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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Saturday, May 15, 2004
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6-8pm -- Breaking Vegas - 
They were "Whales"--the highest of high rollers.
Treated like royalty by casinos worldwide, they
won millions throughout the early to mid-1990s.
And nobody had a clue that they were MIT
students, part of an underground blackjack
team--card counters who used mathematical
wizardry to win. This is the true story of the
rise and fall of the MIT Blackjack Team,
featuring interviews with Ben Mezrich, author of
"Bringing Down the House", casino executives,
security experts, and actual members of the team.

8-9pm -- Time Machine - Grand Canyon
Journey back through time for a look at the human
history of the Grand Canyon, one of earth's great
natural wonders. Learn how the Canyon began
forming billions of years ago, and how man
discovered, settled, yet continues to be humbled
by its wild and unforgiving landscape. The
Colorado River runs at its bottom, winding
through 277 miles of the Grand Canyon National
Park--mecca for over 5-million tourists, hikers,
archaeologists, geologists, and river runners
each year. (1-hour version)

9-10pm -- The Louisiana Purchase - 
On April 30, 1803, President Thomas Jefferson
completed one of the greatest real estate deals
in history when he acquired the Louisiana
Purchase, buying more than 800,000 square miles
west of the Mississippi from France for $15
million. The product of an unlikely chain of
events born of mishap, backroom bargaining, and
the whims of a few colorful personalities, this
monumental deal heralded Napoleon's downfall and
the twilight of European dominance in North
America, and the U.S. rise in power. Photo Credit
Jendra Jarnagin

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The Technology of
Lewis and Clark
Explore the technology and survival techniques
used by the men of Lewis and Clark on their
landmark journey to the Pacific. From their
15-ton supply ship to the 193 pounds of
dehydrated soup they carried to Lewis's prototype
airgun and experimental iron boat, take a
close-up look at the guns and gear behind this
combination of 19th century high-tech and
pioneering grit. Filmed on location along the
Lewis and Clark Trail, the program features an
interview with William Clark's great-great-great
grandson.

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Sunday, May 16, 2004
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6-8pm -- Barbarians - Barbarians: Mongols/Huns
In this 2-hour special, shot in film on location,
we examine the barbarian hordes that swept across
Europe, Asia, and Africa, from the 9th Century BC
through the 14th Century AD. First, we look at
"The Mongol Catastrophe"--the invasion by nomadic
warriors that swarmed out of the east
overwhelming the Ottoman Empire. Then, we examine
the mysterious Huns, who fell upon the European
continent like the vengeance of God. Some say the
Chinese built the Great Wall to keep them out.

8-10pm -- The True Story of Troy - 
It's the site of history's most legendary war and
the Western world's oldest adventure story.
According to myth, it began with a rigged beauty
contest and ended with a giant wooden horse
unleashing utter destruction. Now,
archaeologists, literary detectives, and military
analysts are uncovering evidence suggesting the
war was really waged. From archaeological
trenches at ancient Troy and the citadel fortress
of King Agamemnon, from Homer to Hollywood, we
search for the true story of Troy.

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - Bren Gun &
Carrier/Special Forces School Final Exam/Beasts
of Burden/Predator/1st RPV: #52
R. Lee Ermey rolls up to HQ toting a WWII light
machine gun, the Bren Gun, and rides in a
"Tankette", the armored vehicle that carried the
Bren and its 2-man team. At the Army's Special
Warfare Center and School, he checks out
"Operation Robin Sage", the final exam--a 14-day
"war" waged in North Carolina. Lee learns that
Green Berets are training to handle pack beasts
like camels and donkeys, and looks at the leading
remote-powered vehicle, the Predator, and the
first RPV, WWII's "Weary Willy".

10:30-11pm -- Tales of the Gun - Million Dollar
Guns
The treasures of a select few, each tells a story
of human triumph or desperate tragedy, cast
forever in iron, steel, and wood. A few are so
prized and historic that their values have soared
to monumental prices. They are the million-dollar
firearms. We view Catherine the Great's pistols
and Hitler's gold pocket pistol, among others.
(Half-hour version)

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Monday, May 17, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Black Hawk: Night
Stalker
For over 20 years, the Black Hawk has been the
U.S. Army's frontline utility helicopter for air
assault, air cavalry, and medical evacuation. The
Black Hawk remains today the world's most
advanced twin-turbine military helicopter and
flies wherever duty calls, from hot deserts to
the icy Arctic. This is the dramatic story of how
post-Vietnam, in the 1970s, the U.S. designed and
built a new generation of sophisticated
helicopters.

