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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For July 2006 (schedules available after the 1st & 15th)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Saturday, July 1, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Money
How does America make money--literally? We visit the
United States Mint and the Bureau of Printing and
Engraving to see the secretive government facilities
where our legal tender is generated. With a storied
past as tantalizing as the wealth they create, these
mints can spit out fortunes in an hour and keep our
economy flowing.

8-10pm -- Kennedys: The Curse of Power - 
Traces the Kennedy clan's calamities that occurred on
the rise to power--from immigration from Ireland up to
John Kennedy Jr.'s tragic death in 1999. The first
hour sees the loss of Joe Jr. in WWII and the
assassinations of JFK and RFK. Hour two witnesses
Ted's downfall and role as surrogate father to a
fatherless generation.

10-12am -- The Kennedy Assassination: Beyond
Conspiracy - 
No other murder in history has produced as much
speculation as the assassination of President John F.
Kennedy. Forty years after he was fatally shot, more
than 70 percent of polled Americans believe there was
a conspiracy and that Lee Harvey Oswald did not act
alone. In this 2-hour special, ABC News Anchor Peter
Jennings takes a fresh look at the assassination, the
evidence, the various and many theories, and an exact
computer simulation of the famous Abraham Zapruder
film that offers surprising results.

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Sunday, July 2, 2006
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7-8pm -- The Revolution - Rebellion to Revolution.
Rebellion escalates into war with the Battle at Bunker
Hill. The Continental Congress establishes an army and
appoints George Washington as Commander-in-Chief. But
Washington faces nearly insurmountable obstacles in
turning the motley militias into a battle-ready army.
When the Continental Army surrounds British troops
that occupy Boston, Britain sends additional troops
and its three best generals--William Howe, John
Burgoyne, and Henry Clinton--to take over command in
the insurgent colonies. The Continental assault from
Dorchester Heights forces the British and Loyalists to
evacuate the city.

8-9pm -- The Revolution - Declaring Independence.
1776: Noble ideas and dreams of independence ring out
as America is born. However, dark and devastating
struggles will quickly challenge these hopes and leave
few believing that the glorious cause will survive.
Join us as we relive the drama surrounding the birth
of the United States in this documentary series.

9-10pm -- The Revolution - American Crisis.
The newly proclaimed nation stares at the stark
realization that it could soon be dead. Desperate and
determined, General George Washington gambles on a
brilliant yet dangerously daring stroke to save his
army and America.

10-11pm -- The Revolution - Path to World War.
In this 13-part series, we cover the years between the
Boston Tea Party and the ratification of the
Constitution. In this hour, America's elder statesman,
Benjamin Franklin, descends on Paris to seduce the
French to join the fight against their common enemy,
England. British General William Howe delivers a
crushing blow to George Washington's troops at the
Battle of Brandywine taking Philadelphia, the American
capital, as his prize. But to the north, another
American general enters the spotlight--Horatio Gates
defeats British General John Burgoyne at the Battle of
Saratoga. It is this victory that convinces France to
enter the fight, turning the American Revolution into
a world war.

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Monday, July 3, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Siege Machines.
A look at siege machines that convert energy into
mechanical force to go over, under, or through
fortified or fixed defenses too strong for
conventional force. These engines range from man's
first long-range missile weapon, the slingshot, to the
laser cannons and satellite-destroying robots of the
21st century. All of these machines are designed to
breach barriers--castle walls, entrenched troops, even
outer space. When the going gets tough, the tough get
siege machines.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Texas' Roswell.
In April 1897--50 years before the alleged UFO crash
in Roswell, New Mexico--a mysterious airship crash
rocked the small town of Aurora, Texas...or at least,
that's how the legend goes! The tale includes the
wreckage from the ship, a funeral for the dead "alien"
pilot, and thousands of witnesses from across the
country. And the Aurora crash allegedly took place
five years before the Wright Brothers flew at Kitty
Hawk, so whatever was in the air was not manmade.
Eyewitness accounts of the crash, mysterious metal
found at the site, and the hunt for the only known
alien graveyard are all combined into a story that has
even the most adamant debunkers baffled. Is this the
case that finally proves that UFOs are real? Join us
as we separate fact from fiction.

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - Giants of Patagonia.
Many explorers throughout the centuries, including the
great Ferdinand Magellan, visited the region in South
America now known as Patagonia and reported sighting
giants. From these accounts we get the name
"Patagonia"--Land of the Big Feet. But what exactly
did these explorers see? Now, some experts suggest
that the giant, upright-walking ground sloth, once
widespread throughout Patagonia, could have been the
source of these stories. Josh Bernstein accompanies
paleontologists, naturalists, and crypto-zoologists on
a search to determine whether the ground sloth could
have lived into the era of human habitation. He treks
across the glaciers of Patagonia, descends deep in the
mountain caves, accompanies a band of gauchos on
horseback, and joins a modern-day paleontology dig to
try to discover evidence that the ground sloth still
exists today.

10-11pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Great Lakes Ghost
Ship.
The 1870s were a time of boom and bust on the Great
Lakes, with more than a thousand ships competing for
business. On November 27th, 1875, the Cornelia B.
Windiate--a canal schooner--is sent on one last,
late-season run from Milwaukee to Buffalo. It's a bet
against Mother Nature that few ship owners or crewmen
will take...and this time they lose. The weather takes
a drastic turn for the worse and the Windiate
disappears. For more than 100 years, it's assumed that
the ship was lost in Lake Michigan. But when she's
found, it's in another lake altogether! There's not a
mark on her. No crew. No sign of what caused her to
sink. Our hosts and veteran divers, John Chatterton
and Richie Kohler, dive to examine one of the world's
most pristine shipwrecks and help develop a new
solution to one the strangest mysteries of the Great
Lakes.

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Tuesday, July 4, 2006
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6-8pm -- Washington the Warrior - 
The George Washington we all know is larger than life,
an icon of mythic proportions. But before becoming
"Father" of his country, he was a soldier. This
unique, in-depth portrait of the Washington we don't
always think about begins in 1753, when the
21-year-old obtained an officer's commission in the
Virginia militia. While serving alongside British
regulars, did brash and sometimes reckless decisions
help ignite the French and Indian War? Washington
retired from the militia in 1758, but continued to
hone his leadership skills. Managing his vast Mount
Vernon estate required many of the same talents as
commanding soldiers in the field. When America
declared independence, Washington was the consensus
choice to lead the Continental Army. This is the epic
story of Washington's journey to greatness--propelled
by intense, often painful, transformation. The man who
emerged was a warrior of the purest sort...a man who
preferred liberty to power and justice to glory.

8-10pm -- Flight 93 - 
(movie) The stirring story of the courageous passengers
on hijacked United Airlines Flight 93 who fought back
against the terrorists on 9/11, preventing a probable
attack on Washington, D.C. This heart-pounding film
includes the extraordinary communications that took
place between the passengers and their loved ones on
the ground, and between US military and government
officials as they prepared to shoot the plane down, if
necessary. The passengers' actions prevented the plane
from becoming a guided missile that could have
destroyed the US Capitol or the White House. Stars
Jeffrey Nordling, Ty Olsson, Colin Glazer, and Brennan
Elliott. (2005)

10-11pm -- I Missed Flight 93 - 
On September 11, 2001, United Airlines Flight 93 from
Newark to San Francisco was hijacked by terrorists.
Passengers on board attempted to wrestle control of
the airplane from the terrorists and the plane
crashed, killing all on board. Frank Robertazzi of
East Hanover, New Jersey was supposed to be on that
plane. He regularly took Flight 93 to fly to his
business meetings in San Francisco. So was Daniel
Belardinelli. His uncle, William Cashman, was on
Flight 93. Daniel and his uncle were going to fly out
west together for a vacation. Heather Ogle was booked
for First Class, Seat 1A; two seats away from the lead
terrorist. Through a series of unwitting decisions and
quirks of fate, Robert, Daniel, and Heather narrowly
escaped death. Inter-cutting between our characters'
point of view and the broader story of 9/11 this hour
illuminates the thin line that separates life and
death.

