Site hosted by Angelfire.com: Build your free website today!
please help the children

The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st & 15th)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

******************************************************
To subscribe to a monthly email of this schedule, please visit http://www.HistoryChannel.com/mailinglist
For complete listings go to our site: www.historychannel.com/listings
******************************************************

Meet The History Channel's Featured Historians!
Go to: HistoryChannel.com/historians

History Channel Primetime Listings

Wednesday, March 1, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - FBI's Crime Lab.
To spearhead its fight against crime and terrorism in
the 21st century, the FBI is relying on its $150
million-plus building, the new Crime Lab at Quantico.
Here, nearly 700 highly trained scientists and
technicians utilize cutting-edge forensic technology
to unearth identities of perpetrators. We review the
lab's history, from humble start in a lounge in 1932
to today's state-of-the-art complex, and see how 9/11
and the FBI's new mandate to fight international
terrorism changed the lab forever.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Glue.
It's Super! It's Krazy! And it can be found in
everything from carpet to computers, books to boats,
shoes to the Space Shuttle. It's even used in surgery!
Without it, our material world would simply fall
apart. In this episode, we'll visit the stuck-up,
tacky world of glue. Glue's sticky trajectory spans
human history and we'll cover it all--from Neolithic
cave dwellers who used animal glue to decorate
ceremonial skulls to modern everyday glues and their
uses, including Elmer's glue, 3M's masking and Scotch
tape, and the super glues. Remember the Krazy Glue
commercial in which a man held himself suspended from
a hard hat that had just been glued to a beam? Well,
that 1970s vintage ad understates the power of glue.
With the help of a crane, we're going to hoist a
6,000-pound pickup truck off the ground by a steel
joint that's been bonded with glue!

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Sewers.
A simple flush and it's forgotten. But haven't you
secretly wondered where it all goes when we go? Join
us as we explore this less-than-polite topic, and
examine the network of underground pipes and tunnels
that carries human waste and excess storm water away.
From ancient Rome's pristine sewage-conveying systems,
through the disease-spreading, out-the-window system
of Europe in the Middle Ages, and into the progressive
sanitation engineering of the 19th and 20th centuries,
we go with the flow of sewage history. And we sift
through the flotsam and jetsam of our cities' sewer
systems and delve into the sewers of Paris, Boston,
and Los Angeles to study waste management's evolution.
We meet a sewer diver (and his robotic counterpart)
who inspects and ensures the efficient operation of
the conduits; decipher the myths about "treasures" and
creatures found in the murky depths; and find out
exactly where it goes, how it gets there, and how
we've learned to use it to our benefit.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Bathroom Tech.
From tub to toilet to toothpaste, here's everything
you ever wanted to know about the most used and least
discussed room in the house. From the first home
bathrooms in ancient India, Roman latrines, and
bizarre Victorian-era bath contraptions, to modern
luxurious master bathroom suites, we trace the history
of bathing, showering, and oral hygiene. And we reveal
the messy truth about what was used before toilet
paper--brainchild of the Scott Brothers of
Philadelphia--and why astronauts wear diapers.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, March 2, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Forensic Science: The Crime
Fighter's Weapon.
From Sherlock Holmes' examination of the physical
evidence at a crime scene to today's DNA technology,
we review the history of crime detection through the
use of forensic science.

8-9pm -- Ancient Marvels - Cities of the Underworld,
see Sunday 3-5-06 below, for description

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Secrets of the Koran,
Part 1.
The Koran--one of the most influential religious books
of all time. Muslims worldwide believe the Koran is
God's guidance, a sourcebook to help believers follow
the right path. But much of the non-Muslim world sees
the Koran as a text shrouded in mystery...and
controversy. We'll attempt to demystify and explain
the text: where it came from, what it says, and what
it means. Like any holy scripture, the Koran can't be
separated from its historical context. We'll examine
the history of the verses and also their implications
for modern times, as well as the striking similarities
and differences between the Koran and the Bible--and
the ways in which Muslims believe the Koran corrects
some of the Jewish and Christian scriptures. The
program will get at the heart of one of the world's
holiest books, capturing its majesty and mystery and
illuminating for the audience the very foundation of
Islam. Major Religions

10-11pm -- Declassified - Ayatollah Khomeini.
Before the world heard of Osama bin Laden, there was
Ayatollah Khomeini--at the time, the most radical
Muslim leader of the 20th century, who challenged the
world's "infidels" in the name of Allah. With the
takeover of the US Embassy in Tehran, Iran and the
capture of 52 hostages, Khomeini and his followers
launched a murderous Islamic revolution. In time, his
inspiration would lead to coups, terrorist bombings,
hijackings, and assaults against a demonized West. For
some faithful Muslims, his rise became the inspiration
for political rebirth.

____________________________________________________

Friday, March 3, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gangster Guns.
During the 1920s and '30s in big cities and small
towns alike, they earned a fierce reputation in a
blaze of bullets. They were the best friends of
criminals such as John Dillinger, Pretty Boy Floyd,
Baby Face Nelson, Al Capone, and Bonnie and Clyde.
Handle their Colt 45s and 38s, Tommy guns, Whippets,
and Browning automatic rifles as we uncover the
stories of gangster guns.

8-10pm -- Rome: Engineering an Empire - 
For more than 500 years, Rome was the most powerful
and advanced civilization the world had ever known,
ruled by visionaries and tyrants whose accomplishments
ranged from awe-inspiring to deplorable. One
characteristic linked them all--ambition--and the
thirst for power that all Roman emperors shared fueled
an unprecedented mastery of engineering and labor.
This documentary special chronicles the spectacular
and sordid history of the Roman Empire from the rise
of Julius Caesar in 55 BC to its eventual fall around
537 AD, detailing the remarkable engineering feats
that set Rome apart from the rest of the ancient
world. Featuring extensive state-of-the-art CGI
animation, and exclusive never-before-seen footage
shot on a diving expedition in the water channels
underneath the Colosseum.

10-12am -- Roman Vice - 
The flowering of the Roman Empire saw incomparable
power and civilization - and at the same time
corruption, cruelty and depravity on an unparalleled
scale. Emperors from Augustus to Tiberius and Nero
built the biggest empire the world had ever seen,
while presiding over a way of life riddled with
violence, deviancy and excess. This special visits the
archaeological sites of ancient Rome, talks to leading
historians world-wide and uses stylish reconstructions
to describe and explain how good and evil went side by
side.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, March 4, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters: New
Orleans.
One of the deadliest natural disasters experienced by
US, Hurricane Katrina devastated New
Orleans--submerging it under a torrent of floodwater.
We investigate why the levees and water-pumping system
failed and join "Geological Detectives" as they sift
through the rubble to uncover how 80% of the city was
left underwater; expose how the levee system was a
disaster in the making; and delve deep into the
100-year-old pump system to unearth why it failed and
took weeks to drain the city. We learn the engineering
cause behind the nightmare suffered by victims seeking
shelter in the Superdome. And our investigators
discover the design flaws on one of the major escape
routes of the city. How can New Orleans stop this from
ever happening again and should it be rebuilt at all?
Using satellite global positioning, we determine New
Orleans and the entire Louisiana wetland coastline is
actually sinking and may become a modern-day
"Atlantis" in less then a century.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - 
In a 2-hour special, we scrutinize ancient writings
that didn't "make the cut" in the battle to create a
Christian Bible in the new religion's first few
centuries. Biblical archaeologists and scholars
examine why they were left out and if others might yet
be found. Beginning with the little-known Life of Adam
and Eve, we also peruse the Book of Jubilees, the Book
of Enoch, the Gospel of Thomas, the Protevangelium of
James, the Gospel of Mary, the Gospel of Nicodemus,
and the Apocalypse of Peter.

10-11pm -- Sodom & Gomorrah - 
Did the sinful biblical cities Sodom and Gomorrah
exist or was the story of their destruction crafted
for other purposes? Near the Dead Sea, archaeologists
uncovered the ruins of two ancient cities,
Bab-edh-dhra and Numeira, that show evidence of fire
and collapse and an inscription on a sanctuary near a
cave calling it a shrine to Lot. Is this the cave
where Lot and his daughters sought refuge after the
demise of the evil cities? We examine the many
theories.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, March 5, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Cities of the Underworld - 
Istanbul is undoubtedly one of the most dynamic and
exotic cities in the world. Once the capital city of
three of the world's most powerful empires--The Roman,
Byzantine, and Ottoman--its strategic location made it
the perfect spot for empires to rise, fall...and rise
again. Today Istanbul's residents are walking on top
of remnants of these fallen civilizations...literally.
Taxis drive over parts of Constantine's Lost Great
Palace; children play on cobblestone streets
concealing a massive Byzantine dungeon; a high school
sits on a 3rd century wall leading to the bowels of a
100,000 seat ancient Roman Hippodrome; and basement's
of old Ottoman homes lead to subterranean tunnels and
secret cisterns. Join host Eric Geller as he leaves
the buzz of the city streets behind and follows the
pull of the past. Teamed with leading archeologists
and experts, Eric peels back the layers of the
past--to reveal a hidden history that hasn't seen the
light of day for ages.

