Erwin Rommel. In one of the
greatest deceptions of the war, photo recons help to
fool the Germans into making a catastrophic mistake.
Both British and German aerial reconnaissance
photographs taken at the time have now been layered
over a three dimensional contour map to create a CGI
model of the battle. Using cutting edge technology,
unique archive film, re-enactments and extraordinary
interviews with the men who were there, the story of
Alamein is told in a totally new way.

10-11pm -- Dogfights - 04 - Flying Tigers
Two weeks after Pearl Harbor... A courageous, rag-tag
band of American mercenaries dare to challenge the
over-whelming might of the Japanese Air Force. The
legendary "Flying Tigers" slash through the skies of
China, and help vanquish the unstoppable Japanese.
Follow leading Tiger aces Tex Hill and John Alison as
their P-40 Tomahawks fight to the death against the
agile Japanese 1-97 Nate. First-hand accounts, rare
archival footage and original shooting will supplement
the remarkable computer graphics. 

____________________________________________________

Saturday, November 18, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Civil War Tech.
America protects its homeland with the most
technologically advanced military force ever
conceived. Although they fight 21st-century battles
worldwide, the technology unleashed is directly
descended from a war fought more than 140 years ago.
This episode explores how the War between North and
South was the first modern war, and the technology
used in it was a quantum leap beyond any previous
conflict. The machine gun, aerial reconnaissance,
advanced battlefield medicine, instantaneous
communication, ironclad ships, even the first aircraft
carrier were all innovations developed during the
Civil War. We'll investigate improvements in weapons,
sea power, transportation, troop conveyance, food
processing, medical care, and telecommunications. At a
time when the nation was divided, Civil War technology
revolutionized the way war was waged. Today, those
technological milestones have evolved to ensure that
our modern military has no equal in the world.

8-9pm -- Prostitution: Sex in the City - 
Once upon a time, being a prostitute carried no
stigma--in ancient Sumeria and Babylon, that is. And
in certain cities in ancient Greece, harlots were
associated with sacred activities at temples. Even in
the American Wild West, there was a degree of
tolerance. So what happened through the years? We'll
investigate innumerable stories about the changing
social position of the "ladies of the night"
throughout history, and find out why prostitution is
called the oldest profession!

9-10pm -- The History of Sex - Ancient Civilizations.
In this hour, we study sex in the ancient world--from
Mesopotamians, who viewed adultery as a crime of
theft, to Romans, who believed that squatting and
sneezing after sex was a reliable method birth
control. We also look at revealing Egyptian and Greek
practices--from the origins of dildos, to intimate
relations between Egyptian gods and goddesses, to the
use of crocodile dung as a contraceptive.

10-11pm -- The History of Sex - The Eastern World.
An exploration of sex in China, Japan, India, and the
Arab world that offers an intriguing perspective on
the interrelation of sexuality and spirituality in
eastern culture. Among the topics presented are the
ancient Chinese equivalent of Viagra, Japanese
acceptance of prostitutes and pornographic art, and
tips from the Kama Sutra.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, November 19, 2006
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7-8pm -- The History of Thanksgiving - 
From the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock, Lincoln's 1863
declaration naming it a national holiday, to turkey,
Macy's parade, and football, we'll share the abundant
feast of Thanksgiving history--including all the
trimmings!

8-11pm -- Desperate Crossing: The Untold Story of The
Mayflower - 
Most of the people whom we now know as "the Pilgrims"
made their way from England to the city of Leiden,
Holland, a place of religious tolerance. They found
religious freedom, but faced extreme financial
hardship. A bold decision is made to move to America.
In the late summer of 1620 The Mayflower sets sails
carrying 102 English settlers and 30 sailors. Over the
next four months, about half of the settlers and
sailors die of scurvy and weather-related illness. An
English speaking Indian, Samoset, visits the settlers
and his visit leads to the signing of a peace treaty.
By the Fall of 1621, the English decide to celebrate
their harvest with a feast which is attended by at
least 90 Wampanoags. That peace will last 40 years.
This show features elaborate dramatic reenactments
from original source material written by eyewitnesses
and participants in the actual events of the early
1600s. 

