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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For August 2006 (schedules available after the 1st & 15th)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Tuesday, August 1, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Desert Tech.
It's hot, dry, deadly, and hard to ignore with close
to 40% of Earth classified as desert. But in this
scorching hour, the desert turns from barren wasteland
into an environment rich with hope. In the Middle
East, desalination of seawater now fills water needs.
Americans have created booming desert communities like
Las Vegas, where the Hoover Dam produces hydroelectric
power and manmade Lake Mead supplies water. Native
Americans farmed the desert on a small scale, but
20th-century technology begot greater opportunity.
Once desolate areas of California and Mexico now grow
agriculture due to irrigation, and the desert's
abundant sunshine allows solar-energy and wind-power
production. And in the future, desert technology may
enable colonization of planets like Mars. We also take
a look at how refrigeration and air conditioning have
made life in desert communities tolerable, and examine
the latest in survival gear and equipment.

8-9pm -- Mysteries of the Freemasons.
Is America the creation of the Freemasons? For
hundreds of years, suspicions of a plot to take over
America have swirled around the Freemasons, the
world's oldest secret society. Freemasons led the
Revolution, framed the Declaration of Independence and
Constitution, designed our nation's capital, and in
the early years of the Republic, grew to unmatched
heights of influence and power. The untold story of
the Freemasons in America reveals secret codes,
patterns in the sky, murder, and a radically new
picture of the nation's Founding Fathers. We'll
explore this remarkable story through dramatic
reenactments, expert interviews, sophisticated CGI,
and original location documentary footage. Features
historians Stephen Bullock, Dan Burstein, Brent
Morris, Akram Elias, and author David Shugarts. But
will a rational view reveal the Freemasons as an
important and honorable thread in the fabric of
America?

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - Mega Blast.
Tune in to see this week's episode. 

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - B-25 Bomber
In 1943, a B-25 Mitchell, WWII's most versatile
twin-engine bomber, crash-landed in South Carolina. It
sank 150 feet to the bottom of a lake and over time
was forgotten. Now, 60 years later, a local doctor is
determined to raise the giant bomber intact and give
it to a museum. Our team--divers, engineers, and
preservationists--takes on the job of moving the
20,000-pound bomber to the surface, while faced with
the challenges of working in nearly zero-visibility
murky waters and the wrath of an approaching
hurricane, plus fear that the plane may be breaking
apart!

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Wednesday, August 2, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Paving America.
The story of the construction of our grand national
highway system, from its beginnings in 1912 (it was
conceived by auto and headlight tycoons) to its
completion in 1984 (when the last stoplight was
removed--and buried).

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Distilleries.
From water and grain...to mash...still...vat...barrel
and bottle--the distilling of alcoholic spirits is a
big business and near-sacred religion. Its acolytes
eye the color, swirl the glass, inhale the bouquet,
sip, and then ponder their ambrosia. What's your
pleasure? Bourbon, Scotch, Rum, Gin, Vodka, or
Tequila? We trace the history of distilling from the
one-man/one-still tradition to the Voldstead Act of
1920 that devastated American distilleries to the
mega-sales and high-volume distillery of today.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Brewing.
It's one of the world's oldest and most beloved
beverages--revered by Pharaohs and brewed by America's
Founding Fathers. Today, brewing the bitter elixir is
a multi-billion-dollar global industry. Join us for an
invigorating look at brewing's history from
prehistoric times to today's cutting-edge craft
breweries, focusing on its gradually evolving
technologies and breakthroughs. We'll find the
earliest known traces of brewing, which sprang up
independently in such far-flung places as ancient
Sumeria, China, and Finland; examine the surprising
importance that beer held in the daily and ceremonial
life of ancient Egypt; and at Delaware's Dogfish Head
Craft Brewery, an adventurous anthropologist and a
cutting-edge brewer show us the beer they've concocted
based on 2,700-year-old DNA found in drinking vessels
from the funerary of the legendary King Midas.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Nuts
Pintsized as a pea or big as a bowling ball,
nutritional, durable, and versatile, nuts have been a
staple of the human diet since time began, and
archaeological evidence places them among our earliest
foods. For that, the ancients worshiped them. And
because they were relatively non-perishable, nuts
sustained the imperial armies of Rome and China, the
royal navies of England and Spain, and the native
tribes that roamed the American wilderness. Today, we
think of nuts as mere snacks, but in a poignant
segment, we feature how a peanut product is used by
organizations like UNICEF to reverse malnutrition in
starving children in less than four weeks. And a
powder ground from walnut shells cleans everything
from ship hulls to the Space Shuttle. From ancient
traditions of tree-picking and hand-gathering to
today's powerful machine shakers, sophisticated
irrigation techniques, and the latest bio-science,
we'll provide a spread of history that's just as
smooth as your peanut butter!

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Thursday, August 3, 2006
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7-8pm -- Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway - The Atlantic
Intracostal Highway
It stretches 2,500 miles from Boston to Miami. The
Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway is comprised of a
system of canals, land cuts, and a series of natural
and artificial barrier islands, which provide a
protected passage for low-draft vessels wishing to
avoid the tumultuous currents of the Atlantic Ocean.
The AICW was conceived in the late 18th century,
before there was a system of roads in America. A time
when the numerous rivers, bays, and sounds along the
eastern seaboard were the roads and the Atlantic
Intracoastal Waterway was envisioned to be America's
first superhighway. Much like Route 66, the AICW
represents a bygone era. A time when the transport
industry was in its infancy, and life moved at a
slower pace. It's a safe bet that the ships that sail
its waters today value it for that very reason.

8-9pm -- Ancient Marvels - Ancient Discoveries: Heron
of Alexandria.
In this hour, we travel to Alexandria, Egypt--the home
of inventors and philosophers in ancient times. One of
the greatest inventors was Heron of Alexandria, a
Greek mathematician, geometer, and worker in
mechanics, who taught at the famous Museum. His
strange inventions, such as automaton theaters--puppet
theaters worked by strings, drums, and
weights--automatic doors, and coin-operated machines,
were famous throughout the ancient world.

9-10pm -- Decoding The Past - Mayan Doomsday Prophecy
The world is coming to an end on December 21, 2012!
The ancient Maya made this stunning prediction more
than 2,000 years ago. We'll peel back the layers of
mystery and examine in detail how the Maya calculated
the exact date of doomsday. Journey back to the
ancient city of Chichen Itza, the hub of Maya
civilization deep in the heart of Mexico's Yucatan
Peninsula, to uncover the truth about this prophecy.
The Maya were legendary astronomers and
timekeepers--their calendar is more accurate than our
own. By tracking the stars and planets they assigned
great meaning to astronomical phenomena and made
extraordinary predictions based on them--many of which
have come true. Could their doomsday prophecy be one
of them? In insightful interviews archaeologists,
astrologers, and historians speculate on the meaning
of the 2012 prophecy. Their answers are as intriguing
as the questions.

10-11pm -- American Eats - Cookies
"She's one tough cookie." "That's the way the cookie
crumbles." Whether on Santa's plate or at grandma's
house, cookies are a part of American culture. What
began as hardened biscuits (perfect for traveling),
they grew lighter, richer, and sweeter once sugar
became readily available in the Middle East in the
13th century. But when Dutch settlers brought the idea
to New York, cookies became truly American, and in
1930, America made its mark in the cookie world with
invention of the chocolate chip cookie. Along with the
peanut butter cookie--and yes, the fortune cookie--the
chocolate chip cookie is uniquely American. Whether
dropped, rolled, molded, pressed, filled, or cut into
shapes, cookies are ingrained in our culture and
recognizable icons--from the Cookie Monster to the
Keebler Elves--help sell more than $6-billion each
year. In fact, cookies are consumed in 95.2% of US
homes! Join us for a sweet hour as we get out our
rolling pins for the history of cookies.

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Friday, August 4, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Howard Hughes Tech.
An in-depth look at the technology conceived or
developed by America's first billionaire. A passionate
aviator, Howard Hughes built and flew planes that
broke speed records, and developed war machines, spy
aircraft, and commercial airliners. Despite the
impressive heights reached by his technological
empire, his health and mental well-being were fragile.
During his last years, he wasn't seen publicly or
photographed, rarely left the hotel suites he
occupied, and was terrified of germs. But when Hughes
died in 1976, he left a huge legacy in aviation and
technology. When we board an airliner, view TV via
satellite, or marvel at America's military might, we
might do well to remember the risk-taker who flew
faster than his peers and was at heart an aviator
obsessively dedicated to both the art and science of
flight.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Majestic Twelve: UFO Cover-Up.
What really happened in Roswell, New Mexico in the
summer of 1947? Did a flying saucer crash in the vast
desert scrubland? The initial Army Air Force press
release claimed they had recovered a flying disk. But
a day later, the story dramatically changed--now they
called it a weather balloon! In 1987, secret documents
surfaced indicating the existence of the "Majestic
12"--an elite group of scientists and military and
intelligence officials, allegedly brought together by
President Harry Truman. Did the MJ-12 truly exist? If
so, did these men forever trivialize the most
talked-about UFO event in history, as well as all UFO
sightings thereafter?