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Wednesday, July 5, 2006
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6-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Motorcycles.
Set the sedan's safety brake and hop on your "hog" for
a 2-hour high-speed history of the motorcycle--from
the 1868 "steam velocipede" to the early 20th century,
when they were a low-cost alternative to automobiles;
from Harley-Davidsons preferred by Hell's Angels and
police to motocross riders who take bikes into the air
and onto the dirt. We also look to the motorcycle's
future, featuring Jay Leno's jet-propelled Y2K
sportbike and Erik Buell's bike-without-a-gas-tank
creation.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 6.
An in-depth look at the modern era's most complex,
deadly, and controversial engineering failures. With
the aid of 3-D animation, forensic experts, and
footage of disasters, we seek to understand what went
wrong and how mishap led to remedy. Stories include:
the Marines' AV-8 Harrier "Jump Jet"; the Ford
Explorer/Firestone rollovers; fire on the Piper Alpha
offshore oilrig; derailment of a high-speed train in
Germany; and computer errors that brought the world to
the brink of accidental nuclear war.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Ben Franklin Tech.
You may know him as a man of great wit and wisdom, as
the oldest and wisest Founding Father. But now you'll
get to know Dr. Franklin as the late 18th Century's
foremost scientist, and one of the greatest inventors
of any era. From the humble Pennsylvania Stove to the
spectacular lightning rod--Franklin was concerned with
putting scientific principals to practical use. We'll
explore his many inventions, including: his unique
musical instrument, the glass armonica, for which both
Mozart and Beethoven wrote pieces; his crafty
anti-counterfeiting techniques, including
multi-colored inks, elaborate ornamentation, and the
use of "leaf printing"--when a metal engraving plate
is made from a plant's leaf, making it impossible to
copy; and bifocal glasses. And we'll see how
Franklin's inventive genius extended to entire
systems, including: the modern volunteer fire
department, first fire insurance company, Daylight
Savings Time, and America's first lending library.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - '80's Tech.
Remember "brick" cell phones, Pac-Man, Rubik's Cube,
Sony Walkman, and the first music CDs? Remember all
the new and exciting gadgets of the 1980s? Join us as
we investigate the transition from Industrial to
Information Age--a digital decade dedicated to
ergonomics and entertainment. The microchip ushered in
an era that revolutionized the way we work, play, and
communicate. And we tour Silicon Valley--birthplace of
some of the greatest inventions from an amazing time
of change, including the modern personal computer.
Steve "Woz" Wozniak tells us about the evolution of
Apple computers, and we talk to Sony--makers of the
Walkman, Betamax, and the first CD players. A visit to
the Computer History Museum shows fun technological
"artifacts", primitive by today's standards. At Intel,
makers of the first microchips, we learn why
technology moves at such a fast pace. We also take a
ride in a DeLorean DMC-12 sports car--few things moved
faster.

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Thursday, July 6, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Edison Tech.
He was the father of the future...electric lights,
power systems, motion pictures, recorded sound--even
the tattoo pen. Life as we know it would be
inconceivable without the prodigious output of the
Wizard of Menlo Park, Thomas Alva Edison. His intense
focus on his work came with a hefty personal price,
but his reward was a world forever changed by his
genius. Years after his death, Edison's effect is
seen, heard, and felt everywhere. We follow
descendants of his motion-picture camera to the tops
of Earth's highest mountains, to the bottoms of its
deepest oceans, and even into outer space. We track
his innovations in recorded sound to CDs, iPods,
sophisticated movie sound, and satellite radio. And we
illuminate his world of electric light, powering the
world and turning night into day. Along the way, we
discover a little Edison in corners of modern life
less well-known and even look at his failures. From
the Internet to the stock market to pay-per-view; the
Wizard is everywhere. 

8-9pm -- Ancient Marvels - Cities of the Underworld.
Istanbul is undoubtedly one of the most dynamic and
exotic cities in the world. Once the capital city of
three of the world's most powerful empires--The Roman,
Byzantine, and Ottoman--its strategic location made it
the perfect spot for empires to rise, fall...and rise
again. Today Istanbul's residents are walking on top
of remnants of these fallen civilizations...literally.
Taxis drive over parts of Constantine's Lost Great
Palace; children play on cobblestone streets
concealing a massive Byzantine dungeon; a high school
sits on a 3rd century wall leading to the bowels of a
100,000 seat ancient Roman Hippodrome; and basement's
of old Ottoman homes lead to subterranean tunnels and
secret cisterns. Join host Eric Geller as he leaves
the buzz of the city streets behind and follows the
pull of the past. Teamed with leading archeologists
and experts, Eric peels back the layers of the
past--to reveal a hidden history that hasn't seen the
light of day for ages.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Ten Commandments, Part
1.
What's the real story behind history's most famous
written document? Our 2-part special examines the
three different--and sometimes contradictory--biblical
accounts of Moses on the Mount, and then looks at each
of the 10 Commandments in historical context.
Adultery, perjury, murder, theft, graven images,
Sabbath laws, coveting--what did they mean then? And
do they mean anything today? Also examined are the
other 603 commandments prescribed by Moses that took a
backseat to the more famous first 10. What was in
these commandments and why have they been largely
forgotten? Legal, religious and historical scholars,
including legal author Alan Dershowitz and Old
Testament expert Daniel Smith-Christopher, reveal how
the issues raised by the 10 Commandments have been
viewed--and punished--throughout history. From ancient
to modern times, see how the definitions, the laws,
and morality have changed within the parameters of
history's most formidable "Top 10" list.

10-11pm -- American Eats - Hot Dogs.
Each baseball season, 26-million hot dogs are
consumed. A century before mobile phones or portable
computers, Americans embraced the ultimate in portable
dining--the hot dog, an edible emblem of democracy,
accessible to all. Though its origins date back
thousands of years before the Constitution, We the
People claim the hot dog as a native son--and eat
about 70 hot dogs per person, per year! That's 600 a
second--supplied by state-of-the-art factories that
can churn out as many as a half a million hot dogs a
day. The hot dog has its roots in Germany and Austria
and didn't become red-white-and-blue until we stuffed
it on a bun and put stuff on it. The name "hot dog" is
a mystery, though recent studies trace the term back
to Yale students commenting on the ingredients of
campus sausages. Join us for an appetizing hour as we
digest the history of the hot dog--from Nathan's in
Coney Island to the 1893 Chicago World's Fair to the
Wienermobile and competitive hot dog eating.

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Friday, July 7, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Ball Turret Gunners.
In war, certain missions demand the most and
constitute much of the legends of bravery. Journey
back to the Second World War when fearless airmen
manned the B-17's belly guns--glass bubbles that at
any moment could become their coffin. The ball turret
gunners called their work "flying the ball", others
called it crazy!

8-10pm -- Rumrunners, Moonshiners... - 
Heroes who fight tax collectors and moral crusaders,
or just common criminals? Like it or not, America was
built by rumrunners, moonshiners, and
bootleggers--even founding father John Hancock was a
smuggler. In the 1920s, Prohibition turned fishermen
into rumrunners and two-bit gangsters into
millionaires, and moonshine haulers in their souped-up
cars helped create NASCAR. Rare archival footage and
photos help weave the compelling tale of our nation's
love-hate relationship with illegal alcohol.

10-11pm -- The Big Build - The Speakeasy.
PSSST! Know the password? If so, you can join our
host, contractor Nick Mystrom, as we build a hidden
room in a home in the Second City. In the 1920s to
"speak easy" meant to whisper and we'll build a
speakeasy in the basement of a suburban Chicago home.
But we'll have to build quietly so as to not alert
neighbors and especially not the police, but that will
be a little harder--since two of them live right
upstairs! Nick is in good hands with master builder
Frank Sullivan, a Chicago native who knows millwork
from floorboards to rafters. Together with a team of
specialists, this room will become a highly secure
1920s-style speakeasy. Nick and team have two weeks to
create this woodworking masterpiece in time to
surprise recipient Joe Smith, who spent 32 years as a
Chicago police officer, and his wife Daina, also a
Chicago cop--both of whom love the 1920s era.

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Saturday, July 8, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bulletproof.
How do you stop a speeding bullet? From body armor to
armored cars and trucks, we review the history of the
race between the bullet and a successful way to stop
it. It's not exactly easy to design material that can
catch gunfire traveling up to 3,000 feet per second.
We'll look at little-known advances like bulletproof
layering hidden in walls, futuristic smart materials
that "remember" how to stop a bullet, and a system
that deploys a shield within milliseconds when it
detects an oncoming round.

8-10pm -- The Amazing Story of Superman - 
Here's the story behind the phenomenon of Superman,
the most merchandised and imitated superhero of them
all. Through interviews with the key creative talents
responsible for seven decades of thrilling Superman
adventures, we'll follow the Man of Steel's path from
Depression-era comic book hero to George Reeves's TV
portrayal in the 1950s, Christopher Reeve's movies in
the '70s and '80s, and the TV shows Lois and Clark and
Smallville. There'll even be a sneak preview of the
new film, Superman Returns, to be released this
summer.

10-12am -- Comic Book Superheroes Unmasked - 
Comic books--serious or escapist fantasy? This 2-hour
special shows how comic book superheroes reflect their
times--from the 1930s to the 21st century--and how
these wish-fulfillment figures became role models for
generations of children. Following the most
representative cartoon crusaders and villains, as well
as the industry that formed them, we see how they
mirrored society--from the Depression, WWII, the Cold
War, and the turbulent '60s to today--and how they
proved adaptable to other media.

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Sunday, July 9, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Pirate Tech.
Bold, cunning, and audacious, pirates are a breed of
fighting men and women who have terrorized the high
seas since before recorded history. At the height of
their power in the 1700's they literally influenced
the fate of nations when they became embroiled in the
rivalry between England and Spain. This special will
visit maritime museums and shipwreck sites, utilize
walk-and-talk demonstrations of fire arms, swords, and
navigation instruments to help spotlight the
innovations pirates brought to maritime technology.
Includes a look at how many pirates modified their
ships to make them faster and more powerful.