____________________________________________________

Monday, November 20, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Empire State Building.
The amazing story of how the New York City skyscraper
was constructed during the depths of the Depression.
Requiring 10-million bricks and 60,000 tons of steel
beams, and using a revolutionary technique to hold the
steel girders in place--hot rivets--the landmark
building was completed four months ahead of schedule.

8-9pm -- The History of Thanksgiving - 
From the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock, Lincoln's 1863
declaration naming it a national holiday, to turkey,
Macy's parade, and football, we'll share the abundant
feast of Thanksgiving history--including all the
trimmings!

9-10pm -- Engineering an Empire - Russia.
At the height of its power the Russian Empire
stretched across 15 times zones, incorporated nearly
160 different ethnicities, and made up one sixth of
the entire world's landmass. What started as a few
small principalities was shaped into an indomitable
world power by the sheer force of its leaders.
However, building the infrastructure of this empire
came at an enormous price. As Russia entered the 20th
century, her expansion reached critical mass as her
rulers pushed progress at an unsustainable pace and
her population reacted in a revolution that changed
history. From the Moscow Kremlin, to the building of
St. Petersburg, we will examine the architecture and
infrastructure that enabled the rise and fall of the
Russian Empire.

10-11pm -- Lost Worlds - Hitler's Supercity.
Hitler caused more death and destruction than anyone
else in history. But he also planned to build on a
massive scale and place a new Germany on a par with
ancient Greece and Rome. Our investigators piece
together a picture of how Hitler wanted Germany to
look from the ruins of what was built and from plans
of his architect Albert Speer. In Nuremberg, we
recreate the Zeppelin Tribune: where 60,000 people
could overlook a parade ground. We reveal the real
purpose of the stadium Speer planned to hold the
Olympic Games--with seating for 405,000 people. And we
rebuild, with computer-generated images based on
Speer's plans, the monuments Hitler planned for
himself: the Triumphal Arch--twice the height, and
four times the width of Paris's Arc de Triomphe--and
the People's Hall--a structure so big the Eiffel Tower
could fit inside it. Monstrous, intimidating, built on
slave labor--this is the Lost World we'd now inhabit
if WWII had gone differently.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, November 21, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Chrysler Building.
The 1,046-foot Chrysler Building in New York City,
erected between 1928 and 1930, was the world's tallest
edifice--until the Empire State Building eclipsed it
in 1931! Since then, this Art Deco masterpiece has
become one of the most beloved skyscrapers on the city
skyline. Financed by auto tycoon Walter P. Chrysler
and designed by architect William Van Alen, the
private office building was constructed by more than
2,000 men. Find out why it was the first--and
last--skyscraper Van Alen designed.

8-9pm -- The Presidents - 1789-1825.
Based on the book To the Best of My Ability, this
8-part series provides an insightful look at the
exclusive group of men from all walks of life and
parts of the country who have led America from the
Oval Office. Part 1 probes the Constitutional Era,
when the fledgling nation's revolutionary Founding
Fathers became its first administrators. From George
Washington, who defined the presidency, to James
Monroe, the last of the Revolutionary War heroes, the
office of president evolves and is tested as the
United States undergoes growing pains. Defining
moments include Washington's Whisky Rebellion, John
Adams' XYZ Affair, Thomas Jefferson's Louisiana
Purchase, James Madison's War of 1812, and the Monroe
Doctrine. We also examine the human side of the
Presidents, offering a look at their strengths and
weaknesses, their families, and accomplishments.

9-10pm -- The Presidents - 1825-1849.
In Part 2, America's leadership changes hands from the
Founding Fathers to a new breed of Founding Sons. The
period marked rapid growth and contentious politics,
including the bitterest election in US history and
first decided by popular vote--the election of 1828.
The imposing figure of Andrew Jackson dominates as he
impresses his will upon the nation, heralding the era
of the Common Man and Manifest Destiny. We also peruse
the putrid politics of John Quincy Adams' presidency;
Battle of the Petticoats; Indian Removal Act; Bank
War; economic turmoil during Martin Van Buren's term;
William Henry Harrison's death, the first succession
crisis, elevation of Vice President John Tyler ("His
Accidency"), and the first impeachment resolution
against a president; and exploits of James K. Polk,
who took the US to war with Mexico and expanded the
nation "from Sea to Shining Sea."

