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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Monday, November 1, 2004
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7-8pm -- How They Won with Mo Rocca - 
Hallowed principles, lofty ideas, substantive social
agendas--all vital to a successful bid for the highest
office in the land. But according to history, offering
American voters ideas to aid the poor, defeat enemies,
and better the human race isn't all it takes to win
the White House. Pop cultural historian Mo Rocca
delves into the history of America's presidential
elections and takes a hard look at some of the other,
less weighty topics that shaped past winners and
losers. Can hairstyle make or break a campaign? What
kind of pet will attract the most votes? Is having a
drunken criminal for a brother actually a benefit?
Hosting the show from Grant's Tomb, Mo offers answers
to these and many more questions, and gleans seven
secrets for winning the presidency that contenders
won't want to miss!

8-10pm -- Investigating History - Genghis Khan.
Genghis Khan conquered half the world and his
barbarism influenced generation after generation. A
brilliant and charismatic leader and military
strategist, he united the nomadic Mongol tribes and
left behind sons and grandsons to maintain the dynasty
long after his death. And he left behind one of
history's great mysteries--what happened to all the
booty taken from conquered cities? Nothing has ever
been found--not a goblet, coin, or statue, though
gold, silver, and jewels flowed back to Mongolia like
shining rivers. Legend suggests it was buried with the
Great Khan and the gravedigger-soldiers killed to keep
the gravesite secret. Our investigation follows clues
uncovered by a Chicago attorney and passed on to an
expeditionary team. There's no treasure map, but the
path these scholars take provides insight into the
Asian warlord and the continuing mystery of his burial
place.

10-12am -- The Kings: From Babylon to Baghdad - 
The history of the hotspot now known as Iraq was
written in blood. Ancient kings leading the world's
first armies fought for total control of the fertile
lands of Mesopotamia. Their cities and empires, the
earliest on earth, rose and fell through warfare,
invasion, and conquest. In the modern age, Iraq
provided a stage for European imperialism and more
recently, a focal point in U.S. foreign policy. Our
2-hour look at this historical ground zero recounts
its story through its leaders, from Sargon the Great
to Saddam Hussein, and brings its history to life with
compelling dramatic recreations, captivating location
photography, and archaeological artifacts. Notable
historians, scholars, experts, and policy makers draw
connections and relevance between ancient and modern
Iraq through its government, culture, and religion.

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Tuesday, November 2, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 10.
Disasters investigated include: the 1984 Union Carbide
debacle in Bhopal, India, where a toxic chemical
release killed 3,800 people and left 11,000 with
disabling respiratory ailments; and the 2003 sudden
collapse of a 10-story parking garage at the Tropicana
in Atlantic City, New Jersey that killed four and
injured 20. We find out why a series of structures in
Hutchinson, Kansas mysteriously caught fire and
exploded in 2001; and examine the 1933 construction of
a canal ordered by Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin that
later proved to be nearly useless and cost many lives.
And we get to the bottom of a maritime mystery, when a
tanker carrying non-explosive materials in San
Francisco Bay blew up in 1983.

8-10pm -- Hitler: Tyrant of Terror - 
In a 2-hour profile, we see how various aspects of
Adolf Hitler's personality were reflected in German
policy and the conduct of the war. As Hitler
consolidated power, he created a climate of fear while
anesthetizing the masses with the cult of the
"Führer". We also examine his macabre philosophy, from
birth of his anti-Semitism to state-sanctioned mass
murder. Rare extracts from speeches, eyewitness
accounts, and startling film footage create a shocking
psychological portrait.

10-12am -- Stalin: Man of Steel - 
In almost three decades in power, Joseph
Stalin--self-named Man of Steel--transformed his
country from peasant society to nuclear superpower. It
was a brutal, murderous journey filled with intrigue
and assassination. Along the way, 20-million Russians
died--victims of one of the 20th century's towering
figures, and one of history's greatest tyrants.
Features rare archive film and accounts from Stalin's
bodyguard, cameraman, victims, secret police, Gulag
wardens, and survivors of his family.

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Wednesday, November 3, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Presidential Movers.
The vehicles that transport the President of the
United States aren't your ordinary planes, trains, and
automobiles. They are top-secret. And for your Average
Joe, there's only two ways to find out what they're
really like inside--either get elected or stay
tuned...

8-10pm -- Spartacus, Part 1 - 
Movie. By 72 BC, the Roman Empire had swept across the
European continent, conquering countries and selling
the people into slavery. But one slave dared to take a
stand. This is the story of Spartacus (Goran Visnjic),
from the country of Thrace, who, after witnessing his
father's brutal death and enduring being sold into
slavery, swears to one day live again as a free man.
Based on Howard Fast's acclaimed novel, the miniseries
was filmed in Bulgaria and directed by Robert
Dornhelm. The cast includes Alan Bates, Assen
Blatechki, Ben Cross, Henry Simmons, Angus MacFadyen,
and Rhona Mitra. (2004)

10-12am -- Spartacus, Part 2 - 
Movie. The gladiator Spartacus leads the largest
uprising of escaped gladiators and slaves in Roman
history and nearly leads to the downfall of Rome.
During the battles against the Romans during the Third
Servile War, Spartacus became a legend. Based on
Howard Fast's acclaimed novel and directed by Robert
Dornhelm. The cast includes Alan Bates, Assen
Blatechki, Ben Cross, Henry Simmons, Angus MacFadyen,
and Rhona Mitra. (2004)

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Thursday, November 4, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Air Shows.
From barnstormers to Blue Angels, antique aircraft to
supersonic jets, each year there are an astonishing
425 air shows in America alone, entertaining over
18-million spectators. From futuristic festivals to
billion-dollar expos, we explore the world of amazing
aerobatics and their ever-evolving aircraft and see
how aviation technology has affected air shows--and
how air shows have advanced aviation. Find out why
these high-flying events are second only to baseball
as America's favorite family event.

8-10pm -- Dwight D. Eisenhower - 
A 2-hour profile of the man from Kansas who was
Supreme Allied Commander on D-Day and later U.S.
President. Learn about Ike's decision to attend West
Point; relationship with wife Mamie and alleged affair
with his secretary during WWII; how he manipulated
Churchill and FDR; and his White House years, when he
brought real change to America while seeming to run
the country from an easy chair. Features interviews
with Senators John McCain and Bob Dole, General Wesley
Clark, Tom Brokaw, and Walter Cronkite.

10-11pm -- D-Day to Berlin - The Struggle toward
Germany.
Hitler's armies were in headlong retreat. Paris was
liberated in August 1944, Brussels in the first week
of September. Only one thing stood between the Allies
and the German border--the Allied generals themselves.
In this hour, we see how the most basic debate
remained unsolved--how to conquer Germany itself.
Personality differences and radical disagreements over
strategy threatened to create a rift between
Eisenhower and Montgomery, and burst the alliance wide
open.

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Friday, November 5, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Codes.
Whenever a culture reaches a level of sophistication
in literacy, science, and language, codes spring up
spontaneously. As the social life of a community
increases in complexity, the demands for private
communication between two or more people inevitably
lead to cryptology--a system of secret symbolic
messages. We explore the rich history of communicating
with secret symbols--from Egyptian hieroglyphics to
Caesar's encrypted directives, from WWI and WWII
codebreakers to cyberspace.

8-9pm -- Julius Caesar - 
Profile of one of the world's greatest military minds,
ancient Rome's Julius Caesar, who romanced Cleopatra,
invented the 12-month calendar, and expanded the
boundaries of the empire, before being assassinated by
senators fearful of his growing power.

9-10pm -- Caligula: Reign of Madness - 
Caligula ruled the Roman Empire fewer than four years,
and was only 28 when assassinated by officers of his
guard in 41 AD. His reign was a legendary frenzy of
lunacy, murder, and lust. Between executions, he
staged spectacular orgies, made love to his sister,
and declared himself a living god. Join us for a look
at this devoted son, murderer, pervert, and loving
father whose anguished life was far more bizarre than
the myth that surrounds him.

