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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st & 15th)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Sorry for the delay, apparently everyone at A&E was in the illegal alien rallies yesterday

Monday, May 1, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Dangerous Cargo.
Toxic traffic is everywhere! An average of 800,000
shipments of hazardous materials hit our highways and
railways daily. From Wild West wooden crates filled
with explosives to HAZMAT containers of nuclear waste,
we shadow dangerous cargo. We ride shotgun on a
hazardous material shipment that's tracked by
satellites; hunt down the hush-hush "ghost
fleet"--trucks carrying classified government
materials; and board a Con-Air flight moving another
kind of nasty stuff--dangerous felons!

8-9pm -- UFO Files - The Day after Roswell.
Delve into the aftermath and repercussions of the 1947
Roswell incident, when many believe an alien
spacecraft crashed in New Mexico. Based on The Day
after Roswell by Lt. Col. Philip J. Corso and William
Birnes, we explore if technologies like the laser,
fiber optics, the integrated circuit, super-strong
fibers, and night vision were developed with the aid
of aliens. Career officer Corso claims his first alien
encounter came on July 6, `47, while on late-night
security rounds at Ft. Riley, Kansas, where he saw
bodies of EBEs (Extraterrestrial Biological Entities)
inside shipping crates. In 1961, as Chief of Foreign
Technology in the Army's department of Research and
Development, his job included analyzing alien
technology from Roswell, then introducing it into
America's technological mainstream--thus,
reverse-engineering alien artifacts. And we talk to
many scientists involved at the time, who credit hard
work, not alien contact, with these technological
advances.

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Real Temple of
Doom.
Thousands of years before the Inca ruled the nation
now called Peru, a strange and unique civilization
dominated the region. It was called Chavin, and its
story is one of the most bizarre in history. Unlike
the other civilizations of the Americas, Chavin's
status as a regional superpower wasn't based on its
military muscle. Instead, the rulers of Chavin
exercised a cult-like control over their subjects with
the aid of hallucinogenic plants. Josh Bernstein
ventures deep into the miles of tunnels beneath the
ruins of Chavin de Huantar, comes face to face with
some of the most fearsome animals of the Peruvian
Amazon, and investigates a real temple of doom. As he
tries to understand this mysterious culture, he takes
part in one of the ancient rituals still practiced by
the country's powerful shaman-priests.

10-11pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Mystery of the
Channel Collision.
On a stormy night in March 1899, two ships head toward
each other in the English Channel. The Duke of
Buccleugh, a 380-foot iron steamer is bound for India,
with a mixed cargo of china, glassware, and industrial
goods. The Vandalia, a wooden sailing ship loaded with
barrels of petroleum is hurrying to reach London.
Shortly after 1pm, the two ships collide with deadly,
but surprising results. The iron Duke sinks quickly,
with her entire crew of 47; the badly damaged wooden
Vandalia limps ashore. The surviving captain reports
his sailing ship was operating properly when suddenly
rammed by the iron steamer, and for 100 years, his
claim goes unchallenged. But now, evidence on the
wreck suggests a different story. Did the Duke of
Buccleugh ram the Vandalia or was it the other way
round? And just how does wood sink iron? Join our
intrepid divers, John Chatterton and Richie Kohler, as
they seek answers.

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Tuesday, May 2, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Hadrian's Wall.
74-miles long and 2,000 years old, Hadrian's Wall
winds over the hills and valleys of Northern England,
marking the northernmost extent of a long-dead empire.
Built of stone and mortar by Roman soldiers, it is the
most significant Roman ruin in England. Ordered built
by the Emperor Hadrian around the time of his visit in
122 AD, it was more a permanent demarcation and less a
defensive barrier. We'll visit this archaeological
treasure, which teaches us much of what the Roman era
was like for Britain. Patrick Macnee thinks he was mad.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Hi-Tech Hitler.
Was it possible for good science to come out of the
Nazi regime, and why did science and technology thrive
during this time? When Hitler came to power, Germany
was one of the world's most advanced technological
countries. We'll examine five crucial scientific
advances of the Nazi period that still have an impact
today. Nazi scientists were the first to establish a
direct link between smoking and cancer. Hitler
exploited the discovery of Hi-Fi recording equipment
to boost Nazi propaganda broadcasts. The first jet
fighter flew in Germany, eventually commissioned by
Hitler, but too late to win the war in the air, and
with it came the first pilot ejection seat. Even the
electron microscope, one of the greatest inventions of
the 20th century, was discovered in Germany, but
ignored by the Nazis. This is the true story of the
scientific feats and failures of Hitler's Nazi
Germany.

9-10pm -- Tsunami 2004: Waves of Death - 
The 2004 Tsunami, centered in the Indian Ocean, was
caused by a 9.3 earthquake--the second strongest quake
on record. Join us for a minute-by-minute look at
nature's fury at its worst, when the tsunami kills
more than 200,000 people in 14 countries. In this
special, we examine the tsunami as it moves from coast
to coast through the eyes of people who lived through
it and scientists now studying its path of
devastation. Drawing on the extraordinary volume of
amateur video that recorded the disaster, we take
viewers inside the world's deadliest tsunami.

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - B-25 Bomber
In 1943, a B-25 Mitchell, WWII's most versatile
twin-engine bomber, crash-landed in South Carolina. It
sank 150 feet to the bottom of a lake and over time
was forgotten. Now, 60 years later, a local doctor is
determined to raise the giant bomber intact and give
it to a museum. Our team--divers, engineers, and
preservationists--takes on the job of moving the
20,000-pound bomber to the surface, while faced with
the challenges of working in nearly zero-visibility
murky waters and the wrath of an approaching
hurricane, plus fear that the plane may be breaking
apart!

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Wednesday, May 3, 2006
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6-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Motorcycles.
Set the sedan's safety brake and hop on your "hog" for
a 2-hour high-speed history of the motorcycle--from
the 1868 "steam velocipede" to the early 20th century,
when they were a low-cost alternative to automobiles;
from Harley-Davidsons preferred by Hell's Angels and
police to motocross riders who take bikes into the air
and onto the dirt. We also look to the motorcycle's
future, featuring Jay Leno's jet-propelled Y2K
sportbike and Erik Buell's bike-without-a-gas-tank
creation.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Diamond Mines.
Half a mile below the earth's surface, men mine for
rough diamonds--a pure carbon substance. Brilliant
when cut and polished, they are marketed as the most
precious gem in the world. From the earliest mines of
the 4th century BC to today's technological wonders in
South Africa, we explore the history and technology of
the diamond mine.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Silver Mines.
It was called the "mother lode", a deposit of silver
so massive that it would produce $300-million in its
first 25 years of operation, establish Nevada as a
state, and bankroll the Union Army in the Civil War.
Named after an early investor, we'll see how the
Comstock Lode, discovered near Virginia City, proved
to be a scientific laboratory from which vast
improvements in mining technology and safety were
pioneered, including innovations in drilling,
ventilation, drainage, and ore processing.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Shovels.
From a prehistoric sharpened digging stick to today's
$15-million monster machines, our journey for the
ultimate shovel begins in California's borax mines,
where the P&H 4100 uses advanced electronics, brute
strength, and savvy operators to excavate 170-ton
chunks in a single scoop. We travel back to 1835, when
William Otis set off an American digging frenzy with
his patented steam shovel. And at the Jet Propulsion
Laboratory, we kick the legs of NASA's latest Mars
Lander: Phoenix. This stationary probe has a robotic
arm with a shovel scoop designed to dig into the soil,
locate ice, and analyze its properties. Back on Earth,
the Hitachi Corporation's 200-ton hydraulic
humanitarian shovel is designed to locate and explode
landmines in Third-World countries.

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Thursday, May 4, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Drag Racing.
Legendary drivers lead us on a record-breaking race
through a century-long search for sheer acceleration
that began before World War One, when hot-rodders
modified Model-T Fords to see how fast they could go.
Today's dragsters can cover a quarter-mile from a
standing start in 4.5 seconds, hitting top speeds
above 330 mph. Top driver Gary Clapshaw shows us how
to put together a modern dragster and revolutionary
designer Bob Norwood unveils his newest car.

8-9pm -- Ancient Marvels - Pyramids: Majesty and
Mystery.
Standing majestically for centuries, the world's great
pyramids have long inspired and mystified scholars.
Leading experts and historians explore the engineering
genius that created some of the largest structures on
the planet. From ancient Egypt to Central America, we
visit these technological masterpieces.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Mysteries of the Bermuda
Triangle, Part 2.
In this hour we take a scientific look at just what
may be the causes for shipwrecks and plane crashes in
the Triangle. We employ a team of scientific
investigators from various disciplines to help us in
the search for legitimate explanations. Included on
the team are a meteorologist, oceanographer, aviation
expert, and an accident investigator. Using this team
of scientific investigators, we attempt to unravel
Triangle mysteries, with a focus on the tragedy of
Flight 19. We examine likely causes such as the area's
harsh weather conditions, rapid underwater currents,
and mechanical and human error. Finally, we provide a
minute-by-minute reconstruction of Flight 19. In it,
our accident investigator sorts through all the
evidence and presents the logical verdict as to just
what caused 27 airmen to lose their lives in 1945 over
the Bermuda Triangle.