10-11pm -- Man, Moment, Machine - Lincoln & the Flying
Spying Machine.
May 31st, 1862: President Abraham Lincoln is pressing
for a swift end to the Civil War. As his army bears
down on the confederate capitol, Lincoln has a radical
new machine above the battle--a hydrogen filled spy
balloon, equipped with a telegraph that can instantly
report on enemy troop movements. As the Union army
comes under intense rebel fire, commanders on the
ground use the information from the reconnaissance
balloon to turn the tide against the Confederates. 

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, November 22, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Inside Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade - 
Just like you can't have Thanksgiving without turkey,
you can't have Thanksgiving without the Macy's
Thanksgiving Day Parade. It started as a simple walk
down Broadway, but has turned into an American
institution. Enjoyed by millions of people around the
world, it has evolved from simple horse-drawn floats,
to a high-tech extravaganza. Producing the parade has
become a massive undertaking, requiring thousands of
skilled craftsmen, volunteers, planners and designers.
We will focus on the history and impact of the Macy's
Thanksgiving Day Parade, giving audiences a look at
the yearlong process of creating this momentous event
and how technology has made it into one of the most
sophisticated parades in the world.

8-9pm -- American Eats - Holiday Foods.
A bird roasted to perfection, a steaming plates of
succulent sides, a kaleidoscope of colorful holiday
sweets...nothing quite announces the holiday season
like food. Join us as we take a festive look at
America's most delicious holiday foods. Among
American's favorite trimmings are bread stuffing,
candied yams and cranberry sauce--first introduced in
1864 when General Ulysses S. Grant ordered it served
to the troops during the siege of Petersburg. We'll
also take a look back at America's obsession with the
sweeter side of the holidays, from gingerbread to
candy canes. Learn why the dreaded fruitcake--an
invention dating back to Roman times--was once against
the law! New trends in holiday feasting are always a
hit, from a deep fried turkey born out of the Bayou of
Louisiana, to the ever-humorous, and delicious,
Turducken: a chicken stuffed inside a duck inside a
turkey.

9-10pm -- The Presidents - 1849-1865.
Marked by polar opposites, this hour scrutinizes a
fractious era of the presidency--from Taylor to
Lincoln--one of the most turbulent in US history, when
the volatile issues of states' rights and slavery
erupted in civil war. We highlight the rough-hewn
style of Zachary Taylor, the second president to die
in office, through the compromising weaknesses of
Millard Fillmore and Franklin Pierce (Barbara Pierce
Bush's fourth cousin four times removed), the
near-treasonous James Buchanan administration, to
Abraham Lincoln, savior of the republic to some,
destroyer of the nation to others. The episode ends
with the first presidential assassination on Good
Friday, April 14, 1865, when Southern sympathizer and
actor John Wilkes Booth shot Lincoln in the head at
Ford's Theater in Washington during a performance of
Our American Cousin.

10-11pm -- The Presidents - 1865-1885.
During America's Age of Reconstruction, from Andrew
Johnson (Lincoln's vice president) to Chester A.
Arthur, the ruptured nation faced the difficult task
of rebuilding a union after four years of civil war
and a presidential assassination. This period was also
known as the era of "The Ohio Generals"--three of the
five presidents featured in this hour were generals in
the Civil War, all from the state of Ohio. Defining
moments include the impeachment trial of Andrew
Johnson (by a margin of one, the Senate voted not to
convict him), the triumphant ascendancy of Ulysses S.
Grant, the back-room politics of Rutherford B. Hayes,
the unrequited aspirations of James Garfield, and the
civil service reforms of Chester A. Arthur.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, November 23, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - New York Bridges.
Much of New York City's history can be viewed via its
bridges--all 18 that connect Manhattan Island to its
neighbors. Join us for a look at these architectural
masterpieces from the age of iron and steel; and, see
how they have changed destinies, linking some to
opportunity, others to ruin.

