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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For 10-04

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Friday, October 1, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - City Water.
When you tap your faucet does clean, pure water flow? Can your city supply enough water for industry, firefighting, and street cleaning? U.S. public water-supply systems serve nearly 99 percent of the population, yet few users know how the system of aqueducts, pipes, and pumps work. Learn the colorful history of the water systems in Chicago, New York City, and Los Angeles when we scour the past and look to the future, including desalination plants that turn seawater into drinking water.
8-9pm -- B-17 Flying Fortress - B-17 Flying Fortress. In 1937, the Boeing Aircraft Company built America's first all-metal, 4-engined heavy bomber--the legendary B-17 Flying Fortress. Taking on the worst the Luftwaffe offered, the 8th Air Force's Flying Forts flew daylight bombing missions over occupied Europe's most heavily defended cities. This is the story of the young airmen of the "Mighty Eighth" and the dangers they faced at 30,000 feet! Features superb interviews and home movie material shot by U.S. airmen in Britain--never before shown on TV!
9-9:30pm -- Decisive Battles - Birth of the Roman Empire.
In 198 BC, the classic military conflict between the Ancient World's two dominant military systems took place in a chain of hills called Cynoscephalae (Greek for "Dogs' Heads") in Thessaly, Greece. King Philip V led the Macedonian phalanx, the fighting force that conquered the world under Alexander the Great. Titus Quinctius Flaminius led the Roman Legion, the classic mobile heavy infantry unit that was to hold the Pax Romana for centuries to come. The two sides met in the fog in a battle that ended the Second Macedonian War.
9:30-10pm -- Command Decisions - The Six Day War.
Egypt's President Nasser, frustrated with Israel's 1956 victory at the Suez Canal, decides to fight back. Nasser-led forces, including those of Iraq, Syria, and Jordan, gather on three sides of the tiny country. But on June 5, 1967, Israeli Minister of Defense Dayan strikes first and a surprise raid decimates Egypt's air force. Tank raids smash through Egyptian positions, and fierce fighting pushes Arab forces back across Israel's borders. Join commanders on both sides as they make decisions during these six days that reverberate today.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Guns of Israel.
One of the youngest and smallest nations, Israel has produced some of the world's fiercest weapons. In 1952, shortly after its War of Independence, Israel unleashed the Uzi...a submachine gun that set the standard for nearly 50 years. Between 1950 and 1980, Israel fought three wars, and superior weapons became a matter of survival. We examine the Negev Machine Gun and the Galil Assault Rifle, designed to survive the rigors of desert warfare, and the Tavor 21, a lightweight 21st-century assault rifle.
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Saturday, October 2, 2004
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7-8pm -- Bible Code II: Apocalypse and Beyond -
As we delve further into the provocative theory that a code exists in the Bible outlining past and future events, we learn how the code works from supporters and examine supposed examples of precise messages. And we hear from critics who present compelling arguments that the code is merely a statistical anomaly. We uncover how military and intelligence organizations interact with the code, and compare the code with other sources of biblical prophecy.
8-10pm -- Movies in Time - Movie.
Laurence Fishburne stars in a drama based on true WWII events of the first African-American combat fighter pilots of the U.S. Army Corps. Bigoted officers and the military establishment refused to accept them as equal to white counterparts, until Eleanor Roosevelt intervened and the men of the "Fighting 99th" were able to prove themselves. This is the story of the Tuskegee Airmen and their struggle to defeat the enemy--both at home and aboard. With Andre Braugher and Cuba Gooding Jr. (1995)
10-11:30pm -- Broken Wings -
Historian and adventurer Pat Macha introduces us to the world of aviation archaeology, bringing to life once-majestic planes and the men and women who flew them. "Airplane wrecks that remain undisturbed for years provide us with a sobering opportunity to consider the power of nature and the mistaken judgements of man," Macha explains. Teaming up with forensic experts and aviation authorities, Macha transports us to the past at crash sites and pieces together the puzzle behind the twisted metal.
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Sunday, October 3, 2004
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7-8pm -- Investigating History - Dead Sea Scrolls
The Dead Sea Scrolls are arguably the most important manuscript discovery in history. Believers hoped they would provide clues about the origins of Judaism and Christianity and that the name Jesus might appear in documents written during his life. We follow one scholar in search of new caves that might contain scrolls. As the dig team works along a cliff face near Qumran, we trace the history of the Dead Sea Scroll controversy and the evolving interpretation of what was written 2,000 years ago.
8-9:30pm -- Nine Men Down -
By summer's end 1970, in a forgotten corner of the first televised war, 25 journalists covering the Cambodian chapter of the Vietnam War went missing or were confirmed killed. This is the story of a few of them. On May 31, nine members of a CBS/NBC news team went looking for a story. What they found was execution--their own! What cameraman Kurt Volkert found was a mission. Volkert felt he should have been with the team that day, and spent the next 20 years fighting to bring his dead friends home. Only one man remains missing--he who took Kurt's place that fateful day.
9:30-10pm -- Mail Call - #63
Gunnery Sergeant R. Lee Ermey checks out how our troops, hopefully, are getting the latest gear in record time through the Rapid Fielding Initiative. Next, it's a trip back in time to see the kind of heat the German Army's anti-tank crews packed, followed by a look at some anti-anti-tank weapons. Finally, the Gunney finds out how the Navy used blimps as sub hunters during WWII, and takes a look at an unique WWI invention, the German "cloud car" spy basket.
10-11pm -- Conspiracy? - TWA Flight 800
On July 17, 1996, at 8:31 pm/et, TWA Flight 800 exploded midair and fell into the Atlantic. All 230 onboard perished. Federal investigators meticulously reconstructed the aircraft, looking for any evidence of terrorism and found none. They concluded that a malfunction in the center fuel tank caused the explosion. But this official conclusion has never satisfied a coterie of independent investigators and conspiracy theorists. We weigh existing evidence against various theories to let you decide.
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Monday, October 4, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Forensic Science: The Crime Fighter's Weapon
From Sherlock Holmes' examination of the physical evidence at a crime scene to today's DNA technology, we review the history of crime detection through the use of forensic science.
8-9pm -- UFO Files - UFOs: Then and Now? Cause for Alarm
Studies some of the most disturbing UFO sightings, including: a 4-day extravaganza in 1952, when UFOs cruised the skies over the White House; sightings in 1967 near a secret U.S./Canadian submarine detection base; controversial events at the U.K./U.S. air base at Bentwaters, England; and the military's Test Area 51 in Nevada.
9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - The Confederacy's Secret Weapon
September 13, 1864. A crafty Confederate blockade runner, the Mary Celestia, ran aground on the "blind breakers" off Bermuda's southern coast and struck bottom. All but one of the crew survived, yet the whereabouts of her cargo remain unknown. One of Bermuda's most baffling shipwrecks, events surrounding the sinking of the side paddlewheel steamer are shrouded in mystery. Now, Deep Sea Detectives John Chatterton and Melanie Paul, nautical archaeologists, and the Bermuda Maritime Museum try to dredge up the truth about her fate.
10-11pm -- Investigating History - Lincoln: Man or Myth?
Abraham Lincoln remains our country's most beloved president--but nearly 200 years after his birth, we're still trying to piece together a true picture of this man who never fails to fascinate, surprise, and enlighten us. Scholars and historians examine how Lincoln became a myth. Was he really the Great Emancipator who deeply wanted to free slaves or a racist and white supremacist? Did the writings that inspired a nation truly come from his pen? Do we really even know what he looked like?
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Tuesday, October 5, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Medical Imaging: The Voyage Inward
The story of medical imaging, the technology that allows us to see inside the human body, is full of amazing stories. Learn how X-rays were discovered in 1895, completely by accident; how ultrasound was developed to locate enemy submarines; and how the CAT Scan might never have been built if it weren't for The Beatles!
8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Gold Rush Tech
Discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill in 1848 changed the American West and the world. Thousands of dreamers descended upon California to stake claims, followed by rushes to Nevada, Alaska, Montana, and other territories with the uncovering of silver and copper deposits. Keith Carradine looks at the technology developed to exploit earth's riches--cables, elevators, pumps, ventilators, and drills--as mining went further underground and evolved from a one-man operation to a multi-billion-dollar industry.
9-9:30pm -- Tech Effect - Flight 103
On December 21, 1988, Pan Am Flight 103 fell from the sky due to a catastrophic explosion over Lockerbie, Scotland, leaving behind a trail of fragmentary evidence and 270 casualties--259 onboard and 11 Lockerbie residents. It became the largest murder investigation in the United Kingdom's history. How did such a small explosion demolish the largest airliner of its day? What techniques and technology did investigators use to trace 12 ounces of plastic explosives to one bag that traveled from Malta to Germany to London and then onto New York? And how did a terrorist manage to orchestrate the whole thing? Find out the facts, and discover what steps have been taken to protect against another such act.
9:30-10pm -- Mail Call
Anti-Tank Rocket/Bazooka/HQ Tour/Tactical Operations Center/Downed Pilots Rescue: #23
R. Lee Ermey heads to the range with the Marines to demonstrate the bazooka's replacement--an AT-4 shoulder-mounted anti-tank rocket--and finds out how the bazooka got its name. After a tongue-in-cheek tour of Mail Call Headquarters, we learn how commanders stay in touch with the battlefield at a Tactical Operations Center, a mobile command post for the computer age. We meet Air Force Pararescuemen, who rescue downed pilots behind enemy lines, and discover the origin of a 21-gun salute.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 8
Join us for a devastating but enlightening hour as we delve into complex and often-tragic engineering failures that have shaped our world. Five dramatic events unfold as we discover the causes of: the 1983 collapse of New England's Mianus Bridge; the sinking of the Ocean Ranger offshore oilrig in 1982; the crash of a Learjet 35 private plane carrying pro-golfer Payne Stewart in 1999; the 19th-century failure of South Fork Dam that resulted in the flooding of Johnstown, Pennsylvania; and the 1988 PEPCON (Pacific Engineering Production Company of Nevada) jet fuel plant explosion.
