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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Sunday, January 1, 2006
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6:45-8pm Band of Brothers - Points.
Major Winters (Damian Lewis) leads Easy Company into the Bavarian town of Berchtesgaden--once home to top Nazi officers--and receives orders to take the abandoned Eagle's Nest, Hitler's mountaintop fortress. As German officers hand over their weapons, soldiers raid wine cellars and snap up souvenirs. But their elation is short-lived--most of the division faces redeployment to the Pacific Theater. A closing vignette tells what happened to the men of Easy Company after they returned home

8-9pm Modern Marvels - Coffee.
Traces the origins of this tasty drink from Ethiopia over 1,000 years ago to the espresso-fueled explosion of specialty coffee stores like Starbucks today. Along the way, we'll see how American companies like Hills Brothers, Maxwell House, Folgers, and MJB grew to be giants. Discover how billions of coffee beans make their journey from coffee farms and plantations, and are processed in gigantic roasting and packaging plants before showing up in coffee cups all over the world. Details the invention and production of instant coffee, decaffeinated coffee, freeze-dried coffee, and the espresso machine. Also, we explain how coffee made shift work in factories possible, while coffeehouses provided a creative cauldron that brewed political and artistic progress in the 18th and 19th centuries. And, we also provide tips on how to make a better cup at home!

9-10pm Modern Marvels - Distilleries.
From water and grain...to mash...still...vat...barrel and bottle--the distilling of alcoholic spirits is a big business and near-sacred religion. Its acolytes eye the color, swirl the glass, inhale the bouquet, sip, then ponder their ambrosia. What's your pleasure? Bourbon, Scotch, Rum, Gin, Vodka, or Tequila? We trace the history of distilling from the one-man/one-still tradition to the Voldstead Act of 1920 that devastated American distilleries to the mega-sales and high-volume distillery of today

10-11pm Modern Marvels - Brewing.
It's one of the world's oldest and most beloved beverages--revered by Pharaohs and brewed by America's Founding Fathers. Today, brewing the bitter elixir is a multi-billion-dollar global industry. Join us for an invigorating look at brewing's history from prehistoric times to today's cutting-edge craft breweries, focusing on its gradually evolving technologies and breakthroughs. We'll find the earliest known traces of brewing, which sprang up independently in such far-flung places as ancient Sumeria, China, and Finland; examine the surprising importance that beer held in the daily and ceremonial life of ancient Egypt; and at Delaware's Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, an adventurous anthropologist and a cutting-edge brewer show us the beer they've concocted based on 2,700-year-old DNA found in drinking vessels from the funerary of the legendary King Midas
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Monday, January 2, 2006

7-8pm Modern Marvels: Inviting Disaster #4. Based on the popular book, this episode explores historical building collapses--from ancient pyramids to the Cathedral at Beauvais to Kansas City's Hyatt Regency--and demonstrates that clear warning signs often existed, but were ignored. We also examine the collapse of the Twin Towers in New York. Author Jim Chiles believes that designers and engineers must better prepare for all potential disasters--by understanding existing risks, they can prepare for the unknown, like terrorism.

8-10pm Houdini: Unlocking the Mystery
In one of magic history's rarest events, a private collector auctioned off the largest collection of personally-owned Harry Houdini artifacts and memorabilia, providing an unprecedented peek behind the curtain at the world's great showman and magician. In a 2-hour special, hosted by renowned magician Lance Burton, we explore the life and magic of the great escape artist through his most prized possessions: the Chinese Water Torture Cell, the Milkcan, his straitjackets and handcuffs, and lockpicks that were "key" to his handcuff escapes, revealed to the public for the first time. We also unlock secrets of the man--brash showman, fierce competitor, loyal son and husband. With expert commentary, including a great-nephew and the last surviving member of his magic troop

10-12am Absolute Evel: The Evel Knievel Story
His life story reads like a soap opera script. Born Robert Craig Knievel, this wild, young man from the rough mining town of Butte, Montana dreamed of becoming rich and famous. After years of struggle, Bobbie's alter ego Evel Knievel became the world's most famous daredevil. His exploits are legendary and it's unlikely his accomplishments--or notoriety--will ever be duplicated. Now, he's paying a high price for the life he led. He lives in constant pain from the incredible abuse his body suffered during his daredevil days. As he enters the twilight of life, this 2-hour special may be his last chance at a public forum. He's a man who is outspoken, outrageous, at times hilarious, but always fascinating. From humble beginnings in Butte to iconic status and everything in between, Evel candidly shares every aspect of his life. The aging daredevil reflects on his incredible experiences and how he would like to be remembered.
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Tuesday, January 3, 2006

7-8pm Modern Marvels: Siege Machines.
A look at siege machines that convert energy into mechanical force to go over, under, or through fortified or fixed defenses too strong for conventional force. These engines range from man's first long-range missile weapon, the slingshot, to the laser cannons and satellite-destroying robots of the 21st century. All of these machines are designed to breach barriers--castle walls, entrenched troops, even outer space. When the going gets tough, the tough get siege machines.

8-8:30pm Mail Call: Knob Creek Gun Range: #90
Host R. Lee Ermey heads to Knob Creek Gun Range in West Point, Kentucky, outside of Fort Knox, for the Knob Creek Shoot, a weekend when machine-gun owners and collectors converge for unbridled mayhem. At this former military-munitions test range, shooters nationwide come to buy, sell, and trade. First, the Gunny shows us around, talks about the history, hits sales tables, and fires off a few thousand rounds--from state-of-the-art to early vintage. Next, Lee takes a turn on the "Jungle Walk", a machine-gun shooting course with hidden targets and dense brush to recreate what it was like for the grunts in Viet Nam; and he gets a lift on a mule to the Knob Creek helipad where he goes aloft in a Cayuse OH-6A Helicopter for the range's aerial shooting course. Then, it's the night shoot, when you really get to see raw power as machine guns shoot tracers and fire at targets filled with diesel fuel and dynamite, incinerating cars, refrigerators, and oil drums

8:30-9pm Mail Call: 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division: #49
Mail Call devotes an entire show to the gear and guys of "Easy Company"--the men depicted in Band of Brothers. Shot in a "You Are There" style, R. Lee Ermey hosts in a vintage jumpsuit, supported by a team of paratrooper reenactors using and demonstrating the real gear, weapons, and medical evac used during the Invasion of Normandy and through to the end of WW2

9-10pm Modern Marvels: Engineering Disasters 17
It's another chapter of complex, deadly and controversial engineering failures, using 3-D animation, forensic engineering experts, and footage of the actual disasters to understand what went wrong, and how disaster has led to improvement. In Sun Valley, California, weeks of record rain turn a crack in the middle of a street into a 200-foot long sinkhole. Months later, rain led to the Laguna Beach, California landslide, which destroyed 11 homes and caused millions in damage. On May 23, 2004, four people were killed when the roof of the new Terminal 2E at Charles de Gaulle International Airport in Paris collapses. Other disasters: the 1931 crash of Fokker F-10 passenger airplane with coach Knute Rockne aboard; the sinking of the coal ship Marine Electric off the coast of Virginia; and the blinding reflection of the new Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles

10-11pm Modern Marvels: The World's Fastest
Perhaps no field has experienced the revolution in velocity more acutely than transportation. We look at five blazingly fast technological marvels that have pushed the speed limits to the very edge, each with its own unique and dramatic history: the world's fastest production car (Sweden's Koenigsegg CCR); the world's fastest train (the Maglev in Shanghai); the world's fastest boat (The Spirit of Australia); the world's fastest roller coaster (the Kingda Ka) and the fastest thing on earth (the Holloman High Speed Test Track), used to test highly sensitive equipment for many branches of the government and commercial clients
Wednesday, January 4, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Biggest Machines 3.
Giant robots on the factory floor and in outer space. 
A floating fortress that's home to 6,000 military
personnel, which is almost as long as the Empire State
Building is tall. And a diesel engine with 108,000
horsepower. (You read that right.) These giants must
be seen to be believed! In this episode, we travel
over land and sea to find these and more of the
biggest, baddest, most audacious feats of engineering
in the world.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The World's Biggest
Machines.
Join us for a look at the biggest, heaviest, tallest,
longest, meanest machines on the planet! We'll see
what these monsters do and how they operate, and how
they're designed and assembled. Machines investigated
include the largest draglines, excavators used in
mining; the biggest dump truck; a front-end loader
with an 80-ton bucket and the largest tires of any
vehicle; the cruise ship, the Voyager of the Seas; a
240-foot tall wind generator; and a fusion reaction
machine the size of a football field.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - World's Biggest Machines 4.
From a giant machine press that stamps out an entire
car body to a 125-ton chainsaw that cuts through the
world's hardest rock; from a huge telescope that
glimpses the ends of the known universe to the world's
largest rock crusher. Join us for a workout of the
world's largest machines, and take a long look through
the lens of the world's biggest optical telescope, the
Keck Observatory, atop 13,800-foot Mauna Kea in
Hawaii.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Containers.
They hold just about everything--Containers. We follow
a day-in-the-life of a steel freight container from
port to port and see how standard containers can be
transported by ship, train, or truck while looking
into new technology and security measures being used
today. We visit a Georgia Pacific plant to see how raw
materials are processed in a state-of-the-art plant.
We also visit the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, an
underground container used for extraordinary amounts
of vital product. The containers that hold the US
Strategic Petroleum Reserve are actually underground
salt domes. In a visit to Bryan Mound, Texas, one of
four locations housing the SPR, we learn how the
caverns within the salt domes are created and how the
oil contained in these caverns actually benefits from
this type of storage. We also check out silos that
were necessary for farmers' progress. And finally, we
sip from metal cans, which revolutionized the food and
beverage industry.

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Thursday, January 5, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Military Movers.
The challenge: Move millions of soldiers and tons of
cargo halfway around the world and into the thick of
action. How? Use the biggest ships, the widest planes,
and the strongest trucks. Today, military planners
move men and equipment further and faster than ever.
The United States Transportation Command, answering to
the Department of Defense, runs military transport
like an efficient private shipping and travel agency.
From the Civil War to US Transcom, we track the
development of military logistics.

8-10pm -- The World Trade Center - 
On September 11, 2001, terrorists did the unthinkable
when they flew two fuel-loaded jetliners into the
World Trade Center. The Twin Towers' physical height
and symbolic stature made them the perfect target.
They were remarkable achievements in architecture,
construction, and technology. In this 2-hour profile,
we look at how the WTC was constructed and talk to
representatives from the Army Corps of Engineers, New
York's Office of Emergency Management, FEMA, and DNA
experts about the aftermath. 3000 names

10-11pm -- Declassified - The Taliban.
To the United States and the Soviet Union, Afghanistan
was always a pawn in a much bigger game. First the
Soviets bought them off and then the US sent in arms.
The Russians sent in troops and we sent in the CIA to
train the Mujahedin to kill Russians. But then came
the Taliban and the pawns started moving on their
own... We'll mine the guarded vaults and archives
around the world to reveal the untold story of how the
pieces turned on the players and the jihad came to
Kabul and the streets of New York.

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Friday, January 6, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Quarries.
Dynamite explodes hills to bits, drills divide sheer
stone walls, 400,000-pound blocks are pulled from pits
by giant cranes, and men work around the clock to
wrest rock out of the earth. Not diamonds or
gold...rock, the raw material of civilization! Without
rock, modern society wouldn't exist. Roads, sewers,
dams, bridges, buildings, paint, glue, make-up,
antacids, and even chewing gum need crushed stone.
From ancient days to the present, we explore the
evolution of quarrying techniques.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - 
A 2-hour panoramic and global overview of the
phenomenon known as Cosa Nostra--from the mass
immigration of Italians to the US at the end of the
19th century up to the arrests in 2000 on the New York
Stock Exchange, where the Mafia was laundering money.
What becomes evident in a chain of stories depicting
the most renowned "godfathers" is their uncanny
ability to act as political representatives of an
illegal state within the legal state and to exploit
major cycles and crises throughout history.

10-11pm -- Heroes Under Fire - True Warriors: Urgent
Fury.
October 25, 1983, Operation Urgent Fury. The Navy's
newest, top-secret weapon against terrorism, SEAL Team
Six, gets its first "hot" operation--a danger-fraught
mission to restore democracy to Grenada, a tiny
Caribbean country hijacked by Cuban communists. Told
they will face only light resistance, SEAL Team Six's
job is to rescue the trapped Grenadian Governor. But
they fast-rope into a hornet's nest of small arms fire
and anti-aircraft artillery. Set up to fail, SEAL Team
Six simply refused!

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Saturday, January 7, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bible Tech.
Arguably the most influential book ever written, the
Bible provides a glimpse into the origins of ancient
technology and its use to withstand the elements,
build great structures, wage war, and conserve
precious water. We examine the technological
plausibility of biblical structures and
machines--including the Tower of Babylon, the Temple
of Jerusalem, ancient bronze and iron forging, and
shipbuilding skills that might have been employed to
build Noah's Ark.

8-9pm -- The Man Who Predicted 9/11 - 
In 2001, Rick Rescorla was the 62-year-old head of
security at the Morgan Stanley Bank situated high up
in the South Tower at the World Trade Center. Rescorla
was convinced that Osama Bin Laden would use jet
planes to try and destroy the World Trade Center. Long
before September 11th, he developed an evacuation plan
for the bank, hugely unpopular amongst the city whiz
kids who worked there who thought he was mad. His
evacuation plan however ultimately saved 3,000 of
their lives. Rescorla's plan was put into effect after
the first jet hit the North Tower--even though WTC
managers were instructing everyone to stay in the
buildings. When the second jet hit the South Tower, he
averted panic and organized a rapid evacuation.
Rescorla went back inside to help those injured and
trapped get out. He was still inside when the building
collapsed. His body was never found.

9-10pm -- Grounded on 9/11 - 
In response to the attacks on September 11, 2001, the
FAA orders all planes out of the air. US and Canadian
air traffic controllers face a calamity of epic
proportions--how to safely re-route and land 6,500
planes carrying close to a million people. For
individual air traffic controllers, the work is
chaotic, intense, and deceptively simple: pick a new
route for each flight; radio instructions to turn;
listen for pilot confirmation; hold traffic to keep
airways from overcrowding. From Cleveland, Ohio to
Gander, Newfoundland, controllers on September 11th
searched for alternate airports to land large jets
even as their traumatized colleagues stream back from
break rooms after watching the attacks on TV.

10-11pm -- Wild West Tech - Vices.
In the Old West, there were whores a-plenty and rivers
of homemade hooch. Sin was in and available in various
flavors. Most vices were still legal back in the 19th
century, and inventors could make a fortune creating
new technologies to bring them to the masses. Back in
the good old days, cocaine was even found in soda pop,
and the cure for alcoholism was said to be heroin!
Thanks to technology, you didn't have to slump at the
opium den, you could get high at home. Take a "trip"
out West to the frontier of sex, drugs, and
lock'n'load!

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Sunday, January 8, 2006
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7-8pm -- Weather...or Not? - 
Hurricanes. Tsunami's, earthquakes, mudslides, weeks
of rain....lately the question on everyone's mind is:
what's with the weather? From Yakuza
weather-terrorists to Government conspiracies, the
apocalypse and Military weather programs, meet the
people behind some of the most interesting theories
and explore how outrageous, or implausible--or even
downright believable--their ideas are.

8-10pm -- Little Ice Age: Big Chill - 
Not so long ago, civilization learned that it was no
match for just a few degrees drop in temperature.
Scientists call it the Little Ice Age--but its impact
was anything but small. From 1300 to 1850, a period of
cataclysmic cold caused havoc. It froze Viking
colonists in Greenland, accelerated the Black Death in
Europe, decimated the Spanish Armada, and helped
trigger the French Revolution. The Little Ice Age
reshaped the world in ways that now seem the stuff of
fantasy--New York Harbor froze and people walked from
Manhattan to Staten Island, Eskimos sailed kayaks as
far south as Scotland, and two feet of snow fell on
New England in June and July during "the Year Without
a Summer". Could another catastrophic cold snap strike
in the 21st century? Leading climatologists offer the
latest theories, and scholars and historians recreate
the history that could be a glimpse of things to come.
Face the cold, hard truth of the past--an era that may
be a window to our future.

10-11pm -- Icebreakers - 
They are the toughest ships in the water, plowing
headlong into one of nature's hardest obstacles.
Modern icebreakers can smash through 10-foot thick ice
sheets without stopping, allowing scientists and
commercial shipping access to some of Earth's most
inhospitable spots. Join our blustery journey as we
patrol the Great Lakes on the USCG Cutter Mackinaw and
traverse the infamous Northwest Passage on the maiden
voyage of the USCG Healy, the newest Polar Class
Icebreaker in the US Fleet.