8-11pm -- Desperate Crossing: The Untold Story of The
Mayflower - 
Most of the people whom we now know as "the Pilgrims"
made their way from England to the city of Leiden,
Holland, a place of religious tolerance. They found
religious freedom, but faced extreme financial
hardship. A bold decision is made to move to America.
In the late summer of 1620 The Mayflower sets sails
carrying 102 English settlers and 30 sailors. Over the
next four months, about half of the settlers and
sailors die of scurvy and weather-related illness. An
English speaking Indian, Samoset, visits the settlers
and his visit leads to the signing of a peace treaty.
By the Fall of 1621, the English decide to celebrate
their harvest with a feast which is attended by at
least 90 Wampanoags. That peace will last 40 years.
This show features elaborate dramatic reenactments
from original source material written by eyewitnesses
and participants in the actual events of the early
1600s. 

____________________________________________________

Friday, November 24, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Modern Marvels: Statue of
Liberty 
It started as an idea at a French dinner party and
became the symbol of the free world. The story of
France's gift to the U.S. reveals a 20-year struggle
to design and build the world's largest
monument--using paper-thin copper sheets. This program
is part of a special night of 3 hour commercial-free
programming 7-10PM ET/PT.

8-9pm -- Shootout - Okinawa: The Last Battle of WWII.
It was the last battle before the bombs--the final
stepping stone on the warpath to Japan. Equal parts
bloodbath and chess match, these are the strategies
and tragedies that made Okinawa the Pacific's
bloodiest battlefield. Rifleman Leonard "Laz" Lazarick
and mortarman Donald Dencker relive the massive
Japanese assault on Nishibaru Ridge that nearly cost
them their lives. Sgt. Jack Mullikin and
machine-gunner Mel Heckt take us moment-by-moment
through a death-defying shootout inside a ruined
shack, and Private Jack Houston recalls the terrifying
moments as his company of Marines is cut down on the
slopes of infamous Sugar Loaf Hill. We will examine
the strategy, leadership, and firepower of this battle
using unique visual graphics and eyewitness testimony.

9-10pm -- The Lost Evidence - 10 - Peleliu
September 15th 1944. 17,000 US Marines hit the beaches
of the tiny coral island of Peleliu. They have been
told that this will be a three day operation, but six
days later an entire regiment has been destroyed and
the remaining units are trapped by the island's hidden
Japanese defenders. For 74 terrible days the Japanese
garrison on Peleliu make the American invasion force
pay in blood for every inch of ground. For the first
time aerial reconnaissance photographs are combined
with the latest in computer technology to create a 3D
model of the island, revealing the true nature of
Peleliu's tortured landscape and the secrets of the
Japanese defense system. With archive film,
re-enactments and powerful eye witness testimony, this
is the incredible story of one of the most ferocious
battles of the Pacific War.

10-11pm -- Dogfights - 05 - Guadalcanal
August 1942... the Solomon Islands. Heroic, die-hard
American pilots of the tiny Cactus Air Force match
skills and instincts against top Japanese aces as they
battle in the skies above Guadalcanal. Legendary
Marine Capt. John Smith and Medal of Honor recipients
Jeff De Blanc and Jim Swett pit their tough 4F4
Wildcats against the relentless Japanese Zeros. At
stake--the fate of the Pacific War. 

____________________________________________________

Saturday, November 25, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Tobacco.
Discovered around 18,000 years ago, tobacco was first
cultivated in the Andes between 5000 and 3000 B.C. At
a modern tobacco farm in North Carolina, a farmer will
show us how the crop is harvested and cured and we'll
visit the Fuente cigar plantation in the Dominican
Republic. While tobacco has brought pleasure to
countless smokers the world over--it has sent millions
to an early grave. In an interview with the Surgeon
General, we will explore this leading public health
issue. The show will also look at smokeless methods of
consumption as well as explore the use of nicotine
replacement therapy. 

8-10pm -- The Kennedy Assassination: Beyond Conspiracy
- 
No other murder in history has produced as much
speculation as the assassination of President John F.
Kennedy. Forty years after he was fatally shot, more
than 70 percent of polled Americans believe there was
a conspiracy and that Lee Harvey Oswald did not act
alone. In this 2-hour special, ABC News Anchor Peter
Jennings takes a fresh look at the assassination, the
evidence, the various and many theories, and an exact
computer simulation of the famous Abraham Zapruder
film that offers surprising results.