8-10pm -- Hell: The Devil's Domain - 
Our in-depth history of Hades begins with the story of
a negative near-death experience, in which a man
thinks he went to Hell after being declared clinically
dead and before resuscitation. Following Lucifer's
trail from cave paintings in France circa 6,000 BC to
current portrayals in popular culture, our 2-hour
exploration shows how Hell and the Devil remain
powerful forces--at a church in Texas, where souls are
delivered from Satan's grip; in talks with a survivor
of the 1980s recovered memory craze, who "recalled"
attending Witches' Sabbaths that practiced
cannibalism; and at the modern Church of Satan. We
review literary landmarks that expanded our ideas of
the Underworld, from Dante's Inferno and Milton's
Paradise Lost to Mark Twain's anti-hero, and trace
development of Christian, Moslem, Jewish, and Buddhist
conceptions of the afterlife. Major Religions

10-11pm -- The Antichrist - Part 1.
How would you recognize the most evil person on Earth?
According to many historical texts, you should look
for a brilliant, enigmatic public figure who
transforms the world for good--for a while. 
Basically, the last person you'd tap as Satan's human
emissary. While many believe the Antichrist has come
and gone, just as many believe he will soon arrive, if
he's not already in our midst. Join us for harrowing
look at an evil so obscure that he answers only to
Satan. Real? Our group of prophecy believers and
historical experts help sort it out. We follow the
emergence of the Antichrist from pre-Judaic texts,
through the Book of Daniel and Revelation, into
Christian writings of the Middle Ages, and other
religious traditions as well. Aided by interviewees
both religious and secular, comprised of eminent
clergy, scholars, historians, psychologists, and
culture makers, we'll examine the evil enigma from
every conceivable angle. The Omen

____________________________________________________

Monday, March 6, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Overseas Highway.
A spectacular roadway nearly 120 miles long, the
Overseas Highway links mainland Florida with the
Florida Keys, and contains 51 bridges, including the
Seven-Mile Bridge. A boat was the only mode of travel
from Miami to Key West until oil tycoon Henry Flagler
completed his railroad line in 1912. After a 1935
hurricane destroyed 40 miles of track, the scenic
highway was built using Flagler's bridges. A
$175-million refurbishment that ended in 1982 resulted
in today's remarkable Overseas Highway.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Canada's Roswell.
Roswell conjures up the most famous UFO case in US
history, luring believers on an unending search for a
"smoking gun" locked away in some secret government
vault. Could Canada have the real thing--a UFO case
with a certifiable paper trail? In Nova Scotia, on the
night of October 4, 1967, in the remote town of Shag
Harbour, dozens of eyewitnesses--airline pilots,
fishermen, teenagers, and police officers--see what
appears to be an extraterrestrial craft hovering above
the water's surface. Some claim to have seen and heard
the UFO plunge into the waters off the shoreline.
Canadian authorities dispatched the Navy, Coast Guard,
and police, and after a full government inquiry,
claimed not a trace of anything suspicious. But does
the government know more than it's telling? Lingering
questions lead two UFO researchers to launch an
investigation--and they uncovered documents that make
it clear that the case should never have been closed.

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - City of the Gods.
There was only one ancient city in the Americas that
ever truly rivaled the size, scale, and power of its
Old World counterparts--Teotihuacán, the City of the
Gods. And today, it's the largest ghost town in the
world. Still home to the world's third largest
pyramid, this mysterious city was once a metropolis
many times larger and more populous than the biggest
Mayan and Aztecan cities ever built. Now, Josh
Bernstein heads to central Mexico to check it out.
He'll soar above the ancient city, explore its
obsidian mines, make prehistoric tools, and try to
decode its impressive murals in a quest to understand
who built the City of the Gods, how it became so
powerful, and, most mysterious of all, why it was
abandoned.

10-11pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Train Wreck in Lake
Michigan.
Railroad car ferries were thought to be some of the
safest vessels on the Great Lakes, built to withstand
ice and waves year round. But on October 22nd, 1929,
the SS Milwaukee sailed into a Force-9 Gale and
disappeared. Was it foolishness on the part of the
ship's captain, Robert "Heavy Weather" McKay? Or was
he ordered to sail by the railroad company? Was there
a design flaw with the ship itself? Or was there a
conspiracy to cover up unsafe business practices? Our
hosts, veteran divers John Chatterton and Richie
Kohler, using cutting-edge technology, fascinating
underwater footage, and expert interviews, compare the
official post-accident investigation with the wreck
itself, and possibly rewrite history.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, March 7, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Paving America.
The story of the construction of our grand national
highway system, from its beginnings in 1912 (it was
conceived by auto and headlight tycoons) to its
completion in 1984 (when the last stoplight was
removed--and buried).

8-9:30pm -- Mail Call - VJ Special.
R. Lee Ermey relives the war that America waged across
the Pacific in World War Two, culminating with the
Japanese surrender and US celebration of VJ Day on
August 14th, 1945. We'll go aboard the USS Missouri,
where General Douglas MacArthur accepted the surrender
of Japan, and cover all the highlights of America's
historic island hopping campaign--from the tragedy of
Pearl Harbor to the pivotal battle of Midway and
storming of the bloody beaches of Iwo Jima. As the
Gunny tours the Missouri, viewers find out about the
gear and the guys who made it all happen and how our
navy became the most lethal force on the high seas. In
this 90-minute special, we celebrate the ingenuity and
fighting spirit that defeated the seemingly invincible
Japanese Empire and finally brought an end to World
War Two.

9:30-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Bullets.
From "safe" bullets that stop hijackers but leave
aircraft unscathed to bullets that chain-saw through
steel and "smart" bullets computer-programmed to hit a
target, this explosive hour examines the evolution of
bullets from origin in the 1300s--stones and round
lead balls shot from iron and bamboo tubes. Lead balls
ruled until 1841 when a conical-shaped bullet changed
ammo forever. We learn how to construct a modern
cartridge, and at pistol and rifle ranges view
demonstrations of modern firepower.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Harvesting.
Cutting, digging, picking, stripping, shaking, and
raking--whatever the crop, there's a custom machine to
harvest it. It all began with handpicking and today
it's often one man and one machine harvesting hundreds
of acres in a single day. The farmer may even get a
little help from satellites. Far above the earth,
high-resolution photography is giving the grower more
opportunities to cut costs and maximize the harvest.
From the debut of the sickle in ancient Egypt to
McCormick's famous Reaper to the field of ergonomics
that assists human harvesters, we'll dig into the past
and future of the harvest.
____________________________________________________

Wednesday, March 8, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - George Washington Bridge.
When opened on October 25, 1931, the George Washington
Bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world.
Today, standing as a main traffic artery between
Manhattan and New Jersey, the bridge referred to by
locals as the "GW" is the busiest in the world,
carrying nearly 320,000 cars each day. We'll examine
the construction methods employed that made the bridge
an anomaly, coming in both under budget and ahead of
schedule, and see why the GW is distinguished in a
city of great bridges.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The Butcher.
In a carnivorous world, a butcher is a necessary link
in the food chain, carving a carcass of unsavory flesh
into mouthwatering cuts. We trace the grisly trade's
evolution--from yesteryear's butcher-on-every-corner
to today's industrial butcher working on a
"disassembly" line. We tour the infamous remains of
the Chicago Stockyards, where Upton Sinclair, Clarence
Birdseye, and refrigeration changed butchering
forever; witness high-speed butchering; and travel to
a non-stop sausage factory. And if you're still
squeamish, a USDA inspector offers the lowdown on
HACCP--the country's new system of checks and balances
on everything from quality grading to E.coli,
Salmonella, and Mad Cow Disease. Finally, we visit the
last bastion of old-school butchering--the rural
custom butcher, who slaughters, eviscerates, skins,
and cuts to his customer's wishes.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Taxidermy.
It began as a tool used by prehistoric man to attract
animals to the hunt. Over time it became an invaluable
study aid for the natural scientist and a popular
hobby for hunters and fishermen. Join us for a
tantalizing look at the history of taxidermy, the
craft of preserving animal skins and using them to
recreate a still life of the animal as it appeared in
life. We also check out fiberglass reproduction, which
is gaining popularity as fish and game regulations
become stricter. Finally, we examine human subjects in
taxidermy. Using the very latest process of
plastination, the once taboo science and art of
preserving and displaying human corpses, now draws
crowds in Europe, Asia, and the US, proving the
age-old practice continues to mesmerize us!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Leather.
Sometime at the dawn of civilization, animal hides
were rubbed down with animal fat, making them more
flexible, durable, and malleable. By the 5th Century
BC, this "tanning" process expanded to include
vegetable and tree oil washes, creating what's now
known as "leather"--one of man's most reliable and
versatile products. Without advances in leather shoes,
the Romans could never have marched to the Tigris; nor
could the Pilgrims have survived winters in Plymouth.
Today, leather is a staple of our daily lives. Modern
tanners have devised techniques to make leather more
versatile, colorful, and luxurious than ever. We visit
modern tanneries of conventional cowhide leather, and
explore the more exotic leathers made from alligator,
snakes, and even sting-ray. And we'll examine the race
of modern science to create synthetic leathers that
are supposedly more convenient in today's fast-paced
life. We'll see how leather binds us to the past in an
unparalleled way.
____________________________________________________

Thursday, March 9, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Chesapeake Bay Bridge &
Tunnel.
Named one of the seven engineering wonders of the
modern age, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and Tunnel
connects Virginia proper with its easternmost
landmass. Stretching 17 miles across the historic
Chesapeake Bay, the structure represents a man-made
boundary between the Bay and the Atlantic. The
structure includes two 2-lane highways supported
mostly by trestles, four man-made and one natural
island, two truss bridges, and two revolutionary
sunken tube tunnels.