10-11pm -- Declassified - Secrets of World War I.
This is the secret story of "the War to End All Wars"
and what happened when the first weapons of mass
destruction reached the battlefield. We uncover the
forgotten story of the secret deals, government
mistakes, political intolerance, and America's role in
the war. We mine formerly guarded vaults and archives
worldwide, reviewing once top-secret footage and
declassified materials to search for the facts behind
the thrilling stories with which we've become
familiar.

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Friday, May 5, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bullet Trains.
Traveling between 135 and 190 miles per hour with an
astonishingly high safety record, bullet trains can be
found throughout Europe, Japan, and on the US eastern
seaboard. How high-speed trains are propelled is
rooted in fundamentals that haven't changed since the
first electric trolleys appeared in the 19th century.
We see how scientists are looking at new alternatives
to electricity, including magnetic levitation that can
move passenger trains 345 miles per hour and beyond!

8-9pm -- Super Tools - Ship.
A modern-day aircraft carrier is like a floating city:
with 5,000 crewmembers, 80 aircraft, and a
four-and-a-half acre big flight deck. It's nearly as
long as the Empire State Building is tall, and has its
very own 20-story skyscraper balanced on top of it.
Constructing one of these is as much a marvel as the
ship itself. We take viewers to the Newport News
Shipyard in Virginia, where the George H. W. Bush--the
latest Nimitz-class aircraft carrier--is inching
closer to completion. Gone are the hammers, nails, and
even rivets of the old shipyards, replaced with
plasma, lasers, and robots that are pressed into
service building the largest warship afloat. We go
deep inside the guts of this warship-in-the-making to
get up close to the tools that rule the shipbuilding
world: the plasma beveling cutter, robotic welder,
shafting lathe, laser tracker, and pneumatic drill.

9-10pm -- Super Tools - Tunnel.
In this episode, we dig deep into the workings,
history, and technology of the superstar tools that
enable us to burrow beneath the earth.
Tunnels--underground, through mountains, beneath
oceans and rivers--are among engineering's great
achievements. Workers must create a seamless and
waterproof space where only unforgiving rock existed
before. We'll visit one of America's biggest tunnel
projects, Atlanta's CSO (Combined Sewage Overflow). To
help manage waste water during torrential rains, two
four and a half mile long tunnels are being
constructed under the city to channel storm water
overflow to a pumping station. We'll watch the action
of the five superstar tools of tunnel
construction--the rock drill, explosives, the tunnel
boring machine, the gas detector, and the shotcrete
gun. What began as backbreaking labor with a simple
hammer and chisel is today a state-of-the-art hi-tech
industry thanks to the ever-improving technology of
these five essential tools.

10-11pm -- Super Tools - Skyscraper.
Skyscrapers are an extraordinary feat of human
engineering: exposing millions of pounds of concrete
and steel to the enemy forces of wind and gravity.
Starting with the foundation and on through the
support structures and concrete flooring, every piece
of these superstructures has to be super-strong. We'll
soar high to spotlight the construction of three new
buildings: a 30-story hotel tower for the Palms Casino
in Las Vegas; a 52-story office building in Manhattan,
the new headquarters of The New York Times; and a
92-story residential and commercial building in
Chicago, the Trump International Hotel and Tower.
Along the way, we go behind the scenes with the five
tools that make these buildings possible: the
foundation drill rig, the tower crane, the impact
wrench, the power trowel, and the total station. Each
of these tools has evolved over the 100-plus year
history of the skyscraper era.

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Saturday, May 6, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil Tankers.
The biggest moving objects ever built by man, oil
tankers dominate the world's waterways, both in size
and numbers. Upwards of 10,000 strong, the world
tanker fleet's vast number results from the modern,
insatiable thirst for oil. We'll dig into the history
of oil transport--from Civil War days to the critical
WWII years and invention of the supertanker in the
1950s. And we examine the financial impact of
modifying these steel leviathans to prevent future
catastrophic environmental disasters.

8-10pm -- Boneyard: Where Machines End Their Lives - 
Where do machines go when they die? From B-52 Bombers
to massive aircraft carriers, from passenger cars to
Cold War cruise missiles and remnants of the Twin
Towers, all that we manufacture has a lifespan. But
reaching the end of their original purposes can be
just the beginning. Join us on a fascinating visual
journey as we follow some of our greatest achievements
in manufacturing, design engineering, and construction
to their after-lives and final resting places.

10-12am -- The World Trade Center - 
On September 11, 2001, terrorists did the unthinkable
when they flew two fuel-loaded jetliners into the
World Trade Center. The Twin Towers' physical height
and symbolic stature made them the perfect target.
They were remarkable achievements in architecture,
construction, and technology. In this 2-hour profile,
we look at how the WTC was constructed and talk to
representatives from the Army Corps of Engineers, New
York's Office of Emergency Management, FEMA, and DNA
experts about the aftermath. 3000 names

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Sunday, May 7, 2006
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7-8pm -- Comets: Prophets of Doom - Part 2.
At the conclusion of two spectacular NASA missions
that sent spaceships to rendezvous with these
mysterious objects, we examine the scientific and
historical record of comets, including man's reaction
to them. Did a comet lead the Wise Men to Bethlehem?
Did they foretell the death of kings, the destruction
of civilizations? How did Halley's Comet provide Isaac
Newton with the clues for his theories of gravity?
Finally, what comprises this "dirty snowball" and how
can we protect ourselves if headed on a
collision-course with one? 

8-10pm -- Mega Movers - Moving the Impossible.
From the engineers of ancient Egypt to the architects
of Renaissance Rome and the modern era's moving
miracles--the men, methods, and machines of structural
moving have pushed the limits of imagination and
technology for over 5,000 years. In this 2-hour
chronicle, we'll investigate the amazing feats of mega
moving from primitive civilization through the
Industrial Revolution into the 21st Century--including
the evolution of technology that allows a 3,000-ton
building to be driven down the street by remote
control! From the granite blocks of Stonehenge to the
awesome Vatican Obelisk and the Cape Hatteras
Lighthouse, see how ambition and ingenuity have
continued to defy convention, break records, and
achieve the unthinkable in moving!

10-12am -- Meteors: Fire in the Sky - 
Meteors, comets, and asteroids cross the solar system
to offer clues about our planet and universe. Can they
destroy civilizations? Did they wipe out the
dinosaurs? Have they brought life to our planet? And
when will the next one hit? Aided by elaborate
animation and live-action footage, we learn what these
mysterious space rocks really are and imagine what
likely happened 65-million years ago, when an object
plowed into the Yucatan Peninsula. We see how certain
spectacular meteor falls advanced our understanding of
what they are and the danger that they pose. We talk
to leading experts--astronomers and geologists
including David Levy and Carolyn Shoemaker,
co-discoverers of the Shoemaker-Levy comet that fell
into Jupiter in 1994. And we talk to NASA scientists
about recent missions to asteroids and comets and
speculate on ways to move Earth-threatening asteroids
and comets out of our way. Because it isn't a question
of if but when the next deadly impact will take place.

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Monday, May 8, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters: New
Orleans.
One of the deadliest natural disasters experienced by
US, Hurricane Katrina devastated New
Orleans--submerging it under a torrent of floodwater.
We investigate why the levees and water-pumping system
failed and join a "Geological Detective" as he sifts
through the rubble to uncover how 80% of the city was
left underwater and discovers how the levee system was
a potential disaster in the making. We also delve deep
into the 80-year-old pumping system to unearth how it
flooded and why it took weeks to drain the city of up
to 25 feet of water. We learn the engineering cause
behind the nightmare suffered by victims seeking
shelter in the Superdome. And our investigators
discover the design flaws on one of the major escape
routes of the city. Using satellite global
positioning, we find that New Orleans and the entire
Louisiana wetland coastline are actually sinking. How
can New Orleans stop this from ever happening again
and should it be rebuilt at all?