10-12am -- Kennedys: The Curse of Power - 
Traces the Kennedy clan's calamities that occurred on
the rise to power--from immigration from Ireland up to
John Kennedy Jr.'s tragic death in 1999. The first
hour sees the loss of Joe Jr. in WWII and the
assassinations of JFK and RFK. Hour two witnesses
Ted's downfall and role as surrogate father to a
fatherless generation.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, November 26, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Indian Warriors: The Untold Story of the
Civil War - 
Though largely forgotten, some 20-30 thousand Native
Americans fought in the Civil War. Ely Parker was a
Seneca leader who found himself in the thick of battle
at the side of General Ulysses S. Grant. Stand Waite,
a Confederate General and a Cherokee was known for his
brilliant guerilla tactics. Also highlighted is Henry
Berry Lowery, who became known as the Robin Hood of
North Carolina. Respected Civil War authors Thom
Hatchand and Lawrence Hauptman help reconstruct these
stories, along with descendants like Cherokee Nation
member Jay Hanna, whose great-grandfathers fought for
both the Union and the Confederacy. Together, they
reveal a new perspective and the very personal reasons
that drew these Native Americans into the fray.

8-10pm -- Banned from The Bible - 
In a 2-hour special, we scrutinize ancient writings
that didn't "make the cut" in the battle to create a
Christian Bible in the new religion's first few
centuries. Biblical archaeologists and scholars
examine why they were left out and if others might yet
be found. Beginning with the little-known Life of Adam
and Eve, we also peruse the Book of Jubilees, the Book
of Enoch, the Gospel of Thomas, the Protevangelium of
James, the Gospel of Mary, the Gospel of Nicodemus,
and the Apocalypse of Peter.

10-12am -- Beyond The Da Vinci Code - 
Is it the greatest story ever told - or the greatest
story ever sold? A best-selling novel sparks a debate
that could change Christianity forever. Were Jesus and
Mary Magdalene married and co-leaders of their
movement? Was Mary Magdalene, herself, the Holy Grail
- the vessel said to hold Jesus's blood--and mother of
his descendants? Did the early Church know this
"truth" and deliberately mislead followers? Is there a
secret, ancient society, the Priory of Sion, which
still protects this bloodline? Have some of the most
illustrious names in art and science been members?
These are some of the questions that Dan Brown's
best-selling novel The Da Vinci Code raises. We
examine both sides of the story--the conventional view
of Christianity and the "alternate history" proposed
by Brown--so that viewers can decide.

____________________________________________________

Monday, November 27, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Overseas Highway.
A spectacular roadway nearly 120 miles long, the
Overseas Highway links mainland Florida with the
Florida Keys, and contains 51 bridges, including the
Seven-Mile Bridge. A boat was the only mode of travel
from Miami to Key West until oil tycoon Henry Flagler
completed his railroad line in 1912. After a 1935
hurricane destroyed 40 miles of track, the scenic
highway was built using Flagler's bridges. A
$175-million refurbishment that ended in 1982 resulted
in today's remarkable Overseas Highway.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Snackfood Tech.
Extruders, molds, in-line conveyor belts. Are these
machines manufacturing adhesives, plastics, or parts
for your car? No, they're making treats for your
mouth--and you will see them doing their seductively
tasty work in this scrumptious episode. First, we
visit Utz Quality Foods in Hanover, Pennsylvania, that
produces more than one million pounds of chips per
week, and Snyder's of Hanover, the leading US pretzel
manufacturer. Next, we focus on the world's largest
candy manufacturer, Masterfoods USA, which makes Milky
Way, Snickers, Mars, and M&Ms, and take a lick at the
world's largest lollipop producer, Tootsie Roll
Industries. And at Flower Foods' Crossville, Tennessee
plant, an army of cupcakes rolls down a conveyer belt.
The final stop is Dreyer's Bakersfield, California
plant, where 20,000 ice cream bars and 9,600
drumsticks roll off the line in an hour.