8-10pm -- True Caribbean Pirates - 
Blackbeard. Ann Bonny. Henry Jennings. Calico Jack.
Henry Morgan. Black Bart Roberts. During the mid to
late 17th and early 18th centuries, they were feared
criminals. The Caribbean was their domain, the parade
of treasure and cargo to Europe their target. The
origins of Caribbean piracy began when Columbus made
landfall in the Bahamas. Two years later, the Pope
granted Spain the exclusive right to the Caribbean and
most of the New World. The Spanish reaped an immense
fortune in gold and silver, but with a price. England,
France, and Holland all desired a portion of this
wealth and each established Caribbean bases and used
privateers--private sailors fighting for profit--to
protect their interests and steal Spanish treasure.
The line between privateering and piracy became
blurred. We'll examine this Golden Age of Piracy and
the true stories of the infamous pirates, how they
operated, and their successes and failures in this
dark and deadly profession.

10-11pm -- The Revolution - Forging an Army.
George Washington's losses are adding up and some in
Congress begin to question his leadership.
Washington's main concern, however, is sustaining and
rebuilding his ragged, starving, and dwindling army
through the frigid winter at Valley Forge. With the
help of Baron von Steuben and Nathanael Greene, the
Continental Army becomes a more professional fighting
force. And Washington rebuilds his reputation by
holding back the British at the Battle of Monmouth.
Join us for this 13-part look at the birth of
America--from the Boston Tea Party to the ratification
of the Constitution.

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Monday, July 10, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Colosseum.
Nothing symbolizes the Roman Empire at its height or
Rome in magnificent ruins more than the Colosseum.
Built in 70 AD, it seated 80,000 people, boasted a
retractable roof, underground staging devices, marble
seating, and lavish decorations. It still serves as
the prototype for the modern stadium. The complexity
of its construction, the beauty of its architecture,
and the functionality of its design made it the
perfect place for massive crowds to congregate for the
bloody spectacles it contained.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Deep Sea UFOs: Red Alert.
In this hour, we'll dive deeper into the ongoing
mystery of USOs--Underwater Submerged Objects--UFOs
that have reportedly been witnessed going into and out
of Earth's oceans. The show features a dive into the
Santa Catalina Channel near Los Angeles to search for
trace evidence of a 1992 USO event--a detailed account
of the USS FDR, a magnet for USO and UFOs from the
early 1950s until its decommissioning in the 1970s,
with at least eight major sightings. Australia's
famous Tully Water-Crop Circle Case is explored, as
well as many other astounding and recent USO cases
from the US and the world. Interviews include USS FDR
veterans Chet Gruisinsky and Harry Jordan, USO
researcher Dr. Stephen Greer, and Australian UFO
expert Bill Chaulker.

9-10pm -- Lost Worlds - Knights Templar.
They defended the Holy Land through bloodshed and
prayer. Founded in the 12th century, these Christian
warrior monks reigned supreme for nearly 200 years
before suffering a spectacular fall from grace. Tried
for heresy, they were disbanded and their Grand Master
burned at the stake. We'll search behind the legend
for their lost world. We recreate the city they knew
as Tortosa--now hidden among modern homes in the
Syrian city of Tartus. We reveal secrets of their
headquarters at Temple Mount in Jerusalem, with
magnificent underground vaults that could stable 1,000
horses. And we visit the circular church in London
built to resemble the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in
Jerusalem and the site of the Templar's mysterious
initiation rites. We bring to life the hilltop
fortress that Lawrence of Arabia called "the finest
castle in the world", and return to the Mediterranean
island where the Knights Templars made their last
stand against Moslem enemies.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Da Vinci Code:
Bloodlines.
Josh Bernstein searches for solid evidence behind the
controversial theory laid out in Dan Brown's book The
Da Vinci Code. Brown's theory claims that Jesus
married Mary Magdalene and that she conceived a child.
It also suggests that the bloodline
continues--unbroken--to this day. Josh shows what's
true and what's clearly make-believe in Dan Brown's
bestseller. From musty libraries to ancient churches,
Josh's unique quest leads him to seek the DNA evidence
that might prove or disprove one of the most
sensational claims in modern history. Most remarkably,
he'll orchestrate the first ever DNA test on a
Merovingian royal to find out if the story of a divine
bloodline stretching back to Jesus and Mary Magdalene
could possibly be true.

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Tuesday, July 11, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Biggest Machines 3.
Giant robots on the factory floor and in outer space. 
A floating fortress that's home to 6,000 military
personnel, which is almost as long as the Empire State
Building is tall. And a diesel engine with 108,000
horsepower. (You read that right.) These giants must
be seen to be believed! In this episode, we travel
over land and sea to find these and more of the
biggest, baddest, most audacious feats of engineering
in the world.

8-9pm -- Decoding The Past - The Search for Noah's
Ark.
The great flood that destroyed the world, except for
Noah, his family, and herd, would probably be
dismissed as legend--if not for other ancient evidence
suggesting the presence of a once-massive flood.
Instead, the quest for Noah's Ark continues to this
day--one of the most controversial searches for one of
the largest items described in the Bible. We'll
examine evidence of those who claim to have found
proof of the Ark, and visit Mt. Ararat and other
targeted sites for the landing of the Ark.

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - Windy City Tornado.
Chicago is known as the "Windy City", but many believe
a tornado can't strike a downtown filled with massive
high-rise skyscrapers. It's a dangerous misconception.
In 1967, a destructive high-speed tornado screamed
along a 16-mile path through the south Chicago suburb
of Oak Lawn and all the way to Lake Michigan. Had the
path been just 10 miles to the north, the twister
would have punched its way right into the Loop. The
city's emergency officials say it bluntly: "Chicago is
at high risk for tornadoes." In 1967, 33 people died.
In the future, how many more will be at risk? Will the
city's skyscrapers survive? It happened before, it can
happen again. We'll revisit the '67 disaster, restage
it using state-of-the-art computer animation, and
simulate how Chicago might hold up in the face of
current catastrophe.

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - Space Machines.
Some of the most spectacular Mega Moves in history
have taken place through a route unavailable to most
movers: the air. In Florida, the crew of one of the
world's most unusual looking airplanes will move a
piece of the International Space Station to a facility
in Alabama. And in Colorado, watch as Russia's largest
cargo jets transport sections of the Atlas Satellite
Rocket for an upcoming launch. Do these engineers have
the right stuff to get the job done? We'll follow the
dangerous relocation of these structures--from the
planning process to the actual move--where any second
can spell disaster.

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Wednesday, July 12, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Taxidermy.
It began as a tool used by prehistoric man to attract
animals to the hunt. Over time it became an invaluable
study aid for the natural scientist and a popular
hobby for hunters and fishermen. Join us for a
tantalizing look at the history of taxidermy, the
craft of preserving animal skins and using them to
recreate a still life of the animal as it appeared in
life. We also check out fiberglass reproduction, which
is gaining popularity as fish and game regulations
become stricter. Finally, we examine human subjects in
taxidermy. Using the very latest process of
plastination, the once taboo science and art of
preserving and displaying human corpses, now draws
crowds in Europe, Asia, and the US, proving the
age-old practice continues to mesmerize us!

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Pirate Tech.
Bold, cunning, and audacious, pirates are a breed of
fighting men and women who have terrorized the high
seas since before recorded history. At the height of
their power in the 1700's they literally influenced
the fate of nations when they became embroiled in the
rivalry between England and Spain. This special will
visit maritime museums and shipwreck sites, utilize
walk-and-talk demonstrations of fire arms, swords, and
navigation instruments to help spotlight the
innovations pirates brought to maritime technology.
Includes a look at how many pirates modified their
ships to make them faster and more powerful.

9-11pm -- True Caribbean Pirates - 
Blackbeard. Ann Bonny. Henry Jennings. Calico Jack.
Henry Morgan. Black Bart Roberts. During the mid to
late 17th and early 18th centuries, they were feared
criminals. The Caribbean was their domain, the parade
of treasure and cargo to Europe their target. The
origins of Caribbean piracy began when Columbus made
landfall in the Bahamas. Two years later, the Pope
granted Spain the exclusive right to the Caribbean and
most of the New World. The Spanish reaped an immense
fortune in gold and silver, but with a price. England,
France, and Holland all desired a portion of this
wealth and each established Caribbean bases and used
privateers--private sailors fighting for profit--to
protect their interests and steal Spanish treasure.
The line between privateering and piracy became
blurred. We'll examine this Golden Age of Piracy and
the true stories of the infamous pirates, how they
operated, and their successes and failures in this
dark and deadly profession.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, July 13, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Containers.
They hold just about everything--Containers. We follow
a day-in-the-life of a steel freight container from
port to port and see how standard containers can be
transported by ship, train, or truck while looking
into new technology and security measures being used
today. We visit a Georgia Pacific plant to see how raw
materials are processed in a state-of-the-art plant.
We also visit the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, an
underground container used for extraordinary amounts
of vital product. The containers that hold the US
Strategic Petroleum Reserve are actually underground
salt domes. In a visit to Bryan Mound, Texas, one of
four locations housing the SPR, we learn how the
caverns within the salt domes are created and how the
oil contained in these caverns actually benefits from
this type of storage. We also check out silos that
were necessary for farmers' progress. And finally, we
sip from metal cans, which revolutionized the food and
beverage industry.