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Monday, January 9, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Command Central
"Centcom" in Doha, Qatar represents everything a
modern military command post can be with the most
sophisticated military information systems--from
video-conferencing to real-time frontline satellite
communication. From this forward command in the heart
of the Middle East, the U.S. ran the Iraq War. But
command posts have not always been so technologically
advanced as we see when we delve into the history of
military communication--from tattooed messenger to
satellite technology.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Out of This World.
Are we alone in the universe? Is the earth on the
brink of a cosmic catastrophe? Do aliens really exist?
And if they do, how do they get here? Long before man
landed on the moon, people have been asking these and
other questions that are out of this world. Perhaps
clues to some of these questions lie in understanding
the behavior of asteroids, life on Mars, and secrets
that our government may hold about UFOs and Roswell.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Bible Mysteries.
The Bible has been studied by millions of people over
thousands of years-but it continues to mystify us even
today. Did Noah's Ark really exist-and is it trapped
in the snow and ice on a mountaintop in Turkey? Have
archeologists found the remains of the evil cities of
Sodom and Gomorrah? Was the Shroud of Turin really the
burial cloth of Jesus Christ-or just a medieval
forgery? And are there secret messages and codes
hidden within the text of the Old Testament?

10-11pm -- Decoding The Past - The Other Nostradamus.
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Tuesday, January 10, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Survival Technology.
In an historic survey of man's adaptation to killer
environmental conditions, we travel to the desert, the
Arctic, the sea, jungle, and space, charting the
body's physiological responses to extreme
circumstances such as frostbite, heatstroke, and
hypothermia. We talk with military survival experts
and learn about the latest cutting-edge survival gear,
as well as the equipment aboard the space station, and
look to the future, when nano-technology will create a
new type of technology.

8-8:30pm -- Mail Call - #91.
At ease, Private! R. Lee Ermey is your commanding
officer in this series that answers viewers' questions
about military methods and technology with practical
demonstrations by military experts. Viewers go on the
frontlines, to foreign lands, and into basic training
as Lee demonstrates the hows and whys behind weaponry,
military hardware, vehicles, and jargon. It's a
glimpse of military life and history that civilians
rarely see.

8:30-9pm -- Mail Call - MK-19 Grenade
Launcher/PPSH-41/WWII Weasel/Vertijet: # 79.
R. Lee Ermey, is back at HQ for a new season of shows
jam-packed with gear, gun and guts. First, the Gunny
is pitching horseshoes and because "close only counts
in horseshoes and hand grenades," it's the perfect
introduction to Lee's trip to Camp Pendleton where he
gets some trigger time with the MK-19 grenade
launcher. Next, the focus is on Russian tactics and
weapons of WWII. Lee shows us the Russian sub machine
gun of choice during the campaign, the PPSH-41. Then,
it's time for a test drive when a WWII Weasel shows up
at HQ. Finally, it's time to dip into the Gunny's
Fabulous Flops file for a segment about the Vertijet,
America's first vertical take-off jet aircraft.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 3.
When design flaws fell projects, the cost is often
exacted in lives as we see in this look at engineering
disasters. Why did the Tower of Pisa begin to lean by
as much as 17 feet; what caused the first nuclear
accident in 1961 in Idaho; what killed three Soyuz 11
cosmonauts aboard the world's first orbiting space
station; how did a winter storm destroy the Air
Force's Texas Tower Radar Station, killing 28; and
what errors led to NASA's loss of the Mars Climate
Orbiter and the Mars Polar Lander?

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Mountain Roads.
Join our journey along monumental feats of engineering
that preserved America's natural wonders while paving
the way towards her future. Travel the Donner Pass in
the Sierra Nevada Mountains, site of a dark chapter in
US history. Today, crews use the latest technology to
keep I-80 open during the worst winter storms. Enjoy
the view while traveling to the summit of Pike's Peak
in Colorado, inspiration for America the Beautiful.
The "Going-to-the-Sun-Road" slices through Montana's
majestic Glacier National Park, crossing the
Continental Divide and allowing motorists unsurpassed
views of mountain scenery. Outside Denver, the
Eisenhower Memorial Tunnel, carved through mountain
rock, united eastern and western Colorado. And the
Blue Ridge Parkway, which took 52 years to complete,
snakes through large, scenic swatches. 

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Wednesday, January 11, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gold Mines.
Around the world and across the eons, gold stands as a
symbol of power, wealth, and love. The quest for the
yellow metal took men across oceans, into the depths
of the Alaskan winter, and miles beneath South African
earth. This is the story of the hunters of the
precious metal and their methods for extracting it.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Rubber.
The story of rubber is more than tires, toys, gloves,
and gum--it's imbedded in modern life, from the
controversial Challenger O-rings to seals on hydrogen
fuel cells. A gigantic worldwide synthetic rubber
industry creates exotic elastomers for high-tech
applications, while China's rapid industrialization
plays havoc with the world's natural rubber supply.
From the ancient Olmecs of Yucatán, who knew the
secret of vulcanization, to modern processing plants,
we trace rubber's history and future.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Metal.
They constitute the very essence of the modern world;
the cadence of our progress sounds in the measured
ring of the blacksmith's hammer. From soaring
skyscrapers and sturdy bridges to jet planes and
rockets, metals play a key role. Our journey begins
before the Bronze Age and takes us into the shiny
future when new metal structures--engineered at a
molecular level to be stronger, lighter, and
cheaper--shape human progress, as they have since man
first thrust copper into a fire and forged a tool.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Fire.
Fire--we have learned to create and control it, but
have yet to tame it? It's alive--it breathes, feeds,
and grows. Fire is behind essentially every component
of the modern world and has spawned entire industries.
We'll feature great feats in pyrotechnology, or the
intentional use and control of fire by humans--from
the massive 8-story fire-breathing boilers that create
steam heat for downtown Philadelphia, to the nearly
2,000 degree flames that create electricity at a
biomass plant. From the massive coal-fired locomotives
that powered us across the continent, to the rocket
engines that took us to the moon, we'll cover what
fire is, how we have learned to create and harness it,
and its behavior with various fuel sources. At a match
factory, we see how the seeds of fire are made and
explore the significance of this seemingly simple
innovation. We also take a look at the important role
that fire has played in technological advances as well
as warfare.

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Thursday, January 12, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - High Voltage.
Look closely at those tall metal towers that span the
country and you might see tiny specks climbing up the
soaring steel like spiders on an enormous web. Meet
the courageous linemen who erect, string, and repair
250-foot high electrical transmission towers, working
with energized power lines that can carry up to
765,000 volts!

8-10pm -- Time Machine - 
In a 2-hour special, we scrutinize ancient writings
that didn't "make the cut" in the battle to create a
Christian Bible in the new religion's first few
centuries. Biblical archaeologists and scholars
examine why they were left out and if others might yet
be found. Beginning with the little-known Life of Adam
and Eve, we also peruse the Book of Jubilees, the Book
of Enoch, the Gospel of Thomas, the Protevangelium of
James, the Gospel of Mary, the Gospel of Nicodemus,
and the Apocalypse of Peter.

10-11pm -- Declassified - John Lennon.
From approximately 1956-1971, thousands of American
residents and US citizens, from John Lennon to John
Kerry to Martin Luther King Jr., were the subjects of
COINTELPRO (Counter Intelligence Program), the FBI's
secret operation to target people and organizations
viewed as un-American. Decades later, historians and
the subjects of the spying themselves have begun to
use the Freedom of Information Act to piece together
the story of COINTELPRO. In this episode, we focus on
the case of John Lennon and uncover the effects of the
FBI's domestic spymasters on this pop-culture icon and
the myriad of people who loved him.

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Friday, January 13, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Great Inventions.
Join us for a survey of the world's greatest
inventions in which we examine the wheel, steam
engine, railroad, automobile, airplane, printing
press, electric light, wireless telegraph, telephone,
TV, and computer. Then, travel back in time to the
labs, candle-lit offices, and garages to see how these
marvels were created.