9-10pm -- American Eats - Holiday Foods.
A bird roasted to perfection, a steaming plates of
succulent sides, a kaleidoscope of colorful holiday
sweets...nothing quite announces the holiday season
like food. Join us as we take a festive look at
America's most delicious holiday foods. Among
American's favorite trimmings are bread stuffing,
candied yams and cranberry sauce--first introduced in
1864 when General Ulysses S. Grant ordered it served
to the troops during the siege of Petersburg. We'll
also take a look back at America's obsession with the
sweeter side of the holidays, from gingerbread to
candy canes. Learn why the dreaded fruitcake--an
invention dating back to Roman times--was once against
the law! New trends in holiday feasting are always a
hit, from a deep fried turkey born out of the Bayou of
Louisiana, to the ever-humorous, and delicious,
Turducken: a chicken stuffed inside a duck inside a
turkey.

10-11pm -- Engineering an Empire - Britain: Blood and
Steel
At its pinnacle, the British Empire spanned every
continent and covered one quarter of the Earth's land
mass. Through the centuries, the rulers of this
enormous powerhouse used extraordinary engineering
feats to become an industrial and military titan,
loaded with riches. Some of their many pioneering
accomplishments include the world's first locomotive,
a superhighway of underground sewers, the imposing and
grand Westminster Palace, and the most powerful and
technically advanced navy in the age of sail. Using
cutting edge CGI, we'll take a look at the key leaders
of the British Empire--and explore the mark each left
on society. Peter Weller hosts.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, November 28, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Panama Canal.
Chronicles one of the most incredible engineering
feats of all time: construction of the 51-mile canal
that took 10 years to build and employed over 40,000
workers, 6,000 of whom died of yellow fever, malaria,
and other horrors. An earlier, 9-year attempt by the
French ended in failure and cost 20,000 lives.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Candy.
It pulls, stretches, bubbles, hardens, crunches, and
melts! We eat about 7-billion tons of it yearly. We're
talking about Candy--loved by kids and savored by
adults. Candy-making evolved from a handmade operation
to high-tech mass production. Nowhere is that more
apparent than at Hershey's. On a tour of their newest
production facility, we learn how they process the
cocoa bean. At See's Candy, we see how they make their
famous boxed chocolates--on a slightly smaller scale
than Hershey's. We get a sweet history lesson at
Schimpff's Confectionery, where they still use small
kettles, natural flavors, and hand-operated equipment.
Then, we visit Jelly Belly, purveyors of the original
gourmet jellybean. Saltwater-taffy pullers hypnotize
us on our sweet-tooth tour; we gaze at extruders
making miles of licorice rope; and watch as nostalgia
candy bars Abba-Zaba and Big Hunk get packaged. And in
this sugary hour, we digest the latest
sensations--gourmet chocolates and scorpion on a
stick!

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Breakfast Tech.
It slices and squeezes, sorts and sizes, mixes and
cooks. Every morning we count on it to keep our orange
juice fresh, our eggs whole, our cereals flaked, and
our McGriddle syrupy--this is Breakfast Tech. Aboard
the aircraft carrier USS Stennis, we'll see how
technology makes it possible for chefs to prepare a
fresh and nutritious breakfast for five thousand
hungry sailors. We will take you to the Tyson Foods
factory where thousands of pork bellies are dissected
into savory, smoked slices of bacon and at the Sunkist
Orange Juice Factory, we'll watch a million oranges
get squeezed to a pulp. For those on the go, it's a
tour of a McDonald's factory to see the McGriddle
pancake being made. If you eat breakfast and you're
not afraid to see where it came from, join us on this
tasty journey.

10-11pm -- Man, Moment, Machine - Alexander Graham
Bell & the Astonishing Telephone.
March 1876: Alexander Graham Bell struggles with an
invention that may change the world. Early nineteenth
century America is experiencing an explosive growth
and expansion across a vast landscape. A technology is
needed to meet the communication needs for this new
nation, and Bell is convinced that he can transmit
speech over great distances. Early telegraphs can only
transmit one message over one wire at one time, and
the message must be coded and decoded one letter at a
time. Bell begins work on a multiple telegraph, but
his genius will lead to a different revolutionary
device that will carry thousands of simultaneous
messages and shape the future--the telephone.