8-9pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Machines II.
How did the ancients harness power? Did Archimedes use
solar power to defeat the Romans? Was he the first to
concentrate the power of the sun? Early historical
accounts of the battle of Syracuse in 212 BC claim
that Archimedes used polished shields to focus light
onto the sails of the invading Roman ships and set
them ablaze. We investigate this and other intriguing
and incredible objects. An earthenware jar about the
size of a man's fist sits in the National Museum of
Iraq. Its existence could require history books
throughout the world to be rewritten. The jar appears
to be an electric battery pre-dating Christ. Did the
ancient world master electricity nearly two millennia
before the modern world? A recent discovery of a flour
mill in Barbegal in southern France contained 16
waterwheels that operated the mill. Is this one of the
first examples of Roman industrial-revolution
technology--1,800 years before our own?

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Secrets of the Koran,
Part 2.
In this hour, we explore what role the Koran has
played throughout Islamic history. From the 500-year
Golden Age of Islam, to the legendary clashes of
Muslim and Christian forces during the times of the
Crusades, we'll identify what influence the Koran had
on the individuals living out those momentous events.
We also look at the use of the word jihad, its meaning
within the Koran, and how the concept has been used by
others including modern-day Islamic radicals. The
messages in Islam's holy book have been used to launch
some of the world's greatest civilizations, and at
times its interpretations have been used as
justification for acts of violence. We'll attempt to
get at the heart of one of the world's holiest books,
capturing its majesty and mystery, and illuminating
for the audience the very foundation of Islam.

10-11pm -- Declassified - The Tet Offensive.
It began with a suicide attack on the US Embassy
Compound, and by the time it was over there were
80,000 casualties. The United States had won the
battle, an American President had been toppled, and
the outcome of the Vietnam War had been decided--in
favor of the North Vietnamese. The year is 1968 and
this decisive military action came to be known as the
Tet Offensive. Newly uncovered materials, including
long-ignored CIA warnings of a sneak attack, help to
reveal the story of the Vietcong surprise attack that
broke the stalemate in Southeast Asia.

____________________________________________________

Friday, March 10, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Cape Cod Canal.
In a battle against the ferocious Atlantic or safe
passage through waters where ships wrecked and lives
were lost, it was an engineering feat that many
believed impossible. This is the story of the Cape Cod
Canal and the men who braved the natural elements and
the Great Depression by venturing into new engineering
territory. In 1909 excavation began on what would
become one of the greatest success stories of our
time. The evolution of the Cape Cod Canal into what it
is today--a major commerce and recreational route of
the Intracoastal Waterway--is a tale of determination,
ingenuity, and the American spirit. Through historical
photographs and expert interviews, the Canal's story
unfolds, and while traveling along on an Army Corps of
Engineers Patrol Boat and Coast Guard vessel we see
firsthand what happens on the Canal on a daily basis.
And we meet the people who make the Canal and its
bridges functional and safe, keeping the legacy of the
early engineers alive.

8-10pm -- Warrior Queen Boudica - 
Wife, mother, queen...and leader of one of the most
violent rebellions against Roman domination in British
history. This we know about Boudica, Queen of the
Iceni. Her story and her tribe's have been recorded by
Roman historians, pondered by scholars, and examined
by archaeologists who continue to dig for clues about
this warrior whose army set fear in the hearts of
Romans. When King Prasutagus died, the Iceni tribe,
which once lived in peace with Rome, were brutally set
upon by Romans--they beat Queen Boudica and raped her
daughters. Seething with revenge, Boudica's forces
attacked Roman settlements including London, a
thriving Roman merchant center, which was destroyed.
Here, we uncover the remarkable story of Boudica, who
led her tribe in a revolt never seen before or since
in British history. Her struggle--to free Briton's
tribes from Roman domination; at stake--the freedom
and independence of all Briton's tribes and their
unique Celtic culture.

10-11pm -- Heroes Under Fire - Shadow Warriors.
Afghanistan, 1981. The Soviet Union invaded
Afghanistan in 1979, threatening to expand its huge
hold of territory and edge closer to the rich
oilfields of the Middle East. President Reagan decided
to send CIA officers in to train Afghan rebels to
fight against the Soviets. But he didn't want to tip
America's hand, so he sent in a small team of
undercover officers from the CIA's Islamabad station
in Pakistan. Working in dark alleys and traveling on
Pakistani military helicopters, Milt Bearden and his
team of CIA officers gradually built a network to
funnel arms and cash into Afghanistan and train the
rebels to fight. Dodging bullets and risking their
lives, the CIA officers became secret warriors
fighting America's last battle of the Cold War.
____________________________________________________

Saturday, March 11, 2006
____________________________________________________

6-8pm -- The Kennedy Assassination: Beyond Conspiracy -
No other murder in history has produced as much
speculation as the assassination of President John F.
Kennedy. Forty years after he was fatally shot, more
than 70 percent of polled Americans believe there was
a conspiracy and that Lee Harvey Oswald did not act
alone. In this 2-hour special, ABC News Anchor Peter
Jennings takes a fresh look at the assassination, the
evidence, the various and many theories, and an exact
computer simulation of the famous Abraham Zapruder
film that offers surprising results.

8-12am -- Reel To Real - JFK.
(movie) Oliver Stone's masterpiece details the actions
of New Orleans' District Attorney Jim Garrison (Kevin
Costner), who takes it upon himself to investigate the
assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas,
Texas in 1963. Garrison, extremely suspicious of the
official story presented by the FBI and what he
already knows and subsequently learns, reopens the
official files. Fact or fiction? You decide. The film
stars, among others, Tommy Lee Jones, Kevin Bacon,
Laurie Metcalf, Gary Oldman, Sissy Spacek, Jack
Lemmon, Joe Pesci, Edward Asner, Donald Sutherland,
Vincent D'Onofrio, and many, many more. (1991)
____________________________________________________

Sunday, March 12, 2006
____________________________________________________

6-8pm -- Star Wars: Empire of Dreams. - 
A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, George
Lucas launched the most successful movie franchise
ever created. We look at how the Star Wars trilogy
changed movie-making, catapulted Harrison Ford to
stardom, and made director George Lucas a legend. For
Lucas, what began as a quest for creative freedom
became a philosophy, a cultural phenomenon, and an
empire of dreams. Features film clips, screen tests,
and interviews with Lucas, Ford, Steven Spielberg,
Mark Hamill, and Carrie Fisher.

8-10pm -- How William Shatner Changed the World - 
You've got a cell phone at one ear, an iPod at the
other. You know that Blackberry is now a verb and Spam
is not only canned meat. But just how did we get here?
Blame William Shatner--yes, that William
Shatner--Captain Kirk. We'll boldly go where few have
gone before to reveal how scientists, inspired by the
series, would revolutionize medicine and are
surpassing the far-out vision of the future
foreshadowed in Star Trek in the 1960s. From cell
phones to computers to even leading-edge medical
advancements, this 2-hour special explores how those
sci-fi inventions have now permeated everyday life as
we know it. Hosted and narrated by Shatner and based
on his book, I'm Working on That, we'll meet the
brightest minds of Silicon Valley and the
Trek-inspired inventions that have help change the
world. In his current TV-series, Shatner's cell-phone
has a familiar sound when he opens it as a nod to S.T.