8-9pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Ancient Discoveries:
Ancient Computer?
Journey back in time for an eye-opening look at the
amazing ancient roots of technologies we like to think
of as modern. New research suggests that many of the
inventions of the last 200 years may, in fact, have
already been known to the ancients. In this hour, we
explore the Antikythera mechanism, an ancient machine
that was discovered deep in the Aegean Sea. Could it
perhaps have been an ancient computer? Could
Archimedes have had a hand in its creation?

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Ten Commandments, Part
2.
Thousands of years ago, the laws of Moses were given
to the Israelites--laws that prescribed both their
relationship with God and with each other. The 10
Commandments, the word of God, carved into stone--a
sacred covenant between God and the Israelites. In
both Exodus and Deuteronomy, it tells us that Moses
brought down these commandments in the form of two
tablets. It has become traditional to split the
commandments between them, half on one tablet, and
half on the other. The first commandments deal with
God and how He should be worshipped. The second set of
commandments, sometimes called the Laws of Man,
provided society with the means of living with one
another. We'll take a close look at these last
commandments and see how they have translated into our
modern legal system.

10-11pm -- American Eats - Salty Snacks.
For every new snack food introduced, there are about
100 duds! Americans buy more than 4.3 billion pounds
of snack food a year--in fact, snacking is quickly
becoming America's favorite meal. A snack is defined
as a meal or food item eaten hurriedly or casually,
which might include anything from a candy bar to a
hamburger. The word is derived from the Dutch word
snacken, "to bite". Whether it's chips, pretzels, or
popcorn, Americans love their snacks--especially if
salty! Perhaps the first truly American salty snack
was popcorn. But of all the salty treats we indulge
in--pretzels, peanuts, corn chips--the potato chip is
by far America's favorite snack, with annual sales in
excess of $6 billion. Today, the larger food
manufacturers are generally full-service snack
companies--producing chips, pretzels, and other salty
goodies. With creative new snack varieties on the way,
the salty snack food industry shows no signs of
waning.

____________________________________________________

Friday, July 14, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gangster Guns.
During the 1920s and '30s in big cities and small
towns alike, they earned a fierce reputation in a
blaze of bullets. They were the best friends of
criminals such as John Dillinger, Pretty Boy Floyd,
Baby Face Nelson, Al Capone, and Bonnie and Clyde.
Handle their Colt 45s and 38s, Tommy guns, Whippets,
and Browning automatic rifles as we uncover the
stories of gangster guns.

8-10pm -- Countdown to Armageddon - 
Asteroids on a collision course with Earth, super
volcanoes, global warming, killer viruses--all are
potential catastrophes that threaten to wipe out life
on our planet. Are these simply natural disasters that
have been occurring since time immemorial? Or are
these threats terrifying prophesies from the Bible
that are at last coming true? Are our fears overblown?
Or are the infamous Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
riding among us in a countdown to Armageddon?

10-12am -- Bible Battles - 
In one of the most hostile lands on the planet, an
ancient people called the Israelites forged an army
and carved out an empire. Their ancient military
exploits are described in one of history's most famous
religious texts--the Old Testament of the Bible. But
by reading between the religious lines, military
historians unlock the soldiers' secrets of the Bible
by examining the weapons, strategies, and the
commanders, some of whom are not always thought of as
warriors, like Abraham, Moses, and Deborah. In this
2-hour special, we explore the biblical world from a
military perspective from the time of Abraham until
David's ascension to the throne. Blood often flows
more freely than holy water in the days of the Old
Testament, and the military secrets of the Bible have
yet to be revealed...until now!

____________________________________________________

Saturday, July 15, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Ben Franklin Tech.
You may know him as a man of great wit and wisdom, as
the oldest and wisest Founding Father. But now you'll
get to know Dr. Franklin as the late 18th Century's
foremost scientist, and one of the greatest inventors
of any era. From the humble Pennsylvania Stove to the
spectacular lightning rod--Franklin was concerned with
putting scientific principals to practical use. We'll
explore his many inventions, including: his unique
musical instrument, the glass armonica, for which both
Mozart and Beethoven wrote pieces; his crafty
anti-counterfeiting techniques, including
multi-colored inks, elaborate ornamentation, and the
use of "leaf printing"--when a metal engraving plate
is made from a plant's leaf, making it impossible to
copy; and bifocal glasses. And we'll see how
Franklin's inventive genius extended to entire
systems, including: the modern volunteer fire
department, first fire insurance company, Daylight
Savings Time, and America's first lending library.

8-10pm -- The Road Warrior
(movie) A former police officer is now a lone wanderer,
traveling through a devastated Australia after a
nuclear war looking for the now-priceless fuel.
He lives to survive and is none too pleased
when he finds himself the only hope of a small group
of honest people running a remote oil refinery. He
must protect them from the bike gang that is
terrorizing them whilst transporting their entire fuel
supply to safety. Mel Gibson stars with Bruce Spence
and Michael Preston. (1982)

10-11pm -- Reel To Real - The Doomsday Clock.
Developed in 1947 as an image to symbolize urgency in
the Cold War and the threat of nuclear disaster, the
mission of the Doomsday Clock has expanded to include
non-nuclear global security issues. Maintained by the
Board of Directors of the Bulletin of the Atomic
Scientists, it's based at the University of Chicago.
In response to world events, they move the clock's
minute hand closer to or away from midnight--doomsday.
In this hour, we cover the clock's history, its
effectiveness, and its critics
____________________________________________________

Sunday, July 16, 2006
____________________________________________________

6-8pm -- True Caribbean Pirates - 
Blackbeard. Ann Bonny. Henry Jennings. Calico Jack.
Henry Morgan. Black Bart Roberts. During the mid to
late 17th and early 18th centuries, they were feared
criminals. The Caribbean was their domain, the parade
of treasure and cargo to Europe their target. The
origins of Caribbean piracy began when Columbus made
landfall in the Bahamas. Two years later, the Pope
granted Spain the exclusive right to the Caribbean and
most of the New World. The Spanish reaped an immense
fortune in gold and silver, but with a price. England,
France, and Holland all desired a portion of this
wealth and each established Caribbean bases and used
privateers--private sailors fighting for profit--to
protect their interests and steal Spanish treasure.
The line between privateering and piracy became
blurred. We'll examine this Golden Age of Piracy and
the true stories of the infamous pirates, how they
operated, and their successes and failures in this
dark and deadly profession.

8-10pm -- Return of the Pirates - 
A new war rages off the world's coastlines. Piracy is
making a comeback. Intelligence indicates that pirates
and terrorists are merging tactics. Over 90% of
international trade travels by water and pirates have
long known what Sir Walter Raleigh once said:
"Whosoever commands the sea commands the trade;
whoever commands the trade of the world commands the
riches of the world, and consequently the world
itself." Nations and corporations are racing to
protect themselves and their goods. So far the pirates
are ahead, but new international response units and
mercenary ships are combating the attacks. The US
Coast Guard trains navies worldwide in anti-piracy
measures, but corrupt law enforcement officials mar
advances in their effectiveness. Though Captain Kidd
and Blackbeard have disappeared into Davy Jones's
Locker, piracy is a growing threat to the world's
economy and security. Today's pirate is organized,
political, and will command world attention once
again.

10-11pm -- The Revolution - 07 - Treason & Betrayal.
In a 13-part series, we explore the drama surrounding
the founding of the United States. In this hour,
heroic General Benedict Arnold turns his back on his
cause and country in an act of pride, sealing forever
his legacy as a traitor. George Washington takes his
war to the frontier, burning the Iroquois Indians out
of New York State and leaving a wake of destruction
and devastation.

____________________________________________________

Monday, July 17, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Sub Zero.
Come in from the cold while we explore some of Earth's
most frigid places and examine how man copes with
sub-zero climates. With the advance of technology, our
boundaries have expanded--from the North and South
Poles, to the depths beneath the Arctic and Antarctic
sea ice, to the Moon, Mars, and outward to Saturn.
Enter these forbidding territories, guided by a
special breed of experts as we inspect the new US
South Pole Station, try on the latest Polartec
fashions with anti-microbial fibers, ride on the
newest snowmobiles and Sno-Cats, sail through glacial
waters on ice-breaking ships, and fly on an LC-130
transport plane. And we'll see what NASA has on the
planning board for deep-space exploration, including a
beach-ball robot explorer, and learn from scientists
studying fish in the waters off Antarctica to
understand glycoproteins, which may keep frozen tissue
healthy longer for transplantation.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - An Alien History of Planet Earth.
Nick Cook enters a world of bluff and double bluff. In
Washington, he meets Melvin Goodman, a former senior
analyst of the Soviet Desk at the CIA, who reveals
startling testimony about how the CIA manipulated the
UFO story to gain the upper hand in the Cold War.
Goodman reveals that the CIA encouraged the spread of
UFO stories in the media as a perfect "smoke screen"
behind which the military could develop and test
secret craft. Following up this lead in Russia, Cook
meets Igor Sinitsin, a former KGB operative and
personal aide to Yuri Andropov. There he discovers
that the CIA's disinformation campaign succeeded
beyond its wildest dreams. Cook concludes there is a
strong case to be made that secret military technology
offers a convincing explanation for many UFO stories.
But there are some cases Cook admits he can't explain
away, including the extraordinary rash of cattle
mutilation reports and alien abductions that swept
across America in the `80s and `90s.