8-8:30pm -- Mail Call - Bren Gun &
Carrier/Special Forces School Final Exam/Beasts
of Burden/Predator/1st RPV: #52
R. Lee Ermey rolls up to HQ toting a WWII light
machine gun, the Bren Gun, and rides in a
"Tankette", the armored vehicle that carried the
Bren and its 2-man team. At the Army's Special
Warfare Center and School, he checks out
"Operation Robin Sage", the final exam--a 14-day
"war" waged in North Carolina. Lee learns that
Green Berets are training to handle pack beasts
like camels and donkeys, and looks at the leading
remote-powered vehicle, the Predator, and the
first RPV, WWII's "Weary Willy".

8:30-9pm -- The Color of War - Anchors Aweigh
For the sailors who fought in WWII, combat at sea
differed radically from any previous conflict.
The jobs they performed were far more complex and
technically more demanding than ever before, and
the threats they faced were much more lethal.
Utilizing vivid color film and photographs
unearthed from archives and personal collections,
along with firsthand accounts from veterans, we
recall the remarkable stories of these sailors
and the battles they fought. Peter Coyote
narrates. (Half-hour version)

9-10:15pm -- Band of Brothers - Replacements
Fresh replacements join Easy Company in time for
a massive paradrop into German-occupied Holland.
The Dutch townspeople of Eindhoven welcome them
as liberators, but when Easy and a cluster of
British tanks move into a nearby town, a superior
German force inflicts many casualties and forces
a retreat. As they move onto another assignment
in Holland, Capt. Winters (Damian Lewis) laments
the retreat, and Capt. Nixon (Ron Livingston)
thinks that the ambitious Allied operation seems
to have failed.

10:15-11:15pm -- Investigating History -
Napoleon's Mass Grave
In March 2002, in Vilnius, Lithuania,
construction workers uncovered a mass grave
filled with close to 2,000 skeletons. Scientists
determined that the remains belonged to the last
remnants of Napoleon's Grand Army retreating from
Moscow in 1812. The find offers new insight into
Napoleon's invasion of Russia, the largest
military disaster ever recorded. Follow
scientists as they seek to learn who these people
were and how they died. Was it a massacre, an
epidemic, or the result of brutal cold?

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gangster Guns
During the 1920s and '30s in big cities and small
towns alike, they earned a fierce reputation in a
blaze of bullets. They were the best friends of
criminals such as John Dillinger, Pretty Boy
Floyd, Baby Face Nelson, Al Capone, and Bonnie
and Clyde. Handle their Colt 45s and 38s, Tommy
guns, Whippets, and Browning automatic rifles as
we uncover the stories of gangster guns.

8-9pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Destroyer Down!
In 1943, the USS Murphy, along with seven other
destroyers and two battleships, left New York
Harbor to accompany a supply convoy headed to
England. The convoy sailed dark on that moonless
night--not even a cigarette could be lit on deck.
Suddenly, the Murphy was struck and sliced in
half. The bow sank and took 35 men down, but
incredibly, the stern stayed afloat. We follow a
team of divers who found the bow in 2000 as they
piece together what happened, and talk to
survivors of that deadly dark night.

9-10pm -- Tactical to Practical - Balloons/Army
Engineers/Command Centers: #17
Many think manned flight began with the Wright
Brothers, but it really began 200 years earlier.
As early as 1783, balloons were used in
everything from espionage to bombing. Host Hunter
Ellis takes a ride on a cluster balloon and looks
at the revival of the hot air balloon for
civilian use. Next, we see how the Army Corps of
Engineers has paved the way from Bunker Hill to
Iraqi Freedom. And we compare military command
centers to their civilian counterparts used for
transportation and energy systems.