10-11pm -- Ivan the Terrible: Might and Madness - 
The life of the bloodthirsty first Tsar of Russia.
Ivan killed his own son and had several of his wives
murdered.

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Saturday, November 6, 2004
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7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - Area 51.
Each day, they board unmarked 747s at a private
section of Las Vegas's McCarren Airport for
unscheduled flights to a base that doesn't officially
exist to work on projects so hush-hush they can't even
discuss them with their families. Welcome to Area 51!
Born in the Cold War along with flying saucers and
bomb shelters, Area 51 (aka Groom Lake or Dreamland)
became the Air Force's strategic test site for
top-secret planes and the mysterious Aurora
Project--and a symbol of the nefarious
military-industrial-intelligence complex. We interview
Phil Patton, author of Dreamland: Travels inside the
Secret World of Area 51 for an account of the "black
projects", and visit the tiny town of Rachel, which
borders the top-secret base, for a look into
mysterious deaths of base workers. 

8-10pm -- Movies in Time - 
Movie. Shot in Lithuania, this 2-part movie portrays
the life of one history's most feared men--Attila,
King of the Huns in the 5th century--and the Western
World's fate, represented by a rapidly diminishing
Roman Empire. Part 1 follows young Attila, who
survives the murder of his chieftain father and the
slaughter of his village, and goes on to become a
great warrior whose exploits draw the attention of
Roman General Flavius Aetius. Starring Gerard Butler,
Powers Boothe, and Alice Krige. (2001)

10-12am -- Movies in Time - 
Movie. After defeating his brother, Attila becomes
king and marries N'Kara--who tragically dies in
childbirth. Attila grows in power and, after a series
of triumphs over Roman fortifications in Gaul, finally
meets Aetius on the battlefield. The fate of each man
is intertwined in a tangled web of revenge, deception,
and betrayal--and the outcome of the Battle of Chalôns
will decide the fate of Western civilization. Starring
Gerard Butler, Powers Boothe, Tim Curry, and Simmone
Jade MacKinnon. (2001)

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Sunday, November 7, 2004
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6-8pm -- Movies in Time - 
Movie. After defeating his brother, Attila becomes
king and marries N'Kara--who tragically dies in
childbirth. Attila grows in power and, after a series
of triumphs over Roman fortifications in Gaul, finally
meets Aetius on the battlefield. The fate of each man
is intertwined in a tangled web of revenge, deception,
and betrayal--and the outcome of the Battle of Chalôns
will decide the fate of Western civilization. Starring
Gerard Butler, Powers Boothe, Tim Curry, and Simmone
Jade MacKinnon. (2001)

8-11pm -- The True Story of Alexander the Great - 
334 BC--a 20-year-old military commander from Northern
Greece set out to conquer the known world. During the
next 12 years, King Alexander of Macedon led 40,000
troops more than 20,000 miles, defeated the world's
most powerful ruler, King Darius of Persia, and
conquered West Asia before dying at age 32. In a
3-hour special, host Peter Woodward explores the true
story of Alexander the Great--a tale of conquest,
love, hate, revenge, and ultimately tragedy. He visits
locations of Alexander's youth, temples dedicated to
Greek gods where Alexander sought divine counsel, and
actual battlefields, as well as demonstrating his
signature battle plans and weaponry. How could one man
accomplish so much at such a young age? What led to
his demise? These questions drive our analysis of
Alexander's complex character, delicately balanced
between genius and insanity.

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Monday, November 8, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - U.S. Guns of World War II.
An examination of the weapons that battled through
surf and snow, dense jungle and choking dust...the
guns of the American GI. Though WWII introduced
instruments that pierced the dark and weapons that
released the power of the atom, the infantryman's guns
were designed decades before--but in dependability
they were unequaled.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Roswell: Final Declassification.
In 1947, a strange object fell from the sky near
Roswell, New Mexico, and controversy brewed over what
it really was. In November 2001, we convened a team of
experts at the National Archives for an exclusive
first look at the top-secret government files of the
UFO incident. We unveil the remaining classified
files--11 boxes with 17 notebooks of declassified
files, photos, transcripts and audiotapes of dozens of
witnesses, and 22 films and videos--in a definitive
statement on the 50-year-old mystery.

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Tugboat Down!
March 5, 1993, the tugboat Thomas Hebert, manned by a
crew of seven, left Virginia towing a barge loaded
with 8,500 tons of coal for Maine. Around midnight on
March 7, the captain and first mate went to bed,
leaving the wheelhouse to the relief captain and
relief mate. Suddenly, at about 3:00 a.m., the vessel
listed to starboard. The captain and first mate bolted
out of bed and shifted the throttles into neutral, but
to no avail. A blast of air and water blew captain and
first mate into the water, where they watched
helplessly as the tug went down. They're left in a
life raft alone, in the middle of the night, in the
middle of the ocean, wondering what sank the tug and
killed their five friends. Host John Chatterton is on
the case!

10-11pm -- Declassified. The Rise and Fall of the Wall
- 
Join us for a riveting hour about the brutal life and
catastrophic death of the Berlin Wall, central symbol
of the 20th century's longest and deadliest war, in
our series that mines formerly guarded vaults and
archives around the world to reveal untold stories. We
begin with the history of the conflict and technology
that built it, but quickly move to the escapes and
espionage tales that swirled around it. We learn about
a blunder that ended the Cold War and the demise of
the USSR. All the detail and drama is presented in a
non-stop, fast-moving montage, cut to a rock and roll
beat. Features rare footage, insider reports, and
exclusive interviews with major players, including
Mikhail Gorbachev and George H.W. Bush.

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Tuesday, November 9, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Berlin Wall.
During the Cold War, the Berlin Wall stood as a
forbidding barrier in an embattled world. Erected in
August 1961, the Wall system stretched 103 miles
through and around Berlin, locking in 1.3-million
people. 261 died trying to get over, under, around,
and through it. We review the daunting devices within
the Death Strip--one of the deadliest obstacle courses
ever--and the ingenious ways people ran it. When the
Wall fell with a thud in 1989, its pieces became
souvenirs or were recycled for new roads.

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Six-Shooter Tech.
Six-shooters--revolvers with six chambers--were as
common as cell phones in the Wild West, but when one
went off, it was more than annoying--it was most often
deadly. A priest, a 16-year-old boy sailing the world,
and a covey of cold-blooded killers all played
important parts in the development of this classic
western weapon. What was missing from Samuel Colt's
first revolving handgun? How did Smith & Wesson
exploit a technological edge to make millions of
dollars? Which six-shooter was prone to blowing up?
Join us for a bang-up hour as we examine the advances
that made the six-shooter safer and more reliable as a
first line of defense...and just as often, as a first
line of attack.

9-9:30pm -- Modern Marvels - Dangerous Cargo.
Toxic traffic is everywhere! An average of 800,000
shipments of hazardous materials hit our highways and
railways daily. From Wild West wooden crates filled
with explosives to HAZMAT containers of nuclear waste,
we shadow dangerous cargo. We ride shotgun on a
hazardous material shipment that's tracked by
satellites; hunt down the hush-hush "ghost
fleet"--trucks carrying classified government
materials; and board a Con-Air flight moving another
kind of nasty stuff--dangerous felons!