9-10pm -- UFO Files - Kecksburg UFO.
What came down in the forest outside the sleepy hamlet
of Kecksburg, Pennsylvania on December 9, 1965? Some
residents claimed to see an acorn-shaped metal object
with strange, hieroglyphic writing on its side,
half-buried on the forest floor. Astronomer Von Del
Chamberlain wrote that the Kecksburg object was a
meteorite. NASA consultant James Oberg theorized that
it was a failed Russian probe, but now also thinks it
was probably a meteorite. Often called the
"Pennsylvania Roswell" in UFO circles, the debate
raged until, in late December 2003, NASA finally
released 39 pages of material and the Air Force
released 2,800 pages on the case from its files. The
only thing the government documents conclusively prove
is that the object was not a Russian probe. But for
UFO enthusiasts and researchers, many questions remain
unanswered. 

10-11pm -- UFO Files - New UFO Revelations: The Gray's
Agenda.
According to ufologists, the Grays--beings from
another world--abduct humans, implant devices, and
conduct reproductive experiments. The most "familiar"
aliens, we see their images in every media. What do
they want? Where are they from? Do alien life forms
kidnap humans in order to replicate their dying race?
Is our government in collusion with extraterrestrials
in exchange for advanced technology? Hundreds of
eyewitnesses swear they encountered aliens and dozens
claim they have actual physical proof. To test their
claims and sift fact from fiction, we conduct a
hypnotic regression in which abductees relive shocking
alien encounters, witness surgery to remove a foreign
object, and sweep the night sky looking for possible
alien-inhabited planets. So join us as we go in search
of the Grays and their alien agenda.

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Saturday, August 5, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - B-25 Bomber
In 1943, a B-25 Mitchell, WWII's most versatile
twin-engine bomber, crash-landed in South Carolina. It
sank 150 feet to the bottom of a lake and over time
was forgotten. Now, 60 years later, a local doctor is
determined to raise the giant bomber intact and give
it to a museum. Our team--divers, engineers, and
preservationists--takes on the job of moving the
20,000-pound bomber to the surface, while faced with
the challenges of working in nearly zero-visibility
murky waters and the wrath of an approaching
hurricane, plus fear that the plane may be breaking
apart!

8-9pm -- Save Our History - Inside the B-25 Bomber
In the Pacific, it flew only feet off the ground at
more than 200 miles per hour, and strafed and
skip-bombed Japanese ships and fixed targets. In
Europe, it roared at 12,000 feet through intense
German anti-aircraft fire, dropping 500-pound bombs on
rail lines and bridges. The plane was the B-25 Bomber,
considered the most versatile plane of WW2. Steve
Thomas uncovers the story of how the B-25 played a
crucial role during the war. He sees up close how
several B-25s are being restored today, meets six
veterans who flew them in intense combat (including
the Doolittle Raid), and takes them all up in a B-25
one more time.

9-10pm -- Gestapo - The Sword Is Forged.
The Nazis converted their country from a flawed
democracy to a fascist dictatorship in which the
rights of the individual were trampled in the
interests of the state. Institutions and organizations
were warped to serve this purpose, none more than the
police. At first, it was the Storm Troopers of the SA,
who beat, intimidated, and killed those who opposed
the regime. But something more was needed than simple
thuggery and the police were co-opted. The Gestapo,
the Secret State Police, was the organization set up
to perform this function. By reputation its network of
black-clad officers spread everywhere; yet it was a
small organization--at its height in 1941 there were
only 8,000 officers. Program 1 shows the power
struggle between the worst of Hitler's henchmen,
Himmler and Heydrich on the one hand, and Göring on
the other. And it introduces us to a mysterious
figure, Heinrich Müller, a career policeman who became
the ice-cold leader of the Gestapo.
10-11pm -- Gestapo - The Sword Unsheathed.
With opposition quelled in Germany and the annexed
territories of Austria and the Sudetenland, Hitler's
plans could proceed. When the Nazis faked incidents at
the border with Poland, it gave them the excuse to
invade. And the Gestapo, the Secret State Police, was
at the heart of it. The Gestapo's role changed from
merely "protecting" the state from dissent to enabling
its expansionist policies. As the Reich took over new
territories, the Gestapo expanded its policies of
seeking out enemies--dissenters, spies working for the
Allies, and organized resistance. When security chief
Heydrich was assassinated in Prague, the Gestapo
carried out the brutal revenge. But it viewed its
ultimate enemy as the Jew and death-squads, the
Einsatzgruppen spent much time tracking them down and
deporting them to the death camps. Hitler placed this
task in the hands of the Gestapo, and the chief
bureaucrat of the Holocaust, Adolf Eichmann, was
Müller's special protégé.

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Sunday, August 6, 2006
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7-8pm -- Mega Disasters - Mega Blast.
Tune in to see this week's episode. 

8-10pm -- Mega Movers - Moving the Impossible.
From the engineers of ancient Egypt to the architects
of Renaissance Rome and the modern era's moving
miracles--the men, methods, and machines of structural
moving have pushed the limits of imagination and
technology for over 5,000 years. In this 2-hour
chronicle, we'll investigate the amazing feats of mega
moving from primitive civilization through the
Industrial Revolution into the 21st Century--including
the evolution of technology that allows a 3,000-ton
building to be driven down the street by remote
control! From the granite blocks of Stonehenge to the
awesome Vatican Obelisk and the Cape Hatteras
Lighthouse, see how ambition and ingenuity have
continued to defy convention, break records, and
achieve the unthinkable in moving!

10-11pm -- The Revolution - 10 - The End Game.
In this hour, Washington faces two mutinies in the
Continental Army. Congress is broke and the army
desperately needs more help from the French. In
England, the opposition to the war grows as Henry
Clinton and Lord Cornwallis argue over the British
strategy in the South. The French are tired of
supporting the war, but Franklin continues to beg for
aid. The French finally send their fleet to America,
under the command of Admiral DeGrasse. Cornwallis
moves his army to Yorktown, Virginia, and the Allied
forces close in for the last major battle of the war.
Experience the drama that surrounded the founding of
the United States in this 13-part series that covers
the years between the Boston Tea Party in 1773 to the
ratification of the Constitution in 1787.

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Monday, August 7, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil.
From the first well in Pennsylvania to the gushing
Spindletop and modern supertankers, the story of oil
is the story of civilization as we know it. We'll take
a look at the ingenious and outrageous men who risked
everything for "black gold" and unimaginable wealth.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Black Box UFO Secrets.
Reveals for the first time the cockpit and control
tower audio recordings of pilot and astronaut
confrontations and sightings of unidentified flying
objects high in our skies. From a detailed account of
one of the very the first reported pilot case, the
Arnold case in 1947, to recent recordings over New
England and Texas, to NASA recordings and video from
2005, this special features interviews with pilots,
witness and experts, including UCLA's Joseph Nagy,
actor Ed Asner, and pilot/UFO researcher Don Berliner.

9-10pm -- Lost Worlds - Secret Cities of the A-Bomb.
In 1939, a group of scientists--Albert Einstein among
them--warned FDR of the possibility that Hitler's
Germany might be close to producing an atomic bomb.
Roosevelt issued an order--the US had to be the first
to develop an atomic bomb and within three years they
were well on their way to creating a hidden world of
secret cities and classified nuclear facilities. Six
decades later, we return to the once-classified sites
where the course of history was decided. In top secret
cities and nuclear facilities, we uncover and rebuild
this lost world in three top-secret cities in isolated
parts of Tennessee, New Mexico, and Washington State.
This was to be the most costly and labor-intensive
engineering program ever undertaken. Using classified
material, eyewitness testimony, and cutting-edge
graphic technology, we recreate the secret world of
the Manhattan Project.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - Lost Cities of the
Amazon.
For 500 years, explorers have been rummaging the
Amazon for traces of its fabled lost cities...now host
Josh Bernstein searches for the most famous of them
all. Following in the footsteps of explorer Colonel
Percy Heath Fawcett, Josh treks through thick
overgrown regions of the Amazon rainforest on the
trail of the legendary "Lost City of Z". Along the
way, he braves piranha-infested rivers, hacks through
virgin jungle, and comes to terms with massive regions
of deforestation. Finally, he joins up with the
Kuikuro tribe. This warrior people will take him to
investigate the archaeological remains of a huge
forgotten city. Could it be the "Lost City of Z"?
They'll teach him the ancient hunting, fishing, and
horticultural techniques that allowed them to flourish
long before European contact...and which may be the
key to the rainforest's future.