10-12am -- Modern Marvels - Walt Disney World.
Journey underground and backstage at the technological
marvel that is Walt Disney World. Enter a make-believe
world spanning some 27,000 acres, brought to life by
cutting-edge technology. What was once Florida
swampland now boasts the world's largest theme park.
The ride technology ranges from space-age centrifuges
to enhanced motion vehicles powered by 3,000 PSI of
hydraulic pressure. And hundreds of audio animatronics
brought to life through the power of pneumatics,
hydraulics, and electrical systems. Walt Disney World
is made up of four separate theme parks, each with its
own innovations: the 107-acre Magic Kingdom, Epcot,
Disney-MGM Studios, and Disney's Animal Kingdom. The
four parks are all part of a megaplex of a resort.
Twice the size of Manhattan, it was the final vision
and crowning achievement of a man who spent more than
40 years pushing the limits of technology to create
entertainment magic: Walt Disney.
____________________________________________________

Monday, March 13, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Tunnels of Vietnam.
Here is the heroic story of a intrepid band of
infantry soldiers, the "Tunnel Rats", charged with a
daring mission--to search for, find, and destroy a
secret subterranean network of enemy tunnels in
Vietnam. Armed with only a flashlight, valor, and a
.45, they faced a determined foe and overcame lethal
odds, uncovering secret enemy arms and intelligence
caches. Tragically, many of these volunteers died and
others were seriously wounded on this terrifying
suicide mission.

8-10pm -- Comets: Prophets of Doom - 
Comets--these celestial travelers have forever filled
us with fear and wonder. Lurking in the furthest
reaches of our solar system, they come close to Earth
as they orbit our Sun. Could something as destructive
as comets hold the key to life? Are the building
blocks of carbon-based life forms frozen inside? Might
they contain information about the creation of our
solar system? At the conclusion of two spectacular
NASA missions that sent spaceships to rendezvous with
these mysterious objects, we examine the scientific
and historical record of comets, including man's
reaction to them. Did a comet lead the Wise Men to
Bethlehem? Did they foretell the death of kings, the
destruction of civilizations? How did Halley's Comet
provide Isaac Newton with the clues for his theories
of gravity? Finally, what comprises this "dirty
snowball" and how can we protect ourselves if headed
on a collision-course with one?

10-11pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Mystery of the
Channel Collision.
On a stormy night in March 1899, two ships head toward
each other in the English Channel. The Duke of
Buccleugh, a 380-foot iron steamer is bound for India,
with a mixed cargo of china, glassware, and industrial
goods. The Vandalia, a wooden sailing ship loaded with
barrels of petroleum is hurrying to reach London.
Shortly after 1pm the two ships collide with deadly,
but surprising results. The iron Duke sinks quickly,
with her entire crew of 47; the badly damaged wooden
Vandalia limps ashore. The surviving captain reports
his sailing ship was operating properly when suddenly
rammed by the iron steamer, and for a hundred years,
his claim goes unchallenged. But now, evidence on the
wreck suggests a different story. Did the Duke of
Buccleugh ram the Vandalia or was it the other way
round? And just how does wood sink iron? Join our
intrepid divers, John Chatterton and Richie Kohler as
the set out to discover the answers.
____________________________________________________

Tuesday, March 14, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Edison Tech.
He was the father of the future...electric lights,
power systems, motion pictures, recorded sound--even
the tattoo pen. Life as we know it would be
inconceivable without the prodigious output of the
Wizard of Menlo Park, Thomas Alva Edison. His intense
focus on his work came with a hefty personal price,
but his reward was a world forever changed by his
genius. Years after his death, Edison's effect is
seen, heard, and felt everywhere. We follow
descendants of his motion-picture camera to the tops
of Earth's highest mountains, to the bottoms of its
deepest oceans, and even into outer space. We track
his innovations in recorded sound to CDs, iPods,
sophisticated movie sound, and satellite radio. And we
illuminate his world of electric light, powering the
world and turning night into day. Along the way, we
discover a little Edison in corners of modern life
less well-known and even look at his failures. From
the Internet to the stock market to pay-per-view; the
Wizard is everywhere. 

8-10pm -- An Alien History of Planet Earth - 
Nick Cook, a British aerospace journalist with a
20-year history of "getting below the surface" of some
of the strangest military aircraft to take to the
skies, applies his expert, investigative skills to a
world of mystery and deceit--a fantastical place full
of UFOs, strange encounters, and alien abductions.
Much of his time has been spent at the respected
journal, Jane's Defence Weekly. His job is to
investigate secret programs--the shadow defense
industry, worth billions of dollars, but hidden from
public view. Now, with more people than ever believing
in UFOs, Cook wants to know what really has been
flying through our air space. He traces the phenomenon
from early sightings of UFOs during WWII to the mass
reports of alien abductions that swept America in the
1980s and `90s. Entering the world of bluff and
double-bluff, he investigates such landmark cases as
the Roswell Incident and the Zamora Sighting to try to
answer the question: Are UFOs real? Is there real
fire in the sky?

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Real Queen of
Sheba.
According to the Bible, the Queen of Sheba came to
Solomon's Palace bearing fabulous gifts of gold,
frankincense, and myrrh. She is mentioned only briefly
in the Bible before she and her entourage disappear
back into the desert from which they came. Was this
Queen real? If so, who was she? Host Josh Bernstein
digs deep in Ethiopia, legendary home of the Queen,
follows the ancient incense trail, and ends up in
Yemen, while attempting to discover her mystery and
legacy. 
____________________________________________________

Wednesday, March 15, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bunkers.
From the earliest bunkers of WWI through the
ultra-futuristic ones of tomorrow's wars, we trace the
story of defensive fortifications. In the constant
struggle to hold off ever more potent forms of attack,
bunkers function in a variety of forms. Three mammoth
block structures comprise a submarine bunker at
Lorient, France, able to house 20 subs. We visit
Churchill's Cabinet War Room and Hitler's Berlin
bunker, as well as backyard Cold War bunkers and those
that protect nuclear weapons themselves.

8-10pm -- Meteors: Fire in the Sky - 
Meteors, comets, and asteroids cross the solar system
to offer clues about our planet and universe. Can they
destroy civilizations? Did they wipe out the
dinosaurs? Have they brought life to our planet? And
when will the next one hit? Aided by elaborate
animation and live-action footage, we learn what these
mysterious space rocks really are and imagine what
likely happened 65-million years ago, when an object
plowed into the Yucatan Peninsula. We see how certain
spectacular meteor falls advanced our understanding of
what they are and the danger that they pose. We talk
to leading experts--astronomers and geologists
including David Levy and Carolyn Shoemaker,
co-discoverers of the Shoemaker-Levy comet that fell
into Jupiter in 1994. And we talk to NASA scientists
about recent missions to asteroids and comets and
speculate on ways to move Earth-threatening asteroids
and comets out of our way. Because it isn't a question
of if but when the next deadly impact will take place.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Snackfood Tech.
Extruders, molds, in-line conveyor belts. Are these
machines manufacturing adhesives, plastics, or parts
for your car? No, they're making treats for your
mouth--and you will see them doing their seductively
tasty work in this scrumptious episode. First, we
visit Utz Quality Foods in Hanover, Pennsylvania, that
produces more than one million pounds of chips per
week, and Snyder's of Hanover, the leading US pretzel
manufacturer. Next, we focus on the world's largest
candy manufacturer, Masterfoods USA, which makes Milky
Way, Snickers, Mars, and M&Ms, and take a lick at the
world's largest lollipop producer, Tootsie Roll
Industries. And at Flower Foods' Crossville, Tennessee
plant, an army of cupcakes rolls down a conveyer belt.
The final stop is Dreyer's Bakersfield, California
plant, where 20,000 ice cream bars and 9,600
drumsticks roll off the line in an hour.
____________________________________________________

Thursday, March 16, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Chunnel.
The job of joining Britain and France via a tunnel
under the English Channel was a challenge. Geologists
tracked the only safe route with satellite technology,
and French and British teams drilled towards each
other using two of the largest Tunnel Boring Machines
ever made. We'll explore the greatest underwater
land-link of all time.

8-10pm -- How William Shatner Changed the World - 
You've got a cell phone at one ear, an iPod at the
other. You know that Blackberry is now a verb and Spam
is not only canned meat. But just how did we get here?
Blame William Shatner--yes, that William
Shatner--Captain Kirk. We'll boldly go where few have
gone before to reveal how scientists, inspired by the
series, would revolutionize medicine and are
surpassing the far-out vision of the future
foreshadowed in Star Trek in the 1960s. From cell
phones to computers to even leading-edge medical
advancements, this 2-hour special explores how those
sci-fi inventions have now permeated everyday life as
we know it. Hosted and narrated by Shatner and based
on his book, I'm Working on That, we'll meet the
brightest minds of Silicon Valley and the
Trek-inspired inventions that have help change the
world.

10-11pm -- Declassified - John Lennon.
From approximately 1956-1971, thousands of American
residents and US citizens, from John Lennon to John
Kerry to Martin Luther King Jr., were the subjects of
COINTELPRO (Counter Intelligence Program), the FBI's
secret operation to target people and organizations
viewed as un-American. Decades later, historians and
the subjects of the spying themselves have begun to
use the Freedom of Information Act to piece together
the story of COINTELPRO. In this episode, we focus on
the case of John Lennon and uncover the effects of the
FBI's domestic spymasters on this pop-culture icon and
the myriad of people who loved him.