9:30-10pm -- Mail Call - Celebrity Golf Tournament,
Gala Ball, and Auction: #65.
Gunnery Sergeant R. Lee Ermey hosts from his first
annual Celebrity Golf Tournament, Gala Ball, and
Auction in Washington, DC. It's bad golf for a good
cause--the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society and the
Young Marines Youth Organization. From the links, Lee
reviews the celebrity-filled history of the USO with
rare footage of some of its best and most dangerous
performances in wartime. After a taste of the gala and
auction, we get the lowdown on some of America's best
athletes who served on both playing field and
battlefield. And we visit the private beaches and ski
resorts reserved for warriors--where soldiers,
sailors, marines, and airmen can go on leave courtesy
of the military.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 12.
In Milwaukee, 104 died after drinking contaminated tap
water. At Texas A&M, a tradition turned tragic when a
pile of bonfire logs collapsed onto its builders.
Thousands of U.S. soldiers expired in known WWII
deathtraps--Sherman Tanks. In 1973, 14 men working on
a 26-story building died when supports were removed
from wet concrete. And in 1993, Denver's "dream"
airport became a nightmare when its baggage-handling
system ran amok. Aided by computer graphics,
catastrophe footage, and visits to the locations
today, MIT scientists, Center for Disease Control
experts, WWII vets, bonfire builders, and construction
engineers explain these tragedies and measures taken
to prevent them in future.

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Wednesday, November 10, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Nature's Engineers.
Towering skyscrapers buzzing with life, intricate
tunnels connecting entire communities, mighty dams
that tame the wildest rivers--this is construction
animal style! Take a walk on the wild side as we
investigate common creatures seemingly designed to
alter their habitat and remake the world. Our ability
to learn and capacity for abstract thought may
separate us from beavers, honeybees, birds, termites,
and spiders, but these engineers of nature remind us
that we're merely the latest in a long line.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Trucks.
Icons of the open road, trucks form the backbone of
the construction and transportation industries. The
facility to handle nearly any load and the ability to
deliver goods almost anywhere make trucks integral to
modern life. From 18th-century steam-powered carriages
to tomorrow's computerized trucks, it's a long haul
you'll enjoy!

9-10pm -- Full Throttle - 1968 Mustang.
The concept is simple--two teams are given the same
model of a classic car or motorcycle in similar
disrepair. We supply them with a garage, tools, and
parts. After 20 hours of repair time, we hold an
old-fashioned drag race on a legal, certified track
with safety devices for the novice drivers. The winner
gets to keep both cars. The loser gets nothing. As we
follow the teams, we interject history at each step
they take, including factory footage and interviews
with the legends behind the vintage vehicles. In the
first episode, we take two of America's favorite pony
cars, the 1968 Mustang, and inject explosive, modern
high-performance technology to make them into
rambunctious racing machines.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Surveillance Tech.
In the world of surveillance, Big Brother is not only
watching, he's also listening, analyzing, recording,
scanning, and tracking every aspect of our lives. And
with advanced surveillance technology, there's
virtually no place to hide. We'll examine some of the
most important and potentially terrifying equipment
the world has ever seen...or rather, not seen...in
this thriving surveillance revolution. We check out
parabolic microphones that pick up conversations a
mile a way, cameras that learn what and who to
photograph, RadarVision that "sees through walls", and
Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). And we explore the
mind-bending future of surveillance technology, while,
of course, reviewing its surprising history.

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Thursday, November 11, 2004
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7-8pm -- Gallipoli: The First D-Day - 
Not many people realize that famous D-Day of World War
Two was Winston Churchill's second attempt at such an
operation. During World War One, Churchill planned a
similar amphibious operation on the Turkish peninsula
of Gallipoli that ended in carnage, capitulation, and
utter defeat. After his campaign's failure, Churchill
was sacked. Amazingly, he managed to resurrect his
career and 29 years later, as Prime Minister of Great
Britain, mastermind the second D-Day. We talk to
descendents of some of the survivors who relate their
relatives harrowing stories, and examine the lessons
Churchill learned on the bloody beaches of Gallipoli
that would prove crucial to victory the second time
around.

8-9pm -- The Last Day of World War I - 
At 11 a.m., November 11, 1918, World War One ended.
Victory had been assured and final territory already
agreed upon. So why did more soldiers die that day
than on D-Day? Based on Joseph Persico's book 11th
Month, 11th Day, 11th Hour: Armistice Day, 1918, we
reveal how Allied leaders found outrageous excuses to
send 13,000 men to their deaths against a defeated
enemy. Some leaders desired promotion, others craved
retribution, while one commander chose to capture a
town that day solely to bathe! Despite the human toll,
nothing was gained--territories taken that day were
eventually returned to Germany. The senseless
11th-hour slaughter captures the whole WWI in a
microcosm--pointless carnage for no positive purpose.

9-11pm -- Battle History of the Coast Guard - 
In its third century of service, the U.S. Coast
Guard's reputation as the worldwide emblem of rescue
at sea overshadows the unbelievable scope of its feats
as America's fifth armed service. Once again in time
of crisis, the nation calls upon this agile service to
shift gears beyond its other vital duties to deal with
the terrorist threat. Our 2-hour special features its
exploits from inception by Alexander Hamilton in 1790
to the present day. Witness the stepchild service
battle for existence, enduring by becoming
indispensable and irreplaceable. And meet the men and
women of the Coast Guard who perform nautical good
deeds year in and year out, while fighting in all U.S.
wars and protecting 16,000 miles of ocean, river, and
lake shoreline!

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Friday, November 12, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Battlefield Engineering.
Meet some of the most important, yet least-recognized,
warriors--the battlefield engineers who lay the
groundwork for oncoming conflicts. We'll cover combat
engineering from ancient Rome to modern-day Iraq, and
take a look at the "Next Big Thing".

8-9pm -- Heavy Metal - Mosquito Attack!
During WWII, one airplane was equally at home at
30,000 feet on a reconnaissance mission as it was
skimming over treetops while taking the fight to the
enemy. With a speed of over 400 mph, the Mosquito was
so fast and maneuverable that Germany awarded pilots
two kills if they shot one down. Powered by two Rolls
Royce Merlin engines, its revolutionary leap of design
had no armor, no weapons, could carry the same bomb
load as a B-17, and was built entirely of wood! By
war's end, over 40 versions of this amazing aircraft
were in use. Fly into the heat of battle on one of
these wooden wonders--from bombing Berlin to flying at
10 feet against Gestapo prisons; from night fighter
against the Luftwaffe to pathfinder on D-Day.

9-10pm -- Battlefield Detectives - Operation Market
Garden.
September 17, 1944: Operation Market Garden--an Allied
plan to drive deep behind enemy lines into German-held
Holland. In history's largest airborne operation, more
than 30,000 U.S., British, and Polish troops are
dropped behind enemy lines to try to end WWII by
Christmas. Devised by British Field Marshal Bernard
Montgomery, Operation Market Garden was far from a
decisive masterstroke--it was one of the worst Allied
defeats of the war. The question is, why? Using
innovative research on the ground over which the
campaign was fought, we uncover new insights in the
fields of intelligence, communications, weaponry, and
terrain. Was it a daring plan that almost succeeded,
or fatally flawed before it began?

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Nuclear Tech.
Nuclear research ranges from well-known applications,
such as bombs and reactors, to little-known uses in
medicine, food preparation, and radiation detection.
It's also spawned ancillary technologies to store
nuclear waste and clean up accidents. Despite the risk
of use and abuse for destructive purposes, many
scientists remain optimistic about what's next for the
atom. In an explosive hour, we explore the atom in war
and peace, and the latest in nuclear power generation,
safety, and security.

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Saturday, November 13, 2004
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7-8pm -- History's Mysteries - The Nazi Plan to Bomb
New York.
Aviation historian David Myhra has been investigating
secret German aircraft projects for more than 20
years, and has uncovered evidence of a diabolical Nazi
plan to deliver a radioactive bomb to New York. In
late 1944, the "Amerika Bomber" project was planned,
and three aerospace designers--Wernher von Braun,
Eugen Sanger, and Reimar Horten--each had a different
solution. Through vivid 3D animation, photos, and
recreations, these unusual projects are finally
revealed!