9-10pm -- Lost Worlds - Atlantis.
Field investigators using the latest research, expert
analysis, and cutting-edge technology take us back to
ancient Greece, to a peaceful island that exploded
with devastating force. But, at the dawn of the 20th
Century, the remains of a palace were discovered on
the island of Crete, preserved beneath volcanic ash.
Could the ruins be home to the ancient civilization of
Atlantis? Our investigators find that a Cretan palace
and a town on Santorini are linked by unique
engineering of their buildings. Rebuilding towns,
temples, and the palace of Atlantis as described by
Plato, we reveal the majesty and mystery of this lost
world. The builders of the original palace achieved a
level of engineering excellence not matched for
centuries. With its massive scale, complex
water-management systems, and sparkling gypsum walls,
the engineering of this extraordinary palace connects
it to Plato's descriptions of Atlantis.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - Troy: Of Gods and
Warriors.
The Iliad is one of the most famous literary works of
the Western world. It's an epic tale of Greek gods,
earthly soldiers, and a decade-long fight over the
most beautiful woman in the world. Could The Iliad
actually be based on fact? Could the Trojan War really
have happened? Josh Bernstein travels to Greece and
Turkey in search of ancient Troy. Along the way, he'll
learn what it took to live and fight on the coasts of
the Aegean in the late Bronze Age. He'll test the
tools of the Trojan warriors, and he'll uncover a city
in northern Turkey that just might prove The Iliad was
far more than a simple work of fiction.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, July 18, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Proving Grounds.
Where can you fire a missile without scaring the
neighbors? Or lift millions of pounds in pursuit of a
couple of ounces of gold? On a proving ground, of
course, where performance is the only thing that
matters. Because in the heat of battle or head-to-head
competition, no excuses can be given. We'll visit the
US military's Cold Regions Testing Center in Alaska
and desert proving grounds in Arizona, the Olympic
Complex in Colorado, and the now-defunct Packard
proving grounds in Michigan.

8-9pm -- Mega Disasters - West Coast Tsunami.
What would happen if a massive earthquake and tsunami
were to strike the West Coast of the United States?
Experts say it could easily match the catastrophic
2004 Indian Ocean tsunami in scale and might. A
700-mile stretch of coast, from northern California to
southern British Columbia lies just off the extremely
volatile Cascadia Subduction Zone. Many seismologists
say that after more than 300 years of massive pressure
build-up, it is likely to erupt in the not too distant
future. And it has happened in the past. Geologists
have discovered evidence of a massive tsunami that
struck the Pacific Northwest in 1700--as powerful as
the devastating Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004. Hundreds
of thousands of lives are at stake. We'll talk to
emergency planners, seismologists, and other
researchers who are trying to get a handle on when
Cascadia will blow, and what--if anything--we can do
to minimize the disaster.

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - East Coast Tsunami.
Hurricanes. Earthquakes. Floods. Blizzards.
Frightening but all too familiar natural disasters.
But what about a tsunami wave hitting the east coast
of the United States? In this hour, we look at such an
event that could be caused by a massive island
landslide triggered by a volcano off the coast of
Africa. We explore the awesome tsunami recorded by
German colonists in New Guinea triggered by a volcanic
explosion on Ritter Island in 1888. Leaping forward,
we hear from leading scientists about the possibility
of a potentially catastrophic collapse of the
west-facing fašade of a volcano located in the Canary
Islands. Potentially 500 times the size of the
collapse at Ritter Island, it could trigger a tsunami
with initial waves over 900 meters high. A North
American city on the eastern seaboard, such as
Charleston, South Carolina, would have no more than
nine hours to evacuate before waves as high as 40 feet
inundated the city, leaving a huge wake of destruction
and damage.

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - Strange Structures.
Everyday Mega Movers are asked to relocate some very
strange structures. In Mississippi a crew tackles
century old 150 ton oak trees. These eight story tall
trees with root extending 60 feet survived Hurricane
Katrina. Now they must survive this Mega Move. In
Maryland, a veteran Mega Mover will confront a
146-year-old Victorian house that is thought to be
jinxed. For years, many have tried to move it, and all
have failed after facing major issues with utility
lines, clearances, property, and accessible routes. In
this episode, Mega Movers prove that no matter how
strange or eerie or haunted they will get the job
done.

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, July 19, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Nature's Engineers 2.
Think man is unique within the animal kingdom? You
might not after this hour that features an amazing
collection of earth's non-human inhabitants that use
tools, build intricate structures, create traps to
capture prey, and perform complex procedures,
including farming. From Egyptian vultures utilizing
stones to crack open hard-shelled ostrich eggs to
chimpanzees using a "tool kit" to extract termites
from their nests, we learn that our ability to create
tools is not exclusive. Other mammals create
subterranean structures, including those prodigious
diggers Prairie Dogs, and many animals and insects
make devices to augment hunting, such as the
Ogre-faced Spider that spins a small web to throw down
on unsuspecting passersby. And we're not the only ones
to work as a unified, multi-skilled force.
Aphid-Raising Ants protect and care for herds of plant
juice-sucking aphids that they "milk".

8-10pm -- Alaska: Dangerous Territory - 
For generations, Alaska has exerted a powerful pull as
the place to head for a job like no other; work that
promises the adventure of a lifetime, the chance to
strike it rich, and the very real prospect of never
making it back alive. Plying their trades on America's
last frontier, soldiers, Coast Guard crewmen, bush
pilots, and truckers all work for the same boss from
hell: a dangerous territory full of the most
inhospitable weather and extreme terrain on earth.
Even today, Alaska boasts four of the country's top 10
most dangerous jobs. We'll feature dramatic stories of
four killer jobs from the last 150 years of Alaskan
history and experience what it takes to survive and
thrive in this intense and harsh climate by riding
along with today's workers and hearing from old-timers
who forged the way. And we'll weave in the traditions,
technology, and tools that can mean the difference
between life and death in Alaska's killer jobs.

10-12am -- Alaska: Big America - 
Alaska--a land of extremes. Its size is
staggering--nearly 600,000 square miles, or more than
twice the size of Texas. Its vast distances, extreme
weather, imposing landscape--all helped shape its
history and the lives of those who come under its
spell. Our 2-hour special heads to far-flung corners
of the 49th State to hear compelling stories of life
in the bush--from Russian expeditions in the 1700s to
building of the Alcan Highway to the WWII Battle for
the Aleutian Islands and 1959 statehood.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, July 20, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Icebreakers.
They are the toughest ships in the water, plowing
headlong into one of nature's hardest obstacles.
Modern icebreakers can smash through 10-foot thick ice
sheets without stopping, allowing scientists and
commercial shipping access to some of Earth's most
inhospitable spots. Join our blustery journey as we
patrol the Great Lakes on the USCG Cutter Mackinaw and
traverse the infamous Northwest Passage on the maiden
voyage of the USCG Healy, the newest Polar Class
Icebreaker in the US Fleet.

8-9pm -- Ancient Marvels - Ancient Discoveries: Galen,
Doctor to the Gladiators.
In this fascinating mini-series, we examine ancient
inventions once believed to have been created in
modern times, and test the wits of ancient inventors
against some of the world's great modern inventors.
Part 2 uncovers the revolutionary work of Galen, the
great Roman doctor to the gladiators, who was
performing brain surgery 2,000 years ahead of his
time. We also explore the sophistication of Roman
medicine and compare it to modern techniques.

9-10pm -- Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway - 
It stretches 2,500 miles from Boston to Miami. The
Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway is comprised of a
system of canals, land cuts, and a series of natural
and artificial barrier islands, which provide a
protected passage for low-draft vessels wishing to
avoid the tumultuous currents of the Atlantic Ocean.
The AICW was conceived in the late 18th century,
before there was a system of roads in America. A time
when the numerous rivers, bays, and sounds along the
eastern seaboard were the roads and the Atlantic
Intracoastal Waterway was envisioned to be America's
first superhighway. Much like Route 66, the AICW
represents a bygone era. A time when the transport
industry was in its infancy, and life moved at a
slower pace. It's a safe bet that the ships that sail
its waters today value it for that very reason.

10-11pm -- American Eats - Soda.
Did you know that...Coca-Cola is the second most
universally recognized word on the planet after "OK"?
Each year, Americans drink enough carbonated beverages
to fill more than 100,000 Olympic-sized pools? One
modern soft-drink maker sells
turkey-and-gravy-flavored soda at Thanksgiving? Sugar,
water, carbon dioxide--these simple ingredients are
the foundation for a $25-billion a year industry.
Modern, state-of-the-art bottling plants supply
Americans with 15-billion gallons of soda every year,
in every variety of flavor, no calorie or low-calorie,
caffeinated or caffeine-free, in a 12-ounce can or
half-gallon bottle, all packaged and sold with some of
the best marketing strategies ever developed. Inspired
by miracle mineral waters, advanced by small town
pharmacists, the story of soft drinks is the story of
American ingenuity and competition, along with an
insatiable thirst for profits. We'll take a bubbling
dip into bygone days and a look at the future of fizz.