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Tuesday, August 8, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gas Tech.
Gas--it makes a balloon go up, cooks our food, and
fills our lungs. But this invisible state of matter
does far more, and has a very visible impact on the
world. We follow natural gas from well tip to stove
top and trace its use from 3rd century BC Chinese salt
producers to modern appliances. Next, we investigate
the most plentiful gas in the
universe--hydrogen--which may also prove to be the
most powerful. We also experience the cryogenic world
of industrial gasses--what they do and where they come
from--as we travel to the British Oxygen Company's
Braddock Air Separation Plant to see how they freeze
millions of tons of oxygen and nitrogen. And at the
Bush Dome Helium Reserve in Texas, we learn why the US
government sits atop 36-billion cubic feet of the
stuff. Finally, we look inside the colorful world of
gas and neon lights. So lay back, breathe deep, and
count backwards from 10...

8-9:25pm -- Band of Brothers - Currahee.
They were ordinary men, swept up in the most
extraordinary conflict in history. With the eyes of
the world upon them, they found their greatest source
of strength in each other. From Tom Hanks and Steven
Spielberg, this is the story of Easy Company--an elite
team of US paratroopers whose WWII exploits are as
incredible as they are true. Part 1 begins on June 4,
1944, in England, as Lts. Richard Winters (Damian
Lewis) and Lewis Nixon (Ron Livingston) reflect on the
past that led them to D-Day.

9:25-10:30pm -- Band of Brothers - Day of Days.
Planes carrying thousands of paratroopers cross the
English Channel into French airspace, where German
flak causes the pilots to drop them in a less than
safe and organized fashion. Lt. Winters (Damian Lewis)
lands alone in a field, soon joined by John Hall
(Andrew Scott), a private from another company.
Executive producers Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg
bring to life renowned WWII historian Stephen
Ambrose's nonfiction book about an Army rifle company
that parachuted into France on D-Day.

10:30-12am -- Sink the Tirpitz - 
The Tirpitz was the Third Reich's ultimate weapon.
Sister to the Bismarck, she was the most successful
WWII German battleship and the pride of Hitler's Navy.
Secretly built off the Baltic coast in 1939, the
warship spent the next five years terrorizing the
Allies in the Atlantic and Artic seaways, leaving
entire convoys annihilated in her wake. With the odds
against them, heroic Allied servicemen threw
everything into sinking the warship: manned torpedoes,
magnetic mines, miniature submarines, and even dive
bombers. But with the latest in radar technology and
anti-aircraft systems, the Tirpitz was almost
impervious to these attacks. All that changed in 1944
with development of a new technology: the earthquake
bomb, an Allied weapon that spelled doom for the
terrorizing warship. This is the story of the epic
bravery and technological wizardry that finally
destroyed this war machine, a feat that took over five
years and 36 attempts.

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Wednesday, August 9, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Jet Engines.
Strap on a parachute and soar through the saga of jet
propulsion, which radically transformed our world
since inception in WWII--from the Nazi's first
jet-powered aircraft to the US F-22 jet fighter, from
the Concorde to tomorrow's scram-jet, a hypersonic
transport plane that switches to rocket power outside
earth's atmosphere!

8-9:20pm -- Band of Brothers - Carentan.
After regrouping in the town of Angoville-au-Plain,
Easy Company tries to capture the town of Carentan.
Two days after D-Day, some members of Easy Company are
still lost and alone in Normandy, including Pvt.
Albert Blithe (Marc Warren), who finds the rest of the
unit just in time to help take Carentan, which Allied
armor from Utah and Omaha beaches need in order to
link up. Later, the company returns to England, but
celebrations are short-lived when news comes that
they'll be moving out again.

9:20-10:35pm -- Band of Brothers - Replacements.
Fresh replacements join Easy Company in time for a
massive paradrop into German-occupied Holland. The
Dutch townspeople of Eindhoven welcome them as
liberators, but when Easy and a cluster of British
tanks move into a nearby town, a superior German force
inflicts many casualties and forces a retreat. As they
move onto another assignment in Holland, Capt. Winters
(Damian Lewis) laments the retreat, and Capt. Nixon
(Ron Livingston) thinks that the ambitious Allied
operation seems to have failed.

10:35-11:35pm -- American Eats - Cookies
"She's one tough cookie." "That's the way the cookie
crumbles." Whether on Santa's plate or at grandma's
house, cookies are a part of American culture. What
began as hardened biscuits (perfect for traveling),
they grew lighter, richer, and sweeter once sugar
became readily available in the Middle East in the
13th century. But when Dutch settlers brought the idea
to New York, cookies became truly American, and in
1930, America made its mark in the cookie world with
invention of the chocolate chip cookie. Along with the
peanut butter cookie--and yes, the fortune cookie--the
chocolate chip cookie is uniquely American. Whether
dropped, rolled, molded, pressed, filled, or cut into
shapes, cookies are ingrained in our culture and
recognizable icons--from the Cookie Monster to the
Keebler Elves--help sell more than $6-billion each
year. In fact, cookies are consumed in 95.2% of US
homes! Join us for a sweet hour as we get out our
rolling pins for the history of cookies.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, August 10, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Hydraulics.
The machines that helped build our world have been
powered by hydraulics, a compact system of valves,
hoses, and pumps that transmits forces from point to
point through fluid. This basic concept of powerful
force transmission through fluid provides the drive
for most machines today. From the ancient Roman
mastery of the aqueduct to Universal Studios, a
veritable hydraulic theme park, we see how hydraulics
power industry, keep planes flying, and make that
3-point-turn a U-turn.

8-9:10pm -- Band of Brothers - Crossroads.
Capt. Winters (Damian Lewis) leads a contingent of
Easy Company men on a risky mission over a Dutch dike
that results in a "turkey shoot" of fleeing Germans,
and is promoted to Battalion Executive Officer,
leaving Easy Company in the hands of Lt. "Moose"
Heyliger (Stephen McCole). After moving back off the
line to France, Lt. Nixon (Ron Livingston) insists
that Winters take a break and see Paris. But when
Winters returns, news comes in of a massive German
counterattack in the Ardennes Forest.

9:10-10:30pm -- Band of Brothers - Bastogne.
In the dead of winter, in the forest outside of
Bastogne, Belgium, Easy Company struggles to hold the
line alone, while fending off frostbite and hunger. An
overwhelmed Medic Eugene Roe (Shane Taylor), on edge
and close to combat exhaustion, finds friendship with
a Belgian nurse (Lucie Jeanne). Easy spends a
miserable Christmas in the trenches, but is buoyed
after hearing news that General McAuliffe met the
German Army's demand for surrender with the defiant
answer: "Nuts!"

10:30-11:30pm -- American Eats - Chocolate
With approximately 380 known chemicals, scientists are
still struggling to learn how chocolate affects our
brains. We do know that it mimics the way our brains
react to marijuana, amphetamines, and the drug we call
"love"! How did this little pod from a little tree
become a global obsession? Enjoyed as a drink by the
Mayans and Aztecs, it was Europeans who added sugar.
But in 1847, chocolate became edible as well as
drinkable and Milton S. Hershey made it popular in the
US. And during WWII, the chocolate bar became an
internationally recognized American symbol. GIs used
chocolate bars as barter, and the little candies known
as M&Ms became a favorite. Recent studies show health
benefits to chocolate, especially dark chocolate that
contains some of the same antioxidant potential as red
wine. So now you can have your chocolate and eat it,
too!

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Friday, August 11, 2006
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - More of the World's Biggest
Machines.
On land, in the air, or on the sea--we examine some of
the biggest machines ever built, including: the
Antonov AN-225, the world's biggest aircraft; the GE
90-115B jet engine; the Sikorsky CH-53E helicopter;
the Union Pacific's biggest steam locomotive, the "Big
Boy" 4000 and GE's AC 6000; the Discoverer Enterprise,
the world's largest oil-drilling ship; the RB 293
bucket-wheel mine excavator; and the LED Viva Vision,
the world's largest printing screen, which stretches
4-blocks long in Las Vegas.

8-9:25pm -- Band of Brothers - The Breaking Point.
Having thwarted the Germans at Bastogne, Belgium, an
exhausted Easy Company must now take the nearby town
of Foy from the enemy. Several are killed and wounded
in fierce shelling, compounded by the incompetence of
their new commander, Lt. Dike (Peter O'Meara), about
whom Winters (Damian Lewis) can do nothing. Easy takes
Foy, but at an enormous cost.

9:25-10:40pm -- Band of Brothers - The Patrol.
Easy Company arrives in an Alsatian town near the
German border, and is ordered to send a patrol across
the river to take enemy prisoners. Lt. Hank Jones
(Colin Hanks), fresh from West Point and eager for
combat experience, volunteers to lead, though he must
convince a skeptical Winters (Damian Lewis). Also
assigned to the patrol is Pvt. David Webster (Eion
Bailey), back in Easy after rehabilitation of an
injury. While successful, the mission costs a
soldier's life.