8-11pm -- The True Story of Alexander the Great - 
334 BC--a 20-year-old military commander from Northern
Greece set out to conquer the known world. During the
next 12 years, King Alexander of Macedon led 40,000
troops more than 20,000 miles, defeated the world's
most powerful ruler, King Darius of Persia, and
conquered West Asia before dying at age 32. In a
3-hour special, host Peter Woodward explores the true
story of Alexander the Great--a tale of conquest,
love, hate, revenge, and ultimately tragedy. He visits
locations of Alexander's youth, temples dedicated to
Greek gods where Alexander sought divine counsel, and
actual battlefields, as well as demonstrating his
signature battle plans and weaponry. How could one man
accomplish so much at such a young age? What led to
his demise? These questions drive our analysis of
Alexander's complex character, delicately balanced
between genius and insanity.

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Sunday, November 14, 2004
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7-8pm -- Investigating History - Dalton Gang Raid.
On October 5, 1892, the Dalton Gang rode into history
with a bold attempt to rob two banks at once in
Coffeyville, Kansas. Brothers Bob, Grat, and Emmett
Dalton, Bill Powers, and Dick Broadwell attempted to
accomplish what no other outlaw gang had ever
done--all were killed except Emmett, who, after
recovering from his wounds, was sentenced to life in
prison, though he was later pardoned. What really
happened on that fateful day near the lawless border
of Oklahoma and the Indian Territories? What went
wrong from the Dalton's perspective, and conversely,
what went right for the citizens who stood up to the
gang?

8-10pm -- The Imperial Japanese Navy: Kaigun - 
Today, Japan has one of the largest fleets in the
world and, for over half a century, has stood shoulder
to shoulder with the U.S. Navy, defending the waters
of Far East Asia and the vital sea lanes surrounding
the Japanese islands. Yet previously, these two forces
were locked in history's largest and most destructive
naval war--World War II. This 2-hour documentary
dramatizes the rise, fall, and rise again of one of
the most remarkable naval forces in all of history.
Tracing the heritage of the Imperial Japanese Navy
from origins in a 13th century Mongol invasion,
through stunning rise under the influence of Great
Britain and the United States during the 19th century,
to amazing victories and total defeat in WWII, to
today's Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force--one of
the world's strongest and finest navies.

10-11pm -- Conspiracy? - Who Killed Martin Luther King
Jr.?
On April 4, 1968, a sniper gunned down Martin Luther
King Jr. as he stood on a motel balcony in Memphis,
Tennessee. Charges of cover-ups and government
complicity were heard almost immediately--suspicions
that haven't waned with time. Several versions have
passed for the "truth" of King's assassination--from
the "official" story in '68 with small-time criminal
James Earl Ray as lone assassin; Ray's later assertion
that he was framed by "Raul", the true killer; to the
'78 House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA)
report that claimed Ray acted on behalf of a
conspiracy. And there's a theory that federal
government agencies were out to get King--and they had
greater motivation to do so than James Earl Ray. We
revisit the murder--one of the least explicable of the
assassinations that rocked the '60s.

____________________________________________________

Monday, November 15, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - M1 Abrams: Supertank!
Join us as we penetrate the history of the world's
most sophisticated tank--the M1 Abrams Main Battle
Tank. In the most radical departure in U.S. tank
design since WWII, the Supertank combines speed, heavy
protective armor, and a fearsome 120mm main gun. In
1991, the new and unproven Abrams tank was deployed in
Operation Desert Storm. Using night vision and laser
targeting, the M1 Abrams tank destroyed Saddam
Hussein's armored Republican Guard, and is again doing
desert duty in the War in Iraq.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Crop Circle Controversy.
The puzzling formations known as crop circles have
appeared worldwide throughout history. In the Middle
Ages, they were called "witch" or "pixie" circles, and
a 1678 woodcut, the "Mowing Devil", depicts one
thought to be Satan's work. But in the 1980s, the
phenomenon escalated, with dozens of crop circles
popping up in England and other countries. When two
Englishmen claimed they had perpetrated the hoax, many
felt the riddle was solved. And yet, more have
materialized. We explore the mystery.

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Cruiser under Siege.
July 1918--Just south of Long Island, the crew of the
armored cruiser USS San Diego, en route to New York
City to join a Europe-bound convoy, reports a dull
thud ringing in the hull and explosions in the boiler
room before the warship sinks. In his final log entry,
the captain attributes the initial explosion to a
torpedo. A German U-boat was in the area and her
captain took credit for the sinking; but the U-156
itself sank with the conclusive evidence--her
captain's log. According to the U.S. Navy, a
German-laid mine ignited the initial explosion. But in
1999, declassified Soviet documents revealed new
evidence describing an onboard German saboteur set to
destroy the ship and disrupt the convoy. Did a
torpedo, mine, or spy sink the San Diego? Host John
Chatterton and detectives dive for the truth.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - The Lost Battle of
the Civil War.
October 25, 1864--the sky is clear and the air brisk
in Kansas. Perfect weather for soldiers as they charge
into battle. At the Battle of Mine Creek, 2,800 Union
Cavalry soldiers defeat a Confederate cavalry of
7,000--in a mere half-hour. The bravery and cunning
exhibited ranks the battle alongside the charges at
Gettysburg and Brandy Station. What made this a
successful battle for the Union Cavalry and why is it
excluded from historical records? The battle unfolds
through interviews with members of the Mine Creek
Battlefield Foundation and local historians, archival
letters, diaries, and the one known historical account
of the battle written by Lumir Buresh in 1977. And as
we walk the battlefield with a tactician from the U.S.
Army, we divulge new information about its size,
weapons used, and the brigades that met there from all
over the country to fight at Mine Creek.

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Tuesday, November 16, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Jet Engines.
Strap on a parachute and soar through the saga of jet
propulsion, which radically transformed our world
since inception in WWII--from the Nazi's first
jet-powered aircraft to the U.S. F-22 jet fighter,
from the Concorde to tomorrow's scram-jet, a
hypersonic transport plane that switches to rocket
power outside earth's atmosphere!

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Vigilante Tech.
In the wilds of the American West, average citizens
often stepped into the fray to keep their towns from
being taken over by society's dregs. It seemed like
pickpockets and pimps rolled into main street the
moment gold was struck. And often, it was left up to a
few brave men and women to dish out their own brand of
justice--vigilante justice, and it wasn't pretty. The
hemp neck-tie would string up hundreds of renegades,
but vigilantes also needed technology to defend
themselves and defeat the most fearsome of criminals.
Cannons, forts and even windmills were employed in
their "extra-legal" executions. Hosted by David
Carradine.

9-9:30pm -- Modern Marvels - The World's Biggest
Machines.
Join us for a look at the biggest, heaviest, tallest,
longest, meanest machines on the planet! We'll see
what these monsters do and how they operate, and how
they're designed and assembled. Machines investigated
include the largest draglines, excavators used in
mining; the biggest dump truck; a front-end loader
with an 80-ton bucket and the largest tires of any
vehicle; the cruise ship, Voyager of the Seas; a
240-foot tall wind generator; and a fusion reaction
machine the size of a football field.