____________________________________________________

Friday, July 21, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Silver Mines.
It was called the "mother lode", a deposit of silver
so massive that it would produce $300-million in its
first 25 years of operation, establish Nevada as a
state, and bankroll the Union Army in the Civil War.
Named after an early investor, we'll see how the
Comstock Lode, discovered near Virginia City, proved
to be a scientific laboratory from which vast
improvements in mining technology and safety were
pioneered, including innovations in drilling,
ventilation, drainage, and ore processing.

8-10pm -- Sharp Shooters - 
Wild Bill Hickok. John Wesley Hardin. Buffalo Bill. 
Doc Carver. Annie Oakley. Some of these skillful shots
used their talents to survive in a hostile and lawless
American West. Others honed their abilities onstage to
make a living performing for audiences. But it turns
out their legends might be the least accurate thing
about these shooters. So famous are these historic
gunslingers, it's hard to separate the truth from the
myth...until now. We stack up some of today's greatest
sharpshooters against the legendary feats of the past.
Bill Oglesby, Jerry Miculek, and Tom Knapp demonstrate
attempt to recreate famous gun-slinging achievements.
We also cast a skeptical eye at many stories culled
from newspaper accounts and pulp fiction novels. Along
the way, we'll meet some of history's greatest shots.
In the process, we might just blow a hole in some of
those treasured old legends. So keep your eye on the
target, because you won't believe your eyes.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Mountain Roads.
Join our journey along monumental feats of engineering
that preserved America's natural wonders while paving
the way towards her future. Travel the Donner Pass in
the Sierra Nevada Mountains, site of a dark chapter in
US history. Today, crews use the latest technology to
keep I-80 open during the worst winter storms. Enjoy
the view while traveling to the summit of Pike's Peak
in Colorado, inspiration for America the Beautiful.
The "Going-to-the-Sun-Road" slices through Montana's
majestic Glacier National Park, crossing the
Continental Divide and allowing motorists unsurpassed
views of mountain scenery. Outside Denver, the
Eisenhower Memorial Tunnel, carved through mountain
rock, united eastern and western Colorado. And the
Blue Ridge Parkway, which took 52 years to complete,
snakes through large, scenic swatches. 

____________________________________________________

Saturday, July 22, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Butcher.
In a carnivorous world, a butcher is a necessary link
in the food chain, carving a carcass of unsavory flesh
into mouthwatering cuts. We trace the grisly trade's
evolution--from yesteryear's butcher-on-every-corner
to today's industrial butcher working on a
"disassembly" line. We tour the infamous remains of
the Chicago Stockyards, where Upton Sinclair, Clarence
Birdseye, and refrigeration changed butchering
forever; witness high-speed butchering; and travel to
a non-stop sausage factory. And if you're still
squeamish, a USDA inspector offers the lowdown on
HACCP--the country's new system of checks and balances
on everything from quality grading to E. coli,
Salmonella, and Mad Cow Disease. Finally, we visit the
last bastion of old-school butchering--the rural
custom butcher, who slaughters, eviscerates, skins,
and cuts to his customer's wishes.

8-10pm -- How William Shatner Changed the World - 
You've got a cell phone at one ear, an iPod at the
other. You know that Blackberry is now a verb and Spam
is not only canned meat. But just how did we get here?
Blame William Shatner--yes, that William
Shatner--Captain Kirk. We'll boldly go where few have
gone before to reveal how scientists, inspired by the
series, would revolutionize medicine and are
surpassing the far-out vision of the future
foreshadowed in Star Trek in the 1960s. From cell
phones to computers to even leading-edge medical
advancements, this 2-hour special explores how those
sci-fi inventions have now permeated everyday life as
we know it. Hosted and narrated by Shatner and based
on his book, I'm Working on That, we'll meet the
brightest minds of Silicon Valley and the
Trek-inspired inventions that have help change the
world.

10-12am -- Decoding The Past - Godfathers.
A 2-hour panoramic and global overview of the
phenomenon known as Cosa Nostra--from the mass
immigration of Italians to the US at the end of the
19th century up to the arrests in 2000 on the New York
Stock Exchange, where the Mafia was laundering money.
What becomes evident in a chain of stories depicting
the most renowned "godfathers" is their uncanny
ability to act as political representatives of an
illegal state within the legal state and to exploit
major cycles and crises throughout history.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, July 23, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Mega Disasters - East Coast Tsunami.
Hurricanes. Earthquakes. Floods. Blizzards.
Frightening but all too familiar natural disasters.
But what about a tsunami wave hitting the east coast
of the United States? In this hour, we look at such an
event that could be caused by a massive island
landslide triggered by a volcano off the coast of
Africa. We explore the awesome tsunami recorded by
German colonists in New Guinea triggered by a volcanic
explosion on Ritter Island in 1888. Leaping forward,
we hear from leading scientists about the possibility
of a potentially catastrophic collapse of the
west-facing fašade of a volcano located in the Canary
Islands. Potentially 500 times the size of the
collapse at Ritter Island, it could trigger a tsunami
with initial waves over 900 meters high. A North
American city on the eastern seaboard, such as
Charleston, South Carolina, would have no more than
nine hours to evacuate before waves as high as 40 feet
inundated the city, leaving a huge wake of destruction
and damage.

8-10pm -- Meteors: Fire in the Sky - 
Meteors, comets, and asteroids cross the solar system
to offer clues about our planet and universe. Can they
destroy civilizations? Did they wipe out the
dinosaurs? Have they brought life to our planet? And
when will the next one hit? Aided by elaborate
animation and live-action footage, we learn what these
mysterious space rocks really are and imagine what
likely happened 65-million years ago, when an object
plowed into the Yucatan Peninsula. We see how certain
spectacular meteor falls advanced our understanding of
what they are and the danger that they pose. We talk
to leading experts--astronomers and geologists
including David Levy and Carolyn Shoemaker,
co-discoverers of the Shoemaker-Levy comet that fell
into Jupiter in 1994. And we talk to NASA scientists
about recent missions to asteroids and comets and
speculate on ways to move Earth-threatening asteroids
and comets out of our way. Because it isn't a question
of if but when the next deadly impact will take place.

10-11pm -- The Revolution - 08 - The War Heads South.
Failing to defeat the tenacious George Washington, the
British change course, turning their attention
southward. In a last ditch effort to quell the
rebellion, they surround and lay siege to Charleston,
South Carolina, the third largest city in the
colonies. General Benjamin Lincoln, commander of the
southern wing of the Continental Army, sinks his heels
in and braces for the attack but his outnumbered force
will fall.

____________________________________________________

Monday, July 24, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Diamond Mines.
Half a mile below the earth's surface, men mine for
rough diamonds--a pure carbon substance. Brilliant
when cut and polished, they are marketed as the most
precious gem in the world. From the earliest mines of
the 4th century BC to today's technological wonders in
South Africa, we explore the history and technology of
the diamond mine.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Real UFO's.
Ever since the military started using sophisticated
airplanes, they have sought ways to build an aircraft
that can fly undetected, maneuver like a helicopter
and fly like a jet. The Nazis were the first to pursue
the idea of building a disc-shaped aircraft. After the
war, the Americans, Canadians and Russians all were
able to build aircraft similar to the German
prototype, perhaps based on the concepts smuggled out
by German engineers. This episode looks at top secret
flying saucer designs of the Air Force, with specific
dates, times and locales of flights that may point to
the real explanation behind the many UFO sightings
beginning in 1947, and why the saucer design was
abandoned for stealth technology.

9-10pm -- Lost Worlds - Ramses' Egyptian Empire
1300 BC. The mighty Egyptian civilization is in its
golden age. Its ruler is Ramses II, a man who intends
to be the greatest of the Pharaohs. He will make his
mark by building: vast statues; towering obelisks;
temples carved from the living rock. Ramses is a giant
of a man, dominating his kingdom for 67 years, pushing
it on to ever greater glory. The ruins of what he
built still stand, and with the aid of new research
and cutting edge graphics technology, the true scale
of his ambition can now be fully revealed. We
reconstruct the grand hypostyle hall at Karnak;
explore the technical innovation and engineering skill
that produced the temple at Abu Simbel; we rebuild the
Ramesseum as he would have seen it, and uncover how
the extraordinary tomb that Ramses built for himself
would have looked when his body was finally laid
there.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - Cleopatra: The Last
Pharaoh.
She ruled over men, bedding the likes of Julius Caesar
and Marc Anthony, and led one of the world's greatest
civilizations. Her name has been immortalized in myth
and legend. So, how did Cleopatra become the last of
the pharaohs? In the shadow of the pyramids, Josh
Bernstein joins Zahi Hawass on a hunt for mummies from
the time of Cleopatra. He'll come face to face with
Cleopatra's killer, the Egyptian cobra, and sail down
the Nile River searching for clues to her true
history. In Alexandria, Josh will descend into the
cisterns below the modern city to look for evidence of
Cleopatra's reign. Finally he'll dive into the harbor
of Alexandria, where a beautiful palace lies--possibly
the last vestige of Cleopatra's legendary wealth--the
only testament to a woman who was perhaps the wisest
and most cunning of all of Egypt's pharaohs.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, July 25, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Lumberyard.
At the center of the American Dream is the home--and
at the center of its creation or renovation is the
lumberyard. We'll explore the options lumberyards
provide for builders and renovators--from natural to
engineered woods. We'll show how plywood and pressed
woods are made, trace exotic woods to jungle and
desert, visit a special lumberyard that deals in
recycled and antique woods, and go on an underwater
expedition as divers locate ancient logs buried in the
Great Lakes and New Zealand. We'll see how
50,000-year-old ancient Kauri wood is "mined" from a
bog and is now all the rage among those who live in
mansions and travel on yachts. From the lowly 2-by-4
used to build a tract home, to a reclaimed set of
historic planks used to make a million-dollar bar in a
5-star hotel, this eye-opening program hits the nail
right on the head.