8-9pm -- Pacific: The Lost Evidence - Leyte.
October 20, 1944--US troops storm ashore on the island
of Leyte. After two long years under Japanese
occupation, the liberation of the Philippines has
begun. The invasion triggers the Japanese Navy's
last-ditch attempt to stop the American advance in the
Pacific. But, in three days of desperate combat, the
Americans finally beat back the Japanese attacks and
write one of the most glorious pages in US Naval
history. We'll offer new insight into this important
WWII battle using aerial photographs that have been
brought to life with the latest computer-imaging
technology to create a 3-D model of the Philippines.
Now, it's possible to follow both the US and Japanese
fleets as they battle for supremacy in the waters
around Leyte Gulf.

9-10pm -- Pacific: The Lost Evidence - Pearl Harbor.
December 7, 1941--"a date which will live in infamy".
The unprovoked attack on the US Pacific Fleet moored
at Pearl Harbor is one of the key moments in modern
history, signaling the US entry into WWII, turning the
war into a global conflict, and marking America's
emergence as a military superpower. In this hour, we
offer an unprecedented viewpoint of the attack. Aerial
photographs taken of Pearl Harbor and the Hawaiian
Island of Oahu are layered over a 3-D contour map to
create a CGI "model". But, this isn't a computer game.
Rather, a facsimile of Pearl Harbor as the battle
raged. These original high-resolution images allow the
viewer to track the attack from the air. Individual
stories of courage and heroism are explored in the
exact spots where they took place. Using cutting-edge
techniques, rare archive film, reenactments, and
extraordinary interviews with men who were there, we
tell, in a totally new way, the story of WWII's
greatest surprise attack.

10-11pm -- Heroes Under Fire - True Warriors: Death
from Above.
Behind Taliban lines in the foreign and notoriously
dangerous terrain of Afghanistan, three Air Force
commandos go hunting for terrorists in October 2002.
Flaunting the notion of capture, Andy Kubik, Calvin
Markham, and Bart Decker scout potential Taliban
targets on foot or by horse, provide F-16s with
real-time intelligence, paint each target with a laser
pointer, and watch as precision bombs obliterate
Taliban strongholds. This is the story of these
little-known super soldiers.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, January 14, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Brewing.
It's one of the world's oldest and most beloved
beverages--revered by Pharaohs and brewed by America's
Founding Fathers. Today, brewing the bitter elixir is
a multi-billion-dollar global industry. Join us for an
invigorating look at brewing's history from
prehistoric times to today's cutting-edge craft
breweries, focusing on its gradually evolving
technologies and breakthroughs. We'll find the
earliest known traces of brewing, which sprang up
independently in such far-flung places as ancient
Sumeria, China, and Finland; examine the surprising
importance that beer held in the daily and ceremonial
life of ancient Egypt; and at Delaware's Dogfish Head
Craft Brewery, an adventurous anthropologist and a
cutting-edge brewer show us the beer they've concocted
based on 2,700-year-old DNA found in drinking vessels
from the funerary of the legendary King Midas.

8-9pm -- The Presidents - 1945-1977.
An era of seeming bliss turns into a period of total
political disenfranchisement. Plain-spoken Harry
Truman becomes president after FDR dies in office and
presides during the last days of WWII. He also ushers
the US into the Atomic Age and the beginning of the
Cold War. Truman is followed by the hero of D-Day,
Dwight D. Eisenhower. Ike's grandfatherly image and
"hidden hand" politics are replaced by youth and
charisma when John F. Kennedy is elected.
Assassination thrusts Lyndon B. Johnson into office
and Vietnam drives him out. After Richard Nixon
resigns in disgrace, Gerald Ford tries to heal a
wounded nation. Defining moments include the dropping
of the first atom bombs, containment of communism, the
Cold War, Cuban Missile Crisis, man on the Moon, JFK's
assassination, Civil Rights, the Vietnam War,
Watergate, and the first presidential resignation.

9-10pm -- The Presidents - 1977-Present.
The final hour of the series brings us to precipice of
the 2005 inauguration. This is an era marked by a new
world order, defined by the fall of the Berlin Wall,
then shattered by the specter of global terrorism.
Defining moments include Jimmy Carter's economic
malaise and the Iran Hostage Crisis; the election of
actor Ronald Reagan, bringing another assassination
attempt, Iran-Contra, and the Strategic Defense
Initiative; George H.W. Bush's Gulf War; Bill
Clinton's booming economy, sex scandals, and
impeachment; and the terror strikes on America on
9/11, George W. Bush's handling of the crisis, the War
on Terror, doctrine of preemptive strikes, and
invasion of Iraq. We also look at the contentious 2004
reelection of Bush over John Kerry.

10-11pm -- Conspiracy? - Jack Ruby.
On November 24, 1963, a stunned America struggled to
accept the assassination of President John F. Kennedy
two days earlier. As tens of millions stared at their
televisions that Sunday morning, they witnessed TV's
first live murder--the killing of assassination
suspect Lee Harvey Oswald by Dallas strip-club owner
Jack Ruby. What was seen for 47 hours as an isolated
tragedy became one of the most notable suspected
conspiracies in US history. And while the Warren
Commission claimed that Oswald and Ruby both acted
alone, the House Select Committee on Assassinations
concluded in 1979 that JFK's murder most likely
resulted from a conspiracy. Now, a new development has
shaken both sides of the conspiracy controversy.
Recently revealed evidence suggests the CIA may have
been tracking Oswald and indicates a possible link
among anti-Castro Cubans, Carlos Marcello, Ruby,
Oswald, and the CIA.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, January 15, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - Who Killed Martin Luther King
Jr.?
On April 4, 1968, a sniper gunned down Martin Luther
King Jr. as he stood on a motel balcony in Memphis,
Tennessee. Charges of cover-ups and government
complicity were heard almost immediately--suspicions
that haven't waned with time. Several versions have
passed for the "truth" of King's assassination--from
the "official" story in '68 with small-time criminal
James Earl Ray as lone assassin; Ray's later assertion
that he was framed by "Raul", the true killer; to the
'78 House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA)
report that claimed Ray acted on behalf of a
conspiracy. And there's a theory that federal
government agencies were out to get King--and they had
greater motivation to do so than James Earl Ray. We
revisit the murder--one of the least explicable of the
assassinations that rocked the '60s.

8-10pm -- Kennedys: The Curse of Power - 
Traces the Kennedy clan's calamities that occurred on
the rise to power--from immigration from Ireland up to
John Kennedy Jr.'s tragic death in 1999. The first
hour sees the loss of Joe Jr. in WWII and the
assassinations of JFK and RFK. Hour two witnesses
Ted's downfall and role as surrogate father to a
fatherless generation.

10-12am -- Eighty Acres of Hell - 
"To the Victor, Belongs the Silence." Hidden until
now, we uncover an important and shocking chapter of
the American Civil War. Although our nation is
well-versed about the atrocities committed against
Union POWs at Andersonville, Georgia, few have heard
of the wholesale annihilation of Confederate prisoners
at Camp Douglas in Chicago, Illinois (12,000 inmates
were incarcerated, 6,000 never left). Unlike
Andersonville, Camp Douglas had the resources
necessary to house and care for its prisoners, but
calculated cruelty, torture, and neglect by the US
military conspired to exterminate Southern soldiers
who entered this "80 Acres of Hell". But, Southern
prisoners were not the only victims. Under martial
law, prominent Chicago citizens were unjustly tried
and imprisoned by a ruthless military tribunal. From
1862 to 1866, more than 6,000 Rebel prisoners and 14
civilians died at the hands of a corrupt and murderous
system with tentacles to the White House.
____________________________________________________

Monday, January 16, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Logging Tech.
When Paul Bunyan cried "Timber!", he never foresaw
today's cutting-edge, controversial industry that
feeds a ravenous, lumber-crazy world--a world striving
to protect nature while devouring it. Come into the
woods to see how he-men and hi-tech combine forces to
topple 4-billion trees annually; journey to
19th-century America, when lumberjacks cut a legend as
large as the timber they felled; and travel with a
tree from stump to sawmill and learn its non-wood
uses--from aspirin to film to toothpaste!