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Alien Engineering, Part 1.
Prepare for an exercise in imagination. Suppose that
an alien spacecraft crashed in the desert and we
humans recovered it. What could we learn from its
engineers? Using data gleaned from years of UFO
sightings, we recreate a typical ship using
cutting-edge animation, discover why aliens choose the
craft shapes they do, learn how they overcome the
effects of Earth's atmosphere, defy gravity, cancel
inertia, and travel faster than the speed of light!
Our experts--reverse engineers--show us what's "under
the hood" of alien craft. We explore the technology
that makes other-world visitations possible, what
distance-shrinking device or wormhole excavator
permits ships to travel space's expanse in minutes,
and how the semi-transparent spacecraft skin
functions. At first inspection, the technology seems
crazy, but according to our experts, nothing is beyond
the realm of possibility.

9-11pm -- Mega Disasters: San Francisco Earthquake - 
At the dawn of the 20th century, San Francisco was the
place to be; a hub of trade and travel, business and
banking. Located just to the east of the San Andreas
Fault, the bay area is interlaced with eight major
earthquake-producing faults. We examine the
cataclysmic earthquake that struck on April 18,
1906--it jolted the city for 50 seconds, the earth
split for 270 miles, and a resulting firestorm raged
for three days. Amazing photographs document the
city's destruction and efforts to rebuild. But the
rush to get back in business came at a price--the city
was rebuilt on the same seismic hazards. Now
scientists warn that if it happens again damage and
casualties will be much worse. The potential
catastrophe unfolds through state-of-the-art graphics
with bridges collapsing, high-rise fires, and freeways
destroyed. A similar seismic jolt today would lead to
a mega-disaster in San Francisco, with billions of
dollars in damage and casualties in the tens of
thousands.

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Tuesday, May 9, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Nature's Engineers 2.
Think man is unique within the animal kingdom? You
might not after this hour that features an amazing
collection of earth's non-human inhabitants that use
tools, build intricate structures, create traps to
capture prey, and perform complex procedures,
including farming. From Egyptian vultures utilizing
stones to crack open hard-shelled ostrich eggs to
chimpanzees using a "tool kit" to extract termites
from their nests, we learn that our ability to create
tools is not exclusive. Other mammals create
subterranean structures, including those prodigious
diggers Prairie Dogs, and many animals and insects
make devices to augment hunting, such as the
Ogre-faced Spider that spins a small web to throw down
on unsuspecting passersby. And we're not the only ones
to work as a unified, multi-skilled force.
Aphid-Raising Ants protect and care for herds of plant
juice-sucking aphids that they "milk".

8-9pm -- Rogue Waves - 
Join us for the amazing story of one of nature's most
terrifying forces. With striking visuals from ships in
storm-tossed seas, the special presents dramatic tales
of rogue wave disasters throughout history, and
explores the astonishing scientific discoveries
surrounding this deadly phenomenon. Aided by
mind-blowing CGI footage from the motion picture
Poseidon by Wolfgang Petersen, director of The Perfect
Storm, we reveal the awesome power of this ocean
menace as it really is--a monster rising from the
deep!

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - West Coast Tsunami.
What would happen if a massive earthquake and tsunami
were to strike the West Coast of the United States?
Experts say it could easily match the catastrophic
2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in scale and might. A
700-mile stretch of coast, from northern California to
southern British Columbia lies just off the extremely
volatile Cascadia Subduction Zone. Many seismologists
say that after more than 300 years of massive pressure
build-up, it is likely to erupt in the not too distant
future. And it has happened in the past. Geologists
have discovered evidence of a massive tsunami that
struck the Pacific Northwest in 1700--as powerful as
the devastating Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004. Hundreds
of thousands of lives are at stake. We'll talk to
emergency planners, seismologists, and other
researchers who are trying to get a handle on when
Cascadia will blow, and what--if anything--we can do
to minimize the disaster.

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - Locomotives.
Travel back to the golden age of railroads in this
episode when a small town in the state of Washington
is determined to save its cherished train depot from
the wrecking ball. But time and Mother Nature have
taken their toll on the aging structure. Will the old
depot once again welcome tourists to the town of
Morton? Meanwhile, in two Texan cities, we move two
unique locomotives using two different methods--one
used for more than 150 years, and another that's on
the cutting edge of technology. Watch how these giant
locomotives roll again for the first time in 50 years.

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Wednesday, May 10, 2006
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7-8pm -- History's Mysteries - Ship of Gold.
In 1857, en route to New York from California, the
steamship Central America vanished in a killer storm
off North Carolina's coast, taking with her 400
passengers and nearly 21 tons of gold bullion. Here is
the story of the worst US peacetime sea disaster, and
how high-tech treasure hunters recovered her fortune
over 130 years later.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The Lumberyard.
At the center of the American Dream is the home--and
at the center of its creation or renovation is the
lumberyard. We'll explore the options lumberyards
provide for builders and renovators--from natural to
engineered woods. We'll show how plywood and pressed
woods are made, trace exotic woods to jungle and
desert, visit a special lumberyard that deals in
recycled and antique woods, and go on an underwater
expedition as divers locate ancient logs buried in the
Great Lakes and New Zealand. We'll see how
50,000-year-old ancient Kauri wood is "mined" from a
bog and is now all the rage among those who live in
mansions and travel on yachts. From the lowly 2-by-4
used to build a tract home, to a reclaimed set of
historic planks used to make a million-dollar bar in a
5-star hotel, this eye-opening program hits the nail
right on the head.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Logging Tech.
When Paul Bunyan cried "Timber!", he never foresaw
today's cutting-edge, controversial industry that
feeds a ravenous, lumber-crazy world--a world striving
to protect nature while devouring it. Come into the
woods to see how he-men and hi-tech combine forces to
topple 4-billion trees annually; journey to
19th-century America, when lumberjacks cut a legend as
large as the timber they felled; and travel with a
tree from stump to sawmill and learn its non-wood
uses--from aspirin to film to toothpaste!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Drilling.
Spiraling deep into the ground...driving holes through
solid rock...rotating, hammering, and scraping its way
through whatever it may encounter...whether it's earth
or ice, steel or stone, nothing can stand in its way!
This episode penetrates the world of drilling and
explores various types of drilling's colorful
histories. From drilling for water in the New Mexico
desert to searching for oil in the Gulf of Mexico,
we'll show you how it's done. The program features the
quest to drill the deepest hole ever and the
scientific drill ship expected to perform the feat,
and also looks at drills used to recover ice cores
that will unearth thousands of years of climate
history. We also examine the latest and greatest
tunnel boring machines, robotic drills, and handheld
power drills. Finally, we check out laser drills--both
large and small--including a drill that can bore a
hole a fraction of the diameter of a human hair.

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Thursday, May 11, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Panzers.
German tanks revolutionized military doctrine. Their
speed and tactical usage, backed up by the Luftwaffe,
helped create the Blitzkrieg (lightning war) that
stormed over Europe and dominated battlefields.

8-9pm -- Snipers - One Shot--One Kill.
Statistics prove it's damned hard to kill an enemy
soldier on the battlefield. That's why the US Marine
Corps urges its best marksmen to become snipers--human
machines, inhuman patience and precision. From
distances up to three miles, tomorrow's Marines train
to neutralize enemies with one shot from their
rifles--a shot that can mean the difference between
peaceful surrender and bloody assault. We journey from
Vietnam to Africa and Eastern Europe to observe these
snipers watching...waiting...firing.

9-10pm -- Snipers - World's Deadliest Snipers.
Among the world's best, the British Royal Marines
build on their noble traditions and the lessons of
history to hone the skills of snipers and place them
in a proud global lineage. The daring British
Commandos, perfecting their use of camouflage and
stalking, cleared the hedgerows at Normandy. The
Russian Red Army snipers, known for patience and
stealth, helped to break the siege of Stalingrad. We
also look at a little-known force--the Red Army's
deadly women snipers, who fought alongside the men.

10-11pm -- Declassified - The Taliban.
To the United States and the Soviet Union, Afghanistan
was always a pawn in a much bigger game. First the
Soviets bought them off and then the US sent in arms.
The Russians sent in troops and we sent in the CIA to
train the Mujahedin to kill Russians. But then came
the Taliban and the pawns started moving on their
own... We'll mine the guarded vaults and archives
around the world to reveal the untold story of how the
pieces turned on the players and the jihad came to
Kabul and the streets of New York.

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Friday, May 12, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Egyptian Pyramids.
Constructed as tombs for the ancient pharaohs, over
100 pyramids remain in Egypt. Built during a span of
well over 1,000 years, they stand as cultural and
engineering marvels of staggering proportions. But
many things about these monuments, including the exact
methods used to construct them, remain tantalizingly
obscure. Travel back in time as we investigate their
evolution--from the earlier mastaba to the Step
Pyramid, Bent Pyramid, and of course, the magnificent
necropolis at Giza.