10-11pm -- Wild West Tech - Train Tech
Nothing affected settlement of the American West
more than construction of the transcontinental
railway that connected the Wild West to the
civilized East. We spotlight tools as well as
techniques used to build tracks, bridges, and
tunnels through mountains of solid granite. We
also explore technology developed to make trains
less vulnerable to bandits and train
wrecks--better tracks and rails, arming mechanics
with guns, and use of the telegraph as a warning
system. Keith Carradine narrates.

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Wednesday, May 19, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Telephone
An exploration of the intense competition,
romance, success, and disappointment that led to
the miracle of long-distance communication.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The Aircraft Carrier
The dramatic story of how the Essex-class
aircraft carriers rose like a phoenix after the
Pacific Fleet's destruction at Pearl Harbor.
Weighing in at over 27,000 tons, and over 800
feet in length, they were known as floating
cities--and the spearhead of every naval battle
in the Pacific Theater of War. Despite their huge
size, each carrier was terrifyingly vulnerable,
holding tens of thousands of gallons of fuel.
Though the target of kamikaze assaults, no
carrier was sunk by the Japanese.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - T-34: Russian Victory
Born out of a desperate need to defend the
Motherland, Stalin enlisted the ideas of an
American engineer J. Walter Christie to develop
in total secrecy one of the most formidable tanks
in history. In 1941, straining under Operation
Barbarossa, Stalin ordered his new weapon into
the fray and changed the course of WWII. Using
detailed reenactments and interviews, we reveal
what life was like inside Russia's "secret"
weapon, the T-34, and the horrifying reality of
combat on the Eastern Front.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Guns of the Russian
Military
Forged in Europe's shadow, Russian small arms
were once dismissed as crude copies. Often
lacking the finish of Western counterparts,
Russian guns have been battle-proven worldwide,
with their emphasis on robustness and simplicity
of design. Review the long history of Russian
small arms--from Peter the Great to the Cold War.

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Thursday, May 20, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Police Technology
When police forces were born in the 1800s,
British "bobbies" made due with a billy club.
Public wariness and institutional resistance to
change held back technological advances for much
of the 20th century. But in the last decades,
police have been swept up in a technological
revolution that has transformed nearly all
aspects of crime fighting.

8-9pm -- Time Machine - Hitler's War: The Western
Front: The Longest Day
Our series depicting WWII's Western Front begins
on D-Day, June 6, 1944. The invasion caught the
Germans off-guard, but bad weather caused many
bombs and shells to land too far inland leaving
German defensive positions intact and Allied
soldiers open to machine-gun fire. Former U.S.
pilots tell of recurring nightmares, French
voices criticize the bombardment that killed
10,000 civilians, Montgomery's adjutant Sir Carol
Mather admits Allied mistakes, and family of
combatants on both sides comment.

9-10pm -- Time Machine - Hitler's War: The
Western Front: The Battle for Monte Cassino
On February, 15, 1944, the U.S. Air Force reduced
the monastery at Monte Cassino to rubble. Built
in 529 by St. Benedict, it sheltered about 800
refugees and wounded. The Allies called it "a key
installation, equipped with heavy artillery."
Nazi propaganda declaimed the destruction of "the
cradle of civilization" around which they had
established a 300-meter secure zone to protect
it. Eyewitnesses shed light on the controversy,
including Bradford Evans, who piloted the lead
bomber.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The Subs of WWII
Meet the U.S. Navy submariners of WWII--hunters
who lived under the sea in cramped and
claustrophobic quarters as they stalked their
victims. We'll see how Navy designers struggled
to achieve a submarine design that ultimately
proved to be the best underwater craft to fight
in the war. Included are stories of the Squalus,
whose crew was the first to be rescued from a
disastrous sinking, and the Argonaut, the largest
submarine built until the advent of nuclear subs
in the 1950s.

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Friday, May 21, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Frontline Reporting
In March 2003, embedded civilian correspondents
rolled along with the U.S. military convoy as it
invaded Iraq. Equipped with satellite and video
phones, digital cameras, and lightweight
satellite uplinks, frontline reporters dispatched
the news of war as it happened. Reports of war
are as old as war itself; once the exclusive
province of soldier-scribes like Julius Caesar,
the accounts were usually written after the fact.
Join us as we review the history and preview the
future of frontline reporting.