10:40-11:40pm -- Alien Abductions - 
Examination of people's claims that they've been taken
aboard UFOs. Features two Virginia horse breeders who
claim 40 abductions, and a computer technician who
says aliens snatched his baby from her crib.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, August 12, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Nuts
Pintsized as a pea or big as a bowling ball,
nutritional, durable, and versatile, nuts have been a
staple of the human diet since time began, and
archaeological evidence places them among our earliest
foods. For that, the ancients worshiped them. And
because they were relatively non-perishable, nuts
sustained the imperial armies of Rome and China, the
royal navies of England and Spain, and the native
tribes that roamed the American wilderness. Today, we
think of nuts as mere snacks, but in a poignant
segment, we feature how a peanut product is used by
organizations like UNICEF to reverse malnutrition in
starving children in less than four weeks. And a
powder ground from walnut shells cleans everything
from ship hulls to the Space Shuttle. From ancient
traditions of tree-picking and hand-gathering to
today's powerful machine shakers, sophisticated
irrigation techniques, and the latest bio-science,
we'll provide a spread of history that's just as
smooth as your peanut butter!

8-9:10pm -- Band of Brothers - Why We Fight.
Easy Company finally enters Germany to surprisingly
little resistance, and relaxes for the first time in
months. A patrol in a nearby forest discovers an
abandoned Nazi concentration camp, still filled with
emaciated prisoners. The local citizenry, unbelievably
disavowing knowledge of its existence, is made to
clean it up. Suddenly, news arrives from Berlin--Adolf
Hitler committed suicide!

9:10-10:25pm -- Band of Brothers - Points.
Major Winters (Damian Lewis) leads Easy Company into
the Bavarian town of Berchtesgaden--once home to top
Nazi officers--and receives orders to take the
abandoned Eagle's Nest, Hitler's mountaintop fortress.
As German officers hand over their weapons, soldiers
raid wine cellars and snap up souvenirs. But their
elation is short-lived--most of the division faces
redeployment to the Pacific Theater. A closing
vignette tells what happened to the men of Easy
Company after they returned home.

10:25-12am -- Decoding The Past - Mysteries of the
Bermuda Triangle.
Since the 15th century, the Bermuda Triangle has
mysteriously vanished an untold number of ships,
planes and lives with three more known incidents in
2004. Using today's scientific knowledge and
investigative techniques, we study the riddle of the
Bermuda Triangle. Through computer graphics, highly
stylized recreations, and underwater cameras, we will
dramatically visualize the accidents as well as
investigate the possible causes and explanations.
On-camera interviews with both skeptics and believers
will help lay out the facts and opinions of the cases.
Can the latest science available today finally lay to
rest the mysteries of the Triangle?

____________________________________________________

Sunday, August 13, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Mega Disasters - Asteroid Apocalypse.
Many scientists now believe that a "killer asteroid"
wiped out the dinosaurs and 70% of all living things
160-million years ago. How likely is it that a similar
event can occur again? In this episode, we explore the
catastrophic effects of a 2-kilometer-long asteroid
hitting just off the coast of Los Angeles. Using the
Chicxulub asteroid impact of 160-million years ago
(the one that killed off the dinosaurs), we
watch--moment by moment--as the blast annihilates not
just Los Angeles, but communities within 100 miles of
the coast. A firestorm consumes much of southern
California and tsunamis wreak havoc up and down the
entire western US coast. The resultant dust cloud
covers much of the Midwest, devastating crops for at
least a year. Millions of people die from the direct
effects of the impact, and millions suffer a famine
the likes of which the world has never seen. The good
news is that technology has given us the tools
to--perhaps--avert such a disaster.

8-10pm -- Countdown to Ground Zero - 
A gripping, dramatic look, with the most recently
released materials, at the extraordinary events of
September 11th, 2001...not just this infamous day in
history, but also how this day came to be through the
dramatic stories of people whose lives converge at a
moment when history turns. We'll recount the story of
Al Qaeda's agents as they plan and execute the most
deadly strike on the US since Pearl Harbor. It's also
the story of the men and women who were attacked in
the World Trade Center, and of the heroic rescuers who
risked everything to save those trapped inside the
doomed Twin Towers. And finally, it's also a political
action thriller. It portrays FBI agents and
counterterrorism experts in the months leading up to
the attack as they desperately try to convince key
players in both the Clinton and Bush administrations
of the dangers of Al Qaeda and the possibility of a
deadly attack on US soil.

10-11pm -- The Revolution - 11 - Becoming a Nation.
The news of the American victory at Yorktown spreads
like wildfire around the globe. Patriots celebrate and
loyalists begin evacuating, as Washington awaits the
next British move. Parliament's growing anti-war
faction forces the king to sue for peace and agree to
American independence. John Adams joins Benjamin
Franklin in France to negotiate the treaty of 1783.
But the new nation is broke and confused, as
Washington resigns his commission and Congress
disbands the standing Continental Army. The 13
American states convene a Constitutional Convention to
hammer out a new form of government, and urge a
reluctant Washington to become the United State's
first president.

____________________________________________________

Monday, August 14, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Plumbing: The Arteries of
Civilization.
Each day, billions of gallons of water flow through
cities into homes and back out again in a confusing
mess of pipes, pumps, and fixtures. The history of
plumbing is a tale crucial to our survival--supplying
ourselves with fresh water and disposing of human
waste. From ancient solutions to the future, we'll
plumb plumbing's depths.

8-9pm -- The Miracle of Stairway B - 
It is perhaps the single most amazing story of
9/11--the story of how 12 firefighters, three office
workers, and a Port Authority cop lived through the
devastating collapse of the North Tower, survived for
hours under half-a-million tons of debris and were
rescued when all hope seemed lost. We reveal the chain
of uncanny coincidences and bizarre events that
enabled these individuals to stay alive when so many
were dying all around them. We tell their interlocking
stories from the time they woke on 9/11, to the moment
they were finally reunited with their families. In
doing so, we also tell the bigger story of the heroic
efforts of the firefighters to save lives--and of the
2,700 men and women who never made it home.

9-10pm -- Lost Worlds - Hitler's Supercity.
Hitler caused more death and destruction than anyone
else in history. But he also planned to build on a
massive scale and place a new Germany on a par with
ancient Greece and Rome. Our investigators piece
together a picture of how Hitler wanted Germany to
look from the ruins of what was built and from plans
of his architect Albert Speer. In Nuremberg, we
recreate the Zeppelin Tribune: where 60,000 people
could overlook a parade ground. We reveal the real
purpose of the stadium Speer planned to hold the
Olympic Games--with seating for 405,000 people. And we
rebuild, with computer-generated images based on
Speer's plans, the monuments Hitler planned for
himself: the Triumphal Arch--twice the height, and
four times the width of Paris's Arc de Triomphe--and
the People's Hall--a structure so big the Eiffel Tower
could fit inside it. Monstrous, intimidating, built on
slave labor--this is the Lost World we'd now inhabit
if WWII had gone differently.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - City of the Gods.
There was only one ancient city in the Americas that
ever truly rivaled the size, scale, and power of its
Old World counterparts--Teotihuacán, the City of the
Gods. And today, it's the largest ghost town in the
world. Still home to the world's third largest
pyramid, this mysterious city was once a metropolis
many times larger and more populous than the biggest
Mayan and Aztecan cities ever built. Now, Josh
Bernstein heads to central Mexico to check it out.
He'll soar above the ancient city, explore its
obsidian mines, make prehistoric tools, and try to
decode its impressive murals in a quest to understand
who built the City of the Gods, how it became so
powerful, and, most mysterious of all, why it was
abandoned.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, August 15, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Garage Gadgets.
Handy around the house? You will be after this history
of the household garage. From lawn care products to
snow removal and outdoor cooking, the garage gadgets
for do-it-yourselfers have evolved over the decades to
meet the ever-changing challenges of maintaining a
home. With a typical garage as our starting point,
we'll explore the uncommon histories behind some
common garage items such as the lawn mower, string
trimmer, leaf blower, barbecue grill, and more.

8-9pm -- The Man Who Predicted 9/11 - 
In 2001, Rick Rescorla was the 62-year-old head of
security at the Morgan Stanley Bank situated high up
in the South Tower at the World Trade Center. Rescorla
was convinced that Osama Bin Laden would use jet
planes to try and destroy the World Trade Center. Long
before September 11th, he developed an evacuation plan
for the bank, hugely unpopular amongst the city whiz
kids who worked there who thought he was mad. His
evacuation plan however ultimately saved 3,000 of
their lives. Rescorla's plan was put into effect after
the first jet hit the North Tower--even though WTC
managers were instructing everyone to stay in the
buildings. When the second jet hit the South Tower, he
averted panic and organized a rapid evacuation.
Rescorla went back inside to help those injured and
trapped get out. He was still inside when the building
collapsed. His body was never found.