8-10pm -- Warrior Empire: The Mughals - 
From 1526 to 1858, the Mughals, a dynasty of nomadic
Asian rulers, created a massive and powerful empire
covering much of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh,
passing along an appetite for territory expansion and
brutality. But they were also technological innovators
and builders of some of the most enduring architecture
in South Asia. Through their conquests and
achievements, we learn about their military
innovations like composite bows, matchlock guns,
rocketry, chain mail, and cannons. We explore their
feats of archery on horseback and use of elephants as
fearsome weapons. And we examine their culture and
enduring architecture, including palaces, forts, water
systems, gardens, and the Taj Mahal--a tomb that took
22 years to build in honor of the most beloved of the
sultan's wives. Join us for a sweeping history of the
military ambition, innovative weapons and battle
strategies, material excess, architectural wonders,
and cultural flowering that shaped modern India.

10-11pm -- High Hitler - 
Adolf Hitler dreamt of creating a master race, but
achieved a Holocaust--the murder of millions of Jews
and those deemed physical or mental defects. But the
Führer, an appalling hypochondriac, abused laxatives
and suffered from stomach cramps and embarrassing
flatulence. And that was just the start! When he
committed suicide in 1945, the great dictator was
frail with tremors and a shuffling walk--a feeble
condition concealed from the world. We explore the
relationship between Hitler and his personal
physician, Dr. Theodore Morell. How did amphetamine
abuse, Parkinson's Disease, and tertiary syphilis
impact on his state of mind?

____________________________________________________

Saturday, May 13, 2006
____________________________________________________

8-9pm -- The Antichrist - Part 1.
How would you recognize the most evil person on Earth?
According to many historical texts, you should look
for a brilliant, enigmatic public figure who
transforms the world for good--for a while. 
Basically, the last person you'd tap as Satan's human
emissary. While many believe the Antichrist has come
and gone, just as many believe he will soon arrive, if
he's not already in our midst. Join us for harrowing
look at an evil so obscure that he answers only to
Satan. Real? Our group of prophecy believers and
historical experts help sort it out. We follow the
emergence of the Antichrist from pre-Judaic texts,
through the Book of Daniel and Revelation, into
Christian writings of the Middle Ages, and other
religious traditions as well. Aided by interviewees
both religious and secular, comprised of eminent
clergy, scholars, historians, psychologists, and
culture makers, we'll examine the evil enigma from
every conceivable angle. It's an omen

9-10pm -- The Antichrist - Zero Hour
From popes and presidents to dictators, Antichrists
have been identified in all periods of recorded
history and in all walks of life. Even nations,
movements, and technologies have been thought by some
to be the agents of the Antichrist. Throughout
history, people have seen their own times as the most
morally bankrupt and have recognized signs of the
coming of the Apocalypse. If the end is near, what
will it be like? What is the Antichrist's agenda? How
does he intend to take over the world and wreak
destruction? Is this escapist fantasy or inescapable
fate?

10-12am -- Time Machine - 
The world of the Bible was one beset by terror, when
disasters of truly biblical proportions ravaged
humanity. It was a time of global flooding, fiery
destruction, plagues, earthquakes, killer epidemics,
and famine. Are these biblical accounts fact or
fiction? We'll explore new and controversial evidence
as we seek to learn how ancient disasters may provide
valuable insight for a modern world besieged by
similar catastrophes.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, May 14, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Mega Disasters - West Coast Tsunami.
What would happen if a massive earthquake and tsunami
were to strike the West Coast of the United States?
Experts say it could easily match the catastrophic
2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in scale and might. A
700-mile stretch of coast, from northern California to
southern British Columbia lies just off the extremely
volatile Cascadia Subduction Zone. Many seismologists
say that after more than 300 years of massive pressure
build-up, it is likely to erupt in the not too distant
future. And it has happened in the past. Geologists
have discovered evidence of a massive tsunami that
struck the Pacific Northwest in 1700--as powerful as
the devastating Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004. Hundreds
of thousands of lives are at stake. We'll talk to
emergency planners, seismologists, and other
researchers who are trying to get a handle on when
Cascadia will blow, and what--if anything--we can do
to minimize the disaster.

8-10pm -- Titanic's Final Moments: Missing Pieces - 
In August 2005, John Chatterton and Richie Kohler,
hosts of Deep Sea Detectives, led an expedition to the
wreck of RMS Titanic. Diving 2½ miles down in Russian
submersibles, they searched outside the known debris
field for new evidence. On their final dive they made
an extraordinary find: two large intact sections of
the bottom hull of the Titanic in pristine condition
with the red bottom paint still on them. For four
months, a team of historians, marine architects, and
engineers has been conducting a forensic analysis of
this find. All agree that it's the most significant
new discovery since the wreck was located in 1985.
Analysis is ongoing, but preliminary indications are
that these bottom sections will change our
understanding of how the ship broke apart, and rewrite
the story of the final moments of the Titanic.

10-11pm -- Rogue Waves - 
Join us for the amazing story of one of nature's most
terrifying forces. With striking visuals from ships in
storm-tossed seas, the special presents dramatic tales
of rogue wave disasters throughout history, and
explores the astonishing scientific discoveries
surrounding this deadly phenomenon. Aided by
mind-blowing CGI footage from the motion picture
Poseidon by Wolfgang Petersen, director of The Perfect
Storm, we reveal the awesome power of this ocean
menace as it really is--a monster rising from the
deep!

____________________________________________________

Monday, May 15, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engines.
Story of the development of engines and motors, with
particular emphasis on the ones that have profoundly
changed society. Beginning with the steam engine, we
see how it was created, how it works, and how it led
to the Industrial Revolution. We review the electric
motor, internal combustion engine, jet engine, and
rocket engine, and conclude with a look at futuristic
engine technologies, including hydrogen-powered cars
and microtechnology engines so small that they fit on
the tip of a finger.

8-10pm -- Beyond The Da Vinci Code - 
Is it the greatest story ever told - or the greatest
story ever sold? A best-selling novel sparks a debate
that could change Christianity forever. Were Jesus and
Mary Magdalene married and co-leaders of their
movement? Was Mary Magdalene, herself, the Holy Grail
- the vessel said to hold Jesus's blood--and mother of
his descendants? Did the early Church know this
"truth" and deliberately mislead followers? Is there a
secret, ancient society, the Priory of Sion, which
still protects this bloodline? Have some of the most
illustrious names in art and science been members?
These are some of the questions that Dan Brown's
best-selling novel The Da Vinci Code raises. We
examine both sides of the story--the conventional view
of Christianity and the "alternate history" proposed
by Brown--so that viewers can decide.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Da Vinci Code:
Bloodlines.
Josh Bernstein searches for solid evidence behind the
controversial theory laid out in Dan Brown's book The
Da Vinci Code. Brown's theory claims that Jesus
married Mary Magdalene and that she conceived a child.
It also suggests that the bloodline
continues--unbroken--to this day. Josh shows what's
true and what's clearly make-believe in Dan Brown's
bestseller. From musty libraries to ancient churches,
Josh's unique quest leads him to seek the DNA evidence
that might prove or disprove one of the most
sensational claims in modern history. Most remarkably,
he'll orchestrate the first ever DNA test on a
Merovingian royal to find out if the story of a divine
bloodline stretching back to Jesus and Mary Magdalene
could possibly be true.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, May 16, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Racetrack Tech.
A look at the "science of safety" as applied to Indy
or NASCAR racing. From tires to roll-cages to hood
flaps, we examine the incredible technology that's
helping prevent crashes and enabling drivers to
survive the inevitable ones. See how today's
innovative minds digitally reconstruct crashes and
design new technology that keeps pushing the limits of
racing. The drivers may grab the glory, but they
wouldn't dare get behind the wheel if it weren't for
the guys in white lab coats. (1-hour version)

8-9pm -- Opus Dei Secrets Revealed - 
Secretive and cult-like or divinely inspired and
misunderstood? Opus Dei, a conservative organization
within the Roman Catholic Church, was thrust into an
unforgiving spotlight because of the way it was
portrayed in Dan Brown's thriller The Da Vinci Code.
Opus Dei claims it's more fiction than fact and that
it's misrepresented. Founded in 1928 by Spaniard
Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer, it encourages members
to find God through work and daily life. Members can
be found in 61 countries and the majority are lay
professionals. Another fraction is comprised of
priests. The most orthodox commit to a celibate life,
live in Opus Dei residences, give the majority of
their income to the organization, and practice
corporal mortification, the infliction of self-pain as
a holy act of sacrifice. Now, Opus Dei leaders grant
unprecedented access as we lift the veil surrounding
their mysterious organization to reveal the truths and
demystify the myths.

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - Tornado Alley Twister.
What happens when the most intense tornado ever
measured strikes Dallas, Texas? With winds clocked at
318 miles per hour, the monster twister carves a path
through the city up to a mile wide. It happened once
before, just 200 miles to the north in Oklahoma City.
There, in May 1999, a "MegaTornado" scoured the earth
for 85 minutes along a 38-mile path. 43 people died
and property damage was enormous. It became history's
first billion-dollar tornado. But in more densely
developed Dallas, the scenario is worse: as many as
1,000...and FIVE-billion dollars in damage.