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Wednesday, October 6, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Prosthetics
From the earliest recorded account of an amputation and subsequent prosthesis in ancient Hindu writings, to a 16th-century fully articulated artificial hand controlled by an intricate geared mechanism, to today's use of plastics and space-age materials, we chronicle the long history of prosthetic devices.
8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Nature Tech: Tsunamis
Among the most mysterious disasters, tsunamis--Japanese for "harbor waves"--claimed over 50,000 lives in the 20th century! Generated by offshore earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and landslides, these giant water walls result from large-scale displacement of seabed sediment. Rolling rapidly over the ocean floor, a tsunami rises to rapturous heights when it hits land. Scientists in Japan, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington, and California show the latest technology used to predict these killer waves.
9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Logging Tech
When Paul Bunyan cried "Timber!", he never foresaw today's cutting-edge, controversial industry that feeds a ravenous, lumber-crazy world--a world striving to protect nature while devouring it. Come into the woods to see how he-men and hi-tech combine forces to topple 4-billion trees annually; journey to 19th-century America, when lumberjacks cut a legend as large as the timber they felled; and travel with a tree from stump to sawmill and learn its non-wood uses--from aspirin to film to toothpaste!
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Harvesting
Cutting, digging, picking, stripping, shaking, and raking--whatever the crop, there's a custom machine to harvest it. It all began with handpicking and today it's often one man and one machine harvesting hundreds of acres in a single day. The farmer may even get a little help from satellites. Far above the earth, high-resolution photography is giving the grower more opportunities to cut costs and maximize the harvest. From the debut of the sickle in ancient Egypt to McCormick's famous Reaper to the field of Ergonomics that assists human harvesters, we'll dig into the past and future of the harvest.
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Thursday, October 7, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - FBI's Crime Lab
To spearhead its fight against crime and terrorism in the 21st century, the FBI is relying on its $150 million-plus building, the new Crime Lab at Quantico. Here, nearly 700 highly trained scientists and technicians utilize cutting-edge forensic technology to unearth identities of perpetrators. We review the lab's history, from humble start in a lounge in 1932 to today's state-of-the-art complex, and see how 9/11 and the FBI's new mandate to fight international terrorism changed the lab forever.
8-10pm -- Killer Storm -
October 1991--an unpredicted monster storm ravaged the U.S. Atlantic coast, unleashing its fury on land and sea. Unique in destructive power and as a 100-Year Meteorological Event, its 114-hour rampage posed daunting challenges to weather forecasting, emergency warning agencies, and search and rescue teams as we see in this 2-hour exploration of the events surrounding the savage storm.
10-11pm -- Tornadoes: Nature's Deadly Spirals
A look at tornadoes from an historical perspective beginning with colonial days and ending with the 1997 tornado that ravaged Arkadelphia, Arkansas. From an onslaught of tornadoes in 1936 to the outbreak in 1953 that spurred the establishment of the National Severe Storms Laboratory, we study this furious natural enigma.
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Friday, October 8, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - MiG 15
The MiG 15 was one of the 20th century's most feared high-performance weapons. When it first appeared in 1950, its high speed, lightning maneuverability, and intense firepower outclassed everything in the sky. During the Korean War, when Soviet MiGs engaged with America's F 86 Sabre jets, they finally met their match and a new era in air warfare had begun. Features exclusive interviews with MiG fighter pilots who flew against U.S. pilots and the nephew of the founder of the MiG Design Bureau.
8-9pm -- B26 Marauder! - B26 Marauder!
Bombing from altitudes of over 10,000 feet, the Marauder had the lowest loss rate of any Allied bomber during WWII--less than one-half of one percent. By the end of the war, it had flown over 100,000 missions and dropped over 150,000 tons of bombs. Meet the designers, technicians, and soldiers who played integral roles in the Marauder's development.
9-9:30pm -- Decisive Battles - Boudicca: Warrior Queen
Julius Caesar invaded Britain in 55 and 54 BC, gaining submission of the six eastern Celtic tribes. As the Roman Empire's farthest flung province, its merchants enjoyed a healthy trade with Roman Gaul, and for about 100 years, the tribes were mainly left alone. But in 60 AD, a warrior queen named Boudicca rose in revolt. When her husband died, Boudicca became Queen of the Iceni. Roman administrators tried to control the Iceni by appropriating their land and disarming the tribe. After the Romans flogged Boudicca and raped her two daughters, she raised a mighty army believed to number over 100,000 and took the fight to the Romans.
9:30-10pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Chalôns
Nomadic horsemen led by Attila the Hun race across Europe, cross the Rhine, and ravage Gaul. Former enemies--the Romans, Gauls, and Vandals--band together against "the Scourge of God" under the leadership of the noble Aetius, often called "the last of the Romans." At the Marne River near the city of Chalôns, Attila's forces take possession of a strategic hill. The Huns are expert archers and the battle is fierce. Travel back to 451 AD, and join Attila and his 100,000 men and Aetius and his 160,000 men as they decide the fate of the Western Roman Empire.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - High Tech Sex
Join us for a walk on the wild side of the history of sexual enhancement and contraception--from Cleopatra's box of buzzing bees to 17th-century condoms to Internet sex and 21st-century holographic pornography! In an explicit exploration of the aphrodisiacs, drugs, contraceptives, toys, and cyber-tech innovations that have ushered in a brave new world of modern sexuality, we talk to sexologists and historians for ribald romp behind the bedroom's closed doors.
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Saturday, October 9, 2004
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7-8pm -- Cinco De Mayo -
Each May 5th, Cinco de Mayo celebrations are held in cities throughout the United States. But few people know the holiday's significance. It's a story that began on a sweltering morning, May 5, 1862, in the city of Puebla, Mexico and surrounding forts, when an ill-equipped Mexican Army, along with Zacapoaxtla Indians and regular citizens, beat Napoleon's invading French Army. Filmed in Mexico and the U.S., this is the riveting story--from events leading up to the bloody battle and the aftermath. Today, the memory of French occupation has faded, except for Cinco de Mayo--the day the Mexicans defeated the most powerful army in the world.
8-10pm -- Alaska: Big America
Alaska--a land of extremes. Its size is staggering--nearly 600,000 square miles, or more than twice the size of Texas. Its vast distances, extreme weather, imposing landscape--all helped shape its history and the lives of those who come under its spell. Our 2-hour special heads to far-flung corners of the 49th State to hear compelling stories of life in the bush--from Russian expeditions in the 1700s to building of the Alcan Highway to the WWII Battle for the Aleutian Islands and 1959 statehood.
10-12am -- Soldiers for Hire
Once called mercenaries, highly trained killers have offered their deadly services for a price--from ancient Rome to the War on Terror. Today, they've marched from the back pages of Soldier of Fortune magazine to form vast corporations with the power of the most advanced militaries. The payday for these private soldiers has reached $100-billion annually! Unregulated by governing forces, they wage war for those who can afford it. Find out if they are the future of conflict resolution in our 2-hour special.
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Sunday, October 10, 2004
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7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - TWA Flight 800
On July 17, 1996, at 8:31 pm/et, TWA Flight 800 exploded midair and fell into the Atlantic. All 230 onboard perished. Federal investigators meticulously reconstructed the aircraft, looking for any evidence of terrorism and found none. They concluded that a malfunction in the center fuel tank caused the explosion. But this official conclusion has never satisfied a coterie of independent investigators and conspiracy theorists. We weigh existing evidence against various theories to let you decide.
8-9pm -- Hitler and Stalin: Roots of Evil
An examination of the minds of two of the 20th century's most brutal dictators and mass murderers--Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin. Based on recent psychological and medical studies, the program explores the personalities of these ruthless leaders, who were directly responsible for millions of deaths--their paranoia, suspiciousness, cold-bloodedness, sadism, and lack of human feeling. Includes interviews with Martin Bormann's son and Hitler's butler.
9-10pm -- High Hitler
Adolf Hitler dreamt of creating a master race, but achieved a Holocaust--the murder of millions of Jews and those deemed physical or mental defects. But the Führer, an appalling hypochondriac, abused laxatives and suffered from stomach cramps and embarrassing flatulence. And that was just the start! When he committed suicide in 1945, the great dictator was frail with tremors and a shuffling walk--a feeble condition concealed from the world. We explore the relationship between Hitler and his personal physician, Dr. Theodore Morell. How did amphetamine abuse, Parkinson's Disease, and tertiary syphilis impact on his state of mind?
10-11pm -- Conspiracy? - Majestic Twelve: UFO Cover-Up
What really happened in Roswell, New Mexico in the summer of 1947? Did a flying saucer crash in the vast desert scrubland? The initial Army Air Force press release claimed they had recovered a flying disk. But a day later, the story dramatically changed--now they called it a weather balloon! In 1987, secret documents surfaced indicating the existence of the "Majestic 12"--an elite group of scientists and military and intelligence officials, allegedly brought together by President Harry Truman. Did the MJ-12 truly exist? If so, did these men forever trivialize the most talked-about UFO event in history, as well as all UFO sightings thereafter?
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Monday, October 11, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Muscle Cars
Pop open the hood, check out the carbs, and hear the engines roar as we journey back to a time when gas was cheap, emission controls non-existent, and all that mattered was acceleration and speed. During the 1960s and '70s, GM, Ford, and Chrysler competed to create high-performance cars at prices teenage baby boomers could afford. Featuring interviews with John DeLorean, creator of the Pontiac GTO, and his marketing partner Jim Wangers, we go behind the scene of the muscle-car wars.
8-9pm -- UFO Files - UFOs: Then and Now? Nightmare