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - Climate Catastrophe
What if Earth's climate were to change dramatically in
only a few years? Many experts fear that such an
abrupt climate change could have devastating effects
across the planet. We may have little time to prepare.
In fact, it may already be too late to prevent a
global disaster. It's happened before on a smaller
scale, but a new sudden alteration of the environment
could threaten the very survival of the human species.
The "freak" weather of the last few decades--stronger
hurricanes, more tornadoes, intense heat waves, to
name a few--has signaled to scientists that the
climate is changing rapidly and unpredictably. Events
such as these were precursors to cataclysmic changes
in the past. The great Mayan civilization was knocked
out by drought in a few generations. The Little Ice
Age battered Europe. Within a decade, freezing
temperatures increased and incessant storms brought
starvation, disease, and death to millions. Could this
happen again?

10-11pm -- Mega Movers - Locomotives.
Travel back to the golden age of railroads in this
episode when a small town in the state of Washington
is determined to save its cherished train depot from
the wrecking ball. But time and Mother Nature have
taken their toll on the aging structure. Will the old
depot once again welcome tourists to the town of
Morton? Meanwhile, in two Texan cities, we move two
unique locomotives using two different methods--one
used for more than 150 years, and another that's on
the cutting edge of technology. Watch how these giant
locomotives roll again for the first time in 50 years.

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, August 16, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Tool Bench: Power Tools.
The history of civilization could easily be measured
in terms of our ability to make, use, and improve
tools--an activity that is at least 4-million years
old! At the tip of our toolmaking timeline are power
tools. We'll examine today's power tool industry,
which is booming thanks to more powerful, lighter, and
quieter cordless tools.

8-10pm -- The World Trade Center - 
On September 11, 2001, terrorists did the unthinkable
when they flew two fuel-loaded jetliners into the
World Trade Center. The Twin Towers' physical height
and symbolic stature made them the perfect target.
They were remarkable achievements in architecture,
construction, and technology. In this 2-hour profile,
we look at how the WTC was constructed and talk to
representatives from the Army Corps of Engineers, New
York's Office of Emergency Management, FEMA, and DNA
experts about the aftermath.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Concrete.
Invented by the ancient Romans, concrete is a
relatively simple formula that changed the world.
Concrete has been used to divide an entire country, as
in the Berlin Wall, and to unite nations, as in the
Chunnel. We'll review the history of this building
block of civilization and look at modern applications.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, August 17, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bricks.
The history of civilization has been built on the back
of brick, and it's been said that "architecture itself
began when two bricks were put together well." From
great Egyptian temples to the Roman aqueducts, the
Great Wall of China, and the dome of the Hagia Sophia,
brick is one of the oldest, yet least celebrated,
building materials manufactured by man. In this
hard-packed episode, we explore brick's past,
highlighting defining moments, such as the Great
London Fire of 1666, the zenith years of brick in the
New York Hudson River Valley, and brick as an
essential building block in infrastructure and
industry. We'll feature advancements through the ages
as well as construction techniques, trends, and the
future of brick construction. Essentially, brick is
still just burnt clay...it has been around for
thousands of years, but continues to serve as the
backdrop of the modern age.

8-9pm -- Grounded on 9/11 - 
In response to the attacks on September 11, 2001, the
FAA orders all planes out of the air. US and Canadian
air traffic controllers face a calamity of epic
proportions--how to safely re-route and land 6,500
planes carrying close to a million people. For
individual air traffic controllers, the work is
chaotic, intense, and deceptively simple: pick a new
route for each flight; radio instructions to turn;
listen for pilot confirmation; hold traffic to keep
airways from overcrowding. From Cleveland, Ohio to
Gander, Newfoundland, controllers on September 11th
searched for alternate airports to land large jets
even as their traumatized colleagues stream back from
break rooms after watching the attacks on TV.

9-10pm -- The Miracle of Stairway B - 
It is perhaps the single most amazing story of
9/11--the story of how 12 firefighters, three office
workers, and a Port Authority cop lived through the
devastating collapse of the North Tower, survived for
hours under half-a-million tons of debris and were
rescued when all hope seemed lost. We reveal the chain
of uncanny coincidences and bizarre events that
enabled these individuals to stay alive when so many
were dying all around them. We tell their interlocking
stories from the time they woke on 9/11, to the moment
they were finally reunited with their families. In
doing so, we also tell the bigger story of the heroic
efforts of the firefighters to save lives--and of the
2,700 men and women who never made it home.

10-11pm -- American Eats - Condiments.
Throughout history, condiments have been versatile and
delicious accompaniments that add salt and moisture or
spice up the flavor of food. In the 13th century,
"sauce hawkers" peddled their savory wares on Parisian
streets at dinnertime. Though considered an American
invention, early versions of ketchup can be traced
back to European fish sauces used in the 18th century
to help brine food and stop the growth of bacteria.
Mustard seeds were purportedly first brought to the
city of Dijon and its surrounding fields by Caesar.
Mayonnaise was invented by the French chef of Duc de
Richelieu, who, after beating the British in 1756,
created a victory feast that included a sauce made of
cream and eggs. Realizing there was no cream in the
kitchen, the chef substituted olive oil--our obsession
with mayonnaise was born. From soy sauce to maple
syrup, today we find condiments as varied as the
people who live here. 

____________________________________________________

Friday, August 18, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Fire.
Fire--we have learned to create and control it, but
have yet to tame it? It's alive--it breathes, feeds,
and grows. Fire is behind essentially every component
of the modern world and has spawned entire industries.
We'll feature great feats in pyrotechnology, or the
intentional use and control of fire by humans--from
the massive 8-story fire-breathing boilers that create
steam heat for downtown Philadelphia, to the nearly
2,000 degree flames that create electricity at a
biomass plant. From the massive coal-fired locomotives
that powered us across the continent, to the rocket
engines that took us to the moon, we'll cover what
fire is, how we have learned to create and harness it,
and its behavior with various fuel sources. At a match
factory, we see how the seeds of fire are made and
explore the significance of this seemingly simple
innovation. We also take a look at the important role
that fire has played in technological advances as well
as warfare.

8-10pm -- Countdown to Ground Zero - 
A gripping, dramatic look, with the most recently
released materials, at the extraordinary events of
September 11th, 2001...not just this infamous day in
history, but also how this day came to be through the
dramatic stories of people whose lives converge at a
moment when history turns. We'll recount the story of
Al Qaeda's agents as they plan and execute the most
deadly strike on the US since Pearl Harbor. It's also
the story of the men and women who were attacked in
the World Trade Center, and of the heroic rescuers who
risked everything to save those trapped inside the
doomed Twin Towers. And finally, it's also a political
action thriller. It portrays FBI agents and
counterterrorism experts in the months leading up to
the attack as they desperately try to convince key
players in both the Clinton and Bush administrations
of the dangers of Al Qaeda and the possibility of a
deadly attack on US soil.

10-11pm -- Decoding The Past - The Bible Code:
Predicting Armageddon.
Is there a prophetic, highly accurate code locked
within the Bible that outlines past and future events?
Does the Code contain hidden messages about people
such as Napoleon, Einstein, and Hitler, and key world
events like WWII, the Kennedy brothers'
assassinations, and 9/11? More frightening are
references to future events--including Earth's
impending end. We take a balanced look through the
eyes of Code supporters and critics and let viewers
determine its accuracy in predicting the future.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, August 19, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Death Devices.
The hangman, guillotine, gas chamber, firing squad,
and electric chair are just a few of the ways in which
societies have rid themselves of those who committed
capital crimes. And throughout history, a select few
have developed the devices that have carried out the
mandate of the people. This is the dark story of those
inventors and the macabre history of execution
mechanics--from the first "stone" of antiquity, the
dungeons of the Inquisition, and Nazi death camps to
today's sterile injection chambers--with a peek at the
future of death technology.

8-10pm -- Banned from The Bible - 
In a 2-hour special, we scrutinize ancient writings
that didn't "make the cut" in the battle to create a
Christian Bible in the new religion's first few
centuries. Biblical archaeologists and scholars
examine why they were left out and if others might yet
be found. Beginning with the little-known Life of Adam
and Eve, we also peruse the Book of Jubilees, the Book
of Enoch, the Gospel of Thomas, the Protevangelium of
James, the Gospel of Mary, the Gospel of Nicodemus,
and the Apocalypse of Peter.

10-12am -- Roman Vice - 
The flowering of the Roman Empire saw incomparable
power and civilization - and at the same time
corruption, cruelty and depravity on an unparalleled
scale. Emperors from Augustus to Tiberius and Nero
built the biggest empire the world had ever seen,
while presiding over a way of life riddled with
violence, deviancy and excess. This special visits the
archaeological sites of ancient Rome, talks to leading
historians world-wide and uses stylish reconstructions
to describe and explain how good and evil went side by
side.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, August 20, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- The Antichrist - Zero Hour
From popes and presidents to dictators, Antichrists
have been identified in all periods of recorded
history and in all walks of life. Even nations,
movements, and technologies have been thought by some
to be the agents of the Antichrist. Throughout
history, people have seen their own times as the most
morally bankrupt and have recognized signs of the
coming of the Apocalypse. If the end is near, what
will it be like? What is the Antichrist's agenda? How
does he intend to take over the world and wreak
destruction? Is this escapist fantasy or inescapable
fate?