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - Lost & Found.
In Pennsylvania, our movers must lift an historic 1938
diner out of a building that has covered it for more
than 50 years. But moving the cherished landmark
unscathed will pose quite a challenge for everyone
involved. Meanwhile, a determined mining historian
must rescue a gigantic 1923 steam shovel that has been
hidden high up in the Colorado Rockies. Will 30 years
of sludge and rugged terrain stop this move before it
even begins?

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, May 17, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil.
From the first well in Pennsylvania to the gushing
Spindletop and modern supertankers, the story of oil
is the story of civilization as we know it. We'll take
a look at the ingenious and outrageous men who risked
everything for "black gold" and unimaginable wealth.

8-10pm -- The Templar Code - 
For nearly two centuries, the Knights Templar were the
medieval world's most powerful order, a fearsome and
unstoppable Crusader militia. Then came accusations of
unspeakable crimes. Who were the Templars, really? How
did they become so powerful, so fast, and why did they
fall just as quickly? Evidence hints that the Templars
excavated under Jerusalem's Temple of Solomon. What
did they find there? Was it, as The Da Vinci Code
suggests, the true identity of the Holy Grail--the
bloodline of Christ? Or an unimaginable treasure,
documented in the Dead Sea Scrolls, buried 1,000 years
before Christ's birth? We explore the Templar's
origin, how they lived, trained, fought and became a
medieval world power, and the suspicious circumstances
behind their sudden downfall. Plus, we reveal why
these warriors, dead for seven centuries, and their
treasure still populate Hollywood blockbusters.
Narrated by Ed Herrmann and featuring preeminent
Templar authors.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Axes, Swords and Knives.
Blade implements have been a part of civilized man's
arsenal since the Paleolithic Age, when sharp tools
were chipped off of flint or obsidian. But with the
discovery of metallurgy, people were able to forge
stronger, more versatile blade implements. We visit an
axe-throwing contest in Wisconsin for an introduction
to the least subtle of the blade tools. Then we visit
a swordsmith and an experienced swordfighter who work
in traditional methods from ancient sources, and
review the history of knives.
____________________________________________________

Thursday, May 18, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Custom Cars.
For most of us, cars are an ordinary fixture of daily
life. But then there are custom cars--literal labors
of love. Supercharged hot rods, sublimely sculpted
classics, flashy tricked-out lowriders, neon-bright
"import tuners"--an eye-popping blend of fine art and
mechanical know-how. In this episode, we trace the
history, technology, and cultural connections between
successive generations who have turned the common car
into an American art form. We'll ride with hot rodders
and lowriders and visit the speed shops and paint
shops where ordinary cars become art.

8-9pm -- Mysteries of the Freemasons - The Beginning.
Suspected throughout their long history of plotting to
overtake the world, accused of fomenting revolution,
and reviled as devil worshippers that stole King
Solomon's treasure, the Freemasons claim they're
merely a civic-minded fraternity, bound together by
harmless rituals. Our high-energy cocktail of dramatic
reenactment, expert interviews, and on-location
footage entertains historians Akram Elias, Stephen
Bullock, and Brent Morris to retell the Freemasons'
central myth concerning Hiram Abiff, mythical builder
of Jerusalem's Temple of Solomon. During construction,
he was killed by three workers who believed his
"secret" would impart magical powers--representing the
three evils against which Freemasons believe they're
still struggling: ignorance, fanaticism, and tyranny.
Today, the world's 2.5 million Freemasons meet to
reenact the ritual of Hiram's murder as the initiation
ceremony for the main rank of Master Mason.

9-10pm -- Mysteries of the Freemasons - America.
Is America the creation of the Freemasons? For
hundreds of years, suspicions of a plot to take over
America have swirled around the Freemasons, the
world's oldest secret society. Freemasons led the
Revolution, framed the Declaration of Independence and
Constitution, designed our nation's capital, and in
the early years of the Republic, grew to unmatched
heights of influence and power. The untold story of
the Freemasons in America reveals secret codes,
patterns in the sky, murder, and a radically new
picture of the nation's Founding Fathers. We'll
explore this remarkable story through dramatic
reenactments, expert interviews, sophisticated CGI,
and original location documentary footage. Features
historians Stephen Bullock, Dan Burstein, Brent
Morris, Akram Elias, and author David Shugarts. But
will a rational view reveal the Freemasons as an
important and honorable thread in the fabric of
America?

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Da Vinci Tech.
Nearly 500 years after his death, Leonardo da Vinci
still intrigues us. Most people think of him as a
great artist, but he was also a remarkable scientist
and inventor. His love of mechanics was unparalleled
and he filled his notebooks with pages of incredible
machines--from weapons of war to "Ships of the Skies",
from submarines and scuba suits to robots and an
analogue computer...even contact lenses and alarm
clocks! How did a 15th-century man envision such
modern innovations? If we follow his plans, would any
of his designs work? We need wonder no more. With
recent technological advances and new materials, we're
the first generation able to bring Leonardo's drawings
to life--to learn whether his "mechanical dreams" were
workable plans. We explore the fascinating
intersection of his art, science, and engineering
marvels, and use them to offer insight into this
"Genius of Geniuses", who remains as elusive as Mona
Lisa's smile.

____________________________________________________

Friday, May 19, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gas Tech.
Gas--it makes a balloon go up, cooks our food, and
fills our lungs. But this invisible state of matter
does far more, and has a very visible impact on the
world. We follow natural gas from well tip to stove
top and trace its use from 3rd century BC Chinese salt
producers to modern appliances. Next, we investigate
the most plentiful gas in the
universe--hydrogen--which may also prove to be the
most powerful. We also experience the cryogenic world
of industrial gasses--what they do and where they come
from--as we travel to the British Oxygen Company's
Braddock Air Separation Plant to see how they freeze
millions of tons of oxygen and nitrogen. And at the
Bush Dome Helium Reserve in Texas, we learn why the US
government sits atop 36-billion cubic feet of the
stuff. Finally, we look inside the colorful world of
gas and neon lights. So lay back, breathe deep, and
count backwards from 10...

8-9pm -- Behind The Da Vinci Code - 
Before Dan Brown's book The Da Vinci Code, there was
Holy Blood, Holy Grail, written by Michael Baigent,
Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln, that is known for
its revelation of the possibility of a sacred
bloodline continued by Jesus and Mary Magdalene. It
was their research on which Brown based much of his
novel. Now, 30-some years since they wrote their last
follow-ups, Henry Lincoln continues to investigate the
source of the story. In this special, the man who
launched the whole story breaks his silence, allowing
viewers to unlock his secrets and addressing critics
who say the whole thing is a hoax. We also explore the
connection to the Knights Templar.

9-10pm -- The Holy Grail - 
Christ's cup from the Last Supper. Medieval poets sang
its praises, and King Arthur's knights chased it to
the ends of the earth. Did Joseph of Arimathea really
claim the cup after the Last Supper and collect
Jesus's blood in it at the Crucifixion? Why are there
so many Grail tales, no two of which fully agree? And
why does the scent of heresy linger about the sacred
cup? Many treasures are bigger, but none more precious
or elusive as we discover in this quest for the
venerable vessel.

10-12am -- Nostradamus: 500 Years Later - 
The life story of Nostradamus unfolds in medieval
Europe at the time of the Great Plague and the
Inquisition. He lived in an age of superstition and
magic and believed that he could foretell the future.
For this he was labeled both a prophet and a heretic,
and his cryptic journals continue to inspire
controversy just as they did in the 16th century. In
this 2-hour examination of his life, we visit his
birthplace in France and trace his career as doctor,
astrologer, father, and seer.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, May 20, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Fire.
Fire--we have learned to create and control it, but
have yet to tame it? It's alive--it breathes, feeds,
and grows. Fire is behind essentially every component
of the modern world and has spawned entire industries.
We'll feature great feats in pyrotechnology, or the
intentional use and control of fire by humans--from
the massive 8-story fire-breathing boilers that create
steam heat for downtown Philadelphia, to the nearly
2,000 degree flames that create electricity at a
biomass plant. From the massive coal-fired locomotives
that powered us across the continent, to the rocket
engines that took us to the moon, we'll cover what
fire is, how we have learned to create and harness it,
and its behavior with various fuel sources. At a match
factory, we see how the seeds of fire are made and
explore the significance of this seemingly simple
innovation. We also take a look at the important role
that fire has played in technological advances as well
as warfare.