8-11pm -- Lincoln - 
Was Abraham Lincoln's lifelong anguish the driving
force behind his ultimate transcendence to America's
most beloved President? Award-winning director Vikram
Jayanti takes a look through Lincoln's eyes on his
last day as Lincoln is wracked by memory, premonition,
and regret. His entire life was a continuing battle to
contain and overcome his depressions, suicidal urges,
unsettled sexuality, tragic family life, and a history
of political opportunism--a battle he fought with his
powerful innate wit and charm and his developing
idealism. Yet today, controversy continues to rage
over his ambiguous psychology and sexuality. In this
3-hour special, we are joined by leading Lincoln
biographers Gore Vidal, Jan Morris, and Harold Holzer,
among others, as well as with Andrew Solomon, author
of The Noonday Demon, for a fresh look.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, January 17, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Chemical and Biological
Weapons.
An examination of the history and technology of
chemical and biological warfare, which can be traced
back at least 4,000 years to the wars of ancient
India, when soldiers used toxic fumes against their
enemies. We also provide chilling details of the vast
Soviet biological warfare program, and talk to Ken
Alibek, former chief scientist for that program until
he defected in 1992, and U.S. bio-weaponeer Bill
Patrick, who debriefed Alibek.

8-10pm -- Ben Franklin - 
Meet Dr. Benjamin Franklin--a far more complex figure
than the squeaky-clean, larger than life Founding
Father whose grandfatherly visage graces the hundred
dollar bill. Inventor, politician, writer,
businessman, scientist, diplomat--that, of course, is
the mythic, legendary Ben Franklin. But it's not the
only Ben Franklin. By his own admission, Franklin had
more than his share of shortcomings and failures.
Photographed largely on location in Philadelphia in
High Definition, and featuring in-depth interviews
with biographers and historians, as well as liberal
doses of Franklin's own, often humorous observations,
the special allows viewers to "walk" in Franklin's
footsteps. In this vivid portrait, we meet an earthy,
brilliant, and flawed Franklin that one biographer
believes would feel right at home in today's world.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Edison Tech.
He was the father of the future...electric lights,
power systems, motion pictures, recorded sound--even
the tattoo pen. Life as we know it would be
inconceivable without the prodigious output of the
Wizard of Menlo Park, Thomas Alva Edison. His intense
focus on his work came with a hefty personal price,
but his reward was a world forever changed by his
genius. Years after his death, Edison's effect is
seen, heard, and felt everywhere. We follow
descendants of his motion-picture camera to the tops
of Earth's highest mountains, to the bottoms of its
deepest oceans, and even into outer space. We track
his innovations in recorded sound to CDs, iPods,
sophisticated movie sound, and satellite radio. And we
illuminate his world of electric light, powering the
world and turning night into day. Along the way, we
discover a little Edison in corners of modern life
less well-known and even look at his failures. From
the Internet to the stock market to pay-per-view; the
Wizard is everywhere. 

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, January 18, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Million Dollar Tech.
For millennia, luxury toys have functioned as flashy
instruments of affluence, authority, and identity and
driven many kingly consumers to covet, create, and
purchase these status symbols. From the Roman Emperor
Caligula's special barges to Carl Faberge's impossibly
intricate eggs, from plasma screen TVs to $600,000
Bentleys and Rolex watches, we examine spectacular
personal possessions--paeans to the lords of a
consumer culture that grows richer and technologically
more sophisticated daily.

8-9pm -- The Presidents - 1789-1825.
Based on the book To the Best of My Ability, this
8-part series provides an insightful look at the
exclusive group of men from all walks of life and
parts of the country who have led America from the
Oval Office. Part 1 probes the Constitutional Era,
when the fledgling nation's revolutionary Founding
Fathers became its first administrators. From George
Washington, who defined the presidency, to James
Monroe, the last of the Revolutionary War heroes, the
office of president evolves and is tested as the
United States undergoes growing pains. Defining
moments include Washington's Whisky Rebellion, John
Adams' XYZ Affair, Thomas Jefferson's Louisiana
Purchase, James Madison's War of 1812, and the Monroe
Doctrine. We also examine the human side of the
Presidents, offering a look at their strengths and
weaknesses, their families, and accomplishments.

9-10pm -- The Presidents - 1825-1849.
In Part 2, America's leadership changes hands from the
Founding Fathers to a new breed of Founding Sons. The
period marked rapid growth and contentious politics,
including the bitterest election in US history and
first decided by popular vote--the election of 1828.
The imposing figure of Andrew Jackson dominates as he
impresses his will upon the nation, heralding the era
of the Common Man and Manifest Destiny. We also peruse
the putrid politics of John Quincy Adams' presidency;
Battle of the Petticoats; Indian Removal Act; Bank
War; economic turmoil during Martin Van Buren's term;
William Henry Harrison's death, the first succession
crisis, elevation of Vice President John Tyler ("His
Accidency"), and the first impeachment resolution
against a president; and exploits of James K. Polk,
who took the US to war with Mexico and expanded the
nation "from Sea to Shining Sea."

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Cotton.
For a soft, fuzzy, white fiber, cotton has played a
starring role in history. As well as being one of the
most useful of materials, cotton has created empires,
helped launch at least one civil war, jumpstarted the
Industrial Revolution, and become the world's most
ubiquitous fabric (you must be wearing at least a
piece of it right now). Follow the jaunt cotton makes
"from dirt to shirt", as they say in the textiles
trade, and the lesser-known journey it makes into
thousands of products, including gunpowder, cattle
feed, plastics, photographic film, lipstick, and ice
cream. We also examine cotton's historical place
beginning with its ancient origins, especially India,
and examine the many innovations in which cotton had a
hand, like the cotton gin, which separated cotton from
seed and also had a hand in both oppression and
progress in both America and England. And don't forget
that evil critter, the boll weevil!

____________________________________________________

Thursday, January 19, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Battle Gear.
From battle armor to bubble gum, you might be
surprised by what soldiers have carried into
battle--and what they'll carry in future wars. In this
look at the development of weapons--from the Roman
soldier's gladius to the M16 assault rifle to infrared
scopes and biological weapons protection--we also
discover the evolution of body armor--from knights to
Kelvar-protected "Land Warriors". And we'll also find
out what the "Future Warrior" will look like.

8-9pm -- The Presidents - 1849-1865.
Marked by polar opposites, this hour scrutinizes a
fractious era of the presidency--from Taylor to
Lincoln--one of the most turbulent in US history, when
the volatile issues of states' rights and slavery
erupted in civil war. We highlight the rough-hewn
style of Zachary Taylor, the second president to die
in office, through the compromising weaknesses of
Millard Fillmore and Franklin Pierce (Barbara Pierce
Bush's fourth cousin four times removed), the
near-treasonous James Buchanan administration, to
Abraham Lincoln, savior of the republic to some,
destroyer of the nation to others. The episode ends
with the first presidential assassination on Good
Friday, April 14, 1865, when Southern sympathizer and
actor John Wilkes Booth shot Lincoln in the head at
Ford's Theater in Washington during a performance of
Our American Cousin.

9-10pm -- The Presidents - 1865-1885.
During America's Age of Reconstruction, from Andrew
Johnson (Lincoln's vice president) to Chester A.
Arthur, the ruptured nation faced the difficult task
of rebuilding a union after four years of civil war
and a presidential assassination. This period was also
known as the era of "The Ohio Generals"--three of the
five presidents featured in this hour were generals in
the Civil War, all from the state of Ohio. Defining
moments include the impeachment trial of Andrew
Johnson (by a margin of one, the Senate voted not to
convict him), the triumphant ascendancy of Ulysses S.
Grant, the back-room politics of Rutherford B. Hayes,
the unrequited aspirations of James Garfield, and the
civil service reforms of Chester A. Arthur.

10-11pm -- Declassified - Tiananmen Square.
It started out as China's answer to Woodstock, but it
ended like Kent State. Here, using unseen footage and
declassified diplomatic sources, we present a
previously shrouded story of the battles and deaths of
hundreds of young Chinese students in June
1989--martyrs for democracy at Tiananmen Square--and
the imprisonment of many others. Watch the birth and
death of a movement, and learn how the demonstrators
changed China forever.

____________________________________________________

Friday, January 20, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Death Devices.
The hangman, guillotine, gas chamber, firing squad,
and electric chair are just a few of the ways in which
societies have rid themselves of those who committed
capital crimes. And throughout history, a select few
have developed the devices that have carried out the
mandate of the people. This is the dark story of those
inventors and the macabre history of execution
mechanics--from the first "stone" of antiquity, the
dungeons of the Inquisition, and Nazi death camps to
today's sterile injection chambers--with a peek at the
future of death technology.