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, November 29, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- History's Mysteries - Ship of Gold.
In 1857, en route to New York from California, the
steamship Central America vanished in a killer storm
off North Carolina's coast, taking with her 400
passengers and nearly 21 tons of gold bullion. Here is
the story of the worst US peacetime sea disaster, and
how high-tech treasure hunters recovered her fortune
over 130 years later.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Wine.
A glass a day is said to keep the doctor away. A
defeated Napoleon drowned his sorrows in it; Thomas
Jefferson became obsessed with it. Wine is an integral
part of our culture and more wine is consumed today
than ever before. Supermarket shelves that once
carried only box wine and jugs are now lined with
wines from Australia, Chile, and South Africa. Aerial
imaging and infrared photography once used by NASA to
map the moon is now employed by wineries to analyze
soil, vine vigor, and even disease. Paying tribute to
wine's unique history we will travel the world over to
explore wineries, the worlds' most historic wine
cellar and the oldest restaurant in Paris.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Coffee.
Traces the origins of this tasty drink from Ethiopia
over 1,000 years ago to the espresso-fueled explosion
of specialty coffee stores like Starbucks today. Along
the way, we'll see how American companies like Hills
Brothers, Maxwell House, Folgers, and MJB grew to be
giants. Discover how billions of coffee beans make
their journey from coffee farms and plantations, and
are processed in gigantic roasting and packaging
plants before showing up in coffee cups all over the
world. Details the invention and production of instant
coffee, decaffeinated coffee, freeze-dried coffee, and
the espresso machine. Also, we explain how coffee made
shift work in factories possible, while coffeehouses
provided a creative cauldron that brewed political and
artistic progress in the 18th and 19th centuries. And,
we also provide tips on how to make a better cup at
home!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Harvesting 2.
In America's orchards and farm fields, the constant
struggle between hand labor and mechanization has
produced dozens of efficient and sometimes bizarre
harvesting methods. We'll learn the secrets of the
orchard manager and his ladder crew as they check
fruit pressures and barometric readings. We'll visit
California's largest fruit packing house and try to
keep up with 10-fruit-per-second conveyors. Then we're
off to the corn fields of Nebraska and the cranberry
marshes of central Wisconsin. Finally, we'll go
underground to the world's largest mushroom farm where
the harvest takes place in limestone caverns that run
some 150 miles. From fruit tree picking platforms to
cranberry beaters and corn pickers, we constantly
strive to speed the harvest.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, November 30, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Farming Technology.
The US agricultural process, from seed to shelf, is so
efficient that most people don't think much about it.
But food growing and processing is ever more
sophisticated, employing computer-guided,
ground-shaking machinery, and sometimes controversial
techniques. It's an industry of declining family
farms, diminishing returns, yet higher yields. We
review the evolution of the tools used to produce
food, show the steps in the cycle that bring food to
the table, and look at the future of farming.