8-9pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Da Vinci Code:
Bloodlines.
Josh Bernstein searches for solid evidence behind the
controversial theory laid out in Dan Brown's book The
Da Vinci Code. Brown's theory claims that Jesus
married Mary Magdalene and that she conceived a child.
It also suggests that the bloodline
continues--unbroken--to this day. Josh shows what's
true and what's clearly make-believe in Dan Brown's
bestseller. From musty libraries to ancient churches,
Josh's unique quest leads him to seek the DNA evidence
that might prove or disprove one of the most
sensational claims in modern history. Most remarkably,
he'll orchestrate the first ever DNA test on a
Merovingian royal to find out if the story of a divine
bloodline stretching back to Jesus and Mary Magdalene
could possibly be true.

9-10pm -- Opus Dei Unveiled - 
Secretive and cult-like or divinely inspired and
misunderstood? Opus Dei, a conservative organization
within the Roman Catholic Church, was thrust into an
unforgiving spotlight because of the way it was
portrayed in Dan Brown's thriller The Da Vinci Code.
Opus Dei claims it's more fiction than fact and that
it's misrepresented. Founded in 1928 by Spaniard
Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, it encourages members
to find God through work and daily life. Members can
be found in 61 countries and the majority are lay
professionals. Another fraction is comprised of
priests. The most orthodox commit to a celibate life,
live in Opus Dei residences, give the majority of
their income to the organization, and practice
corporal mortification, the infliction of self-pain as
a holy act of sacrifice. Now, Opus Dei leaders grant
unprecedented access as we lift the veil surrounding
their mysterious organization to reveal the truths and
demystify the myths.

10-12am -- The Templar Code - 
For nearly two centuries, the Knights Templar were the
medieval world's most powerful order, a fearsome and
unstoppable Crusader militia. Then came accusations of
unspeakable crimes. Who were the Templars, really? How
did they become so powerful, so fast, and why did they
fall just as quickly? Evidence hints that the Templars
excavated under Jerusalem's Temple of Solomon. What
did they find there? Was it, as The Da Vinci Code
suggests, the true identity of the Holy Grail--the
bloodline of Christ? Or an unimaginable treasure,
documented in the Dead Sea Scrolls, buried 1,000 years
before Christ's birth? We explore the Templar's
origin, how they lived, trained, fought and became a
medieval world power, and the suspicious circumstances
behind their sudden downfall. Plus, we reveal why
these warriors, dead for seven centuries, and their
treasure still populate Hollywood blockbusters.
Narrated by Ed Herrmann and featuring preeminent
Templar authors.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, May 21, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Behind The Da Vinci Code - 
Before Dan Brown's book The Da Vinci Code, there was
Holy Blood, Holy Grail, written by Michael Baigent,
Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln, that is known for
its revelation of the possibility of a sacred
bloodline continued by Jesus and Mary Magdalene. It
was their research on which Brown based much of his
novel. Now, 30-some years since they wrote their last
follow-ups, Henry Lincoln continues to investigate the
source of the story. In this special, the man who
launched the whole story breaks his silence, allowing
viewers to unlock his secrets and addressing critics
who say the whole thing is a hoax. We also explore the
connection to the Knights Templar.

8-10pm -- Beyond The Da Vinci Code - 
Is it the greatest story ever told - or the greatest
story ever sold? A best-selling novel sparks a debate
that could change Christianity forever. Were Jesus and
Mary Magdalene married and co-leaders of their
movement? Was Mary Magdalene, herself, the Holy Grail
- the vessel said to hold Jesus's blood--and mother of
his descendants? Did the early Church know this
"truth" and deliberately mislead followers? Is there a
secret, ancient society, the Priory of Sion, which
still protects this bloodline? Have some of the most
illustrious names in art and science been members?
These are some of the questions that Dan Brown's
best-selling novel The Da Vinci Code raises. We
examine both sides of the story--the conventional view
of Christianity and the "alternate history" proposed
by Brown--so that viewers can decide.

10-12am -- Da Vinci & the Code He Lived By - 
Known as "the Mind of the Renaissance", this amazing
artist, scientist, and inventor envisioned flying
machines, submarines, parachutes, armored cars, and
multi-barreled guns centuries before their time. His
mysterious painting the Mona Lisa still moves us and
his fresco The Last Supper remains an icon of faith.
His secretly recorded dissection of human bodies that
brought accusations of consorting with Satan led to
the early understandings of human anatomy. Against a
backdrop of 15th-century Italian opulence, intrigue,
and corruption, he navigated through the glittering
palaces of merchant princes. The bastard son of a
notary in the town of Vinci, Leonardo couldn't even
take his father's name, but sensed that he must
develop a way to overcome the limitations of
illegitimacy. And so a code emerged, a pattern of
decision-making that evolved throughout his life,
enabling him to become the greatest of men in a time
of great men--a mind above all others.

____________________________________________________

Monday, May 22, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Harvesting.
Cutting, digging, picking, stripping, shaking, and
raking--whatever the crop, there's a custom machine to
harvest it. It all began with handpicking and today
it's often one man and one machine harvesting hundreds
of acres in a single day. The farmer may even get a
little help from satellites. Far above the earth,
high-resolution photography is giving the grower more
opportunities to cut costs and maximize the harvest.
From the debut of the sickle in ancient Egypt to
McCormick's famous Reaper to the field of ergonomics
that assists human harvesters, we'll dig into the past
and future of the harvest.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Alien Engineering, Part 2.
If an alien spaceship crash-lands on Earth, the first
thing we'll want to do is take it apart and learn how
it works. Maybe go for a tour inside and learn what
kind of options it has--like an anti-matter reactor,
laser weapons, and even a teletransporter. Amazingly,
many of these "science fiction" devises are based on
real science. And many have human-designed
counterparts right here on Earth. Super-powerful laser
weapons can be found on our own prototype weapons.
We're even researching ways to hide vehicles behind
plasma-generated "invisibility cloaks". Cutting-edge
animation and live-action recreations help us
"imagine" an alien spacecraft and learn how many
amazing devices and mechanisms are really possible,
and likely to be available in a few years. 

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - America's Pyramids.
In 1539, Hernando de Soto's Conquistadors landed in
Florida in search of new lands and treasure for the
Spanish Crown. Three years later, they were run off
the continent by Native American warriors that lived
on enormous, earthen pyramids along the Mississippi
River. Who were these people? And how did they defeat
one of the world's most powerful armies? Follow Josh
Bernstein as he paddles down the bayous; builds his
own earthen pyramid with modern equipment; and
scuba-dives the cold, dark waters of Wisconsin to
solve the mystery of America's pyramid builders.

10-11pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Underwater Train
Wreck.
Our shipwreck hunters become railroad experts when
they find two ghostly locomotives, upright and intact,
just a few miles off the coast of New Jersey. How did
these massive land vehicles end up 90 feet below the
Atlantic in the first place? With no shipwreck nearby
to explain their existence, we launch an investigation
to find out how these locomotives wound up in deep
water seven miles from land. Maybe the locomotives
slid off a vessel during a storm? Perhaps they were
jettisoned to save a ship? Our investigators are going
to have to narrow down the time frame of when these
trains were built to find out how they sank. To help
solve the mystery, we bring in experts to analyze the
evidence. But can we piece together this puzzling
problem before time and/or some unscrupulous diver
removes the evidence forever?

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, May 23, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Survival Technology.
In an historic survey of man's adaptation to killer
environmental conditions, we travel to the desert, the
Arctic, the sea, jungle, and space, charting the
body's physiological responses to extreme
circumstances such as frostbite, heatstroke, and
hypothermia. We talk with military survival experts
and learn about the latest cutting-edge survival gear,
as well as the equipment aboard the space station, and
look to the future, when nano-technology will create a
new type of technology.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Weird Weapons: The Allies.
In this hour we uncover Allied secrets off WWII, such
as a battleship made of ice, bat bombs, floating
tanks, rocket-propelled wheels that would roll through
enemy lines, pigeon-guided missiles, and earthquake
bombs designed to penetrate the earth and shake
structures to pieces. Join us for more bizarre stories
of extraordinary armaments dreamt up by the some of
the time's most inventive minds--weird weapons unlike
anything before. And what about the atomic bomb?

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - New York City Hurricane.
What would happen if a Category 3 Hurricane were to
hit New York City? With an awesomely high storm surge
and intense winds attacking one of the most heavily
populated and economically vital locations in the
world, the potential for massive destruction is almost
unprecedented. We explore the less-known but extensive
history of previous northeast hurricanes--especially
the "Great Hurricane" of 1938--in order to create
empirical evidence that a storm of this size is not
science fiction but a very real possibility in the
near future. We'll also explore the scientific nature
and origins of hurricanes and get an overview of some
of the engineering changes that are taking place in
the field of hurricane damage prevention. Using
computer animation, models, and recreations the story
concludes with a jaw-dropping view of what a storm
like this might look like from inside the Big Apple.