8-9pm -- Decoding The Past - Heaven and Hell.
From the beginning of recorded history, people from
all over the world have believed in an afterlife. In
Christianity, the powerful images of heaven and
hell--fire and brimstone, harps and halos--have shaped
Western thought for thousands of years. What does the
Bible tell us about everlasting punishment and eternal
life? Join us on a biblical journey as we explore the
origins of Heaven and Hell and the symbols that
represent them.

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - San Francisco Earthquake:
Part 1
At the dawn of the 20th century, San Francisco was the
place to be; a hub of trade and travel, business and
banking. Located just to the east of the San Andreas
Fault, the bay area is interlaced with eight major
earthquake-producing faults. We examine the
cataclysmic earthquake that struck on April 18,
1906--it jolted the city for 50 seconds, the earth
split for 270 miles, and a resulting firestorm raged
for three days. Amazing photographs document the
city's destruction and efforts to rebuild. Part 1 of
2.

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - Oil Machines.
Oil is the lifeblood of the world's economy, and it's
up to the Mega Movers to make sure that this flow is
uninterrupted. Off the coast of Singapore, one of the
largest and most unusual ships ever built will
transport an entire 22,000-ton oil rig to the Gulf of
Mexico. Making the 14,000-mile trek across two oceans
will test the skills of both man and machine. And in
Alaska, the pressure is on to move an 80-by-60-foot
pump station on the Trans-Alaskan pipeline. But an
approaching winter storm threatens to stop this move
cold. Will these vital oil industry components
successfully reach their destinations?

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, July 26, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Deadliest Weapons.
In this fiery hour, we profile five of man's deadliest
weapons, focusing on the inventors, battles, and dark
technology behind their lethality. We begin with the
deadliest bomb ever created, the Tsar Bomba--a
50-megaton nuclear bomb with a yield thousands of
times greater than the one dropped on Hiroshima.
During WWI, technological advances in weaponry led to
the deaths of over 8-million, and one of the deadliest
killers was the machine gun. In WWII, the use of
incendiary bombs killed hundreds of thousands of
people. Another deadly invention of WWII was the
proximity fuse, or VT fuse, that allowed artillery to
detonate within a predetermined range of an enemy
target. Finally, we examine VX nerve gas, thought by
many to be the deadliest chemical agent ever created
and suspected to have been used by Saddam Hussein with
devastating results. We'll visit Edgewood Chemical
BioCenter, which plays a large role in protection and
detection for our troops in Iraq.

8-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Boneyard: Where Machines
End Their Lives.
Where do machines go when they die? From B-52 Bombers
to massive aircraft carriers, from passenger cars to
Cold War cruise missiles and remnants of the Twin
Towers, all that we manufacture has a lifespan. But
reaching the end of their original purposes can be
just the beginning. Join us on a fascinating visual
journey as we follow some of our greatest achievements
in manufacturing, design engineering, and construction
to their after-lives and final resting places.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Biggest Machines
5.
Join us for another look at big machines. At NASA's
Ames Research Center, we visit the world's biggest
wind tunnel, part of the National Full-Scale
Aerodynamics Complex, and one of the biggest and most
complex flight simulators, NASA's Vertical Motion
Simulator, or VMS. At the Joy Mining Machinery plant
in Franklin, Pennsylvania, giant machine tools form,
cut, and measure the enormous individual parts that
make up a Continuous Miner, the biggest underground
mining machine in the world. But big machines aren't
limited to science and commerce. Ride with us on the
biggest observation wheel in the world, the London
Eye, which stands 443 feet high and provides a 360
degree unobstructed view of London. And we take a look
at IMAX technology. The film, cameras, projectors, and
theater screens are the largest in the world. Finally,
we take a ride on every lawn tender's dream
machine--the Claas Cougar, the world's biggest
lawnmower.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, July 27, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - B-2 Bomber.
In any battle, the key to victory is the ability to
strike the enemy without them knowing what hit them.
Within the US arsenal one such weapon can go into
harm's way, deliver 40,000 pounds of either
conventional or nuclear bombs, and slip away
unobserved--the B-2 Stealth Bomber. With its origins
in single-wing experimentation in Germany in the
1930s, the B-2 was developed under a cloak of secrecy.
But when that cloak was lifted, the world was awed by
what stood before them. Able to fly over 6,000 miles
without refueling, it can reach whatever target the US
military wants to attack and deliver its awesome array
of laser-guided weapons with pinpoint accuracy. Using
state-of-the-art technology, including over 130
onboard computers, and shrouded by a mantle of
stealth, it's undetectable by any radar. 

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The World's Biggest
Machines.
Join us for a look at the biggest, heaviest, tallest,
longest, meanest machines on the planet! We'll see
what these monsters do and how they operate, and how
they're designed and assembled. Machines investigated
include the largest draglines, excavators used in
mining; the biggest dump truck; a front-end loader
with an 80-ton bucket and the largest tires of any
vehicle; the cruise ship, the Voyager of the Seas; a
240-foot tall wind generator; and a fusion reaction
machine the size of a football field.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Secrets of the Dollar
Bill.
What do the symbols and numbers on the dollar bill
actually mean? We'll take a look at the shadier and
more intriguing threads of meaning and symbolism at
play in the bill's design. Extraordinary strands of
numerology are interwoven into the bill's structure,
which, on analysis, suggest surprising hidden
alignments. Why does it look the way it does and how
has it changed through the ages? We'll analyze the
significance of changes in the bill's appearance over
time and examine alternative designs. We'll also look
at the historical context of the bill's
conception--what the dollar bill set out to
represent--the patriotism and idealism of a young
republic; and go inside the Treasury's Department of
Printing and Engraving for exclusive access to the
presses and the people who process the millions upon
millions of dollars in circulation.

10-11pm -- American Eats - Ice Cream.
Few treats (frozen or not) are as popular or American.
Immigrants arriving at Ellis Island were once served
ice cream as part of their first meal. Due to seasonal
limitations and problems obtaining ice, it didn't
catch on until late in the 18th century in New York
and was limited to the wealthy; but Italian street
vendors serving Penny Licks (it cost a penny and
people licked the bowl clean) helped it become a
national obsession. Then at the 1904 St. Louis World's
Fair, a man selling waffles beside an ice cream vendor
put a scoop of ice cream in a rolled-up waffle when
his neighbor ran out of dishes--the totable treat
caught on and is still a favorite way to enjoy the
frozen confection. But whether in a sundae, ice cream
sandwich, banana split, parfait, or baked Alaska, ice
cream is a dessert we can't desert. We eat 2-billion
gallons a year, or 21.5 quarts on average per person!

____________________________________________________

Friday, July 28, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Machine Guns.
A machine gun puts the power of 20 men into the hands
of one. We review the history of the machine gun from
the first Gatlings in the Civil War to today's
high-speed automatic rifles.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Super Tools: Skyscraper.
Skyscrapers are an extraordinary feat of human
engineering: exposing millions of pounds of concrete
and steel to the enemy forces of wind and gravity.
Starting with the foundation and on through the
support structures and concrete flooring, every piece
of these superstructures has to be super-strong. We'll
soar high to spotlight the construction of three new
buildings: a 30-story hotel tower for the Palms Casino
in Las Vegas; a 52-story office building in Manhattan,
the new headquarters of The New York Times; and a
92-story residential and commercial building in
Chicago, the Trump International Hotel and Tower.
Along the way, we go behind the scenes with the five
tools that make these buildings possible: the
foundation drill rig, the tower crane, the impact
wrench, the power trowel, and the total station. Each
of these tools has evolved over the 100-plus year
history of the skyscraper era.

9-10pm -- History Alive - Cocaine.
Derived from South America's coca leaf, cocaine was
touted as a cure-all in the late 19th century and was
the secret ingredient in many medicines and elixirs
such as Coca-Cola. But cocaine's allure quickly
diminished as racism entered the picture--the concept
of the "cocaine-crazed Negro" even led police to
strengthen the caliber of their guns from .32 to .38.
We'll see how, though it was outlawed in 1914, its
popularity soared in the 1980s and '90s and gave birth
to a deadlier form--crack.