8-9pm -- Time Machine - Hitler's War: The Western
Front: The Battle for Paris
On August 19, 1944, Paris erupted against German
occupation that held the crippled city in its
grip. Without warning, Parisians erected
barricades, ambushed soldiers, and attacked tanks
with Molotov cocktails. But Hitler would much
rather see Paris reduced to rubble than abandon
the site of his greatest victory, and the rebels
learn there will be no Allied support. We depict
the dramatic events of those days when Frances'
fate hung by the thinnest of threads, and how the
city was finally liberated.

9-10pm -- Time Machine - Hitler's War: The
Western Front: The Bridge at Arnhem
In late Summer 1944, routed German units flee to
Holland and Germany's borders. The Allies believe
the war might be over by Christmas. But in the
months to come, they confront bloody
surprises--the British are defeated at Arnhem,
the U.S. advance stalls at Aachen, and on
December 16, the Battle of the Bulge begins.
Civilians and veterans offer recollections,
including U.S. officer Harry W.O. Kinnard, who
details why General McAuliffe replied "Nuts!" to
the German demand for surrender at Bastogne.

10-11pm -- Time Machine - Hitler's War: The
Western Front: The Final Act
In March 1945, war returns to the country where
it began six years earlier. In the east, the Red
Army is attacking over the River Oder, while the
U.S. and British have reached the Rhine in the
west. German forces blow up bridges that cross
the Rhine, but when U.S. forces take the bridge
at Remagen, the German front is breached. We
detail the final chapter of the war in Europe, up
to Hitler's suicide and Germany's unconditional
surrender, hearing from German and Allied
witnesses and participants.

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Saturday, May 22, 2004
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7-8pm -- Investigating History - The Holy Grail 
Rennes le Chateau is a small village in the
Pyrenees of Southern France. It's a quiet place
until tourists arrive hunting its secrets.
According to legend, the Knights Templar brought
the Holy Grail here for safekeeping. Those who
come on pilgrimage think the Grail is very
different than history records. Was it proof of
marriage between Jesus and Mary Magdalene? Did it
verify their bloodline survived? Permission has
been granted to dig in Rennes le Chateau...and
history or legend is about to change.

8-10pm -- Movies in Time - Attila, Pt. 1
Movie. Shot in Lithuania, this 2-part movie
portrays the life of one history's most feared
men--Attila, King of the Huns in the 5th
century--and the Western World's fate,
represented by a rapidly diminishing Roman
Empire. Part 1 follows young Attila, who survives
the murder of his chieftain father and the
slaughter of his village, and goes on to become a
great warrior whose exploits draw the attention
of Roman General Flavius Aetius. Starring Gerard
Butler, Powers Boothe, and Alice Krige. (2001)

10-12am -- Movies in Time - Attila, Pt. 2
Movie. After defeating his brother, Attila
becomes king and marries N'Kara--who tragically
dies in childbirth. Attila grows in power, and
after a series of triumphs over Roman
fortifications in Gaul, finally meets Aetius on
the battlefield. The fate of each man is
intertwined in a tangled web of revenge,
deception, and betrayal--and the outcome of the
Battle of Chalons will decide the fate of Western
civilization. Starring Gerard Butler, Powers
Boothe, Tim Curry, and Simmone Jade MacKinnon.
(2001)

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Sunday, May 23, 2004
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7-8pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Japanese Sub at
Pearl Harbor
The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was a move of
unprecedented aggression that shook the U.S. out
of its peaceful slumber and into WWII. But for 60
years, veterans of the destroyer USS Ward claimed
they sank an enemy submarine outside the harbor
more than an hour before the aerial attack began.
The wreck was never found, and the story was
dismissed. In August 2002, a dive team crossed
its path and their find made headlines worldwide.
We travel to Pearl Harbor to investigate the
midget sub mystery.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - Tora, Tora, Tora: The
Real Story of Pearl Harbor
December 7, 1941, was an historical turning
point--the world was forever changed after the
fateful Japanese attack against the U.S. fleet at
Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. It resulted from a
combination of interrelated and complicated
factors--and at any point, the dangerous
operation could have been called off before its
commander radioed back the code words "Tora,
Tora, Tora" (Tiger, Tiger, Tiger), which meant
complete surprise had been achieved. Here is the
real story of the "Day of Infamy".