8-10pm -- The Exodus Decoded - 
The story of the Exodus invokes an epic tale--Pharaohs
and Israelites, plagues and miracles, splitting of the
sea and drowning of an army, and Moses. It's at the
heart of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. After much
research--working with archaeologists, Egyptologists,
geologists, and theologians--filmmaker Simcha
Jacobovici concluded that the Exodus took place
hundreds of years earlier than thought. With a new
timetable, Jacobovici reexamined artifacts and
discovered that the traditional consensus on the date
was reached without reference to Judaic texts that
record the oral traditions. When Jacobovici consulted
these texts, they revealed names of people and places
unknown to researchers until recently when extensive
excavations in the Nile Delta took place. Teaming up
with special effects designers, he created a unique
digital experience of the Exodus. Blending
archaeological findings with eye-catching effects,
Jacobovici creates a virtual museum to showcase his
discoveries.

10-11pm -- The Revolution - 12 - Road to the
Presidency.
After leading the rebellious British colonies in
America to a most unlikely victory in the War for
Independence, George Washington is called into service
again. But this time to lead the newly born nation he
helped create as its first president. Setting out on
an 8-day trip from his home at Mount Vernon, Virginia
to his inauguration in New York City, Washington's
journey has him not only looking forward to the future
but back on the events of the American Revolution.

____________________________________________________

Monday, August 21, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Battlefield Engineering.
Meet some of the most important, yet least-recognized,
warriors--the battlefield engineers who lay the
groundwork for oncoming conflicts. We'll cover combat
engineering from ancient Rome to modern-day Iraq, and
take a look at the "Next Big Thing".

8-9pm -- UFO Files - UFOs in the Bible.
Journey back through time into the mysterious history
of UFOs as revealed through ancient biblical texts.
Through intensive reinterpretation of early religious
documents, researchers believe that they have found
evidence of ancient UFO activity. From Elijah's flying
"chariots of fire" and Ezekiel's "wheels within wheels
in the sky" to the enigmatic aerial phenomenon that
lead Moses during the Exodus, we apply a modern
perspective to the writings of the Bible in the
context of UFOs.

9-10pm -- Lost Worlds - Jesus' Jerusalem.
Tens of thousands travel yearly to Jerusalem to visit
where Jesus walked, preached, suffered, was crucified,
and buried. But since his death, the city has been
destroyed and rebuilt more than 20 times. Our experts
follow the evidence to reveal the city that Jesus
would have visited. They rebuild Herod's Temple
Mount--in its time the largest man-made structure.
They explain the manipulation of light and stone that
created the Holy Sanctuary--said to "sparkle like a
snow-capped mountain in the sun." They explore the
network of aqueducts, pipes, tunnels, and pools that
kept this desert city from thirst and enabled it to
handle an influx of pilgrims that routinely swelled
its population from 30,000 to 300,000. They seek the
places where Jesus performed miracles. And they map
his final hours: including the real route of the "Via
Dolorosa"--the path that led to his place of
execution. With new research and CGI, we'll glimpse a
world hidden for more than 20 centuries.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - The Holy Grail.
For all its fame, the Holy Grail remains shrouded in
mystery. What exactly was it? Could it have survived
to this day? Why has it inspired so many treasure
seekers? To Christians, it is the holiest of objects,
the cup from which Jesus drank at the Last Supper,
also believed to be the chalice that Joseph of
Arimathea used to catch Christ's blood as he died on
the cross. Though now thought of as a goblet, the
actual word "grail" comes to us from the Latin word
gradalis---a flat dish or shallow vessel brought to
the table during various courses of a meal. The story
itself did not originate until medieval times, when it
helped inflame the Crusaders' quest. Host and
adventurer Josh Bernstein follows the Grail's trail
from Holy Land to medieval French castles to a dark
chapter in the Nazi saga, when Hitler financed a
search for the Grail to unite a secret society of
knights. On the way, Josh learns its true meaning and
power.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, August 22, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - More Earthmovers.
Join us for a second look at the big earth-moving
machines used to tackle the most challenging jobs on,
under, and off Earth! We'll ride on specialized
behemoth dump trucks, delve below sea level to view
dredging equipment, and leave the planet altogether to
explore earthmoving equipment in space.

8-10pm -- The Egyptian Book of the Dead - 
It's a story that spans 4,000 years, older than the
Bible...and it's all true. It was lost for thousands
of years, discovered a century ago, and its true
meaning recently resurrected by the miracle of
computer graphics! The reason the Egyptians built the
pyramids, it's the first written description of any
religion--and is the likely source of the 10
Commandments! In this 2-hour special we follow the
ancient scroll from creation around 1800 BC near the
site of the Egyptian city of Thebes, to rediscovery
(and theft!) in 1887 AD. Join us in a tale that spans
from the age of papyrus to the age of silicon...and
beyond. Biblical scholars agree that portions of the
Old Testament are direct descendants of the Egyptian
text, and some archaeologists argue that Moses must
have read and carried a copy of it with him when he
fled Egypt! And now, a new generation is reexamining
the ancient text for wisdom that can still affect our
inner lives!

10-11pm -- Strange Empires - Egypt.
We all know the Egypt of the pyramids and King Tut's
tomb. But there's much, much more. The daily life of
ancient Egyptians was filled with magic, mystery, and
sex. We'll take a closer look at the beliefs and
habits of one of the world's oldest cultures. There
was incest in the royal palace, divine cats, and an
entire industry devoted to ushering the dead into the
next world. Spells, potions, and incantations ruled
every aspect of life. Yet even in these unusual
customs, we'll find the human face of the ancient
people of Egypt. 

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, August 23, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- History's Mysteries - Ship of Gold.
In 1857, en route to New York from California, the
steamship Central America vanished in a killer storm
off North Carolina's coast, taking with her 400
passengers and nearly 21 tons of gold bullion. Here is
the story of the worst US peacetime sea disaster, and
how high-tech treasure hunters recovered her fortune
over 130 years later.

8-9pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Warfare.
Warfare was a way of life in the ancient world. The
technology of war drove ancient inventors and
engineers to ever-greater lengths to defeat their
enemies. They were, perhaps, the greatest masterminds
of the battlefield-- yet who were they, and how did
they make their sophisticated lethal machines more
than 2,000 years ago? Ancient warfare was every bit as
technical and lethal as today's warfare. Just witness
the colossal and lethal Helepolis ("city taker"),
history's most sophisticated siege machine. From the
sinister machines that could bring a city's wall
crashing down to Greek Fire, the napalm of the ancient
world--warfare was as terrible then as now. The sheer
ingenuity and complexity with which these war machines
were created proves that the people of the ancient
world were great inventors, mathematicians, and
engineers.

9-10pm -- Ancient Discoveries - Ships.
Lurking beneath Lake Nemi's blue waters lay the titans
of Roman naval engineering--the Nemi Ships. Titanic
luxury liners of the ancient world, they held
inventions lost for thousands of years. But why were
they built? Were they Caligula's notorious floating
pleasure palaces--rife with excess and debauchery?
Flagships of a giant sea force? It took Mussolini's
obsession with all things Roman to finally prise the
two wrecks from the depths of Lake Nemi near Rome.
Using an ancient Roman waterway, he drained the lake
and rescued the ships, an accomplishment captured on
film that we access to illustrate this astounding
story. Sophisticated ancient technology discovered in
the boats transformed the understanding of Roman
engineering overnight. Yet by 1944, the adventure had
turned sour and the retreating German army torched the
boats. We reveal the mysteries of the Nemi Ships and
the ancient technology that made them possible.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Mummy Tech.
After thousands of years, Egyptian mummies are
speaking from the grave. With the use of
state-of-the-art computer tomography scanning, known
as CT-scanning, we explore inside a 2,000-year-old
mummified body of an Egyptian child. With today's
technology, mummies are studied without being
unwrapped. Researchers travel around inside the
mummy's head and body with 3-D imagery. We meet Dr.
Robert Brier, a renowned Egyptologist. Dr. Brier
reveals secrets of Mummification--it took up to 70
days to preserve the dead. Aided by new technology, we
investigate the death of one of the most famous
mummies, King Tut. Was he murdered or did he die from
an illness? We also uncover the case of the Mummy who
lay in obscurity for over a hundred years, until
modern science unlocked the secrets of his identity as
an Egyptian pharaoh. And we join a team of
conservationists as they build a nitrogen-filled glass
display case to provide a safe sanctuary to prevent
mummies from decay.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, August 24, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - George Washington Carver
Tech.
One of the 20th century's greatest scientists, George
Washington Carver's influence is still felt. Rising
from slavery to become one of the world's most
respected and honored men, he devoted his life to
understanding nature and the many uses for the
simplest of plant life. His scientific research in the
late 1800s produced agricultural innovations like crop
rotation and composting. Part of the "chemurgist"
movement that changed the rural economy, he found
ingenious applications for the peanut, soybean, and
sweet potato. At Tuskegee Institute, Dr. Carver
invented more than 300 uses for the peanut, while
convincing poor farmers to rotate cotton crops with
things that would add nutrients to the soil. A
visionary, Carver shared his knowledge free of charge,
happy in his Tuskegee laboratory where he could use
his gifts to help others.