8-9pm -- The Presidents - 1885-1913.
From Grover Cleveland to William Howard Taft, the
Gilded Age of the American Presidency, featured a new
breed of men who occupied the White House. It was an
era of unbridled economic growth, combined with the
completion of America's "Manifest Destiny" policy, and
dominated by the emerging figure of Theodore
Roosevelt. Defining moments include Grover Cleveland's
two nonconsecutive terms in office, William McKinley's
assassination, Teddy Roosevelt's anti-trust assaults
on big-money monopolies, and William Howard Taft's
political estrangement from his mentor and friend TR,
which led to a split in the Republican Party.

9-10pm -- The Presidents - 1913-1945.
The sixth hour looks at a challenging period of US
history that was marked by financial depression and
two world wars. This era also witnessed America's
emergence as a player on the world stage and
ultimately a superpower. In 1917, Woodrow Wilson
proclaimed American entrance into World War One a
crusade to make the world "safe for democracy." After
the war's end, he asserted international leadership in
building a new world order. Warren Harding watched as
scandals rocked his administration. Calvin Coolidge
ushered the nation to a dangerous economic precipice
that became the Great Depression during Herbert
Hoover's years. And finally, we look at the three
terms of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who helped the
nation recover from the Depression and led it through
the Second World War.

10-11pm -- Heroes Under Fire - Escape from Liberia.
September 20, 1998, Monrovia, Liberia: rebel gangs
clash in the streets and plunge this West African city
into revolutionary anarchy--the streets of the
Liberian capital have become a vast battlefield. For
several days, Diplomatic Security Service (DSS)
Special Agents Tony Diebler, Scott Folensbee, and
Steve Fakan made forays into the raging streets to
rescue and evacuate fellow Americans. Now, a new
crisis emerges; a group of journalists are pinned down
in a nearby hotel, about to be slaughtered by the
rebels. Safely nestled in the US Embassy, after
accounting for their citizens and staff, our DSS
agents decide to brave a hail of bullets and hand
grenades to reach the trapped reporters. By morning,
the city is in ruins, but thanks to the efforts of the
DSS, the journalists, and all other US personnel are
safely evacuated and the US Embassy stays open to help
negotiate peace.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, January 21, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Cotton.
For a soft, fuzzy, white fiber, cotton has played a
starring role in history. As well as being one of the
most useful of materials, cotton has created empires,
helped launch at least one civil war, jumpstarted the
Industrial Revolution, and become the world's most
ubiquitous fabric (you must be wearing at least a
piece of it right now). Follow the jaunt cotton makes
"from dirt to shirt", as they say in the textiles
trade, and the lesser-known journey it makes into
thousands of products, including gunpowder, cattle
feed, plastics, photographic film, lipstick, and ice
cream. We also examine cotton's historical place
beginning with its ancient origins, especially India,
and examine the many innovations in which cotton had a
hand, like the cotton gin, which separated cotton from
seed and also had a hand in both oppression and
progress in both America and England. And don't forget
that evil critter, the boll weevil!

8-11pm -- Lincoln - 
Was Abraham Lincoln's lifelong anguish the driving
force behind his ultimate transcendence to America's
most beloved President? Award-winning director Vikram
Jayanti takes a look through Lincoln's eyes on his
last day as Lincoln is wracked by memory, premonition,
and regret. His entire life was a continuing battle to
contain and overcome his depressions, suicidal urges,
unsettled sexuality, tragic family life, and a history
of political opportunism--a battle he fought with his
powerful innate wit and charm and his developing
idealism. Yet today, controversy continues to rage
over his ambiguous psychology and sexuality. In this
3-hour special, we are joined by leading Lincoln
biographers Gore Vidal, Jan Morris, and Harold Holzer,
among others, as well as with Andrew Solomon, author
of The Noonday Demon, for a fresh look.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, January 22, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- The Bible Code: Predicting Armageddon - 
Is there a prophetic, highly accurate code locked
within the Bible that outlines past and future events?
Does the Code contain hidden messages about people
such as Napoleon, Einstein, and Hitler, and key world
events like WWII, the Kennedy brothers'
assassinations, and 9/11? More frightening are
references to future events--including Earth's
impending end. We take a balanced look through the
eyes of Code supporters and critics and let viewers
determine its accuracy in predicting the future.

8-10pm -- Beyond The Da Vinci Code - 
Is it the greatest story ever told - or the greatest
story ever sold? A best-selling novel sparks a debate
that could change Christianity forever. Were Jesus and
Mary Magdalene married and co-leaders of their
movement? Was Mary Magdalene, herself, the Holy Grail
- the vessel said to hold Jesus's blood--and mother of
his descendants? Did the early Church know this
"truth" and deliberately mislead followers? Is there a
secret, ancient society, the Priory of Sion, which
still protects this bloodline? Have some of the most
illustrious names in art and science been members?
These are some of the questions that Dan Brown's
best-selling novel The Da Vinci Code raises. We
examine both sides of the story--the conventional view
of Christianity and the "alternate history" proposed
by Brown--so that viewers can decide.

10-11pm -- Decoding The Past - The Templar Code:
Crusade of Secrecy.
For nearly two centuries, the Knights Templar were the
medieval world's most powerful order, a fearsome and
unstoppable Crusader militia. Then came accusations of
unspeakable crimes. Who were the Templars, really? How
did they become so powerful, so fast, and why did they
fall just as quickly? Evidence hints that the Templars
excavated under Jerusalem's Temple of Solomon. What
did they find there? Was it, as The Da Vinci Code
suggests, the true identity of the Holy Grail--the
bloodline of Christ? Or an unimaginable treasure,
documented in the Dead Sea Scrolls, buried 1,000 years
before Christ's birth? We explore the Templar's
origin, how they lived, trained, fought and became a
medieval world power, and the suspicious circumstances
behind their sudden downfall. Narrated by Ed Herrmann
and featuring preeminent Templar authors.

____________________________________________________

Monday, January 23, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Silver Mines.
It was called the "mother lode", a deposit of silver
so massive that it would produce $300-million in its
first 25 years of operation, establish Nevada as a
state, and bankroll the Union Army in the Civil War.
Named after an early investor, we'll see how the
Comstock Lode, discovered near Virginia City, proved
to be a scientific laboratory from which vast
improvements in mining technology and safety were
pioneered, including innovations in drilling,
ventilation, drainage, and ore processing.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Deep Sea UFOs.
Join us for a detailed examination of the little-known
phenomenon of USOs, or "Unidentified Submerged
Objects", an advanced type of UFO that can operate
just as efficiently in water as in the atmosphere.
These supposed otherworldly vessels have been
reported, some believe, as far back as ancient Egypt.
Others believe that USOs were reported by Alexander
the Great and Christopher Columbus, and might even
involve the lost city of Atlantis. Highlights include
the 1967 "Shag Harbour Incident", a
government-documented USO crash off the coast of Nova
Scotia, Canada, and a trip to the area around Laguna
Cartegena in Puerto Rico, a reported hotbed of USO
activity. Interviewees include the US Navy's Bruce
Maccabee, UCLA's Kathryn Morgan, as well as USO and
UFO experts Stanton Friedman, Bill Birnes, and Preston
Dennett.

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Real Temple of
Doom.
Thousands of years before the Inca ruled the nation
now called Peru, a strange and unique civilization
dominated the region. It was called Chavin, and its
story is one of the most bizarre in history. Unlike
the other civilizations of the Americas, Chavin's
status as a regional superpower wasn't based on its
military muscle. Instead, the rulers of Chavin
exercised a cult-like control over their subjects with
the aid of hallucinogenic plants. Josh Bernstein
ventures deep into the miles of tunnels beneath the
ruins of Chavin de Huantar, comes face to face with
some of the most fearsome animals of the Peruvian
Amazon, and investigates a real temple of doom. As he
tries to understand this mysterious culture, he takes
part in one of the ancient rituals still practiced by
the country's powerful shaman-priests.

10-11pm -- Mysteries on the High Seas - 
Unexplained happenings on the water have baffled
scientists and historians alike. Why does the Bermuda
Triangle have such a frightening reputation for
travelers' disappearances? What can account for ships
mysteriously meeting their doom on the Great Lakes,
and planes vanishing over Alaska's icy waters? What
lies behind classic ghost-ship stories like the Flying
Dutchman and the Mary Celeste? And what once made New
Jersey's shoreline a hunting ground for killer sharks?

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, January 24, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Diamond Mines.
Half a mile below the earth's surface, men mine for
rough diamonds--a pure carbon substance. Brilliant
when cut and polished, they are marketed as the most
precious gem in the world. From the earliest mines of
the 4th century BC to today's technological wonders in
South Africa, we explore the history and technology of
the diamond mine.