8-9pm -- Engineering an Empire - The Maya: Death
Empire.
At the height of its glory, this mysterious
civilization ruled a territory of 125,000 square miles
across parts of Guatemala, Mexico, Honduras, El
Salvador and Belize. What began as a modest population
of hunters and gatherers expanded into more than forty
flourishing city-states who engineered sky-high
temple-pyramids, ornate palaces and advanced hydraulic
systems. Where did they come from and what
catastrophes caused the collapse of this innovative
civilization? From the Temple-Pyramids at Tikal, to
the royal tomb at Palenque, to the star observatory at
Chichén Itzá, this episode will examine the
architecture and infrastructure that enabled the rise
and fall of the ancient Maya civilization.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - More Snackfood Tech.
They crunch; they ooze; they crackle; they pop--mmmmm,
yeah! Soft drinks, donuts, meat snacks, popcorn, and
gum. What's your weakness? From the handmade treats of
the earliest civilizations to hi-tech mass production,
these snacks are borne of man's need to feed his
cravings. Join us for an hour-long tasty treat as we
examine the history of snackfoods and check out how
they are made today.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Nuts
Pintsized as a pea or big as a bowling ball,
nutritional, durable, and versatile, nuts have been a
staple of the human diet since time began, and
archaeological evidence places them among our earliest
foods. For that, the ancients worshiped them. And
because they were relatively non-perishable, nuts
sustained the imperial armies of Rome and China, the
royal navies of England and Spain, and the native
tribes that roamed the American wilderness. Today, we
think of nuts as mere snacks, but in a poignant
segment, we feature how a peanut product is used by
organizations like UNICEF to reverse malnutrition in
starving children in less than four weeks. And a
powder ground from walnut shells cleans everything
from ship hulls to the Space Shuttle. From ancient
traditions of tree-picking and hand-gathering to
today's powerful machine shakers, sophisticated
irrigation techniques, and the latest bio-science,
we'll provide a spread of history that's just as
smooth as your peanut butter!
FREE Work At Home GUIDE for our visitors!
3000 names from September 11, 2001
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Note: Wild West Tech hosted by David Carradine, some episodes narrated by Keith Carradine:

Wild West Tech marathon:
Deadwood Tech.
Saturday September 2 10:00 AM
Saloons.
                     11:00 AM
Freak Shows 2.
                     12:00 PM
Biggest Machines in the West.
                     01:00 PM
Execution Tech.
                     02:00 PM
The Gunslingers.
                     03:00 PM
Revenge Tech
                     10:30 PM
Vices.
                     @ 11pm 


Mail Call:
Bren Gun & Carrier/Special Forces Final Exam/Beasts of Burden/Predator/1st RPV: #52
Tuesday September 05 12pm & 6pm
R. Lee Ermey rolls up to HQ toting a WWII light machine gun, the Bren Gun, and rides in a "Tankette", the armored vehicle that carried the Bren and its 2-man team. At the Army's Special Warfare Center and School, he checks out "Operation Robin Sage", the final exam--a 14-day "war" waged in North Carolina. Lee learns that Green Berets are training to handle pack beasts like camels and donkeys, and looks at the leading remote-powered vehicle, the Predator, and the first RPV, WWII's Weary Willy.

MK-19 Grenade Launcher/PPSH-41/WWII Weasel/Vertijet: # 79
Tuesday September 05 12:30 PM & 6:30 PM
R. Lee Ermey, is back at HQ for a new season of shows jam-packed with gear, gun and guts. First, the Gunny is pitching horseshoes and because "close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades," it's the perfect introduction to Lee's trip to Camp Pendleton where he gets some trigger time with the MK-19 grenade launcher. Next, the focus is on Russian tactics and weapons of WWII. Lee shows us the Russian sub machine gun of choice during the campaign, the PPSH-41. Then, it's time for a test drive when a WWII Weasel shows up at HQ. Finally, it's time to dip into the Gunny's Fabulous Flops file for a segment about the Vertijet, America's first vertical take-off jet aircraft.

M-1 Garand Rifle/First Assault Rifle/Jato/Golden Knights Parachute Team/Barrage Balloons
Saturday September 09 11am & Wednesday September 20 12pm
R. Lee Ermey answers viewer questions about the M-1 Garand, the rifle General Patton called "the greatest battle implement ever devised", and demonstrates the world's first assault rifle, the German MP-44. He takes to the sky to explain jet assisted take-off (JATO); offers an eye-popping look at the stunts performed by the Golden Knights, the Army's precision freefall parachute team; explains how barrage balloons protected London during the Blitz; and goes through the alphabet--military style!

Revolutionary War Musket/Jousting/Foxholes: #8
Saturday September 16 11am
Find out how fast a Revolutionary War soldier could fire a musket, the ins and outs of jousting, and how to dig a foxhole.

For info on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket
(movie available on video and DVD)

Previous History Channel primetime listings:

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February
January 2006 Hellcats of the Navy

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From the invention of the electric battery in 1800 to the murdered remains of missing Washington intern Chandra Levy being discovered in a Washington D.C. park*, find out what happened when with our exclusive History of the World Timeline!
GO TO: HistoryChannel.com/worldtimeline

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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