8-10pm -- The Exodus Decoded - 
The story of the Exodus invokes an epic tale--Pharaohs
and Israelites, plagues and miracles, splitting of the
sea and drowning of an army, and Moses. It's at the
heart of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. After much
research--working with archaeologists, Egyptologists,
geologists, and theologians--filmmaker Simcha
Jacobovici concluded that the Exodus took place
hundreds of years earlier than thought. With a new
timetable, Jacobovici reexamined artifacts and
discovered that the traditional consensus on the date
was reached without reference to Judaic texts that
record the oral traditions. When Jacobovici consulted
these texts, they revealed names of people and places
unknown to researchers until recently when extensive
excavations in the Nile Delta took place. Teaming up
with special effects designers, he created a unique
digital experience of the Exodus. Blending
archaeological findings with eye-catching effects,
Jacobovici creates a virtual museum to showcase his
discoveries.

10-11pm -- American Eats - BBQ
Three out of four of US households own a barbecue
grill. Between grills, charcoal, smokers, sauce, and
spices, it's a multi-billion dollar industry. The word
probably derives from barbe a queue, French for "from
snout to tail". But the Spanish are thought to have
brought it to North America in the form of hogs that
they cooked in pits of oak and hickory coals, a method
learned from Native Americans in the West Indies. The
word first appeared in Virginia in the 1700s--where
multiple meanings of the word were born--the method of
cooking, the food, and gathering. It became a
tradition in the late 1800s during cattle drives.
Henry Ford invented the charcoal briquette from
leftover wood scraps and sawdust from his car factory.
E.G. Kingsford bought the invention and put it into
commercial production. Whether a fan of North Carolina
pulled pork, spicy Texas barbequed beef, or Charlie
Bryant's Kansas City ribs, there's no denying that
barbeque is truly cook American.

____________________________________________________

Friday, August 25, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Loading Docks.
Each day ships, trains, trucks, and planes haul
supplies that keep store shelves full and factories
moving. At every stop there's a loading dock--an
interface where shipping and storage hook up. You may
not think much about a loading dock, but to the
transportation industry it's the very heart of their
business. From ancient times to tomorrow's lights-out
facility, where computers and machines will store,
sort, retrieve, and load stock without human
interaction, we deliver the goods on loading docks.

8-10pm -- Rome: Engineering an Empire - 
For more than 500 years, Rome was the most powerful
and advanced civilization the world had ever known,
ruled by visionaries and tyrants whose accomplishments
ranged from awe-inspiring to deplorable. One
characteristic linked them all--ambition--and the
thirst for power that all Roman emperors shared fueled
an unprecedented mastery of engineering and labor.
This documentary special chronicles the spectacular
and sordid history of the Roman Empire from the rise
of Julius Caesar in 55 BC to its eventual fall around
537 AD, detailing the remarkable engineering feats
that set Rome apart from the rest of the ancient
world. Featuring extensive state-of-the-art CGI
animation, and exclusive never-before-seen footage
shot on a diving expedition in the water channels
underneath the Colosseum.

10-11pm -- Life and Death in Rome - Chaos.
In the 3rd Century AD, the Roman Empire faced its
greatest threat--as the world's superpower. A
combination of plague, bloody civil war, and imperial
debauchery tore the Empire apart and brought it to its
knees. This is the story of how the crisis came about,
and it is the tragic tale of the unknown Emperor who
pulled Rome back from the brink of disaster.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, August 26, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Hoover Dam.
The task was monumental: Build the world's largest dam
in the middle of the desert, and tame the river that
carved the Grand Canyon--all in seven years! When the
Hoover Dam was completed in 1935, it was the largest
dam in the world. We'll reveal how this engineering
wonder of the world was conceived and built.

8-10pm -- Ottoman Empire: The War Machine - 
The Ottoman Empire was born in a fight for survival.
Under constant attack, tribes of Muslim Turks banded
together in self-defense and created an empire that
endured for over 600 years. We delve into the history
of this vast empire--from the 14th Century up until
today. In WWI, the Ottomans sided with Germany. The
Gallipoli Campaign stands out as a landmark in the
history of the Great War. Nine months of bloody war in
the area resulted in more than 100,000 deaths and the
Allies retreated without gaining territory. A
commander named Mustafa Kemal led his troops to
several victories over the Allies, and in the
tradition of Mehmet and Suleyman The Magnificent,
Mustafa established himself in Ankara as the leader of
the Turkish Republic. Kemal transformed a country in
ruins and implemented westernization, modernization,
solidarity, and equality. Out went the Arabic
alphabet--in came the Latin. The Ottoman Empire is a
mere memory--Turkey is the future.

10-11pm -- Strange Empires - Egypt.
We all know the Egypt of the pyramids and King Tut's
tomb. But there's much, much more. The daily life of
ancient Egyptians was filled with magic, mystery, and
sex. We'll take a closer look at the beliefs and
habits of one of the world's oldest cultures. There
was incest in the royal palace, divine cats, and an
entire industry devoted to ushering the dead into the
next world. Spells, potions, and incantations ruled
every aspect of life. Yet even in these unusual
customs, we'll find the human face of the ancient
people of Egypt. 

____________________________________________________

Sunday, August 27, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Mega Disasters - Mega Freeze.
Could North America and parts of Europe be headed for
a "big chill?" Many experts fear that an abrupt
climate change could have catastrophic effects across
the planet, including devastating winters in some
northern regions. New research has indicated to
scientists that the climate is changing rapidly and
unpredictably. In different parts of the world, we
could be facing drought, floods, storms and extreme
cold. Cataclysmic climate changes, similar to what may
happen to us, have happened in the past. The great
Mayan civilization was knocked out by drought in a few
generations. The Little Ice Age battered Europe.
Within a decade, freezing temperatures increased and
incessant storms brought starvation, disease, and
death to millions. Could this happen again? We may
have little time to prepare. In fact, it may already
be too late to prevent a global disaster. A new sudden
alteration of the environment could threaten the very
survival of the human species.

8-10pm -- Violent Earth - Nature's Fury: New England's
Killer Hurricane
On September 21, 1938 the residents of New England and
Long Island are enjoying the last day of summer. While
national attention focuses on the Great Depression and
the impending war in Europe, families extend summer
vacations, children begin a new school year, and
actress Katharine Hepburn returns to her family's
summer home in Connecticut to nurse a failing career.
They are completely unaware that the hurricane
barreling toward them at near record speed will become
one of the deadliest in US history, claiming more than
600 lives. Even the most seasoned weather forecasters
won't predict the devastation this 500-mile wide
monster will inflict. Unfamiliar with hurricanes, the
25-million residents of the Northeast will learn of
their power firsthand in the most violent and
destructive natural disaster in their history.

10-11pm -- The Revolution - 13 - A President and His
Revolution.
George Washington completes his 8-day trip from his
home at Mount Vernon, Virginia to New York City where
he is inaugurated as the first president of the newly
created United States of America. The former
Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army now becomes
simply "Mr. President".

____________________________________________________

Monday, August 28, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- To Be Determined - To Be Announced.
Programming to be announced.

8-9pm -- Violent Earth - Tsunami 2004: Waves of Death.
The 2004 Tsunami, centered in the Indian Ocean, was
caused by a 9.3 earthquake--the second strongest quake
on record. Join us for a minute-by-minute look at
nature's fury at its worst, when the tsunami kills
more than 200,000 people in 14 countries. In this
special, we examine the tsunami as it moves from coast
to coast through the eyes of people who lived through
it and scientists now studying its path of
devastation. Drawing on the extraordinary volume of
amateur video that recorded the disaster, we take
viewers inside the world's deadliest tsunami.

9-10pm -- Lost Worlds - Churchill's Secret Bunkers.
During WWII, a vast complex of secret bunkers was
constructed under the streets of London. Lost to time,
this world was an important refuge from the nightly
onslaught of Nazi air raids, but only now can we
reveal the full extent of the scheme. The existence of
Churchill's Bunker is no secret, but that there was an
entire subterranean city, built to keep the British
government running, is only now being revealed. Very
little of this covert network, which also sheltered
American General Dwight Eisenhower, has ever been
revealed to the public. Now this lost world is brought
back to life with cutting-edge computer graphic
technology--the tunnels beneath the heart of London's
great buildings; the underground command center from
where the Battle of Britain was coordinated; the deep
level, ultra-secure chambers that could withstand the
most deadly weapons in the Nazi arsenal. Beneath the
sidewalk, this program exposes wartime secrets we were
never meant to know.