9:30-10pm -- Mail Call - XM8/Spencer/AC-47
Spooky/Small Diameter Bomb/Gotha Bomber: #62.
R. Lee Ermey pulls a little trigger time with the
latest and greatest in military rifles, the XM8, then
takes a draw on one of the oldest repeating rifles,
the Civil War-era Spencer. Next, he looks back at one
of the hardest-hitting war birds of the Vietnam War,
the AC-47 Spooky gunship, and a peek at one of the
kookiest inventions to be tested during the war, the
Manpack "people sniffer". Finally, the Gunny travels
down to Eglin AFB to check out the Small Diameter
Bomb, followed by a look at one of the earliest heavy
bombers, the German Gotha Bomber.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 13.
In this hour, death seeps out of the ground into a
neighborhood sitting on a toxic waste dump at Love
Canal in New York; soldiers die during Desert Storm in
1991 when software flaws render Patriot Missiles
inaccurate; on September 11, 2001, World Trade Center
Building #7 wasn't attacked, but seven hours after the
Twin Towers collapsed, it too is mysteriously reduced
to a pile of rubble; a night of revelry in Boston
turns the Cocoanut Grove nightclub into an inferno
that kills over 400 people in 1942; and the science of
demolition is put to the test and fails when a
building in Rhode Island, the "Leaning Tower of
Providence", stands its ground.

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Wednesday, November 17, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - More of the World's Biggest
Machines.
On land, in the air, or on the sea--we examine some of
the biggest machines ever built, including: the
Antonov AN-225, the world's biggest aircraft; the GE
90-115B jet engine; the Sikorsky CH-53E helicopter;
the Union Pacific's biggest steam locomotive, the "Big
Boy" 4000 and GE's AC 6000; the Discoverer Enterprise,
the world's largest oil-drilling ship; the RB 293
bucket-wheel mine excavator; and the LED Viva Vision,
the world's largest printing screen, which stretches
4-blocks long in Las Vegas. 

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The Autobahn.
Imagine a superhighway designed for speed...thousands
of miles of roadway unhindered by limits of any kind.
Buckle up for safety as we take you for the ride of
your life when we explore the fascinating history and
current reality of the world's fastest freeway. The
number-one works project of the Third Reich, the
Autobahn was known as Adolf Hitler's Road until
Germany's defeat in WWII. Reconstructed and extended
to more than four times its original size, it became a
symbol of the New Germany.

9-10pm -- Full Throttle - 1985 Buick Grand National.
The Grand National represented Buick's return to its
"muscle car" roots, and in the 1980s, America's "King
of the Streets" received a makeover from the inside
out, including headers, turbos, intercoolers, fuel
injectors, ECU chips, new racing transmissions, and
high-stall torque converters.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Sub Disasters.
When the men and women aboard a modern submarine hear
the command to dive, they can take a measure of
comfort in the fact that no U.S. sub has been lost in
nearly 40 years, though it's been said that the sea is
a more hostile environment than space. The tragedies
of former disasters have not been forgotten or
squandered and the Navy has been extremely motivated
to find ever more effective ways to prevent them.
We'll examine sub disasters to discover what caused
them and what they've taught us. And as we explore the
early history of the submarine--including a sub used
in the American Revolution and one used in the Civil
War--we follow a modern crew using submarine
simulators to train for disasters, study subs in the
nuclear age, and explore state-of-the-art rescue
technology.

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Thursday, November 18, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Extreme Aircraft.
Join us for a supersonic look at some of the most
cutting-edge aircraft ever developed--from the X-1
that first broke the sound barrier to the X-43
Scramjet that recently flew at Mach 7. These extreme
aircraft have made their mark on aeronautical history,
and sometimes on political history as well. The U-2
and SR-71 spy planes played a crucial role in the Cold
War, and now Lockheed Martin's top-secret "Skunkworks"
division is touting the new "air dominance" fighter
plane-- the F/A-22 Raptor.

8-11pm -- Tora! Tora! Tora! - 
Movie. Executive Producer Darryl F. Zanuck's
inspiration meticulously represented both the Japanese
and American points of view about the events leading
up to and including Pearl Harbor. Directed by Richard
Fleischer, Kinji Fukasaku, and Toshio Masuda, the
all-star cast includes Martin Balsam, Jason Robards,
Sô Yamamura, Joseph Cotten, Tatsuya Mihashi, E.G.
Marshall, James Whitmore, and Neville Brand. (1970) repeated 12am

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Friday, November 19, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bullet Trains.
Traveling between 135 and 190 miles per hour with an
astonishingly high safety record, bullet trains can be
found throughout Europe, Japan, and on the U.S.
eastern seaboard. How high-speed trains are propelled
is rooted in fundamentals that haven't changed since
the first electric trolleys appeared in the 19th
century. We see how scientists are looking at new
alternatives to electricity, including magnetic
levitation that can move passenger trains 345 miles
per hour and beyond!

8-9pm -- Heavy Metal - Apache Helicopter.
For enemy combatants, the first thing heard is a
thunderous noise. The ground trembles, sand and trees
whip-up into a storm. If they should see it, its huge
rotor blades, missile pods, and giant optical eyes are
reminiscent of a massive, deadly insect. For many,
it's the last thing they ever see--the AH-64 Apache
Attack Helicopter. Developed during the Cold War, this
incredible aircraft is now the most powerful and
feared helicopter in the world. Able to dive into
action at over 200 mph, it can deliver a devastating
firestorm of missiles or rockets. With its 30mm
cannon, it can attack tanks, armored vehicles, and
troops with razor-sharp accuracy. Using unique archive
film, detailed reenactments, and extraordinary
interviews, we fly into harm's way aboard these lethal
aircraft.

9-10pm -- Battlefield Detectives - Native American
Wars: The Apache.
For over 300 years, the North American Apache tribes
were remarkably successful, beating opponents who were
wealthier, better armed, and apparently more
organized. Apache warriors gained an unrivalled
reputation as fighters. In this hour, historians
explore two important battles to try and uncover the
secrets of their success. Archaeologists and forensic
scientists investigate and compare the weapons used by
the Apache and their last enemy--the U.S. Army. A
military geologist unpicks clues to Apache use of the
landscape itself to help defeat outsiders. And at the
sites of the Battle of Cieneguilla (1854) and
Hembrillo (1880), remote locations in New Mexico, we
uncover tantalizing clues. But how did the Army
eventually overpower the Apache? Battlefield
Detectives reveals the answer.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The F-14.
October 7, 2001: Missiles from lethal U.S. jets rain
down onto Afghanistan. One powerful and deadly plane
led the majority of the assaults--the F-14 Tomcat, the
world's most complete military fighter. No other
fighter jet carries the F-14's unique combination of
weapons. Its state-of-the-art system can spot an
oncoming enemy plane at almost 200 miles. Its radar
can detect targets as low as 50 feet and as high as
80,000 feet and does so three times faster than the
radar of any other fighter jet.

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Saturday, November 20, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - Who Killed Martin Luther King
Jr.?
On April 4, 1968, a sniper gunned down Martin Luther
King Jr. as he stood on a motel balcony in Memphis,
Tennessee. Charges of cover-ups and government
complicity were heard almost immediately--suspicions
that haven't waned with time. Several versions have
passed for the "truth" of King's assassination--from
the "official" story in '68 with small-time criminal
James Earl Ray as lone assassin; Ray's later assertion
that he was framed by "Raul", the true killer; to the
'78 House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA)
report that claimed Ray acted on behalf of a
conspiracy. And there's a theory that federal
government agencies were out to get King--and they had
greater motivation to do so than James Earl Ray. We
revisit the murder--one of the least explicable of the
assassinations that rocked the '60s.

8-10pm -- The Kennedy Assassination: Beyond Conspiracy
- 
No other murder in history has produced as much
speculation as the assassination of President John F.
Kennedy. Forty years after he was fatally shot, more
than 70 percent of polled Americans believe there was
a conspiracy and that Lee Harvey Oswald did not act
alone. In this 2-hour special, ABC News Anchor Peter
Jennings takes a fresh look at the assassination, the
evidence, the various and many theories, and an exact
computer simulation of the famous Abraham Zapruder
film that offers surprising results.

10-12am -- Kennedys: The Curse of Power - 
Traces the Kennedy clan's calamities that occurred on
the rise to power--from immigration from Ireland up to
John Kennedy Jr.'s tragic death in 1999. The first
hour sees the loss of Joe Jr. in WWII and the
assassinations of JFK and RFK. Hour two witnesses
Ted's downfall and role as surrogate father to a
fatherless generation.