10-11pm -- History Alive - Marijuana.
In a series investigating the history of drug use, we
begin our trip tracing the rise of marijuana and
synthetic amphetamines. Marijuana, from the Indian
hemp plant, has been used worldwide as a source of
rope, cloth, and paper; its medicinal qualities were
first documented 4,000 years ago in China. But it's
best known as the drug of choice of the 1960s. During
WWII, US troops were given an estimated 200 million
amphetamines to fight drowsiness and battle fatigue,
and they're still used to fight depression.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, July 29, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - '80's Tech.
Remember "brick" cell phones, Pac-Man, Rubik's Cube,
Sony Walkman, and the first music CDs? Remember all
the new and exciting gadgets of the 1980s? Join us as
we investigate the transition from Industrial to
Information Age--a digital decade dedicated to
ergonomics and entertainment. The microchip ushered in
an era that revolutionized the way we work, play, and
communicate. And we tour Silicon Valley--birthplace of
some of the greatest inventions from an amazing time
of change, including the modern personal computer.
Steve "Woz" Wozniak tells us about the evolution of
Apple computers, and we talk to Sony--makers of the
Walkman, Betamax, and the first CD players. A visit to
the Computer History Museum shows fun technological
"artifacts", primitive by today's standards. At Intel,
makers of the first microchips, we learn why
technology moves at such a fast pace. We also take a
ride in a DeLorean DMC-12 sports car--few things moved
faster.

8-10pm -- Nostradamus: 500 Years Later - 
The life story of Nostradamus unfolds in medieval
Europe at the time of the Great Plague and the
Inquisition. He lived in an age of superstition and
magic and believed that he could foretell the future.
For this he was labeled both a prophet and a heretic,
and his cryptic journals continue to inspire
controversy just as they did in the 16th century. In
this 2-hour examination of his life, we visit his
birthplace in France and trace his career as doctor,
astrologer, father, and seer.

10-11pm -- Behind The Da Vinci Code - 
Before Dan Brown's book The Da Vinci Code, there was
Holy Blood, Holy Grail, written by Michael Baigent,
Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln, that is known for
its revelation of the possibility of a sacred
bloodline continued by Jesus and Mary Magdalene. It
was their research on which Brown based much of his
novel. Now, 30-some years since they wrote their last
follow-ups, Henry Lincoln continues to investigate the
source of the story. In this special, the man who
launched the whole story breaks his silence, allowing
viewers to unlock his secrets and addressing critics
who say the whole thing is a hoax. We also explore the
connection to the Knights Templar.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, July 30, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Mega Disasters - San Francisco Earthquake:
Part 1
At the dawn of the 20th century, San Francisco was the
place to be; a hub of trade and travel, business and
banking. Located just to the east of the San Andreas
Fault, the bay area is interlaced with eight major
earthquake-producing faults. We examine the
cataclysmic earthquake that struck on April 18,
1906--it jolted the city for 50 seconds, the earth
split for 270 miles, and a resulting firestorm raged
for three days. Amazing photographs document the
city's destruction and efforts to rebuild. Part 1 of
2.

8-9pm -- The Antichrist - Part 1.
How would you recognize the most evil person on Earth?
According to many historical texts, you should look
for a brilliant, enigmatic public figure who
transforms the world for good--for a while. 
Basically, the last person you'd tap as Satan's human
emissary. While many believe the Antichrist has come
and gone, just as many believe he will soon arrive, if
he's not already in our midst. Join us for harrowing
look at an evil so obscure that he answers only to
Satan. Real? Our group of prophecy believers and
historical experts help sort it out. We follow the
emergence of the Antichrist from pre-Judaic texts,
through the Book of Daniel and Revelation, into
Christian writings of the Middle Ages, and other
religious traditions as well. Aided by interviewees
both religious and secular, comprised of eminent
clergy, scholars, historians, psychologists, and
culture makers, we'll examine the evil enigma from
every conceivable angle. It's an Omen

9-10pm -- The Antichrist - Zero Hour
From popes and presidents to dictators, Antichrists
have been identified in all periods of recorded
history and in all walks of life. Even nations,
movements, and technologies have been thought by some
to be the agents of the Antichrist. Throughout
history, people have seen their own times as the most
morally bankrupt and have recognized signs of the
coming of the Apocalypse. If the end is near, what
will it be like? What is the Antichrist's agenda? How
does he intend to take over the world and wreak
destruction? Is this escapist fantasy or inescapable
fate?

10-11pm -- The Revolution - 09 - A Hornet's Nest
After the fall of Charleston, the Revolutionary War
explodes into the Carolina backcountry, touching off a
brutal civil war, and Lieutenant Colonel Banastre
Tarleton's dragoons spread terror throughout the
region. The Americans, under General Horatio Gates,
suffer a humiliating defeat at Camden forcing Congress
to send Nathanael Greene to lead the southern forces.
In an unconventional strategy, Greene and General
Daniel Morgan split the army between them, leading
British General Cornwallis on a harrowing chase, which
culminates in the Battle of Guildford Courthouse.

____________________________________________________

Monday, July 31, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Glue.
It's Super! It's Krazy! And it can be found in
everything from carpet to computers, books to boats,
shoes to the Space Shuttle. It's even used in surgery!
Without it, our material world would simply fall
apart. In this episode, we'll visit the stuck-up,
tacky world of glue. Glue's sticky trajectory spans
human history and we'll cover it all--from Neolithic
cave dwellers who used animal glue to decorate
ceremonial skulls to modern everyday glues and their
uses, including Elmer's glue, 3M's masking and Scotch
tape, and the super glues. Remember the Krazy Glue
commercial in which a man held himself suspended from
a hard hat that had just been glued to a beam? Well,
that 1970s vintage ad understates the power of glue.
With the help of a crane, we're going to hoist a
6,000-pound pickup truck off the ground by a steel
joint that's been bonded with glue!

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Beyond The War of the Worlds.
In print worldwide for over a century, The War of the
Worlds is H.G. Wells at his best. Beginning with its
literary origins, we trace the path of this amazing
story from riveting magazine serial through the panic
broadcast of 1938, and then to major motion pictures.
We uncover the long-forgotten 1968 broadcast that
again drove thousands into the streets of Buffalo, New
York; and gain exclusive access to a new animated
feature film. Loaded with state-of-the-art special
effects and stunning reenactments, we revisit not only
the famous but the obscure, including the radio
broadcast in Ecuador that cost 20 people their lives.
Filled with vintage film clips and previously unseen
interpretations of the Martians, this is one you won't
want to miss!

9-10pm -- Lost Worlds - Athens-Ancient Supercity
In the 5th century BC, one man leads his city to
greatness and paves the way for western civilization.
The city is Athens and Pericles is not a king or
prince, but an elected man. He will mastermind the
most costly and ambitious construction campaign
undertaken in the western world--creating a model city
of temples, houses, market places, civic buildings,
and a highly innovative sanitation system. But
Pericles' decision to raid the Greek treasury and take
the money set aside to defend all the city states will
lead to the downfall of Athens and Pericles himself.
It took 30 years to build, but it was brought down in
one generation by war and disease. Now, 2,500 years
later we restore Athens to its former glory--the first
senate house, the terrifying power of the Greek navy,
and one of the world's most advanced water systems. We
also reveal the magnificence of the Parthenon--a
building often hailed as the most perfect building
ever completed.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Real Sin City:
Sodom & Gomorrah.
According to the Bible, the cities of Sodom and
Gomorrah were destroyed by God to punish them for
their wicked ways. Was this just a biblical parable,
or is there evidence that such a thing actually
happened? Josh Bernstein travels to the Near East to
follow the clues laid out in the Bible. His search
takes him to modern-day Jordan, where, nestled near
the Dead Sea, two sister cities reveal archaeological
evidence of a great destruction. What happened here
and when? Josh will climb Mount Sodom to inspect a
strange "Pillar of Salt"--just like the one the Bible
claims Lot's wife became--and works with a pyrotechnic
expert to reconstruct a natural-gas explosion that
could have resulted in the destruction of Gomorrah.
Could these be the fabled cities of Sodom and
Gomorrah, and if so, can the tools of modern-day
archaeology reconstruct what happened in those fateful
days before these cities were laid to waste?
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Note: Wild West Tech hosted by David Carradine, some episodes narrated by Keith Carradine:
Outlaw Tech. Airs on Monday, June 26 @ 12pm & 6pm
Freak Show Tech. Tuesday, July 25 @ 11pm & 3am
Brothel Tech. Thursday, July 27 @ 11pm & 3am
The next Mail Call will be:

German Renaissance/9mm Luger P-08/AFN/Battle of Britain: #81
Saturday, July 8 @ 11am
Mail Call: #76, take a ride in a B-2 Stealth Bomber on a mock bomb run!
Saturday, July 22 @ 10:20am
Mail Call: #77, R. Lee Ermey heads to the Marine Corps Weapons Training Center for a live fire exercise with the Abrams M1-A1; the first major engagement between Americans and Germans in WW2; a new kind of full body armor stronger than Kevlar
Saturday, July 22 @ 11am
Mail Call: Iwo Jima Special: #73/74, R. Lee Ermey travels to the island of Iwo Jima with 86 veterans of the WWII invasion to relive the US Marine Corps' most heroic battle
Saturday, July 29 @ 10:10am
Mail Call: Benelli M4 Shotgun/1st Air Cav in Vietnam/Germany's WWII ME-163 Komet & Kubelwagen: #78
Saturday, July 29 @ 11am

For info on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket
(movie available on video and DVD)

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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