10-11pm -- Digging for the Truth - Pompeii Secrets
Revealed.
In 79 AD, the volcano Vesuvius exploded in one of
history's deadliest eruptions, burying the city of
Pompeii and other Roman towns along the Bay of Naples
beneath layers of ash and pumice. Pompeii was
rediscovered in the 18th century, but only recently
have archaeologists and volcanologists come to
understand exactly how the eruption unfolded, and why
it took the people of Pompeii almost entirely by
surprise. Intrigued, host Josh Bernstein visits the
Bay of Naples, and learns the entire area is built on
ancient volcanic rock, some of it still steaming. He
climbs the world's most active volcano--Stromboli--an
island near Sicily, where "fireworks" from the
mountain are a nightly entertainment. Back at Pompeii,
he searches for clues that might have enlightened the
Romans to the growing threat in their midst. And he
literally plays with fire as he follows the story
right into the heart of Vesuvius.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, August 29, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- To Be Determined - To Be Announced.
Programming to be announced.

8-9pm -- Violent Earth - Katrina: 7 Days in September.
August 29, 2005, Katrina came ashore. Before the
hurricane, Mississippi and Louisiana sheltered 6,500
National Guardsmen in preparation for the usual
disaster relief. Some had only recently returned from
Iraq. This is the story of how they responded to the
emerging crisis--rescuing and protecting people,
supporting local police, helping evacuate thousands of
people, patrolling the streets, ensuring law and
order, rescuing thousands stranded in their homes,
manning huge dozers to clear streets for emergency
vehicles, and flying in 7,000-pound sandbags with
helicopters to plug football field-sized holes in the
levees. By the end of September, they'd saved more
than 11,000 lives, helped approximately 70,000 people
evacuate, and facilitated more than 100,000 others in
Louisiana as they moved to safety. Even for a force
created before the foundation of the US, this was an
epic challenge. We'll hear firsthand accounts from the
people who were on the frontlines of disaster relief.

9-10pm -- Mega Disasters - New York City Hurricane.
What would happen if a Category 3 Hurricane were to
hit New York City? With an awesomely high storm surge
and intense winds attacking one of the most heavily
populated and economically vital locations in the
world, the potential for massive destruction is almost
unprecedented. We explore the less-known but extensive
history of previous northeast hurricanes--especially
the "Great Hurricane" of 1938--in order to create
empirical evidence that a storm of this size is not
science fiction but a very real possibility in the
near future. We'll also explore the scientific nature
and origins of hurricanes and get an overview of some
of the engineering changes that are taking place in
the field of hurricane damage prevention. Using
computer animation, models, and recreations the story
concludes with a jaw-dropping view of what a storm
like this might look like from inside the Big Apple.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters: New
Orleans.
One of the deadliest natural disasters experienced by
US, Hurricane Katrina devastated New
Orleans--submerging it under a torrent of floodwater.
We investigate why the levees and water-pumping system
failed and join a "Geological Detective" as he sifts
through the rubble to uncover how 80% of the city was
left underwater and discovers how the levee system was
a potential disaster in the making. We also delve deep
into the 80-year-old pumping system to unearth how it
flooded and why it took weeks to drain the city of up
to 25 feet of water. We learn the engineering cause
behind the nightmare suffered by victims seeking
shelter in the Superdome. And our investigators
discover the design flaws on one of the major escape
routes of the city. Using satellite global
positioning, we find that New Orleans and the entire
Louisiana wetland coastline are actually sinking. How
can New Orleans stop this from ever happening again
and should it be rebuilt at all?

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, August 30, 2006
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- To Be Determined - To Be Announced.
Programming to be announced.

8-10pm -- Violent Earth - Nature's Fury: New England's
Killer Hurricane
On September 21, 1938 the residents of New England and
Long Island are enjoying the last day of summer. While
national attention focuses on the Great Depression and
the impending war in Europe, families extend summer
vacations, children begin a new school year, and
actress Katharine Hepburn returns to her family's
summer home in Connecticut to nurse a failing career.
They are completely unaware that the hurricane
barreling toward them at near record speed will become
one of the deadliest in US history, claiming more than
600 lives. Even the most seasoned weather forecasters
won't predict the devastation this 500-mile wide
monster will inflict. Unfamiliar with hurricanes, the
25-million residents of the Northeast will learn of
their power firsthand in the most violent and
destructive natural disaster in their history.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Levees
From collapsing floodwalls in New Orleans to high-tech
mechanical storm surge barriers in Europe, we'll
explore the 2,500-year history of keeping rivers and
tides at bay by erecting levees. To get a lesson on
how levees are built and why they fail, we'll climb
atop Sacramento, California's crumbling river levees
to see evidence of erosion that portends a New
Orleans-level disaster. In stark contrast are the
ingeniously engineered levees and dikes holding back
tidal waters in the Netherlands. Their success
inspired other mechanized flood barriers on both the
River Thames outside London and one currently under
construction near the sinking city of Venice, Italy.
We'll also take a look at the hard lessons learned
when levees are breached. In New Orleans, we'll see
what the US Army Corps of Engineers is doing to
protect the Crescent City from future hurricane
seasons.

____________________________________________________

Thursday, August 31, 2006
____________________________________________________

8-10pm -- Violent Earth - Little Ice Age: Big Chill.
Not so long ago, civilization learned that it was no
match for just a few degrees drop in temperature.
Scientists call it the Little Ice Age--but its impact
was anything but small. From 1300 to 1850, a period of
cataclysmic cold caused havoc. It froze Viking
colonists in Greenland, accelerated the Black Death in
Europe, decimated the Spanish Armada, and helped
trigger the French Revolution. The Little Ice Age
reshaped the world in ways that now seem the stuff of
fantasy--New York Harbor froze and people walked from
Manhattan to Staten Island, Eskimos sailed kayaks as
far south as Scotland, and two feet of snow fell on
New England in June and July during "the Year Without
a Summer". Could another catastrophic cold snap strike
in the 21st century? Leading climatologists offer the
latest theories, and scholars and historians recreate
the history that could be a glimpse of things to come.
Face the cold, hard truth of the past--an era that may
be a window to our future.

10-11pm -- American Eats - Canned Food
Canned food has been in pantries for more than 200
years. But long before it was a staple on store
shelves, it was used to feed armies--Napoleon's Army
to be exact. In 1795, a contest was held in France to
find a way to make safe, portable food for the army. A
confectioner came up with the concept of preserving
food in bottles. Before long, the British began
preserving food in thick metal cans. In America,
canning had a slow start but the 1849 Gold Rush and
Civil War contributed to its popularity. A mere 50
years after its development, invention of the can
opener made it more convenient. In America's post-WWII
economy, rise of the suburbs meant supermarkets, and
food with long shelf life became the modern
convenience food. But in the 1980s and `90s, canned
food suffered an image problem. Once celebrated for
its freshness, it was no longer considered so. Now
researchers in can technology are offering the
self-heating can, self-cooling can, and re-closeable
can, among others
FREE Work At Home GUIDE for our visitors!
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Note: Wild West Tech hosted by David Carradine, some episodes narrated by Keith Carradine:
Freak Show Tech. Tuesday, July 25 @ 11pm & 3am
Brothel Tech. Thursday, July 27 @ 11pm & 3am
Massacre Tech. Thursday, August 10 @ 10am & 4pm
Gold Rush Tech. Saturday, August 12 @ 9am

Mail Call:
German Renaissance/9mm Luger P-08/AFN/Battle of Britain: #81
Saturday, July 8 @ 11am
Mail Call: #76, take a ride in a B-2 Stealth Bomber on a mock bomb run!
Saturday, July 22 @ 10:20am
Mail Call: #77, R. Lee Ermey heads to the Marine Corps Weapons Training Center for a live fire exercise with the Abrams M1-A1; the first major engagement between Americans and Germans in WW2; a new kind of full body armor stronger than Kevlar
Saturday, July 22 @ 11am
Mail Call: Iwo Jima Special: #73/74, R. Lee Ermey travels to the island of Iwo Jima with 86 veterans of the WWII invasion to relive the US Marine Corps' most heroic battle
Saturday, July 29 @ 10:10am
Mail Call: Benelli M4 Shotgun/1st Air Cav in Vietnam/Germany's WWII ME-163 Komet & Kubelwagen: #78
Saturday, July 29 @ 11am
Mail Call: 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division: #49
Friday, August 11 @ 12:30pm & 6:30pm
Mail Call: 29 Palms: #71
Saturday, August 12 @ 11am
Mail Call: Fastest Army Vehicle/Uncle Sam/Tank Destroyers/Anti-Tank Rifle/Dive Bomber/Sea Dart: #47
Friday, August 11 @ 12pm & 6pm
Mail Call: Hurricane Katrina
Saturday, August 19 @ 10:30am
Mail Call: The Pentagon: #69
Saturday, August 19 @ 11am

For info on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket
(movie available on video and DVD)

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January 2006 Hellcats of the Navy

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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