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Sunday, November 21, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Secrets of Soviet Space Disasters - 
An investigation into one of the 20th century's most
shocking hidden stories--the dismal failure of the
Soviet space program, which led to more than 150
recorded deaths. Much has come to light from
declassified files. We see how personal rivalries,
shifting political alliances, and bureaucratic
bungling doomed the program.

8-10pm -- Siberia: How the East Was Won - 
While a neophyte United States expanded west, Russia
conquered an inhospitable territory to its
east--Siberia, a vast land of majestic beauty and
abundant natural resources. This is the little-known
story of how the east was won, Russian-style--from
settlement by ancestors of North America's indigenous
people; 16th-century Cossack invasion; the 1890s, when
the Trans-Siberian Railroad enabled convict labor;
Communism's arrival in 1917; and the rush to develop
heavy industry. And when the Iron Curtain finally
fell, capitalism arrived--accompanied by crime, drugs,
prostitution, abandoned children, and AIDS. Yet our
2-hour special reveals Siberia's sense of hope and
promise. Buried deep beneath Siberia's frozen soil
lies oil--and Siberia has sprouted dozens of Wild East
Towns to exploit it!

10-11pm -- Conspiracy? - Princess Diana.
Conspiracy theories capture the public's imagination,
and in this hour, we explore the death of Princess
Diana--the world's most photographed woman, who lived
and died amidst media madness. On August 31, 1997,
while being pursued by paparazzi, the frenzy turned
fatal when the car carrying Princess Di and boyfriend
Dodi Fayed crashed inside the Alma Tunnel in Paris.
From the start, conspiracists suggested that Diana's
death was political. The official French inquiry,
conducted in near-total secrecy, ignited numerous
theories--mainly placing British power behind her
death. And while the "official" British inquiry is
slated for release in 2005, its findings will likely
do little to squelch skeptics.

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Monday, November 22, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Ball Turret Gunners.
In war, certain missions demand the most and
constitute much of the legends of bravery. Journey
back to the Second World War when fearless airmen
manned the B-17's belly guns--glass bubbles that at
any moment could become their coffin. The ball turret
gunners called their work "flying the ball", others
called it crazy!

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Area 51: Beyond Top Secret.
Born during the Cold War, Area 51 in Nevada, also
known as Groom Lake or Dreamland, became not only the
Air Force's most strategic test site, but also a
symbol of everything that was sneaky about the U.S.
military-industrial-intelligence complex. In recent
years, UFO investigators claimed that the top-secret
planes tested there were built with technology gleaned
from captured alien aircraft. We uncover the secrets
of the cryptic desert facility and look into
mysterious deaths of base workers.

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Ship of Doom.
The once majestic SS Marine Electric lies 134 feet
beneath the Atlantic off New Jersey's coast. While
hauling coal on the night of February 12, 1983, she
suddenly capsized and sank in a savage winter storm.
With no time to launch lifeboats, 34 men were hurled
into the frozen Atlantic. Only three survived. What
caused a veteran merchant ship to plunge to the ocean
floor? Survivors blamed the owners for sending an
unsafe boat to sea. But the owners charged that one of
the survivors caused his crewmates' deaths by failing
to observe basic safety procedures. In the shadow of
these allegations, the wreck is a potential crime
scene. Divers pore over the rusting hulk hunting for
evidence in an effort to answer the tantalizing
question of what, or who, sent the Marine Electric to
her watery grave.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - The JFK
Assassination.
How does forensic science help resolve questions about
the JFK assassination? With the help of a group of
scientists and researchers with access to the evidence
in the case, Investigating History looks at new
information that examines which theories are
believable, and which are not. Specifically, the
experts looked at the acoustic evidence from the radio
of one of the motorcycle policemen in the motorcade
and the number of shots that were fired; at the
reliability of autopsy X-rays of JFK's skull; at the
investigation that concluded that Oswald was the lone
assassin; at the new evidentiary support for the
"magic bullet" theory; and more.

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Tuesday, November 23, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Demolition.
While a civilization's greatness is reflected in the
achievements of architects and engineers, equally
impressive are spectacular acts of destruction
throughout history. The cycle of construction and
destruction reflects the shifting values of any given
era. We'll trace the evolution of planned destruction
from ancient to modern-day.

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Alamo Tech.
One of the most famous last-stand battles couldn't
have happened without a little technology--and we
don't just mean guns, cannons, and missiles! The
Mexican army also used music, uniforms, and other
psychological operations to keep the Alamo defenders
off guard. Inside the fort, outnumbered Texans watched
the enemy advance, thanks to telescopes, while
sharpening their Bowie knives and cleaning their
Kentucky rifles in anticipation of the onslaught. The
battle began before dawn, and we'll show you how
combatants used technology to see in the dark. And
you'll learn how the Alamo turned from refuge into
deathtrap. See how Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie, and
General Santa Anna all used technology of the day as
we "Remember the Alamo!" Hosted by David Carradine.

9-9:30pm -- Modern Marvels - Nature's Engineers.
Towering skyscrapers buzzing with life, intricate
tunnels connecting entire communities, mighty dams
that tame the wildest rivers--this is construction
animal style! Take a walk on the wild side as we
investigate common creatures seemingly designed to
alter their habitat and remake the world. Our ability
to learn and capacity for abstract thought may
separate us from beavers, honeybees, birds, termites,
and spiders, but these engineers of nature remind us
that we're merely the latest in a long line.

9:30-10pm -- Mail Call - Rapid Fielding
Initiative/Anti-Tank and Anti-Anti-Tank/Blimp
Sub-hunters/Cloud Car: #63.
Gunnery Sergeant R. Lee Ermey checks out how our
troops, hopefully, are getting the latest gear in
record time through the Rapid Fielding Initiative.
Next, it's a trip back in time to see the kind of heat
the German Army's anti-tank crews packed, followed by
a look at some anti-anti-tank weapons. Finally, the
Gunney finds out how the Navy used blimps as sub
hunters during WWII, and takes a look at an unique WWI
invention, the German "cloud car" spy basket.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 14.
In this hour, we examine a massive oil tanker
explosion that killed nine; a subway tunnel cave-in
that swallowed part of Hollywood Boulevard; a
freighter plane crash that destroyed an 11-story
apartment building; an historic molasses flash flood;
and a freeway ramp collapse that buried construction
workers in rubble and concrete. Investigators from
NTSB, Cal/OSHA, and Boeing, structural and
geo-technical engineers, and historians explain how so
much could have gone wrong, costing so many lives. And
aided by computer graphics, footage and photos of the
disasters, and visits to the locations today, we show
viewers what caused these catastrophes and what design
experts have done to make sure they never happen
again.

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Wednesday, November 24, 2004
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7-8pm -- The History of Thanksgiving - 
From the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock, Lincoln's 1863
declaration naming it a national holiday, to turkey,
Macy's parade, and football, we'll share the abundant
feast of Thanksgiving history--including all the
trimmings!

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Movie Theaters.
Since the late 1800s, when the first flapping images
persuaded people that they were watching action
unfold, movie technology has steadily evolved to make
films seem more and more lifelike. Now movies use
high-tech tricks like computer-generated digital
imaging, multichannel sound, and even 6-story IMAX
images to make the audience believe that what's
happening on the screen is as real as the popcorn
stuck to their teeth and the theater floor. Join us
for a popping hour as we explore 100 years of
movie-theater technology.