Examines the most debatable aspect of alien contact--human abduction! From the first recorded case, the 1961 kidnapping of Betty and Barney Hill, to the 1976 Allagash Incident, when four friends were whisked away while on a camping trip, we hear firsthand from participants and a neuroscientist, who offers more earthbound solutions.
9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Pearl Harbor's Revenge
April 2, 1944. Japanese submarine I-169, aka Shinohara, dove to the bottom of Truk Lagoon to avoid an oncoming attack from U.S. B-24 Bombers. Japan's fleet at Truk Lagoon was about to receive "payback" for its role in Pearl Harbor--but with 10 times the force! The crew of the Shinohara was trapped inside, and the Japanese spent the next six weeks investigating the reason for the tragedy, but to no avail. Many mysteries remain. Why were 100 bodies found inside the sub, when it was supposed to crew 70? Why didn't the sub resurface after the attack? Join our Deep Sea Detectives as they dive for the truth.
10-11:30pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Titanic: High Tech at Low Depth
In its day, the Titanic was a technological wonder. People were so enthralled with the largest moving man-made object in the world that they truly believed it unsinkable. Until it slipped out of sight on April 15, 1912. In a 90-minute special filled with spectacular footage of both recent and archival expeditions, we explore the history of the ship and the technology that finally found it and enabled exploration and salvaging dives.
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Tuesday, October 12, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Drag Racing
Legendary drivers lead us on a record-breaking race through a century-long search for sheer acceleration that began before World War One, when hot-rodders modified Model-T Fords to see how fast they could go. Today's dragsters can cover a quarter-mile from a standing start in 4.5 seconds, hitting top speeds above 330 mph. Top driver Gary Clapshaw shows us how to put together a modern dragster and revolutionary designer Bob Norwood unveils his newest car.
8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - The Gunslingers
In this series that provides an inside look at the inventions, advancements, concepts, and contraptions of America's Wild West past, host Keith Carradine highlights a special breed of man--the gunslinger--and his weapons of choice. Sometimes he wore a badge, sometimes he fought the law. But he always had a gun at his side--and the willingness to pull the trigger. Wild Bill Hickok, Jesse James, Wyatt Earp--we go behind the legends to see how these men were defined by the weapons they carried.
9-9:30pm -- Modern Marvels - Bullets
From "safe" bullets that stop hijackers but leave aircraft unscathed to bullets that chain-saw through steel and "smart" bullets computer-programmed to hit a target, this explosive hour examines the evolution of bullets from origin in the 1300s--stones and round lead balls shot from iron and bamboo tubes. Lead balls ruled until 1841 when a conical-shaped bullet changed ammo forever. We learn how to construct a modern cartridge, and at pistol and rifle ranges view demonstrations of modern firepower.
9:30-10pm -- Mail Call - #64
At ease, Private! R. Lee Ermey is your commanding officer in this weekly series that answers viewers' questions about military methods and technology with practical demonstrations by military experts. Viewers go on the frontlines, to foreign lands, and into basic training as Lee demonstrates the hows and whys behind weaponry, military hardware, vehicles, and jargon. It's a glimpse of military life and history that civilians rarely see.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 9
What happens when the calculations of builders and engineers prove wrong and their constructs come tumbling down? In this episode, we examine the 1987 failure of the Schoharie Creek Bridge in New York; the partial destruction by a runaway freighter of the Riverwalk Marketplace in New Orleans in 1996; the roof collapse of the Rosemont Horizon Arena in Illinois in 1979; the deadliest grain-dust explosion on record in Westwego, Louisiana, when a grain elevator exploded in 1977; and the crash of the British R101 airship in the 1920s.
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Wednesday, October 13, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - 4 X 4
In this full-immersion journey through the world of maximum off-roading, learn what it's like to blow the carbon out of your system as we trace the history of the four-wheel drive vehicle. From the annual Baja 1000-mile race to the Paris-to-Dakar rally, off-roading has become an international sport for motorized thrill seekers. Drive along in your Jeep, dune buggy, Hummer, or SUV for this high-adrenaline, fun-filled romp as we see why 4x4s go where no one has gone before!
8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Extreme Aircraft
Join us for a supersonic look at some of the most cutting-edge aircraft ever developed--from the X-1 that first broke the sound barrier to the X-43 Scramjet that recently flew at Mach 7. These extreme aircraft have made their mark on aeronautical history, and sometimes on political history as well. The U-2 and SR-71 spy planes played a crucial role in the Cold War, and now Lockheed Martin's top-secret "Skunkworks" division is touting the new "air dominance" fighter plane-- the F/A-22 Raptor.
9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Rubber
The story of rubber is more than tires, toys, gloves, and gum--it's imbedded in modern life, from the controversial Challenger O-rings to seals on hydrogen fuel cells. A gigantic worldwide synthetic rubber industry creates exotic elastomers for high-tech applications, while China's rapid industrialization plays havoc with the world's natural rubber supply. From the ancient Olmecs of Yucatán, who knew the secret of vulcanization, to modern processing plants, we trace rubber's history and future.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Sears Tower
Some 23,000 people walk through the Sears Tower's domed entrances daily. 104 elevators (some double-decker), moving at speeds up to 1,600 feet per minute, transport workers and visitors to the 110 floors of North America's tallest building. Sears, Roebuck and Company began as a small mail-order business in Chicago, and by 1960, had grown into the biggest global retailer. Sears Chairman Gordon Metcalf proposed bringing the company under one roof to create the world's largest headquarters. Join us for a look at this pioneering building that remains a symbol of the future and a tribute to the company that dreamt big enough to build it!
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Thursday, October 14, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engines
Story of the development of engines and motors, with particular emphasis on the ones that have profoundly changed society. Beginning with the steam engine, we see how it was created, how it works, and how it led to the Industrial Revolution. We review the electric motor, internal combustion engine, jet engine, and rocket engine, and conclude with a look at futuristic engine technologies, including hydrogen-powered cars and microtechnology engines so small that they fit on the tip of a finger.
8-10pm -- Time Machine -
On June 6, 1944, Allied aerial photo reconnaissance flew 25 sorties along the Normandy beaches to record hour-by-hour progress of D-Day. Recently rediscovered and included in our 2-hour special, the photographs had only been seen by a handful of people. Now, for the first time in 60 years, the images reveal history in the making. Using revolutionary computer software to bring the aerial photos alive, we fly along the D-Day beaches. Features firsthand accounts from U.S., U.K., and German veterans.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - D-Day Tech
By the spring of 1942, Hitler had made a fortress of Europe, and the Allies began to plan the biggest invasion in military history. The history-altering success of the D-Day Invasion depended on innovative engineering and technological advances. This is the story of those scientific and mechanical breakthroughs--the overwhelming array of landing craft, specialized weapons, and ingenious electronics--used to breach Fortress Europe on June 6, 1944.
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Friday, October 15, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Wheel
Spinning your wheels isn't just going around in circles. In fact, it's revolutionary--literally. The history of civilization has turned on the wheel, and we have traveled as far as we have because of it. One of the six simple machines and perhaps the most important invention in the history of mankind, the wheel has been essential in all aspects of life--from farming to fighting, traveling to trading. Features interviews with scientists, historians, philosophers, millers, potters, and spinners.
8-9pm -- P-51 Mustang!
Originally built for the RAF, the USAAF's P-51 Mustang became one of the greatest fighter planes ever made and took on the worst that the Luftwaffe had to offer. The pilots of the 8th Air Force dramatically turned the tide of the air war in Europe when they saved the U.S. daylight bombing campaign over Nazi-occupied Europe by flying escort. We take you inside the cockpit of the "Cadillac of the Skies" to experience firsthand the terrifying reality of aerial combat over Berlin in WWII.
9-9:30pm -- Decisive Battles - Ramses II
One of Egypt's greatest pharaohs, Ramses II, confronts the biggest menace to his reign at the Battle of Kadesh (circa 1300 BC). The Hittite King Muwatallish gathered his allies against Ramses' army, positioning his forces in an ambush behind the hill at Kadesh. The battle, fought on the banks of the Orontes River in Syria, is the earliest battle for which true military tactics are known. We'll review the official, detailed account left by Ramses II of the battle, and see why, though it did not end in victory for either side, its outcome provided a century of stability in the region.
9:30-10pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Gettysburg
Journey back to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania,1863, to a battle that will become the turning point of the American Civil War. The South's General Robert E. Lee has won battle after battle against the Union Army. A frustrated President Lincoln has just appointed General George Meade as Commander of the Army of the Potomac. Lee is threatening Washington and the North--Meade must succeed! By pushing his army, marshalling his resources, and tactically outwitting a master, Meade enables the Union forces to fight another day.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Guns of the Civil War
It was a war in which brother fought brother and battlefields became slaughterhouses. During the Civil War, the country was in the midst of an industrial revolution and developed the most destructive killing machines the world had ever seen. Join us for a test fire of Civil War guns--the first truly modern weapons.
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Saturday, October 16, 2004
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7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - Majestic Twelve: UFO Cover-Up.
What really happened in Roswell, New Mexico in the
summer of 1947? Did a flying saucer crash in the vast
desert scrubland? The initial Army Air Force press
release claimed they had recovered a flying disk. But
a day later, the story dramatically changed--now they
called it a weather balloon! In 1987, secret documents
surfaced indicating the existence of the "Majestic
12"--an elite group of scientists and military and
intelligence officials, allegedly brought together by
President Harry Truman. Did the MJ-12 truly exist? If
so, did these men forever trivialize the most
talked-about UFO event in history, as well as all UFO
sightings thereafter?