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - America Moves.
In America's heartland, few structures are as iconic
as the country barn and the local church. In Nebraska,
our team attempts to transport an historic gothic
horse barn to a new farm. Working in sub-zero
temperatures, they'll have to maneuver the massive
structure through 26 miles of extremely narrow,
unpaved country roads to reach their destination. And
in Texas, a 115-year-old church has to be cut into
five pieces before being relocated to a new spot two
miles away. Will our Mega Movers be able to reassemble
this cherished chapel and preserve it for future
congregations?

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, May 24, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Commercial Fishing.
Battered and fried or simply raw--seafood is a popular
dish, no matter how you serve it. Americans consume
more than 5-billion pounds yearly, an order that takes
more than a fishing rod to fill and worries
conservationists. We follow the fish, the fishermen,
and the science trying to preserve fisheries for
future generations--from ancient ships on the Nile to
a modern technologically sophisticated factory trawler
on the Bering Sea to the University of New Hampshire's
open-ocean aquaculture research project. And we
witness a wide variety of fishing methods--from
gillnetting and longlining to lobster trapping. Hop
aboard and sail through time and around the globe as
we explore the harsh conditions of life at sea and
experience firsthand one of history's deadliest jobs.
Brace yourself and feel the ice-cold, salt spray on
your face as we explore commercial fishing!

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Candy.
It pulls, stretches, bubbles, hardens, crunches, and
melts! We eat about 7-billion tons of it yearly. We're
talking about Candy--loved by kids and savored by
adults. Candy-making evolved from a handmade operation
to high-tech mass production. Nowhere is that more
apparent than at Hershey's. On a tour of their newest
production facility, we learn how they process the
cocoa bean. At See's Candy, we see how they make their
famous boxed chocolates--on a slightly smaller scale
than Hershey's. We get a sweet history lesson at
Schimpff's Confectionery, where they still use small
kettles, natural flavors, and hand-operated equipment.
Then, we visit Jelly Belly, purveyors of the original
gourmet jellybean. Saltwater-taffy pullers hypnotize
us on our sweet-tooth tour; we gaze at extruders
making miles of licorice rope; and watch as nostalgia
candy bars Abba-Zaba and Big Hunk get packaged. And in
this sugary hour, we digest the latest
sensations--gourmet chocolates and scorpion on a
stick!

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - More Snackfood Tech.
They crunch; they ooze; they crackle; they pop--mmmmm,
yeah! Soft drinks, donuts, meat snacks, popcorn, and
gum. What's your weakness? From the handmade treats of
the earliest civilizations to hi-tech mass production,
these snacks are borne of man's need to feed his
cravings. Join us for an hour-long tasty treat as we
examine the history of snackfoods and check out how
they are made today.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - '80's Tech.
Remember "brick" cell phones, Pac-Man, Rubik's Cube,
Sony Walkman, and the first music CDs? Remember all
the new and exciting gadgets of the 1980s? Join us as
we investigate the transition from Industrial to
Information Age--a digital decade dedicated to
ergonomics and entertainment. The microchip ushered in
an era that revolutionized the way we work, play, and
communicate. And we tour Silicon Valley--birthplace of
some of the greatest inventions from an amazing time
of change, including the modern personal computer.
Steve "Woz" Wozniak tells us about the evolution of
Apple computers, and we talk to Sony--makers of the
Walkman, Betamax, and the first CD players. A visit to
the Computer History Museum shows fun technological
"artifacts", primitive by today's standards. At Intel,
makers of the first microchips, we learn why
technology moves at such a fast pace. We also take a
ride in a DeLorean DMC-12 sports car--few things moved
faster.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, May 25, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Demolition.
While a civilization's greatness is reflected in the
achievements of architects and engineers, equally
impressive are spectacular acts of destruction
throughout history. The cycle of construction and
destruction reflects the shifting values of any given
era. We'll trace the evolution of planned destruction
from ancient to modern-day.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Ben Franklin Tech.
You may know him as a man of great wit and wisdom, as
the oldest and wisest Founding Father. But now you'll
get to know Dr. Franklin as the late 18th Century's
foremost scientist, and one of the greatest inventors
of any era. From the humble Pennsylvania Stove to the
spectacular lightning rod--Franklin was concerned with
putting scientific principals to practical use. We'll
explore his many inventions, including: his unique
musical instrument, the glass armonica, for which both
Mozart and Beethoven wrote pieces; his crafty
anti-counterfeiting techniques, including
multi-colored inks, elaborate ornamentation, and the
use of "leaf printing"--when a metal engraving plate
is made from a plant's leaf, making it impossible to
copy; and bifocal glasses. And we'll see how
Franklin's inventive genius extended to entire
systems, including: the modern volunteer fire
department, first fire insurance company, Daylight
Savings Time, and America's first lending library.

____________________________________________________

Friday, May 26, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Hunting Gear.
They are lethal tools that ensured our survival,
altered our evolution, and maintained our dominion
over other animals. Though hunting technology is the
backbone of a multi-billion-dollar sports industry,
current cutting-edge gear is a far cry from
prehistoric man's rudimentary tools. From the crude
knife to 24-hour digital cameras that monitor animal
movement and earmuffs with microphones to amplify
outside noise while blocking gunshot sound, we examine
the development of hunting weapons and gear.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Snackfood Tech.
Extruders, molds, in-line conveyor belts. Are these
machines manufacturing adhesives, plastics, or parts
for your car? No, they're making treats for your
mouth--and you will see them doing their seductively
tasty work in this scrumptious episode. First, we
visit Utz Quality Foods in Hanover, Pennsylvania, that
produces more than one million pounds of chips per
week, and Snyder's of Hanover, the leading US pretzel
manufacturer. Next, we focus on the world's largest
candy manufacturer, Masterfoods USA, which makes Milky
Way, Snickers, Mars, and M&Ms, and take a lick at the
world's largest lollipop producer, Tootsie Roll
Industries. And at Flower Foods' Crossville, Tennessee
plant, an army of cupcakes rolls down a conveyer belt.
The final stop is Dreyer's Bakersfield, California
plant, where 20,000 ice cream bars and 9,600
drumsticks roll off the line in an hour.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, May 27, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Machines II.
How did the ancients harness power? Did Archimedes use
solar power to defeat the Romans? Was he the first to
concentrate the power of the sun? Early historical
accounts of the battle of Syracuse in 212 BC claim
that Archimedes used polished shields to focus light
onto the sails of the invading Roman ships and set
them ablaze. We investigate this and other intriguing
and incredible objects. An earthenware jar about the
size of a man's fist sits in the National Museum of
Iraq. Its existence could require history books
throughout the world to be rewritten. The jar appears
to be an electric battery pre-dating Christ. Did the
ancient world master electricity nearly two millennia
before the modern world? A recent discovery of a flour
mill in Barbegal in southern France contained 16
waterwheels that operated the mill. Is this one of the
first examples of Roman industrial-revolution
technology--1,800 years before our own?

8-9pm -- History Alive - Cocaine.
Derived from South America's coca leaf, cocaine was
touted as a cure-all in the late 19th century and was
the secret ingredient in many medicines and elixirs
such as Coca-Cola. But cocaine's allure quickly
diminished as racism entered the picture--the concept
of the "cocaine-crazed Negro" even led police to
strengthen the caliber of their guns from .32 to .38.
We'll see how, though it was outlawed in 1914, its
popularity soared in the 1980s and '90s and gave birth
to a deadlier form--crack.

9-10pm -- History Alive - Marijuana.
In a series investigating the history of drug use, we
begin our trip tracing the rise of marijuana and
synthetic amphetamines. Marijuana, from the Indian
hemp plant, has been used worldwide as a source of
rope, cloth, and paper; its medicinal qualities were
first documented 4,000 years ago in China. But it's
best known as the drug of choice of the 1960s. During
WWII, US troops were given an estimated 200 million
amphetamines to fight drowsiness and battle fatigue,
and they're still used to fight depression.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - George Washington Carver
Tech.
One of the 20th century's greatest scientists, George
Washington Carver's influence is still felt. Rising
from slavery to become one of the world's most
respected and honored men, he devoted his life to
understanding nature and the many uses for the
simplest of plant life. His scientific research in the
late 1800s produced agricultural innovations like crop
rotation and composting. Part of the "chemurgist"
movement that changed the rural economy, he found
ingenious applications for the peanut, soybean, and
sweet potato. At Tuskegee Institute, Dr. Carver
invented more than 300 uses for the peanut, while
convincing poor farmers to rotate cotton crops with
things that would add nutrients to the soil. A
visionary, Carver shared his knowledge free of charge,
happy in his Tuskegee laboratory where he could use
his gifts to help others.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, May 28, 2006
____________________________________________________

6:40-8pm -- Band of Brothers - Carentan.
After regrouping in the town of Angoville-au-Plain,
Easy Company tries to capture the town of Carentan.
Two days after D-Day, some members of Easy Company are
still lost and alone in Normandy, including Pvt.
Albert Blithe (Marc Warren), who finds the rest of the
unit just in time to help take Carentan, which Allied
armor from Utah and Omaha beaches need in order to
link up. Later, the company returns to England, but
celebrations are short-lived when news comes that
they'll be moving out again.