9-10pm -- Full Throttle - 1975 Firebird.
Two teams are given classic cars in similar disrepair.
We supply them with a garage, tools, and parts. After
20 hours of repair time, we hold an old-fashioned drag
race on a legal, certified track with safety devices
for the novice drivers. The winner gets to keep both
cars. The loser gets nothing. As we follow the teams,
we interject history at each step they take, including
factory footage and interviews with the legends behind
the vintage vehicles. In this episode, the 1975
Firebird is the prize.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Bathroom Tech.
From tub to toilet to toothpaste, here's everything
you ever wanted to know about the most used and least
discussed room in the house. From the first home
bathrooms in ancient India, Roman latrines, and
bizarre Victorian-era bath contraptions, to modern
luxurious master bathroom suites, we trace the history
of bathing, showering, and oral hygiene. And we reveal
the messy truth about what was used before toilet
paper--brainchild of the Scott Brothers of
Philadelphia--and why astronauts wear diapers.

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Thursday, November 25, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - ET Tech.
In 2003, with Mars closer to Earth than it had been in
60,000 years, scientists launched three life-seeking
planetary landers. If the long journeys prove
successful, all should be hard at work on the Red
Planet's surface by January 2004. NASA's Spirit and
Opportunity and the European Space Agency's Beagle 2
represent the pinnacle in the history of the search
for extraterrestrial life. Leading scientists, who
believe life may exist beyond Earth, explain
skepticism about ETs having visited Earth.

8-9pm -- UFOs: What You Didn't Know - UFO Hot Spots.
For those who study the UFO phenomenon, "UFO Hot
Spots" are places around the globe known for a long
history of UFO sightings and reports. From Brazil to
Mexico, from Washington State to Florida, multiple
witnesses, including air traffic controllers and even
the military, confirm that something unexplained is
repeatedly happening in the night sky. Tales of alien
abductions, bizarre and chilling photographs of UFOs,
and hours of videotape all abound as we search for UFO
Hot Spots.

9-10pm -- UFOs: What You Didn't Know - When UFOs
Arrive.
It's all hush-hush as we track a secretive global
paper trail, delving into government plans on how to
deal with other-planet visitors. Searching historical
records, we find that protocols are in place--from the
U.S. military's JANAP-146 reporting requirements to
France's Cometa files, from Chapter 13 of the FEMA
Fire Officer's Guide to Disaster Control titled "Enemy
Attack and UFO Potential", to a now-repealed federal
law titled "Extraterrestrial Exposure".

10-11:25pm -- Band of Brothers - Currahee.
They were ordinary men, swept up in the most
extraordinary conflict in history. With the eyes of
the world upon them, they found their greatest source
of strength in each other. From Tom Hanks and Steven
Spielberg, this is the story of Easy Company--an elite
team of U.S. paratroopers whose WWII exploits are as
incredible as they are true. Part 1 begins on June 4,
1944, in England, as Lts. Richard Winters (Damian
Lewis) and Lewis Nixon (Ron Livingston) reflect on the
past that led them to D-Day.

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Friday, November 26, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Inventions of War.
Arising from the horrible carnage, deprivation, and
suffering caused by war is a countless array of
everyday items--from hairbrushes to microwaves--that
directly descend from wartime innovations. Wartime
research and development have revolutionized
communication, transportation, and medicine. From Spam
to nuclear power to hairspray and cell phones, life as
we know it ironically owes a lot to war. We'll follow
the day-to-day life of an ordinary woman and see the
influence of war on her life.

8-9pm -- Investigating History - Buried Secrets of the
Revolutionary War.
In 1777, as the Revolutionary War escalated, colonists
in upstate New York faced a brutal British
strategy--employment of Native Americans as scouts
with orders to create chaos, kill militia, and scalp
colonists. Set against this scenario, we investigate a
forgotten incident in American history--the death of
Jane McCrea. Engaged to a British loyalist, Jane was
abducted in an Indian raid. But was she scalped by
British-allied Indians, or mistakenly shot by colonial
militia trying to save her? Hunting for clues,
forensic anthropologists open her grave and find two
sets of bones--but no skull! Scientists search for
Jane's kinfolk and, aided by DNA analysis, computer
facial reconstruction, and historical research, try to
resolve questions about her death and the mysteries
uncovered in her grave.

9-10pm -- Battlefield Detectives - American
Revolution: Battle of Monmouth.
A key moment in the Revolutionary War between Great
Britain and her 13 rebellious colonies, the Battle of
Monmouth took place on June 28, 1778, in rural New
Jersey. The British assumed that the American Army was
weak, ill-disciplined, and incapable of facing up to
seasoned British regulars. But at Monmouth, things
turned out differently. Washington used his artillery
so effectively that the cowed British were pinned
down, took significant casualties, and left their dead
unburied. In this hour, historians, archaeologists,
meteorologists, physiologists, and munitions experts
examine the evidence of what took place at Monmouth.
In modern laboratory conditions, they test what
happens when men in heavy woolen uniforms fight on one
of the hottest days in New Jersey history, and
investigate the effects of a new intensive training
regime on the colonial forces.

10-11:05pm -- Band of Brothers - Day of Days.
Planes carrying thousands of paratroopers cross the
English Channel into French airspace, where German
flak causes the pilots to drop them in a less than
safe and organized fashion. Lt. Winters (Damian Lewis)
lands alone in a field, soon joined by John Hall
(Andrew Scott), a private from another company.
Executive producers Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg
bring to life renowned WWII historian Stephen
Ambrose's nonfiction book about an Army rifle company
that parachuted into France on D-Day.

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Saturday, November 27, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 13.
In this hour, death seeps out of the ground into a
neighborhood sitting on a toxic waste dump at Love
Canal in New York; soldiers die during Desert Storm in
1991 when software flaws render Patriot Missiles
inaccurate; on September 11, 2001, World Trade Center
Building #7 wasn't attacked, but seven hours after the
Twin Towers collapsed, it too is mysteriously reduced
to a pile of rubble; a night of revelry in Boston
turns the Cocoanut Grove nightclub into an inferno
that kills over 400 people in 1942; and the science of
demolition is put to the test and fails when a
building in Rhode Island, the "Leaning Tower of
Providence", stands its ground.

8-9pm -- Save Our History - Secrets of Jamestown.
In 1607, 105 Englishmen crowded onto three ships to
cross the Atlantic in search of a new world. They
built a fort at Jamestown and established trade with
the indigenous people. But things turned bad
quickly--the natives became hostile, the land was
unforgiving, and disease and hardship overtook them.
Just how did Jamestown, long thought to be a
near-failure due to its colonists' incompetence,
survive to become the first permanent English
settlement despite all odds? A 10-year-long
archaeological dig is unearthing evidence every day
that tells a different story. Host Steve Thomas climbs
down a 400-year-old well, wades into a swamp filled
with 1,000-year-old trees, and takes us to a firing
range, a sculptor's studio, and right into a forensics
lab to piece together the real story of Jamestown
Colony.

9-10pm -- High Hitler - 
Adolf Hitler dreamt of creating a master race, but
achieved a Holocaust--the murder of millions of Jews
and those deemed physical or mental defects. But the
Führer, an appalling hypochondriac, abused laxatives
and suffered from stomach cramps and embarrassing
flatulence. And that was just the start! When he
committed suicide in 1945, the great dictator was
frail with tremors and a shuffling walk--a feeble
condition concealed from the world. We explore the
relationship between Hitler and his personal
physician, Dr. Theodore Morell. How did amphetamine
abuse, Parkinson's Disease, and tertiary syphilis
impact on his state of mind?