8-10pm -- Movies in Time - 
Movie. Tom Selleck plays General Dwight D. "Ike"
Eisenhower in this sweeping story of the tense days
leading up to the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied
Europe in WWII. Ike confronts seemingly insurmountable
problems--not enough landing craft, tanks may get
stuck on the beaches, paratroopers may be massacred in
the sky, and weather threatens to doom the operation.
Ike must make tough decisions--and accept the blame if
the invasion fails! With Timothy Bottoms as Beetle
Smith. (2004)

10-11pm -- Time Machine - 
It's perhaps the most widely discussed and hotly
debated era in U.S. history. We know all about the
glorious battles and godlike generals. But what about
life after the lights went out? More than 50,000 books
have been written about the Civil War, and yet, hardly
a peep about sex. Only one book, in fact, deals
directly and exclusively with the topic and reveals
the secrets that have long been hidden in history's
closet. Join us as we lift the covers on sexual
practices during the Civil War.

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Sunday, October 17, 2004
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7-8pm -- Investigating History - Wyatt Earp at the
O.K. Corral 
Virtually unknown to history before Hollywood crafted
his saga in the 1930s, Wyatt Earp was an itinerant
gambler, convicted horse thief and pimp, sometime
saloonkeeper, and occasional lawman. We investigate
this last incarnation and the shootout with the
Clanton gang in Tombstone's O.K. Corral. Did Earp hide
behind his tarnished badge to settle personal scores?
Using court records of the gunfight investigation, we
cut through the lingering gunsmoke to recreate the
reality of the bloody gunfight.

8-9pm -- Punishment - 
The definition and exercise of criminal punishment has
changed dramatically during the course of history.
From execution by wild animals during ancient Greek
and Roman times, to religious torture during the
Inquisition using the most perverse instruments ever
devised, to the cruel and unusual punishments meted
out by many nations to this day, we trace the often
ironic history of man's perverted and creative
attempts to bring about a more "humane" society.

9-10pm -- Horrors at Andersonville Prison: The Trial
of Henry Wirz - 
An angry peace lay over Washington during the summer
of 1865, following the Civil War's end and President
Lincoln's assassination. This was the tense atmosphere
surrounding the trial and execution of Captain Henry
Wirz, commandant of Andersonville Prison, where 13,000
Union POWs perished. In a collision of vengeance and
justice, his trial proved a pivotal point in the
nation's reconstruction. We illustrate the horrors of
the prison camp, the drama of Wirz's trial, and the
roles that others--from both South and North--may have
played in the Andersonville atrocities, and see why
the controversial trial, one of the nation's first war
crime tribunals, created enduring moral and legal
notions.