8-9:15pm -- Band of Brothers - Replacements.
Fresh replacements join Easy Company in time for a
massive paradrop into German-occupied Holland. The
Dutch townspeople of Eindhoven welcome them as
liberators, but when Easy and a cluster of British
tanks move into a nearby town, a superior German force
inflicts many casualties and forces a retreat. As they
move onto another assignment in Holland, Capt. Winters
(Damian Lewis) laments the retreat, and Capt. Nixon
(Ron Livingston) thinks that the ambitious Allied
operation seems to have failed.

9:15-10:25pm -- Band of Brothers - Crossroads.
Capt. Winters (Damian Lewis) leads a contingent of
Easy Company men on a risky mission over a Dutch dike
that results in a "turkey shoot" of fleeing Germans,
and is promoted to Battalion Executive Officer,
leaving Easy Company in the hands of Lt. "Moose"
Heyliger (Stephen McCole). After moving back off the
line to France, Lt. Nixon (Ron Livingston) insists
that Winters take a break and see Paris. But when
Winters returns, news comes in of a massive German
counterattack in the Ardennes Forest.

10:25-11:45pm -- Band of Brothers - Bastogne.
In the dead of winter, in the forest outside of
Bastogne, Belgium, Easy Company struggles to hold the
line alone, while fending off frostbite and hunger. An
overwhelmed Medic Eugene Roe (Shane Taylor), on edge
and close to combat exhaustion, finds friendship with
a Belgian nurse (Lucie Jeanne). Easy spends a
miserable Christmas in the trenches, but is buoyed
after hearing news that General McAuliffe met the
German Army's demand for surrender with the defiant
answer: "Nuts!"

11:45pm -- Mail Call #19: LAV/Landing Craft/Doughboy/OPFOR/Chain Mail/Military Salute
____________________________________________________

Monday, May 29, 2006
____________________________________________________

6:45-8pm -- Band of Brothers - Points.
Major Winters (Damian Lewis) leads Easy Company into
the Bavarian town of Berchtesgaden--once home to top
Nazi officers--and receives orders to take the
abandoned Eagle's Nest, Hitler's mountaintop fortress.
As German officers hand over their weapons, soldiers
raid wine cellars and snap up souvenirs. But their
elation is short-lived--most of the division faces
redeployment to the Pacific Theater. A closing
vignette tells what happened to the men of Easy
Company after they returned home.

8-9pm -- To Be Determined - To Be Announced.
Programming to be announced.

9-11pm -- Washington the Warrior - 
The George Washington we all know is larger than life,
an icon of mythic proportions. But before becoming
"Father" of his country, he was a soldier. This
unique, in-depth portrait of the Washington we don't
always think about begins in 1753, when the
21-year-old obtained an officer's commission in the
Virginia militia. While serving alongside British
regulars, did brash and sometimes reckless decisions
help ignite the French and Indian War? Washington
retired from the militia in 1758, but continued to
hone his leadership skills. Managing his vast Mount
Vernon estate required many of the same talents as
commanding soldiers in the field. When America
declared independence, Washington was the consensus
choice to lead the Continental Army. This is the epic
story of Washington's journey to greatness--propelled
by intense, often painful, transformation. The man who
emerged was a warrior of the purest sort...a man who
preferred liberty to power and justice to glory.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, May 30, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- To Be Determined - To Be Announced.
Programming to be announced.

8-9pm -- Decoding The Past - The Antichrist, Part 1.
How would you recognize the most evil person on Earth?
According to many historical texts, you should look
for a brilliant, enigmatic public figure who
transforms the world for good--for a while. 
Basically, the last person you'd tap as Satan's human
emissary. While many believe the Antichrist has come
and gone, just as many believe he will soon arrive, if
he's not already in our midst. Join us for harrowing
look at an evil so obscure that he answers only to
Satan. Real? Our group of prophecy believers and
historical experts help sort it out. We follow the
emergence of the Antichrist from pre-Judaic texts,
through the Book of Daniel and Revelation, into
Christian writings of the Middle Ages, and other
religious traditions as well. Aided by interviewees
both religious and secular, comprised of eminent
clergy, scholars, historians, psychologists, and
culture makers, we'll examine the evil enigma from
every conceivable angle.

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - American Volcano.
The 1980 Mount St. Helens' eruption alerted the world
to the dangers of an explosive volcano in the Cascade
Range. The fiery blast that killed every living thing
within a 25-mile radius and unleashed the biggest
landslide in recorded history. Now, Mount Rainier, 60
miles east of Seattle, threatens an even greater loss
of life and property. This 14,000-foot peak holds more
ice and snow than all other volcanoes in the Cascade
Range combined. Even a small eruption at Rainier could
unleash a debris mudslide that would entomb several
towns in the valley below. Tens of thousands of people
are in grave danger. Geologists say that it's not a
question of if Rainier, an active volcano, will
erupt...but when. Experts have mapped out the hazard
zone and engineered a sophisticated warning system.
But when Rainier blows, the window for evacuation is
small. As we'll see, people must have an efficient
evacuation plan, or else the loss of lives will be
incredible.

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - 900 Ton Building.
The Matyiko brothers are a legendary Mega Mover
family. Their company Expert House Movers entered the
record books when they moved the historic Gem Theatre
in Detroit, Schubert Theatre in Minneapolis, and the
Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. In this episode the brothers
battle time and the elements. In Massachusetts, the
clock is ticking to move a 900-ton brick building to
its new location. Any delays will cost the veteran
house movers thousands of dollars. And in North
Carolina, three vacation houses must make a perilous
journey across eight miles of open beach to reach
their new home. Will the homes arrive safely? Or, will
the treacherous waters of the Outer Banks claim yet
another victim?

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, May 31, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- To Be Determined - To Be Announced.
Programming to be announced.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Coffee.
Traces the origins of this tasty drink from Ethiopia
over 1,000 years ago to the espresso-fueled explosion
of specialty coffee stores like Starbucks today. Along
the way, we'll see how American companies like Hills
Brothers, Maxwell House, Folgers, and MJB grew to be
giants. Discover how billions of coffee beans make
their journey from coffee farms and plantations, and
are processed in gigantic roasting and packaging
plants before showing up in coffee cups all over the
world. Details the invention and production of instant
coffee, decaffeinated coffee, freeze-dried coffee, and
the espresso machine. Also, we explain how coffee made
shift work in factories possible, while coffeehouses
provided a creative cauldron that brewed political and
artistic progress in the 18th and 19th centuries. And,
we also provide tips on how to make a better cup at
home!

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Brewing.
It's one of the world's oldest and most beloved
beverages--revered by Pharaohs and brewed by America's
Founding Fathers. Today, brewing the bitter elixir is
a multi-billion-dollar global industry. Join us for an
invigorating look at brewing's history from
prehistoric times to today's cutting-edge craft
breweries, focusing on its gradually evolving
technologies and breakthroughs. We'll find the
earliest known traces of brewing, which sprang up
independently in such far-flung places as ancient
Sumeria, China, and Finland; examine the surprising
importance that beer held in the daily and ceremonial
life of ancient Egypt; and at Delaware's Dogfish Head
Craft Brewery, an adventurous anthropologist and a
cutting-edge brewer show us the beer they've concocted
based on 2,700-year-old DNA found in drinking vessels
from the funerary of the legendary King Midas.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Distilleries.
From water and grain...to mash...still...vat...barrel
and bottle--the distilling of alcoholic spirits is a
big business and near-sacred religion. Its acolytes
eye the color, swirl the glass, inhale the bouquet,
sip, then ponder their ambrosia. What's your pleasure?
Bourbon, Scotch, Rum, Gin, Vodka, or Tequila? We trace
the history of distilling from the one-man/one-still
tradition to the Voldstead Act of 1920 that devastated
American distilleries to the mega-sales and
high-volume distillery of today.
____________________________________________________

Thursday, June 01 @ 9:30am, repeated @ 3:30pm 
Mail Call #41: Blimp/Military Shotguns/Navy Graveyard/Poop Deck

Saturday, June 03 @ 11am, not repeated
Mail Call #36: Military Pilot Training/Flak/Doolittle Raid/One-Man Submarine/Military Radios
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