____________________________________________________

Friday, March 17, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- The History of Saint Patrick's Day - 
In Ireland, March 17th is a feast day honoring the
bishop who Christianized the island; but in America
it's a boisterous celebration of Irish heritage. We'll
march up New York City's Fifth Avenue with over
150,000 celebrants at the largest and oldest parade on
the day all Americans are Irish. With Andrew Greeley
and Frank McCourt.

8-10pm -- Paddy Whacked: The Irish Mob - 
Long before the Mafia, Murder Inc., and the
African-American gangster, "Paddy" was plundering and
pilfering the stars and stripes. Once called the
"National Scourge", "The Shame of the Cities", and
"The White Man's Burden", the Irish rose from hellish
beginnings riddled with disease, vice, and death. The
Potato Famine or "Ireland's Genocide" had wiped out a
third of their population--America offered hope. They
arrived in swarms, starving and destitute, with their
notorious Celtic stubbornness and toughness. In a land
where man had to fight for his piece of the pie and
fight harder to keep it, "Paddy" was almost
unbeatable. From the 19th century gang wars to the
20th century wars with the Italians, "Paddy" whacked
their way to a mythical status. We trace the legacy of
the Irish Mob, deeply rooted in the diabolical power
trio of "Gangster, Politician, and Lawman" feeding and
festering off one another.

10-12am -- Rumrunners, Moonshiners... - 
Heroes who fight tax collectors and moral crusaders,
or just common criminals? Like it or not, America was
built by rumrunners, moonshiners, and
bootleggers--even founding father John Hancock was a
smuggler. In the 1920s, Prohibition turned fishermen
into rumrunners and two-bit gangsters into
millionaires, and moonshine haulers in their souped-up
cars helped create NASCAR. Rare archival footage and
photos help weave the compelling tale of our nation's
love-hate relationship with illegal alcohol.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, March 18, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Nature Tech: Hurricanes.
They're nature on a rampage. The size and intensity of
hurricanes make them the most feared and destructive
of all storms. Explore how hurricanes start, how
scientists track them, and how if at all possible they
can be stopped. Take a ride on a hurricane "chaser"
plane as it flies directly into the eye of hurricane
Wilma, collecting important barometric pressure and
wind velocity readings. In this hour we'll also track
the historical highlights of hurricanes, and the
history and development of such important hurricane
research tools as radar and weather satellites. We'll
delve into the construction of buildings that weather
hurricanes better than traditional structures and
examine how modern skyscrapers are built to stand up
to hurricane force winds.

8-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Mysteries of the Bermuda
Triangle.
Since the 15th century, the Bermuda Triangle has
mysteriously vanished an untold number of ships,
planes and lives with three more known incidents in
2004. Using today's scientific knowledge and
investigative techniques, we study the riddle of the
Bermuda Triangle. Through computer graphics, highly
stylized recreations, and underwater cameras, we will
dramatically visualize the accidents as well as
investigate the possible causes and explanations.
On-camera interviews with both skeptics and believers
will help lay out the facts and opinions of the cases.
Can the latest science available today finally lay to
rest the mysteries of the Triangle?

10-11pm -- Alaska's Bermuda Triangle - Alaska's
Bermuda Triangle.
There's something about Alaska that the tourist bureau
doesn't want you to know. In Alaska, people, planes,
and ships disappear. Suddenly, inexplicably, and
permanently! Natives say that shape-shifting spirits
kidnap lost travelers. Scientists tell of giant
crevasses that swallow the unwary. Others tell of
conspiracies to wreck aircraft. We take a detailed
look at the 1972 incident that confounded the US
military, when an airplane carrying two Congressmen
vanished between Anchorage and Juneau.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, March 19, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Digging for the Truth - City of the Gods.
There was only one ancient city in the Americas that
ever truly rivaled the size, scale, and power of its
Old World counterparts--Teotihuacán, the City of the
Gods. And today, it's the largest ghost town in the
world. Still home to the world's third largest
pyramid, this mysterious city was once a metropolis
many times larger and more populous than the biggest
Mayan and Aztecan cities ever built. Now, Josh
Bernstein heads to central Mexico to check it out.
He'll soar above the ancient city, explore its
obsidian mines, make prehistoric tools, and try to
decode its impressive murals in a quest to understand
who built the City of the Gods, how it became so
powerful, and, most mysterious of all, why it was
abandoned.

8-9pm -- Super Tools - Skyscraper.
Skyscrapers are an extraordinary feat of human
engineering: exposing millions of pounds of concrete
and steel to the enemy forces of wind and gravity.
Starting with the foundation and on through the
support structures and concrete flooring, every piece
of these superstructures has to be super-strong. We'll
soar high to spotlight the construction of three new
buildings: a 30-story hotel tower for the Palms Casino
in Las Vegas; a 52-story office building in Manhattan,
the new headquarters of The New York Times; and a
92-story residential and commercial building in
Chicago, the Trump International Hotel and Tower.
Along the way, we go behind the scenes with the five
tools that make these buildings possible: the
foundation drill rig, the tower crane, the impact
wrench, the power trowel, and the total station. Each
of these tools has evolved over the 100-plus year
history of the skyscraper era.

9-10pm -- Super Tools - Tunnel.
In this episode, we dig deep into the workings,
history, and technology of the superstar tools that
enable us to burrow beneath the earth.
Tunnels--underground, through mountains, beneath
oceans and rivers--are among engineering's great
achievements. Workers must create a seamless and
waterproof space where only unforgiving rock existed
before. We'll visit one of America's biggest tunnel
projects, Atlanta's CSO (Combined Sewage Overflow). To
help manage waste water during torrential rains, two
four and a half mile long tunnels are being
constructed under the city to channel storm water
overflow to a pumping station. We'll watch the action
of the five superstar tools of tunnel
construction--the rock drill, explosives, the tunnel
boring machine, the gas detector, and the shotcrete
gun. What began as backbreaking labor with a simple
hammer and chisel is today a state-of-the-art hi-tech
industry thanks to the ever-improving technology of
these five essential tools.

10-11pm -- Super Tools - Ship.
A modern-day aircraft carrier is like a floating city:
with 5,000 crewmembers, 80 aircraft, and a
four-and-a-half acre big flight deck. It's nearly as
long as the Empire State Building is tall, and has its
very own 20-story skyscraper balanced on top of it.
Constructing one of these is as much a marvel as the
ship itself. We take viewers to the Newport News
Shipyard in Virginia, where the George H. W. Bush--the
latest Nimitz-class aircraft carrier--is inching
closer to completion. Gone are the hammers, nails, and
even rivets of the old shipyards, replaced with
plasma, lasers, and robots that are pressed into
service building the largest warship afloat. We go
deep inside the guts of this warship-in-the-making to
get up close to the tools that rule the shipbuilding
world: the plasma beveling cutter, robotic welder,
shafting lathe, laser tracker, and pneumatic drill.

____________________________________________________

Monday, March 20, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engines.
Story of the development of engines and motors, with
particular emphasis on the ones that have profoundly
changed society. Beginning with the steam engine, we
see how it was created, how it works, and how it led
to the Industrial Revolution. We review the electric
motor, internal combustion engine, jet engine, and
rocket engine, and conclude with a look at futuristic
engine technologies, including hydrogen-powered cars
and microtechnology engines so small that they fit on
the tip of a finger.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Texas' Roswell.
In April 1897--50 years before the alleged UFO crash
in Roswell, New Mexico--a mysterious airship crash
rocked the small town of Aurora, Texas...or at least,
that's how the legend goes! The tale includes the
wreckage from the ship, a funeral for the dead "alien"
pilot, and thousands of witnesses from across the
country. And the Aurora crash allegedly took place
five years before the Wright Brothers flew at Kitty
Hawk, so whatever was in the air was not manmade.
Eyewitness accounts of the crash, mysterious metal
found at the site, and the hunt for the only known
alien graveyard are all combined into a story that has
even the most adamant debunkers baffled. Is this the
case that finally proves that UFOs are real? Join us
as we separate fact from fiction.

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - Troy: Of Gods and
Warriors.
The Iliad is one of the most famous literary works of
the Western world. It's an epic tale of Greek gods,
earthly soldiers, and a decade-long fight over the
most beautiful woman in the world. Could The Iliad
actually be based on fact? Could the Trojan War really
have happened? Josh Bernstein travels to Greece and
Turkey in search of ancient Troy. Along the way, he'll
learn what it took to live and fight on the coasts of
the Aegean in the late Bronze Age. He'll test the
tools of the Trojan warriors, and he'll uncover a city
in northern Turkey that just might prove The Iliad was
far more than a simple work of fiction.