10-11pm -- Conspiracy? - FDR and Pearl Harbor.
The attack on Pearl Harbor shocked the nation. To
many, the official explanations of misguided
assumptions and missed clues did not account for the
enormity of the catastrophe. We examine "alternative"
theories that arose soon after the attack. Was a plot
hatched in Washington to solve FDR's
"problem"--convincing a reluctant country to fight the
Nazis? Did FDR send a secret cable just days before
the attack ordering Pearl Harbor chiefs to stand down?
Did U.S. intelligence intercept a message from Tokyo
asking its spies in Hawaii to map the harbor for an
imminent air attack? More than six decades later, the
controversy boils under the surface of recent U.S.
history, igniting heated debates over collusion,
intrigue, and thousands of American dead.

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Monday, October 18, 2004
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7-8pm -- Investigating History - Lincoln: Man or Myth?
Abraham Lincoln remains our country's most beloved
president--but nearly 200 years after his birth, we're
still trying to piece together a true picture of this
man who never fails to fascinate, surprise, and
enlighten us. Scholars and historians examine how
Lincoln became a myth. Was he really the Great
Emancipator who deeply wanted to free slaves or a
racist and white supremacist? Did the writings that
inspired a nation truly come from his pen? Do we
really even know what he looked like?

8-9pm -- UFO Files - UFOs: Then and Now? Aliens and
Contact.
On July 11,1991, thousands across Mexico looked
skyward during a total eclipse and were greeted with a
wave of UFO sightings. Was this a prelude to imminent
contact? Or will humans get to them first? Join us for
a review of mankind's efforts to reach out to
Extraterrestrial Intelligence as we listen for a
signal that we are not alone!

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Mystery Sinking in
Bermuda.
On December 30, 1879, the iron 3-masted sailing ship
North Carolina set out from Bermuda laden with cotton
and bound for England. But 36 hours later, in the wee
hours of New Year's Day, this brand new ship became
yet another victim of the deadly circle of reefs that
surround this lonely outpost in the Atlantic. Hosts
John Chatterton and Melanie Paul join marine
archaeologists from the Bermuda Maritime Museum to
solve the mystery of the North Carolina's sinking. But
while they examine the wreck and dig into records,
puzzling facts emerge. As the mystery deepens, our
Deep Sea Detectives must decide whether negligence,
bad luck, or foul play sent her to the ocean's bottom.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - Dalton Gang Raid.
On October 5, 1892, the Dalton Gang rode into history
with a bold attempt to rob two banks at once in
Coffeyville, Kansas. Brothers Bob, Grat, and Emmett
Dalton, Bill Powers, and Dick Broadwell attempted to
accomplish what no other outlaw gang had ever
done--all were killed except Emmett, who, after
recovering from his wounds, was sentenced to life in
prison, though he was later pardoned. What really
happened on that fateful day near the lawless border
of Oklahoma and the Indian Territories? What went
wrong from the Dalton's perspective, and conversely,
what went right for the citizens who stood up to the
gang?

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Tuesday, October 19, 2004
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7-8pm -- History's Mysteries - Ship of Gold.
In 1857, en route to New York from California, the
steamship Central America vanished in a killer storm
off North Carolina's coast, taking with her 400
passengers and nearly 21 tons of gold bullion. Here is
the story of the worst U.S. peacetime sea disaster,
and how high-tech treasure hunters recovered her
fortune over 130 years later.

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Outlaw Tech.
We think of outlaws as a primitive bunch, but these
badmen were ahead of their time and took advantage of
new technology. Host Keith Carradine shows how
dynamite and the telegraph assisted criminals, and how
photography stole their anonymity. As the 20th century
approached, the technology that had helped them outrun
authorities caught up with them in the form of a new
invention--the automobile. Butch Cassidy, Jesse James,
Henry Starr, Black Jack Ketchum, and a few others make
appearances.

9-10pm -- R. Lee Ermey in Afghanistan - 
Join the Gunny on a trip to Afghanistan and see what
it takes to fight on the frontline in the War on
Terrorism. Starting with an Air Force C-17 flight into
the heart of the war, you'll experience an armed
patrol into the countryside; learn how to clear a
minefield; call in an airstrike; and ride along on a
helicopter trip into the mountains as our troops root
out the bad guys.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 10.
Disasters investigated include: the 1984 Union Carbide
debacle in Bhopal, India, where a toxic chemical
release killed 3,800 people and left 11,000 with
disabling respiratory ailments; and the 2003 sudden
collapse of a 10-story parking garage at the Tropicana
in Atlantic City, New Jersey that killed four and
injured 20. We find out why a series of structures in
Hutchinson, Kansas mysteriously caught fire and
exploded in 2001; and examine the 1933 construction of
a canal ordered by Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin that
later proved to be nearly useless and cost many lives.
And we get to the bottom of a maritime mystery, when a
tanker carrying non-explosive materials in San
Francisco Bay blew up in 1983.

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Wednesday, October 20, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Car Crashes.
In the mid-1960s, the U.S. lost an average of 55,000
people yearly to car crashes. Since then, the number
of cars on the road has doubled, but fatalities have
decreased by nearly a third. The dramatic reduction is
the culmination of research and development that led
to safer roads and cars and quicker emergency
response. But car-crash technology's future involves
removal of its biggest threat--human drivers! Find out
if computers and radar can prevent everything from
fender-benders to pile-ups.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Presidential Movers.
The vehicles that transport the President of the
United States aren't your ordinary planes, trains, and
automobiles. They are top-secret. And for your Average
Joe, there's only two ways to find out what they're
really like inside--either get elected or stay
tuned...

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Extreme Trucks.
Hop into the cab for the ride of your life as we
examine extreme trucks, including: a jet truck that
can travel 300 mph; the Baltimore Technical Assistance
Response Unit's mobile command truck; a garbage truck
with an articulated arm; a concrete pumper truck with
telescoping boom and pumping mechanism; and a
4-wheel-drive truck that can convert from mower to
street sweeper to backhoe to snow blower in mere
minutes. Learn how SWAT, bomb squad, HAZMAT, and crime
scene specialty trucks are built.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Gas Tech.
Gas--it makes a balloon go up, cooks our food, and
fills our lungs. But this invisible state of matter
does far more, and has a very visible impact on the
world. We follow natural gas from well tip to stove
top and trace its use from 3rd century BC Chinese salt
producers to modern appliances. Next, we investigate
the most plentiful gas in the
universe--hydrogen--which may also prove to be the
most powerful. We also experience the cryogenic world
of industrial gasses--what they do and where they come
from--as we travel to the British Oxygen Company's
Braddock Air Separation Plant to see how they freeze
millions of tons of oxygen and nitrogen. And at the
Bush Dome Helium Reserve in Texas, we learn why the
U.S. government sits atop 36 billion cubic feet of the
stuff. Finally, we look inside the colorful world of
gas and neon lights. So lay back, breathe deep, and
count backwards from 10...

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Thursday, October 21, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Nuclear Subs.
The most priceless jewels in the arsenals of a handful
of countries, some nuclear submarines carry more
firepower than all the bombs dropped in history. Since
the 1950s, these lethal steel sharks have been a
cornerstone of American defense policy. The Cold War
launched an underwater race for supremacy with the
Soviet Union. The result: engineering miracles, which
roam 70% of the earth's surface, providing deterrence
to enemies, intelligence about adversaries, and an
abiding sense of dread.