10-11:20pm -- Band of Brothers - Carentan.
After regrouping in the town of Angoville-au-Plain,
Easy Company tries to capture the town of Carentan.
Two days after D-Day, some members of Easy Company are
still lost and alone in Normandy, including Pvt.
Albert Blithe (Marc Warren), who finds the rest of the
unit just in time to help take Carentan, which Allied
armor from Utah and Omaha beaches need in order to
link up. Later, the company returns to England, but
celebrations are short-lived when news comes that
they'll be moving out again.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, November 28, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Investigating History - The JFK
Assassination.
How does forensic science help resolve questions about
the JFK assassination? With the help of a group of
scientists and researchers with access to the evidence
in the case, Investigating History looks at new
information that examines which theories are
believable, and which are not. Specifically, the
experts looked at the acoustic evidence from the radio
of one of the motorcycle policemen in the motorcade
and the number of shots that were fired; at the
reliability of autopsy X-rays of JFK's skull; at the
investigation that concluded that Oswald was the lone
assassin; at the new evidentiary support for the
"magic bullet" theory; and more.

8-9pm -- Conspiracy? - Lincoln Assassination.
April 14, 1865--Actor John Wilkes Booth shot President
Lincoln in the back of the head at a Washington
theater. Days later, Wilkes died in a standoff, and
eventually, eight Southern sympathizers were tried for
conspiracy. This much we know to be true. But many
conspiracy theories arose--pointing to the
Confederacy, the Union, and even the Catholic Church!
Once again, new theories have sprung up, based on
recently found documents and forensic technology.
Historian Edward Steers Jr. connects Booth to the
Confederate Secret Service in Montreal, which
indirectly links him to Jefferson Davis and the
Confederate government; while biographer Charles
Higham places Booth in a larger conspiracy.
Historians, biographers, and researchers, who take
issue with Steers and Higham, counter their arguments
here.

9-10pm -- Conspiracy? - FDR and Pearl Harbor.
The attack on Pearl Harbor shocked the nation. To
many, the official explanations of misguided
assumptions and missed clues did not account for the
enormity of the catastrophe. We examine "alternative"
theories that arose soon after the attack. Was a plot
hatched in Washington to solve FDR's
"problem"--convincing a reluctant country to fight the
Nazis? Did FDR send a secret cable just days before
the attack ordering Pearl Harbor chiefs to stand down?
Did U.S. intelligence intercept a message from Tokyo
asking its spies in Hawaii to map the harbor for an
imminent air attack? More than six decades later, the
controversy boils under the surface of recent U.S.
history, igniting heated debates over collusion,
intrigue, and thousands of American dead.

10-11:15pm -- Band of Brothers - Replacements.
Fresh replacements join Easy Company in time for a
massive paradrop into German-occupied Holland. The
Dutch townspeople of Eindhoven welcome them as
liberators, but when Easy and a cluster of British
tanks move into a nearby town, a superior German force
inflicts many casualties and forces a retreat. As they
move onto another assignment in Holland, Capt. Winters
(Damian Lewis) laments the retreat, and Capt. Nixon
(Ron Livingston) thinks that the ambitious Allied
operation seems to have failed.

____________________________________________________

Monday, November 29, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Landmines.
A major battlefield weapon since the American Civil
War and the stuff of nightmares ever since, the
civilian toll from landmines remains immense.
Inflicted by an enemy that can't be seen, landmines
are littered throughout 64 countries, making life a
game of Russian roulette for two-thirds of the world's
poorest nations. Featuring an interview with Jerry
White, co-founder of Landmine Survivor's Network, who
lost a leg due to a landmine in Israel.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - New UFO Revelations: Cattle
Mutilations.
A rancher's nightmare, the mysterious murder of
livestock has plagued farmlands worldwide for
generations. Commonly known as cattle mutilations,
these bizarre deaths happen to horses, goats, sheep,
rabbits, and others, though the most frequent victims
are cattle. Most often, udders, ears, tongues, and
eyes are somehow surgically removed from the animal
without spilling a drop of blood! We explore the
prevailing belief that extraterrestrial beings bear
responsibility for these grotesque, bloodless
slaughters. Alien presence provides an explanation for
the manner of killings and the ability to perform the
delicate operation so consistently and so precisely.
Viewers will watch an actual field investigation
unfold as we delve into the history of the cattle
mutilation phenomenon and its connection to UFOs.

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Sinking by Sabotage.
Host John Chatterton dives the remains of a ship
recently found off Florida whose past is as
illustrious as her demise was mysterious. The Eleanor
Bolling was the workhorse that carried Admiral Richard
Byrd on his 1928 Antarctic expedition. But after
Byrd's return to a New York City tickertape parade,
his historic ship was soon forgotten and eventually
sold in 1937. Renamed the Vamar, she began service as
a cargo carrier in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean.
In March 1942, as the Battle of the Atlantic raged and
German U-boats savaged Allied shipping, the Vamar left
Florida headed for Cuba. The weather was fair, the
seas calm, when suddenly, she sank without warning.
Was she torpedoed? Did she hit a mine? Or was her
captain in reality a Nazi spy who sank her as an act
of sabotage?

10-11:10pm -- Band of Brothers - Crossroads.
Capt. Winters (Damian Lewis) leads a contingent of
Easy Company men on a risky mission over a Dutch dike
that results in a "turkey shoot" of fleeing Germans,
and is promoted to Battalion Executive Officer,
leaving Easy Company in the hands of Lt. "Moose"
Heyliger (Stephen McCole). After moving back off the
line to France, Lt. Nixon (Ron Livingston) insists
that Winters take a break and see Paris. But when
Winters returns, news comes in of a massive German
counterattack in the Ardennes Forest.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, November 30, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Tactical to Practical - # 36.
Host Hunter Ellis takes a ride in a zero-G aircraft
and flies with one of the world's wildest stunt
pilots; examines new designs to keep racetrack drivers
from blacking out during extreme-G acceleration; and
meets thrill seekers hooked on extreme G-force
adventure--like riding the world's fastest roller
coasters to attempting incredible bungee jumps. Next,
he checks out new portable power technologies being
created by the military to lighten the load the
average grunt carries onto a battlefield--which
includes 20 pounds of batteries! And he looks at the
evolution of battery technology that has made possible
all the gadgets we use daily. Finally, Hunter examines
the latest military icebreaker and demonstrates an
inflatable survival suit, used by both the military
and civilians, which allows both flotation and warmth
in extreme cold waters.

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Deadwood Tech.
Touted as one of the "liveliest and peculiar places
west of the Mississippi", in Deadwood speculators,
misfits, and cold-blooded killers came together to
stake their claim. Located in South Dakota's Black
Hills, in this raunchy, rip-roaring town, primitive
technology met bold innovations, commerce and
corruption collided, and shootouts were as common as
the filth that filled the streets. Examines the good,
bad, and ugly technologies of the last and richest
gold rush town, including stagecoaches and stagecoach
robberies; bull whacking and bull trains; gold
counterfeiting; saw mills; smelter and cyanide mills;
electric marquees; and mortuary science. And we
feature forensic analysis of Wild Bill Hickok's death,
and say howdy to a few of Deadwood's other famous
characters like Calamity Jane.

9-10pm -- Secret Allied Aircraft of WWII - 
At WWII's outset, U.S. and U.K. military aircraft
designs were woefully behind Germany's and Japan's
technologically superior planes. But the genius and
ingenuity of innovators on both sides of the Atlantic
closed the gap. For America, it was a handful of
visionaries and their teams; for Great Britain, a
creative and thoughtful spirit emanated from the top
leadership on down. This is the untold stories of
their cutting-edge designs and solutions, some of
which proved decades ahead of their time.

10-11:20pm -- Band of Brothers - Bastogne.
In the dead of winter, in the forest outside of
Bastogne, Belgium, Easy Company struggles to hold the
line alone, while fending off frostbite and hunger. An
overwhelmed Medic Eugene Roe (Shane Taylor), on edge
and close to combat exhaustion, finds friendship with
a Belgian nurse (Lucie Jeanne). Easy spends a
miserable Christmas in the trenches, but is buoyed
after hearing news that General McAuliffe met the
German Army's demand for surrender with the defiant
answer: "Nuts!"

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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