10-11pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Blackbeard's Mystery
Ship.
In 1718, the infamous pirate Blackbeard and his
flagship, the Queen Anne's Revenge, wreaked havoc
raiding British supply routes to and from their
American colonies. Then, the British offered a pardon
to all pirates who would give up their dastardly ways.
Blackbeard decided to accept, but as he moved toward
the coast of North Carolina, his flagship ran aground
in what is now known as Beaufort Inlet. Eventually
Blackbeard abandoned the Queen Anne's Revenge, leaving
her to succumb to the elements...or so the story goes.
In 2001, underwater archaeologists found the remains
of a ship in the inlet. Join our veteran divers John
Chatterton and Richie Kohler as they embark on a
journey to solve the mystery of the ship's identity.
Could this be the final resting place of Blackbeard's
ship? And did the famed master seaman really run
aground, or was that all part of another notorious
Blackbeard scheme?

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, March 21, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Rubber.
The story of rubber is more than tires, toys, gloves,
and gum--it's imbedded in modern life, from the
controversial Challenger O-rings to seals on hydrogen
fuel cells. A gigantic worldwide synthetic rubber
industry creates exotic elastomers for high-tech
applications, while China's rapid industrialization
plays havoc with the world's natural rubber supply.
From the ancient Olmecs of Yucatán, who knew the
secret of vulcanization, to modern processing plants,
we trace rubber's history and future.

8-9pm -- Shootout - WWII: Storming France.
D-Day was hell, but it was just the beginning. For
five months, in the villages and fields of France,
American GIs fought and died for every yard of turf,
as Hitler tried to push them back into the sea. Don
Malarkey, of the famous "Band of Brothers", brings us
into the trenches for Easy Company's daring attack on
a German gun battery. Paratrooper John Hinchliff puts
us behind his machine gun as he tries to hold off a
German assault. Three vets of the 379th Regimental
Combat Scouts recount a harrowing dance with death
when their cover is blown. Bryan Bell, an infantry
platoon leader in Patton's Third Army, leads his men
on a charge up a hillside where death comes much
easier than glory. Computer graphics and battle
reenactments show you how these soldiers fought and
why they won.

9-10pm -- Six Degrees of Francis Bacon - 
Like the popular game 6 Degrees of Kevin Bacon, our
show is also based on the premise that all human
endeavors are connected. Today we give a historical
nod to Francis Bacon (Father of Modern Science), and
show how significant movements in history are as
likely the result of seemingly insignificant,
unrelated events as of a single spark of genius. 

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The F-14.
October 7, 2001: Missiles from lethal US jets rain
down onto Afghanistan. One powerful and deadly plane
led the majority of the assaults--the F-14 Tomcat, the
world's most complete military fighter. No other
fighter jet carries the F-14's unique combination of
weapons. Its state-of-the-art system can spot an
oncoming enemy plane at almost 200 miles. Its radar
can detect targets as low as 50 feet and as high as
80,000 feet and does so three times faster than the
radar of any other fighter jet.

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, March 22, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil Tankers.
The biggest moving objects ever built by man, oil
tankers dominate the world's waterways, both in size
and numbers. Upwards of 10,000 strong, the world
tanker fleet's vast number results from the modern,
insatiable thirst for oil. We'll dig into the history
of oil transport--from Civil War days to the critical
WWII years and invention of the supertanker in the
1950s. And we examine the financial impact of
modifying these steel leviathans to prevent future
catastrophic environmental disasters.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Trucks.
Icons of the open road, trucks form the backbone of
the construction and transportation industries. The
facility to handle nearly any load and the ability to
deliver goods almost anywhere make trucks integral to
modern life. From 18th-century steam-powered carriages
to tomorrow's computerized trucks, it's a long haul
you'll enjoy!

9-10pm -- One Time Only - Failed Inventions.
Join us for a salute to the dreamers and schemers who
brought the world an odd assortment of flawed
ideas--like flying, swimming, and jet-powered
automobiles, flying rocket belts, and radium-filled
clothes that promised to inflate the owner's sagging
love life! And we explore the minds of the off-kilter
geniuses who thought up these off-the-mark concepts.
Some tinkerers' musings were merely ahead of their
time and deemed flops during the inventor's lifetime,
but others were just plain bad!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 19.
We'll examine one of the most mysterious maritime
tragedies, when the sturdy Edmund Fitzgerald suddenly
sank on a stormy night in November 1975, and unlock
the mysteries of the rudder problems behind two Boeing
737 crashes: a 1991 United flight and a 1994 US Air
flight. Then, we take viewers inside one of the most
dangerous but least known nuclear disasters in US
history--a meltdown at a secret government facility in
1959. We also travel to an oil storage facility where
nearly 4-million gallons of diesel fuel suddenly
flowed out as the storage tank cracked and
catastrophically unzipped from top to bottom. Finally,
we take a "close look" at microscopic structures
causing gigantic problems in the electronics
industry--tin whiskers, as they are known by
researchers, which spontaneously grow from the pure
tin coatings on electronic boards and microchips.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, March 23, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Harvesting.
Cutting, digging, picking, stripping, shaking, and
raking--whatever the crop, there's a custom machine to
harvest it. It all began with handpicking and today
it's often one man and one machine harvesting hundreds
of acres in a single day. The farmer may even get a
little help from satellites. Far above the earth,
high-resolution photography is giving the grower more
opportunities to cut costs and maximize the harvest.
From the debut of the sickle in ancient Egypt to
McCormick's famous Reaper to the field of ergonomics
that assists human harvesters, we'll dig into the past
and future of the harvest.

8-9pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Machines II.
How did the ancients harness power? Did Archimedes use
solar power to defeat the Romans? Was he the first to
concentrate the power of the sun? Early historical
accounts of the battle of Syracuse in 212 BC claim
that Archimedes used polished shields to focus light
onto the sails of the invading Roman ships and set
them ablaze. We investigate this and other intriguing
and incredible objects. An earthenware jar about the
size of a man's fist sits in the National Museum of
Iraq. Its existence could require history books
throughout the world to be rewritten. The jar appears
to be an electric battery pre-dating Christ. Did the
ancient world master electricity nearly two millennia
before the modern world? A recent discovery of a flour
mill in Barbegal in southern France contained 16
waterwheels that operated the mill. Is this one of the
first examples of Roman industrial-revolution
technology--1,800 years before our own?

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Secret Brotherhood of
Freemasons.
Join us as we divulge the true nature of the secret
and mystical organization known as freemasons. We
reveal the initiation ceremony, when candidates swear
on pain of death to uphold the order's secrets. In
ancient Egypt, we uncover the murderous legend that
inspired their rituals, and we also study the
society's influence on our democracy.

10-11pm -- Declassified - Godfathers of Havana.
If Castro and his Cuban communist compadres had not
thrown the corrupt Batista government and US Mafia out
of Havana in 1958, the Mob wouldn't have needed to
develop Las Vegas as the ultimate City of Sin. Havana,
just 40 miles south of Miami, was a tropical paradise
fueled by rum, rhumba, and gangsters. Join us as we
expose a network of extraordinary corruption and the
formation of a brutal criminal state on America's
doorstep. Visited by the most celebrated Hollywood
stars, top Mafia bosses, presidents, and politicians,
this was a city of glitzy casinos, luxurious clubs,
exotic dancing girls, and endless nights. Havana was
at the crossroads of the Mafia-controlled narcotic
super-highway before the Cuban Revolution took down
the corrupt, Batista government.

____________________________________________________

Friday, March 24, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Offshore Oil Drilling.
Offshore oil drilling is one of mankind's greatest
technological feats. From the beginning of oil
discovery, the oceans' vast reserves have been the
ultimate frontier. See how these superstructures, both
floating and fixed, revolutionized the search for
crude oil, and the environmental price we pay for
their prolific production.

8-10pm -- Titanic's Final Moments: Missing Pieces - 
In August 2005, John Chatterton and Richie Kohler,
hosts of Deep Sea Detectives, led an expedition to the
wreck of RMS Titanic. Diving 2½ miles down in Russian
submersibles, they searched outside the known debris
field for new evidence. On their final dive they made
an extraordinary find: two large intact sections of
the bottom hull of the Titanic in pristine condition
with the red bottom paint still on them. For four
months, a team of historians, marine architects, and
engineers has been conducting a forensic analysis of
this find. All agree that it's the most significant
new discovery since the wreck was located in 1985.
Analysis is ongoing, but preliminary indications are
that these bottom sections will change our
understanding of how the ship broke apart, and rewrite
the story of the final moments of the Titanic.