8-10pm -- Rumrunners, Moonshiners... - 
Heroes who fight tax collectors and moral crusaders,
or just common criminals? Like it or not, America was
built by rumrunners, moonshiners, and
bootleggers--even founding father John Hancock was a
smuggler. In the 1920s, Prohibition turned fishermen
into rumrunners and two-bit gangsters into
millionaires, and moonshine haulers in their souped-up
cars helped create NASCAR. Rare archival footage and
photos help weave the compelling tale of our nation's
love-hate relationship with illegal alcohol.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Distilleries.
From water and grain...to mash...still...vat...barrel
and bottle--the distilling of alcoholic spirits is a
big business and near-sacred religion. Its acolytes
eye the color, swirl the glass, inhale the bouquet,
sip, then ponder their ambrosia. What's your pleasure?
Bourbon, Scotch, Rum, Gin, Vodka, or Tequila? We trace
the history of distilling from the one-man/one-still
tradition to the Voldstead Act of 1920 that devastated
American distilleries to the mega-sales and
high-volume distillery of today.

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Friday, October 22, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Home Tech.
From the outhouse to the smart house, our lives have
improved drastically in the last 150 years. Today,
there are fully automated homes in which everything,
from the home theater to the outdoor waterfall, can be
operated at the push of a button. But life wasn't
always so easy for homemakers who were wrapped in the
"drudgery of the dishcloth." Other great gadgets
examined include the dishwasher, SOS pads, garbage
disposals, Teflon-coated pans, the Jacuzzi, hair
dryers, and the recliner chair.

8-9pm -- Time Machine - 
After the end of WWII, Allied forces faced guerrilla
bombings and attacks in occupied Germany--Nazi
loyalists tried to derail reconstruction by sabotage
and killing collaborators, while Werewolves, an
underground organization of die-hard SS officers,
boasted of rebirth of the Party. Find out if their
bark was worse than their bite in this dogged
investigation into how Werewolves terrorized military
and civilian targets, and the Allied attempt to purge
Germany's past at denazification tribunals.

9-9:30pm -- Decisive Battles - Herman the German.
Teutoburg Forest, 9 AD. According to the Roman
historian Dio, Arminius (aka Herman), Chief of the
Cherusci, and his father Segemerus, ambushed and wiped
out three legions led by Quinctilius Varus. Not a good
day to be out in the woods of Germany if you were a
Roman. Strung out and unprepared for battle, the
Romans were lulled into a false sense of security and
led into the middle of a dense forest and ambushed in
the heavy rain. The slaughter--which was total--lasted
for three days in a mountain range in the northwest of
Germany, and left the Emperor Augustus lusting for
revenge and return of his legions' eagle standards.

9:30-10pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Little Big
Horn.
Angered by the population influx due to the Gold Rush
and hasty construction of a railroad through their
land, the Sioux tribes rebelled and abandoned the
reservations where they had been confined by the
federal government. General George Custer, confident
that the Sioux would flee, charged a major Sioux
village--the site of the rebellion. But Crazy Horse
and Sitting Bull led their people in a fierce
resistance. The Sioux surrounded Custer's force and
destroyed his army. Travel back to 1876 to southern
Montana, where the American Indian achieved his
greatest victory in battle against the United States
government.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Gunslingers.
During America's western expansion, a new breed of man
arose--the gunslinger. Sometimes he wore a badge,
sometimes he was an outlaw. But he always had a gun at
his side, and the urge to step to the edge and pull
the trigger. Wild Bill Hickok, Jesse James, Wyatt
Earp--see how, the weapons these men carried, etched
the gunmen's existence into American history.

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Saturday, October 23, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - FDR and Pearl Harbor.
The attack on Pearl Harbor shocked the nation. To
many, the official explanations of misguided
assumptions and missed clues did not account for the
enormity of the catastrophe. We examine "alternative"
theories that arose soon after the attack. Was a plot
hatched in Washington to solve FDR's
"problem"--convincing a reluctant country to fight the
Nazis? Did FDR send a secret cable just days before
the attack ordering Pearl Harbor chiefs to stand down?
Did U.S. intelligence intercept a message from Tokyo
asking its spies in Hawaii to map the harbor for an
imminent air attack? More than six decades later, the
controversy boils under the surface of recent U.S.
history, igniting heated debates over collusion,
intrigue, and thousands of American dead.

8-11pm -- Movies in Time - 
Movie. Charlton Heston, Henry Fonda, and Robert
Mitchum head an all-star cast in this epic WWII drama
depicting America's first major victory against the
Japanese in the Pacific. Near the tiny Island of
Midway, an outnumbered U.S. Navy defeats a massive
Japanese flotilla, turning the tide of the Pacific
Theater. (1976)

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Sunday, October 24, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Battle In The Atlantic - Hunt the Bismarck.
A colossus made of Krupp steel and armed to the teeth,
she was regarded as invincible--the most powerful
warship in the world. At the time of her launch, the
Bismarck was already a legend. Hitler expected her to
bring about the turning point in the battle of the
Atlantic before the U.S. finally entered the war. The
first opponent she encountered was the HMS Hood,
Britain's largest battleship, and a duel of giants
ensued. After she sank the Hood, the hunt for the
Bismarck was on. Thanks to the revolutionary new
technology of radar, the British succeeded in locating
the German battleship. Today, her wreckage lies 15,000
feet below the Atlantic. The Bismarck sank on May 27,
1941. Of the 2,221 men onboard, only 115 survived.

8-9pm -- Battle In The Atlantic - The Submarine War.
German submarines were among the most treacherous
weapons of WWII--30,000 Allied seamen fell victim to
them. The submarine commanders and crews were stylized
into heroes--yet they were hunters and hunted at the
same time. Three out of four did not survive their
missions. Here, survivors from both sides report on
the submarine war, a gruesome chapter in the
catastrophic war unleashed by Adolf Hitler. By 1942,
Admiral Karl Dönitz's men were everywhere--from the
Caribbean to the Arctic Ocean. Ultimately, the U-boats
were unable to prevent the Allies from landing in
North Africa. And yet, Hitler continued to rely on
them and his loyal vassal Dönitz. But increasingly,
German U-boats were becoming a death trap for both the
enemy and their own crews.

9-10pm -- Battle In The Atlantic - Turning Point.
In mid-1941, the British pulled off an enormous coup:
They bombarded U-110 and forced the submarine to
surface. The pickings were rich--what fell into their
hands was nothing less than an Enigma machine,
providing the key to the German Navy's secret code.
The machine allowed experts to decipher Admiral Karl
Dönitz's radio commands to his officers and, even more
important, reveal the positions of German submarines.
The Germans knew nothing of the capture, which was to
play a decisive role in the Battle of the Atlantic.

10-11pm -- Conspiracy? - Anthrax Attacks.
Two weeks after the 9/11 tragedy, news outlets in New
York and Florida became targets of the first
biowarfare attack in U.S. history as recipients of
letters tainted with anthrax. Soon, prominent U.S.
Senators received tainted envelopes. Within weeks,
five people were dead, 17 seriously sickened, and
thousands exposed to the bacterium. The second pair of
letters contained refined anthrax that could only be
prepared by scientists in tightly controlled
environments. The most startling discovery--it was a
variety of the Ames strain, long favored by and under
the control of the U.S. biodefense community. Can the
FBI solve this mystery? Or is it anxious to protect
our government from questions about rogue scientists
and a bioweapons program supposedly discontinued in
1972?

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Monday, October 25, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Military Movers.
The challenge: Move millions of soldiers and tons of
cargo halfway around the world and into the thick of
action. How? Use the biggest ships, the widest planes,
and the strongest trucks. Today, military planners
move men and equipment further and faster than ever.
The United States Transportation Command, answering to
the Department of Defense, runs military transport
like an efficient private shipping and travel agency.
From the Civil War to U.S. Transcom, we track the
development of military logistics.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - UFOs in the Bible.
Journey back through time into the mysterious world of
UFOs as revealed through ancient biblical texts.
Through intensive reinterpretation of early religious
documents, researchers believe that they have found
evidence of ancient UFO activity. From Elijah's flying
"chariots of fire" to Ezekiel's "wheels within wheels
in the sky," and even the enigmatic aerial phenomenon
leading Moses during the Exodus, we put a modern
perspective on the writings of the Bible in the
context of UFOs.