8-8:30pm -- Mail Call - Fastest Army Vehicle/Uncle
Sam/Tank Destroyers/Anti-Tank Rifle/Dive Bomber/Sea
Dart: #47.
R. Lee Ermey pits his trusty Jeep against the Army's
nitro-burning dragster "Sarge" at an Arizona speedway;
finds out if a real guy posed for the original Uncle
Sam recruitment poster; reviews the evolution of Tank
Destroyers; demonstrates a Boys .55 Caliber anti-tank
"elephant gun" using a Spam tower as his target; finds
out what caused the screaming noise when dive bombers
attacked; and digs into his Fabulous Flops File to
examine the Sea Dart--America's attempt to put a jet
fighter on water skies.

8:30-9pm -- Mail Call - WWII Half Track/Arctic
Vehicles/Weird Weapons/Navy Hydrofoil/Combat
Controller: #35.
Shot on location, R. Lee Ermey answers viewer
questions about the military with practical
demonstrations in the field. Lee tears around in a
WWII M2A2 half track, with a combination of tracks and
wheels; demonstrates Army vehicles designed for
extreme arctic conditions, including the world's
longest truck--the 572-foot Snow Train; strange
weapons used by the Allies in WWII; and Navy
hydrofoils. And he explains the function of Air Force
combat controllers and Marine Corps gunnery sergeants.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 13.
In this hour, death seeps out of the ground into a
neighborhood sitting on a toxic waste dump at Love
Canal in New York; soldiers die during Desert Storm in
1991 when software flaws render Patriot Missiles
inaccurate; on September 11, 2001, World Trade Center
Building #7 wasn't attacked, but seven hours after the
Twin Towers collapsed, it too is mysteriously reduced
to a pile of rubble; a night of revelry in Boston
turns the Cocoanut Grove nightclub into an inferno
that kills over 400 people in 1942; and the science of
demolition is put to the test and fails when a
building in Rhode Island, the "Leaning Tower of
Providence", stands its ground.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - More of the World's
Biggest Machines.
On land, in the air, or on the sea--we examine some of
the biggest machines ever built, including: the
Antonov AN-225, the world's biggest aircraft; the GE
90-115B jet engine; the Sikorsky CH-53E helicopter;
the Union Pacific's biggest steam locomotive, the "Big
Boy" 4000 and GE's AC 6000; the Discoverer Enterprise,
the world's largest oil-drilling ship; the RB 293
bucket-wheel mine excavator; and the LED Viva Vision,
the world's largest printing screen, which stretches
4-blocks long in Las Vegas.

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, January 25, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - U.S. Mints: Money Machines.
How does America make money--literally? We visit the
United States Mint and the Bureau of Printing and
Engraving to see the secretive government facilities
where our legal tender is generated. With a storied
past as tantalizing as the wealth they create, these
mints can spit out fortunes in an hour and keep our
economy flowing.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Nature Tech: Lightning.
Since time immemorial, flashes of light have startled
our senses and piqued our imagination. But it's only
in recent years that we've begun to unlock the secrets
behind this terrifying phenomenon, as we learn in this
high-tech look at how man has tried to control nature
throughout history. Lightning kills nearly 100 people
yearly in the United States and injures hundreds of
others. Meet men and women who look for new ways of
detection, prevention, and how to save lives when
Mother Nature strikes!

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Wiring America.
We begin with electrical linemen perched precariously
out a helicopter door, repairing 345,000-volt
high-tension power lines. They are part of an army of
technicians and scientists we'll ride, climb, and
crawl with on this episode. They risk their lives so
that we can have the services we take for
granted--electric power and 21st century
communications. They lay and maintain the wire that
connects us one to another, as well as America to the
rest of the world. The hardwiring of America is a
story that is nearly two centuries old. And though
satellites and wireless systems may be challenging the
wire, it's not dead. Fiber optic cable, lines that
transmit light, became a player in information
delivery in the late 1970s. We may be entering a
"wireless" age, but the infrastructure of wires laid
by visionary scientists and industrialists are still
vital to America. Wire technology will be with us,
continuing to provide service, well into the next
century.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Logging Tech.
When Paul Bunyan cried "Timber!", he never foresaw
today's cutting-edge, controversial industry that
feeds a ravenous, lumber-crazy world--a world striving
to protect nature while devouring it. Come into the
woods to see how he-men and hi-tech combine forces to
topple 4-billion trees annually; journey to
19th-century America, when lumberjacks cut a legend as
large as the timber they felled; and travel with a
tree from stump to sawmill and learn its non-wood
uses--from aspirin to film to toothpaste!

____________________________________________________

Thursday, January 26, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Stock Exchange.
Welcome to the center of the American economy, where
nearly $90-million changes hands each minute. Journey
back to the wooden wall, built to hold back Indians,
where early traders signed a pact creating the New
York Stock Exchange; watch worldwide markets quake
with the crash of 1929; and visit today's
computer-driven wonder.

8-9pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Ancient Computer?
Journey back in time for an eye-opening look at the
amazing ancient roots of technologies we like to think
of as modern. New research suggests that many of the
inventions of the last 200 years may, in fact, have
already been known to the ancients. In this hour, we
explore the Antikythera mechanism, an ancient machine
that was discovered deep in the Aegean Sea. Could it
perhaps have been an ancient computer? Could
Archimedes have had a hand in its creation?

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Secret Societies.
Some of the world's most powerful individuals belong
to secret organizations. The Skull & Bones, the
Bilderbergs, and the Tri-Lateral Commission are just a
few of the groups that many suspect are conspiring to
take over the world. Others believe they already have.
What fuels such rampant conspiracy paranoia? We
examine a number of these clandestine organizations,
past and present, and reveal why so many people fear
their nefarious agendas.

10-11pm -- Declassified - Lindbergh.
It's common knowledge that in 1927 Charles Lindbergh
made the first solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic
Ocean in the Spirit of St. Louis and became an
American hero. But now, declassified documents reveal
that Lindbergh was also pro-Nazi and lived part-time
in Germany with a common-law wife and three
illegitimate children.

____________________________________________________

Friday, January 27, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Banks.
Backbones of worldwide economics, for centuries banks
enabled the creation of wealth, and industry leaders
became icons. But modern technology revolutionized the
way banks do business, and the Internet insures they
must adapt or disappear. From banking's early European
origins to "e-banking", this is an hour you can't
afford to miss!

8-10pm -- Boneyard: Where Machines End Their Lives - 
Where do machines go when they die? From B-52 Bombers
to massive aircraft carriers, from passenger cars to
Cold War cruise missiles and remnants of the Twin
Towers, all that we manufacture has a lifespan. But
reaching the end of their original purposes can be
just the beginning. Join us on a fascinating visual
journey as we follow some of our greatest achievements
in manufacturing, design engineering, and construction
to their after-lives and final resting places.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil Fire Fighting.
When a burning gusher shoots flames into the air, only
a handful of men know how to snuff out the monster.
Fighting fire with fire, they place explosives around
the flames to blow it out, or douse it with tons of
water. The modern world depends on these risk takers,
yet their industry began less than 100 years ago. Join
us for a scorching hour as we review the rich history
of this "breed apart", and look at modern
heat-resistant clothing, new technology, and
regulations that protect oil firefighters.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, January 28, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Secrets of Soviet Space
Disasters.
An investigation into one of the 20th century's most
shocking hidden stories--the dismal failure of the
Soviet space program, which led to more than 150
recorded deaths. Much has come to light from
declassified files. We see how personal rivalries,
shifting political alliances, and bureaucratic
bungling doomed the program.

8-10pm -- Failure Is Not an Option - 
Based on the best-selling memoir by retired NASA
Flight Director Gene Kranz, this 2-hour program tells
the story of Mission Control during America's race to
the Moon. For all the publicity about the astronauts,
the men of Mission Control remain largely unknown to
the public. Yet when President Kennedy challenged the
nation to reach the moon, these young engineers were
the ones who had to make it happen. Join us as these
unlauded heroes tell their story for the first time.