10-11pm -- Caligula: Reign of Madness - 
Caligula ruled the Roman Empire fewer than four years,
and was only 28 when assassinated by officers of his
guard in 41 AD. His reign was a legendary frenzy of
lunacy, murder, and lust. Between executions, he
staged spectacular orgies, made love to his sister,
and declared himself a living god. Join us for a look
at this devoted son, murderer, pervert, and loving
father whose anguished life was far more bizarre than
the myth that surrounds him.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, March 25, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Leather.
Sometime at the dawn of civilization, animal hides
were rubbed down with animal fat, making them more
flexible, durable, and malleable. By the 5th Century
BC, this "tanning" process expanded to include
vegetable and tree oil washes, creating what's now
known as "leather"--one of man's most reliable and
versatile products. Without advances in leather shoes,
the Romans could never have marched to the Tigris; nor
could the Pilgrims have survived winters in Plymouth.
Today, leather is a staple of our daily lives. Modern
tanners have devised techniques to make leather more
versatile, colorful, and luxurious than ever. We visit
modern tanneries of conventional cowhide leather, and
explore the more exotic leathers made from alligator,
snakes, and even sting-ray. And we'll examine the race
of modern science to create synthetic leathers that
are supposedly more convenient in today's fast-paced
life. We'll see how leather binds us to the past in an
unparalleled way.

8-9pm -- Save Our History - Alaska's Bloodiest Battle.
Historian Steve Thomas travels through the Aleutians
to Attu Island, where he walks in the footsteps of the
soldiers engaged in a little-known but crucial
conflict of WWII. Along the way, Steve touches down on
other islands involved in those war efforts, where he
discovers a variety of military structures now being
documented, preserved, and restored. The show ends
with Steve on the beach where the troops landed,
describing the Battle of Attu as a wake-up call to
America--showing us that the war would not be easily
won and the cost would be high. Other points of
interest visited during Steve's journey include:
Kodiak Island, Unalaska Island, Anchorage, and
Washington State.

9-11pm -- Alaska: Big America - 
Alaska--a land of extremes. Its size is
staggering--nearly 600,000 square miles, or more than
twice the size of Texas. Its vast distances, extreme
weather, imposing landscape--all helped shape its
history and the lives of those who come under its
spell. Our 2-hour special heads to far-flung corners
of the 49th State to hear compelling stories of life
in the bush--from Russian expeditions in the 1700s to
building of the Alcan Highway to the WWII Battle for
the Aleutian Islands and 1959 statehood.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, March 26, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Digging for the Truth - Cleopatra: The Last
Pharaoh.
She ruled over men, bedding the likes of Julius Caesar
and Marc Anthony, and led one of the world's greatest
civilizations. Her name has been immortalized in myth
and legend. So, how did Cleopatra become the last of
the pharaohs? In the shadow of the pyramids, Josh
Bernstein joins Zahi Hawass on a hunt for mummies from
the time of Cleopatra. He'll come face to face with
Cleopatra's killer, the Egyptian cobra, and sail down
the Nile River searching for clues to her true
history. In Alexandria, Josh will descend into the
cisterns below the modern city to look for evidence of
Cleopatra's reign. Finally he'll dive into the harbor
of Alexandria, where a beautiful palace lies--possibly
the last vestige of Cleopatra's legendary wealth--the
only testament to a woman who was perhaps the wisest
and most cunning of all of Egypt's pharaohs.

8-9pm -- Auschwitz: The Forgotten Evidence - 
When an Allied photo reconnaissance plane flew over
southern Poland in the summer of 1944, it took
horrifying images of the Nazi's most evil
extermination camp--Auschwitz. The gas chambers and
the crematoria in which 12,000 people were being
murdered daily are clearly visible. But the photos
were not analyzed at the time--simply filed away.
Using these photos as a unique starting point, we take
a new look at the Holocaust and ask what the Allies
knew about the extermination camp and when they found
out. When Churchill heard about Auschwitz, he implored
the RAF to bomb it or the railway lines leading to it.
But this was not done. We explore all the arguments
around the practical difficulties of bombing
Auschwitz, but the question remains whether the Allies
should not have done something to stop the killing.
Includes interviews with Auschwitz survivors and
expert historians.

9-10pm -- Standing Tall at Auschwitz - 
They were the largest family of dwarfs in recorded
history. In the 1930s and 1940s, seven Jewish siblings
toured Transylvania and neighboring lands enchanting
enthusiastic crowds with their unique musical
performances. Imprisoned at Auschwitz, they became
endlessly appealing to Dr. Josef Mengele, who
tormented them in the name of genetic research. In
inescapable irony, the Nazi doctor of death became
their protector--and only hope for survival. We follow
the Ovitz family from their beginnings in Transylvania
and incarceration at Auschwitz, to their liberation
from the camp and eventual settling in Israel. This
story of survival unfolds through firsthand accounts
from residents of Rozavlea in Transylvania (now
Romania), where the Ovitz family grew up, and from
fellow Auschwitz survivors that remember them from the
camp. Highlights include an interview with Perla, the
youngest Ovitz, taped before her death in 2001.

10-11pm -- The Nazi Expeditions - 
A ship sailing under the Swastika flag glides through
the Antarctic Ocean in search of stone and ice samples
to support the "global ice theory", according to which
a comet crashed to Earth in prehistoric times and
scattered the "original Aryans" worldwide. In Tibet,
an expedition hunted for new findings relating to
early Germanic history. The Nazis believed in a Nordic
master race that survived the demise of Atlantis.
These expeditions within and beyond the German Reich
were planned in direct collusion with Reichsführer
Heinrich Himmler. They were funded to produce proof of
the superiority of the German race and reinforce the
Nazi claim to world supremacy. Featuring previously
unpublished library material and statements by
witnesses, expedition members, historians, and
scientists, we shed light on these bizarre operations.
Unpublished film shots, propaganda films, and photos
from public and private archives provide incredible
testimony.

____________________________________________________

Monday, March 27, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Proving Grounds.
Where can you fire a missile without scaring the
neighbors? Or lift millions of pounds in pursuit of a
couple of ounces of gold? On a proving ground, of
course, where performance is the only thing that
matters. Because in the heat of battle or head-to-head
competition, no excuses can be given. We'll visit the
US military's Cold Regions Testing Center in Alaska
and desert proving grounds in Arizona, the Olympic
Complex in Colorado, and the now-defunct Packard
proving grounds in Michigan.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Beyond The War of the Worlds.
In print worldwide for over a century, The War of the
Worlds is H.G. Wells at his best. Beginning with its
literary origins, we trace the path of this amazing
story from riveting magazine serial through the panic
broadcast of 1938, and then to major motion pictures.
We uncover the long-forgotten 1968 broadcast that
again drove thousands into the streets of Buffalo, New
York; and gain exclusive access to a new animated
feature film. Loaded with state-of-the-art special
effects and stunning reenactments, we revisit not only
the famous but the obscure, including the radio
broadcast in Ecuador that cost 20 people their lives.
Filled with vintage film clips and previously unseen
interpretations of the Martians, this is one you won't
want to miss!

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Da Vinci Code:
Bloodlines.
Josh Bernstein searches for solid evidence behind the
controversial theory laid out in Dan Brown's book The
Da Vinci Code. Brown's theory claims that Jesus
married Mary Magdalene and that she conceived a child.
It also suggests that the bloodline
continues--unbroken--to this day. Josh shows what's
true and what's clearly make-believe in Dan Brown's
bestseller. From musty libraries to ancient churches,
Josh's unique quest leads him to seek the DNA evidence
that might prove or disprove one of the most
sensational claims in modern history. Most remarkably,
he'll try to find a genetic link between a
long-sheltered pocket of ancient Aramaic Assyrians in
Turkey and a man who claims to be of the bloodline of
Jesus himself!

10-11pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Great Lakes Ghost
Ship.
The 1870s were a time of boom and bust on the Great
Lakes, with more than a thousand ships competing for
business. On November 27th, 1875, the Cornelia B.
Windiate--a canal schooner--is sent on one last,
late-season run from Milwaukee to Buffalo. It's a bet
against Mother Nature that few ship owners or crewmen
will take...and this time they lose. The weather takes
a drastic turn for the worse and the Windiate
disappears. For more than 100 years, it's assumed that
the ship was lost in Lake Michigan. But when she's
found, it's in another lake altogether! There's not a
mark on her. No crew. No sign of what caused her to
sink. Our hosts and veteran divers, John Chatterton
and Richie Kohler, dive to examine one of the world's
most pristine shipwrecks and help develop a new
solution to one the strangest mysteries of the Great
Lakes.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, March 28, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Nature's Engineers.
Towering skyscrapers buzzing with life, intricate
tunnels connecting entire communities, mighty dams
that tame the wildest rivers--this is construction
animal style! Take a walk on the wild side as we
investigate common creatures seemingly designed to
alter their habitat and remake the world. Our ability
to learn and capacity for abstract thought may
separate us from beavers, honeybees, birds, termites,
and spiders, but these engineers of nature remind us
that we're merely the latest in a long line.