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Mystery U-boat of
World War I..
In 1985, a WWI German submarine, the UB-107, was
discovered off the English coast, 100 feet down at the
bottom of the North Sea. But according to history
books, the UB-107 was attacked and sunk 30 miles away!
And, as divers make their way along the wreck, they
discover, entangled in her wreckage, the British
steamship Malvina. But according to WWI archives, the
Malvina went down six days after the UB-107 and 30
miles away! Host John Chatterton travels to the
English coast to dive on both wrecks in the dark and
murky North Sea, and meet up with historians and
divers who help him piece together clues left by these
two WWI ghosts.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - Taking out Al
Capone.
Most people know that the Federal government finally
locked up Al Capone for tax evasion, and believe that
the man who really brought him down was his archenemy,
U.S. Treasury Agent Eliot Ness. But there's much more
to the story. After the St. Valentine's Day Massacre
in 1929, a group of Chicago businessmen, "The Secret
Six", decided to put an end to Capone's 7-year reign
as crime king. They enlisted President Hoover and
helped to finance intelligence agents to unravel
Capone's business operations. Hoover sent two groups
of special agents to infiltrate the Capone gang. We
look at new evidence, uncovered by a university
professor, that shows why Capone was indicted on
income tax evasion instead of breaking Prohibition,
and why a plea bargain was abruptly taken off the
table by the trial judge.

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Tuesday, October 26, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Fire and Ice.
Who could imagine life without our "man-made weather"?
On cold winter nights and hot summer days, we are
forever grateful to the visionaries who took two basic
elements--fire and ice--and turned them into true
modern marvels. Fire warmed the caves and primitive
dwellings of mankind for centuries, yet the technology
of keeping cool lagged far behind as we learn in this
chronicle of heating and air conditioning that covers
advancements from the home and industry to outer space
and beyond!

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Cowboy Tech.
A no-bull episode that roams the range hunting for the
gritty truth behind the Old West's most enduring
figure. Host Keith Carradine examines the cowboy's
trade tools--from saddle to spurs--and undergoes the
dangers of a cattle drive. Reenactments show off
cowboy skills, including roping, riding, shooting, and
branding, as we see how the tradition lives on in
rodeos. And, we shoot down reputations as we look
behind the myths of legendary cowboys like John Wesley
Hardin, Billy the Kid, and Tom Horn.

9-10pm -- How They Won with Mo Rocca - 
Hallowed principles, lofty ideas, substantive social
agendas--all vital to a successful bid for the highest
office in the land. But according to history, offering
American voters ideas to aid the poor, defeat enemies,
and better the human race isn't all it takes to win
the White House. Pop cultural historian Mo Rocca
delves into the history of America's presidential
elections and takes a hard look at some of the other,
less weighty topics that shaped past winners and
losers. Can hairstyle make or break a campaign? What
kind of pet will attract the most votes? Is having a
drunken criminal for a brother actually a benefit?
Hosting the show from Grant's Tomb, Mo offers answers
to these and many more questions, and gleans seven
secrets for winning the presidency that contenders
won't want to miss!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 11.
Join us for look into five engineering disasters... A
dangerous cloud of gas explodes into Cleveland's worst
fiery industrial disaster in 1944, killing 128 people.
A dance competition turns deadly at the new Kansas
City Hyatt in 1981, when a skywalk gives way and kills
114. In 1995, neighbors gaped at the spectacle of a
$1.5-million San Francisco Bay area mansion breaking
into bits as it fell into a massive sinkhole during a
rainstorm. In 1931, one of the worst "natural"
disasters ever occurred in the Yangtze River basin
when six huge flood waves swept down the river
destroying the insufficient dams and levees and
killing at least 145,000 people. The "miracle mineral"
that the U.S. was built upon turns out to be an
invisible killer--an estimated 10,000 people die each
year from asbestos-related diseases.

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Wednesday, October 27, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Terror Tech: Military.
The chance of enemy confrontation by sea, tank, or air
battle is small, but terrorist networks operating in
the shadows will likely challenge the U.S again.
Instead of waiting to react, the military's new
mission is to detect, deter, and defend America from
terrorist attack. We examine cutting-edge technology
that leads the fight in this new battle landscape,
including Smart Bombs, Tactical Ballistic-Missile
Systems, GPS-driven technology, Electro-Optical
Systems, and the pilotless drone Predator.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Breaking the Sound Barrier.
For decades, the sound barrier loomed as an
impenetrable wall against manned flight that buffeted
planes with shock waves as they approached the speed
of sound. Scientists thought the barrier couldn't be
breached--until the development of jet technology and
rocket fuel at the end of WWII. This is the dramatic
story, told through the eyes of many who were there,
of the work leading up to October 10, 1947, when
24-year-old test pilot Chuck Yeager smashed through
the sound barrier in a Bell XS-1 aircraft.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Chesapeake Bay Bridge &
Tunnel.
Named one of the seven engineering wonders of the
modern age, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and Tunnel
connects Virginia proper with its easternmost
landmass. Stretching 17 miles across the historic
Chesapeake Bay, the structure represents a man-made
boundary between the Bay and the Atlantic. The
structure includes two two-lane highways supported
mostly by trestles, four man-made and one natural
island, two truss bridges, and two revolutionary
sunken tube tunnels.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The World's Longest
Bridge.
Bridges are the lifeline of Japan. Since the 1930s,
the island nation has dreamt of linking its many parts
as a whole. But WWII diverted the incredible resources
needed to accomplish this, and only since 1960 has the
dream moved again, slowly, toward reality. The final
step in this massive undertaking was the Akashi-Kaikyo
Bridge, the longest single-span suspension bridge in
the world. This marvel of architectonics stands as a
testament to the genius of Asian engineering and,
judged in a context that perhaps the Japanese
understand best, as the most beautiful bridge in the
world. We'll watch it rise, from sketch to completion,
and see how it fared during the massive Kobe
earthquake.

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Thursday, October 28, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 8.
Join us for a devastating but enlightening hour as we
delve into complex and often-tragic engineering
failures that have shaped our world. Five dramatic
events unfold as we discover the causes of: the 1983
collapse of New England's Mianus Bridge; the sinking
of the Ocean Ranger offshore oilrig in 1982; the crash
of a Learjet 35 private plane carrying pro-golfer
Payne Stewart in 1999; the 19th-century failure of
South Fork Dam that resulted in the flooding of
Johnstown, Pennsylvania; and the 1988 PEPCON (Pacific
Engineering Production Company of Nevada) jet fuel
plant explosion.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - 
From 1939-1945, Germany and Japan forged a strategic
alliance that included logistical support from both
sides and a range of technical cooperation, as well as
jointly supporting major anti-British uprisings in
India. In perhaps the boldest scheme, they conspired
to destroy the Panama Canal. We'll review their
wartime union.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Japanese Sub at Pearl
Harbor.
The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was a move of
unprecedented aggression that shook the U.S. out of
its peaceful slumber and into WWII. But for 60 years,
veterans of the destroyer USS Ward claimed that they
sank an enemy submarine outside the harbor more than
an hour before the aerial attack began. The wreck was
never found, and the story was dismissed. However, in
August 2002, a dive team crossed its path and their
find made headlines worldwide. We travel to Pearl
Harbor to investigate the midget sub mystery.

____________________________________________________

Friday, October 29, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Cemeteries.
More than 2-million people die in the U.S. each year.
That works out to about 5,500 burials a day, with
roughly 80 percent taking the long goodbye in a
casket, and the remaining 20 percent electing to be
cremated or finding some alternative method of
crossing eternity's threshold. We take a look at
dealing with the dead throughout the centuries, and at
today's $20-billion funeral industry. Any way you look
at it, it's a healthy business, with new generations
of customers year after year!