10-12am -- Beyond the Moon: Failure Is Not an Option 2
- 
In 1961, President Kennedy set a goal for the nation:
beat the Russians to the Moon and do it within the
decade. In `69, NASA met that goal--but no one defined
what should happen next. As a growing number of
political, social, and economic problems vie for the
nation's attention and money, Congress, Presidents,
and the public aren't certain if manned space flight
is really worth the cost and risk. But for legendary
flight director Gene Kranz and the men and women of
Mission Control, there's no doubt. Despite waning
public support and shrinking budgets, they still have
a job to do with no room for error. This 2-hour sequel
to Failure Is Not an Option tells the story of
America's post-Apollo space program, from the point of
view of the engineers of Mission Control. Through
their experiences, we get a firsthand look at life
inside Mission Control, as these driven engineers
continue to push the boundaries of space flight from
1972 into the new century.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, January 29, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Real Temple of
Doom.
Thousands of years before the Inca ruled the nation
now called Peru, a strange and unique civilization
dominated the region. It was called Chavin, and its
story is one of the most bizarre in history. Unlike
the other civilizations of the Americas, Chavin's
status as a regional superpower wasn't based on its
military muscle. Instead, the rulers of Chavin
exercised a cult-like control over their subjects with
the aid of hallucinogenic plants. Josh Bernstein
ventures deep into the miles of tunnels beneath the
ruins of Chavin de Huantar, comes face to face with
some of the most fearsome animals of the Peruvian
Amazon, and investigates a real temple of doom. As he
tries to understand this mysterious culture, he takes
part in one of the ancient rituals still practiced by
the country's powerful shaman-priests.

8-10pm -- The Real Tomb Hunters: Snakes, Curses, and
Booby Traps - 
Fighting Nazis; grabbing golden treasure; fleeing
angry natives; dodging pitfalls in a booby-trapped
temple--we all know how fictional explorers and
archaeologists spend their days. But does real life
compare? We follow some of the most daring
archaeologists and take on the dangers they
face--Egyptian archaeologist Zahi Hawass steps into a
booby-trapped tomb; American Arthur Demarest fights
looters in the jungles of Cancuen; and in Chiapas,
angry villagers kidnap Australian-born Peter Mathews.
We also examine stories of past explorers who helped
shape the "Indiana Jones" stereotype--paleontologist
Roy Chapman Andrews battled venomous snakes and Mongol
bandits in the Gobi Desert; John Pendlebury, the
British archaeologist, fought Nazis on Crete; and
Sylvanus Morely, who was the first American
archaeologist/spy. There are no special effects, no
stuntmen, and no retakes...and for these real-life
archaeologists, no guarantee they'll survive for a
sequel.

10-12am -- Cannibals - 
Steeped in controversy, human cannibalism both
fascinates and repulses. Many anthropologists argue
that cannibalism is an instinctive part of human
nature; that it was an institution in many ancient
cultures; that people will turn to cannibalism without
reservation in a survival situation; and that our very
bones are imprinted with evidence that we are
creatures who eat our own. Other experts vehemently
disagree, questioning eyewitness accounts and taking
issue with what archaeologists claim is hard
scientific evidence. This 2-hour special gets to the
heart of the debate by investigating both well-known
and little-known scenarios in which humans may have
resorted to eating other humans. 

____________________________________________________

Monday, January 30, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gasoline.
Traces the history and evolution of the world's most
important fossil fuel. Without gasoline, modern life
would grind to a halt. Americans use about 360-million
gallons of gas every day. And though most of us could
not function without gas, very few understand what it
really is, how it is made, what all those different
octane numbers really mean, and how researchers
developed cleaner-burning gasoline. All these
questions will be answered as we look at the history
of this "supreme" fuel.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - The Day after Roswell.
Delve into the aftermath and repercussions of the 1947
Roswell incident, when many believe an alien
spacecraft crashed in New Mexico. Based on The Day
after Roswell by Lt. Col. Philip J. Corso and William
Birnes, we explore if technologies like the laser,
fiber optics, the integrated circuit, super-strong
fibers, and night vision were developed with the aid
of aliens. Career officer Corso claims his first alien
encounter came on July 6, `47, while on late-night
security rounds at Ft. Riley, Kansas, where he saw
bodies of EBEs (extraterrestrial biological entities)
inside shipping crates. In 1961, as Chief of Foreign
Technology in the Army's department of Research and
Development, his job included analyzing alien
technology from Roswell, then introducing it into
America's technological mainstream--thus,
reverse-engineering alien artifacts. And we talk to
many scientists involved at the time, who credit hard
work, not alien contact, with these technological
advances.

9-10pm -- Digging for the Truth - America's Pyramids.
In 1539, Hernando de Soto's Conquistadors landed in
Florida in search of new lands and treasure for the
Spanish Crown. Three years later, they were run off
the continent by Native American warriors that lived
on enormous, earthen pyramids along the Mississippi
River. Who were these people? And how did they defeat
one of the world's most powerful armies? Follow Josh
Bernstein as he paddles down the bayous; builds his
own earthen pyramid with modern equipment; and
scuba-dives the cold, dark waters of Wisconsin to
solve the mystery of America's pyramid builders.

10-11pm -- Decoding The Past - Cover-ups?
Are some of the most enduring mysteries of our time
the product of conspiracy and cover-up? What really
lies hidden at the secret government facilities at
Area 51? Did Jack Ruby kill Lee Harvey Oswald to keep
him from telling the truth about the JFK
assassination? Did Marilyn Monroe commit suicide-or
was she murdered? Was Robert Kennedy killed by one
disturbed young man or a sinister criminal syndicate?

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, January 31, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gas Tech.
Gas--it makes a balloon go up, cooks our food, and
fills our lungs. But this invisible state of matter
does far more, and has a very visible impact on the
world. We follow natural gas from well tip to stove
top and trace its use from 3rd century BC Chinese salt
producers to modern appliances. Next, we investigate
the most plentiful gas in the
universe--hydrogen--which may also prove to be the
most powerful. We also experience the cryogenic world
of industrial gasses--what they do and where they come
from--as we travel to the British Oxygen Company's
Braddock Air Separation Plant to see how they freeze
millions of tons of oxygen and nitrogen. And at the
Bush Dome Helium Reserve in Texas, we learn why the US
government sits atop 36-billion cubic feet of the
stuff. Finally, we look inside the colorful world of
gas and neon lights. So lay back, breathe deep, and
count backwards from 10...

8-9pm -- Mail Call - B-2: #76.
At Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri, host R. Lee
Ermey gets to do something only a few hundred humans
have done before him--take a ride in a B-2 Stealth
Bomber on a mock bomb run! The Gunny sets the stage
for his historic flight by giving us the facts and
stats on what makes the B-2 the greatest bomber in the
history of aviation. Then, we go along on Lee's
pre-flight training as he prepares to get airborne.
From the cockpit, he shows viewers what it's like to
fly in a stealth bomber. The Whiteman crew the Gunny
flies with are part of the 509th Bomber Group, the
same squadron that flew the first atomic bomb missions
back in World War II. In his tribute to the 509th, the
Gunny shows how the Enola Gay and other bombers got
the mission done.

9-10pm -- Man, Moment, Machine - Mine Rescue Mask.
It's 1916, and several workers involved in building a
tunnel 250 feet beneath Lake Erie become trapped after
an explosion. The workers and their rescuers have only
one hope for getting out--Cleveland resident Garrett
Morgan and his new rescue hood invention. After a
tragic fire at rival sewing factory killed hundreds,
Morgan became determined to invent a device that could
save workers trapped in a fire or industrial accident.
In 1914, he receives a patent for a large
heat-resistant canvas hood with a tube that hangs
toward the ground and enables the rescuers to breathe
the filtered air. When the explosion occurs, eight
workers are killed instantly, while eight more lay
dying. Morgan arrives and, when no one else is willing
to test the hoods, Garrett and his brother don the
masks and heroically head down into the tunnel to pull
out survivors.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The Lumberyard.
At the center of the American Dream is the home--and
at the center of its creation or renovation is the
lumberyard. We'll explore the options lumberyards
provide for builders and renovators--from natural to
engineered woods. We'll show how plywood and pressed
woods are made, trace exotic woods to jungle and
desert, visit a special lumberyard that deals in
recycled and antique woods, and go on an underwater
expedition as divers locate ancient logs buried in the
Great Lakes and New Zealand. We'll see how
50,000-year-old ancient Kauri wood is "mined" from a
bog and is now all the rage among those who live in
mansions and travel on yachts. From the lowly 2-by-4
used to build a tract home, to a reclaimed set of
historic planks used to make a million-dollar bar in a
5-star hotel, this eye-opening program hits the nail
right on the head
3000 names
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
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