8-9pm -- Cannibals #2 - 
Cannibalism evokes an image of uncivilized people
roasting enemies over a fire. But the reality is that
even the most civilized humans have resorted to
cannibalism. And there's new evidence that some of
Europe's first humans had a taste for their own kind
of flesh. Usually cannibalism occurs as a last
resort--people being pushed to do the unthinkable in
order to survive. And while there's little doubt that
it occurred, survivors struggle to conceal the truth
or simply deny it happened. Was it a practice accepted
by societies long ago? We also investigate the recent
discovery of Neolithic bones in England that show
signs of cannibalism--a discovery that shocked experts
and horrified many since some bones belonged to
newborns. Our three tales of cannibalism suggest that
those who ate human meat are far from alone. Secrecy,
denial, even pride, are emotions that accompany the
act of eating human flesh. But how do we handle the
truth behind the act?

9-10pm -- The ArchiTECHS - 
With the unprecedented cooperation of the US Army,
it's a military-makeover as a high-tech think tank of
engineers, designers, writers, and visionaries strives
to rework the Humvee into the four-wheeled workhorse
of the future. For two high-pressure days on a remote
Army base, they will immerse themselves in every
aspect of the Humvee, both under the hood and in the
field, culminating with a dramatic presentation for
General Paul Kern, a retired four-star general. He
will bring their ideas back to the Pentagon--but only
if they're good enough. We'll follow every aspect of
their design process, from off-the-wall brainstorming
to hard-core computer modeling, through long days and
nights of outside-the-box thinking as they push the
limits of the possible. 

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Death Devices.
The hangman, guillotine, gas chamber, firing squad,
and electric chair are just a few of the ways in which
societies have rid themselves of those who committed
capital crimes. And throughout history, a select few
have developed the devices that have carried out the
mandate of the people. This is the dark story of those
inventors and the macabre history of execution
mechanics--from the first "stone" of antiquity, the
dungeons of the Inquisition, and Nazi death camps to
today's sterile injection chambers--with a peek at the
future of death technology.

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, March 29, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Howard Hughes Tech.
An in-depth look at the technology conceived or
developed by America's first billionaire. A passionate
aviator, Howard Hughes built and flew planes that
broke speed records, and developed war machines, spy
aircraft, and commercial airliners. Despite the
impressive heights reached by his technological
empire, his health and mental well-being were fragile.
During his last years, he wasn't seen publicly or
photographed, rarely left the hotel suites he
occupied, and was terrified of germs. But when Hughes
died in 1976, he left a huge legacy in aviation and
technology. When we board an airliner, view TV via
satellite, or marvel at America's military might, we
might do well to remember the risk-taker who flew
faster than his peers and was at heart an aviator
obsessively dedicated to both the art and science of
flight.

8-9pm -- Hitler and Stalin: Roots of Evil - 
An examination of the minds of two of the 20th
century's most brutal dictators and mass
murderers--Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin. Based on
recent psychological and medical studies, the program
explores the personalities of these ruthless leaders,
who were directly responsible for millions of
deaths--their paranoia, suspiciousness,
cold-bloodedness, sadism, and lack of human feeling.
Includes interviews with Martin Bormann's son and
Hitler's butler.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - The World's Biggest
Machines.
Join us for a look at the biggest, heaviest, tallest,
longest, meanest machines on the planet! We'll see
what these monsters do and how they operate, and how
they're designed and assembled. Machines investigated
include the largest draglines, excavators used in
mining; the biggest dump truck; a front-end loader
with an 80-ton bucket and the largest tires of any
vehicle; the cruise ship, the Voyager of the Seas; a
240-foot tall wind generator; and a fusion reaction
machine the size of a football field.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Icebreakers.
They are the toughest ships in the water, plowing
headlong into one of nature's hardest obstacles.
Modern icebreakers can smash through 10-foot thick ice
sheets without stopping, allowing scientists and
commercial shipping access to some of Earth's most
inhospitable spots. Join our blustery journey as we
patrol the Great Lakes on the USCG Cutter Mackinaw and
traverse the infamous Northwest Passage on the maiden
voyage of the USCG Healy, the newest Polar Class
Icebreaker in the US Fleet.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, March 30, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Camouflage.
From ancient hunters' camouflage to computer-generated
digital pattern uniforms, we uncover the past,
present, and future of deception through disguise.
During an ambush exercise by US Marines, we learn that
camouflage came from natural coloration and patterns
of flora and fauna. The art of military camouflage
took off in WWI with the use of the airplane, when the
French learnt to hide from "eyes in the sky". It's a
world of shadows and smoke, where even cities
disappear through disguise.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - Osama bin Laden.
Featuring former and current CIA agents, Special
Forces soldiers, Washington insiders, and best-selling
authors such as Mark Bowden (Black Hawk Down), Steve
Coll (Ghost Wars), Phillip Smucker (Al Qaeda's Great
Escape), and Simon Reeve (The New Jackals), we take a
2-hour groundbreaking look at the hunt for the world's
#1 archenemy. Filmed in 10 countries around the world,
we trace bin Laden's rise through the Jihad against
the Soviets in Afghanistan to his present incarnation.

10-11pm -- Declassified - Chairman Mao.
Mao was the 20th Century's answer to Napoleon: a
brilliant tactician, a political and economic
theorist, and a statesman who ruled a billion people
for three decades. In death, he has become divine,
worshiped as a god in a godless country. Considering
who and what he ruled, Mao, with his Little Red Book,
might just be the single most powerful human being who
ever lived. We mine formerly guarded vaults and
archives to reveal untold stories in a relentless
search for the truth behind the legend.

____________________________________________________

Friday, March 31, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - More Dangerous Cargo.
It comes in many deadly shapes and sizes, and the
transportation of dangerous cargo is one of the most
meticulously planned procedures in the shipping world.
We hitch a ride on a "dynamite run" from explosives
factory to construction site; learn how liquid natural
gas is shipped, a fuel that could vaporize entire city
blocks if ignited; accompany a Drug Enforcement
Administration truck as it transports confiscated
illegal drugs to an incinerator site for destruction;
fly with Air Net as it moves radioactive
pharmaceuticals from factory to hospital; and tag
along with two tigers, part of a breeding program for
endangered species, as they travel from Texas to Ohio.
As each story progresses, we explore the history of
the transport of that particular form of Dangerous
Cargo.

8-10pm -- Saddam and the Third Reich - 
Few people realize that the Baath party was actually
formed upon the principles and organizational
structure of the Nazi party. Iraq, because of its oil
and hatred of Jews, was an important battleground
between the Axis and Allied powers in World War II.
Nazi propaganda was broadcast throughout Baghdad, and
Iraqis often went on rampages against Jews throughout
the war. One of the most ardent Nazi supporters during
WWII was named Khairallah Talfah. Talfah was Saddam's
uncle. After the war, many of the key Iraqi Nazi
supporters, all of whom evaded prosecution, wound up
involved in Saddam's rise to power. This special
examines the key individuals of the Iraqi-Nazi
connection, the little-known battle for Iraq in WWII,
and the strange link to Saddam Hussein.

10-11:30pm -- Sink the Tirpitz - 
The Tirpitz was the Third Reich's ultimate weapon.
Sister to the Bismarck, she was the most successful
WWII German battleship and the pride of Hitler's Navy.
Secretly built off the Baltic coast in 1939, the
warship spent the next five years terrorizing the
Allies in the Atlantic and Artic seaways, leaving
entire convoys annihilated in her wake. With the odds
against them, heroic Allied servicemen threw
everything into sinking the warship: manned torpedoes,
magnetic mines, miniature submarines, and even dive
bombers. But with the latest in radar technology and
anti-aircraft systems, the Tirpitz was almost
impervious to these attacks. All that changed in 1944
with development of a new technology: the earthquake
bomb, an Allied weapon that spelled doom for the
terrorizing warship. This is the story of the epic
bravery and technological wizardry that finally
destroyed this war machine, a feat that took over five
years and 36 attempts.
3000 names
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

For info on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket
(movie available on video and DVD)

Wild West Tech hosted by David Carradine on the History Channel, some episodes narrated by Keith Carradine

Previous History Channel primetime listings:


February
January 2006
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January 2005
Hellcats of the Navy

See if your favorite person, TV series or
motion picture is available on video:

Search:
Keywords:
In Association with Amazon.com


From the invention of the electric battery in 1800 to the murdered remains of missing Washington intern Chandra Levy being discovered in a Washington D.C. park*, find out what happened when with our exclusive History of the World Timeline!
GO TO: HistoryChannel.com/worldtimeline

You might also check out A&E Prime Time listings for this month

Official HistoryChannel.com Homepage
Find out more about any topic any time, including this day in history (your choice of decade), with our Best Search in History: www.HistoryChannel.com

* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

Visit Amazon.com's Jame Bond store!
Or
Our James Bond movies page

Return to TV Listings at www.Sci-fans.com
MonsterVision's Movies Recommendations on TV & Cable for today

"What's the difference between a Nazi and a dog? A Nazi raises his arm" - Victor Borge