8-9pm -- Making History with Roger Mudd - A
Conversation with Walter Cronkite.
In a free-ranging and candid interview, Roger Mudd
sits with one-time colleague, CBS anchorman Walter
Cronkite. Mudd and Cronkite revisit their shared
history at the "Tiffany" network--from dawn of the TV
age through the tumultuous 1960s and '70s. Cronkite
also digs into his past for harrowing tales from the
frontlines of WWII--when he crossed the line between
reporter and soldier to shoot at German planes--to the
frontlines of Vietnam, when he broke the reporter's
rule of neutrality and let America know what he
thought we should do about the war. He fought tears
the day JFK was killed and fought CBS to deliver the
Watergate story. He sets the story straight on his
1981 exit from CBS, and is more provocative than ever
as he defines his outlook on the War in Iraq and the
state of the news.

9-9:30pm -- Decisive Battles - Cannae.
Cannae, Italy, August 216 BC. In a classic example of
double-envelopment maneuver, Hannibal inflicts the
greatest ever defeat on the forces of Rome. A mighty
Roman army, eight legions strong, marches out to crush
the Carthaginian general on an open battlefield.
Though Hannibal has far fewer men at his disposal, and
none of his famous elephants, he manages to surround
and slaughter the superior Roman force. See why
Hannibal's military genius is still being lauded and
taught in academies today. Hosted by Matthew Settle
(Band of Brothers).

9:30-10pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Desert
Storm.
It's 1990. General "Stormin'" Norman Schwarzkopf has
been watching Saddam Hussein maneuver in the Middle
East. He knows that the Iraqi dictator has a massive
army and that he's capable of extreme brutality. Now,
Schwarzkopf sees signs that Hussein is about to launch
a massive invasion. Schwarzkopf is the hot-tempered
commander at the center of Operation Desert Storm.
It's up to him to drive Hussein out of Kuwait. His
main concern? Sparing the lives of his soldiers. But
the desert terrain is tough...the enemy ruthless...and
the orders from the White House nearly impossible to
achieve.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - M1 Abrams: Supertank!
Join us as we penetrate the history of the world's
most sophisticated tank--the M1 Abrams Main Battle
Tank. In the most radical departure in U.S. tank
design since WWII, the Supertank combines speed, heavy
protective armor, and a fearsome 120mm main gun. In
1991, the new and unproven Abrams tank was deployed in
Operation Desert Storm. Using night vision and laser
targeting, the M1 Abrams tank destroyed Saddam
Hussein's armored Republican Guard, and is again doing
desert duty in the War in Iraq.

____________________________________________________

Saturday, October 30, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - Anthrax Attacks.
Two weeks after the 9/11 tragedy, news outlets in New
York and Florida became targets of the first
biowarfare attack in U.S. history as recipients of
letters tainted with anthrax. Soon, prominent U.S.
Senators received tainted envelopes. Within weeks,
five people were dead, 17 seriously sickened, and
thousands exposed to the bacterium. The second pair of
letters contained refined anthrax that could only be
prepared by scientists in tightly controlled
environments. The most startling discovery--it was a
variety of the Ames strain, long favored by and under
the control of the U.S. biodefense community. Can the
FBI solve this mystery? Or is it anxious to protect
our government from questions about rogue scientists
and a bioweapons program supposedly discontinued in
1972?

8-10pm -- Movies in Time - 
Movie. The true story of the "Lost Battalion" of U.S.
soldiers--a group of Irish, Italian, Jewish, and
Polish "gangsters" from New York who were trapped
behind enemy lines in World War One and fought
heroically against the odds. Rick Schroder stars as
battalion leader Major Charles Whittlesey, the
civilian-turned-soldier who won the Congressional
Medal of Honor for keeping his outnumbered troops
alive and fighting in the face of seemingly
insurmountable odds. (2001)

10-12am -- The Face of Evil: Reinhard Heydrich - 
Reinhard Eugen Tristan Heydrich was arguably the most
enigmatic Nazi leader, and as the "Final Solution"
architect, definitely the most murderous as we see in
a 2-hour analysis of his meteoric rise to command over
the Gestapo, SS intelligence network, and
Czechoslovakia. In 1942, Heydrich was considered the
most dangerous man in Germany after Hitler. The Allied
plot to assassinate him--planned in England and
carried out in Prague--was the most brazen of its
kind. Narrated by Charlton Heston.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, October 31, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- The Haunted History of Halloween - 
On October 31, when pint-sized ghouls and goblins
trick or treat, they're upholding an ancient northern
European ritual dating back thousands of years. From
the Celtic festival of Samhain to the mumming
tradition and the Christian feast day All Hallows'
Eve, we find out why this night is the scariest of the
year!

8-9:30pm -- Witch Hunt - 
Devils, witches, ghostly apparitions, spectral
disturbances... Whether real or imaginary, the end
result proved ghastly--20 people tortured and hanged
in 1692. Mass hysteria? Psychological stress brought
on by the brutal Indian Wars? A devious act of
personal revenge? Drug-induced psychosis? Demonic
possession? Meld with the worldview of 17th-century
New England Puritans--to whom witchcraft was real,
dangerous, and a capital crime--as our vivid,
sometimes shocking, recreations reveal the horrifying
hardships of life and how superstition filled
inexplicable dark corners. Period transcripts,
diaries, and letters bring to life the infamous trials
and executions.

9:30-10:30pm -- Conspiracy? - Area 51.
Each day, they board unmarked 747s at a private
section of Las Vegas's McCarren Airport for
unscheduled flights to a base that doesn't officially
exist to work on projects so hush-hush that they can't
talk to their families about them. Welcome to Area 51!
Born in the Cold War along with flying saucers and
bomb shelters, Area 51 (aka Groom Lake or Dreamland)
became the Air Force's strategic test site for
top-secret planes and the mysterious Aurora
Project--and a symbol of the nefarious
military-industrial-intelligence complex. We interview
New York Times writer Phil Patton, author of
Dreamland: Travels inside the Secret World of Area 51
for an account of the "black projects", and visit the
tiny Nevada town of Rachel, which borders the
top-secret base, for a look into mysterious deaths of
base wrokers.

10:30-11:30pm -- Weird U.S - 
From Alaska to California to Florida--from all across
America we investigate macabre legends, peculiar
places, and strange stories that aren't written up in
history books, but merely whispered about in the Weird
U.S. In Morristown, New Jersey, our hosts and travel
guides Mark Scuerman and Mark Moran expose the
gruesome tale of a man who was hung in 1833,
dissected...then turned into wallets! In Tennessee,
Mark and Mark untangle the twisted tale of folks
claiming descent from the first American settlers--not
Pilgrims, but Melungeons. And after investigating Cold
War nuclear bunkers, they head to Florida to tour the
country's most unusual retirement community, where the
circus sideshow comes rest
______________________________________________________
Monday, November 1, 2004
______________________________________________________
8-10pm Investigating History: Genghis Khan
Genghis Khan conquered half the world and his barbarism influenced generation after generation. A brilliant and charismatic leader and military strategist, he united the nomadic Mongol tribes and left behind sons and grandsons to maintain the dynasty long after his death. And he left behind one of history's great mysteries--what happened to all the booty taken from conquered cities? Nothing has ever been found--not a goblet, coin, or statue, though gold, silver, and jewels flowed back to Mongolia like shining rivers. Legend suggests it was buried with the Great Khan and the gravedigger-soldiers killed to keep the gravesite secret. Our investigation follows clues uncovered by a Chicago attorney and passed on to an expeditionary team. There's no treasure map, but the path these scholars take provides insight into the Asian warlord and the continuing mystery of his burial place.
10-12am The Kings: From Babylon to Baghdad
The history of the hotspot now known as Iraq was written in blood. Ancient kings leading the world's first armies fought for total control of the fertile lands of Mesopotamia. Their cities and empires, the earliest on earth, rose and fell through warfare, invasion, and conquest. In the modern age, Iraq provided a stage for European imperialism and more recently, a focal point in U.S. foreign policy. Our 2-hour look at this historical ground zero recounts its story through its leaders, from Sargon the Great to Saddam Hussein, and brings its history to life with compelling dramatic recreations, captivating location photography, and archaeological artifacts. Notable historians, scholars, experts, and policy makers draw connections and relevance between ancient and modern Iraq through its government, culture, and religion

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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