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - Blimp/Military
Shotguns/Navy Graveyard/Poop Deck: #41
R. Lee Ermey flies in a new hi-tech blimp the
military is testing as an anti-terror
surveillance platform that can hover over areas
for hours, and he examines the first aerial recon
balloon from the Civil War. Then, he loads up and
takes aim with military shotguns. Next, Lee goes
where ships go to die in Washington State--water
storage for many WWII and Vietnam-era ships. And
finally, Lee finds out why the Navy has so many
terms involving the word "Poop"--which dates back
to Ancient Rome.

10:30-11pm -- Tales of the Gun - Naval Guns
Perhaps one of the greatest expressions of
weapons, naval guns first encouraged nations to
develop the concept of "sea power". From sail, to
steam, to steel, the warships of the world exist
for one purpose--to overpower the enemy at sea.
Step aboard as we test the mighty force of
enormous guns at sea. (Half-hour version)

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Monday, May 24, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Inventions of War
Arising from the horrible carnage, deprivation,
and suffering caused by war is a countless array
of everyday items--from hairbrushes to
microwaves--that directly descend from wartime
innovations. Wartime research and development
have revolutionized communication,
transportation, and medicine. From Spam to
nuclear power to hairspray and cell phones, life
as we know it ironically owes a lot to war. We'll
follow the day-to-day life of an ordinary woman
and see the influence of war on her life.

8-8:30pm -- Mail Call - Golden Knights/WWII Army
Air Force or Air Corps?/Flying Tigers/AC-130U
"Spooky": #40
Join R. Lee Ermey as he prepares to jump with the
Air Force's Golden Knights--and find out if he's
too chicken! Since people get confused about what
to call the Air Force during WWII, when it was a
part of the Army, he digs into the history. Then,
Lee focuses on the Flying Tiger volunteers who
risked their lives in China before America
entered WWII. And, he profiles the modern gunship
AC-130U. Terrifying to the enemy, it flies at
night, hence its nickname "Spooky".

8:30-9pm -- The Color of War - Why We Fight
After all of the training and discipline, the
soldiers of WWII weren't simply cogs in a huge
war machine. They were men whose thoughts and
actions revealed their true attitudes about their
experiences in the armed forces. In this episode,
we learn why they fought on, sometimes against
their better instincts. Peter Coyote narrates our
compelling journey into WWII through the eyes of
those who lived it, with color film and
photographs unearthed from archives and personal
collections. (Half-hour version)

9-10:10pm -- Band of Brothers - Crossroads
Capt. Winters (Damian Lewis) leads a contingent
of Easy Company men on a risky mission over a
Dutch dike that results in a "turkey shoot" of
fleeing Germans, and is promoted to Battalion
Executive Officer, leaving Easy Company in the
hands of Lt. "Moose" Heyliger (Stephen McCole).
After moving back off the line to France, Lt.
Nixon (Ron Livingston) insists that Winters take
a break and see Paris. But when Winters returns,
news comes in of a massive German counterattack
in the Ardennes Forest.

10:10-11:10pm -- Investigating History - Wyatt
Earp at the O.K. Corral 
Virtually unknown to history before Hollywood
crafted his saga in the 1930s, Wyatt Earp was an
itinerant gambler, convicted horse thief and
pimp, sometime saloonkeeper, and occasional
lawman. We investigate this last incarnation and
the shootout with the Clanton gang in Tombstone's
O.K. Corral. Did Earp hide behind his tarnished
badge to settle personal scores? Using court
records of the gunfight investigation, we cut
through the lingering gunsmoke to recreate the
reality of the bloody gunfight.

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Tuesday, May 25, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bible Tech
Arguably the most influential book ever written,
the Bible provides a glimpse into the origins of
ancient technology and its use to withstand the
elements, build great structures, wage war, and
conserve precious water. We examine the
technological plausibility of biblical structures
and machines--including the Tower of Babylon, the
Temple of Jerusalem, ancient bronze and iron
forging, and shipbuilding skills that might have
been employed to build Noah's Ark.

8-9pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Lost Treasure Ship
Found!
No tale inspires shipwreck hunters more than
rumor of priceless treasure lying on the bottom
of the sea. Such ships have been found, but few
as unique as the 1999 discovery of the Vrouw
Maria. Caught in a storm in October 1771, the
2-masted merchant vessel, en route to St.
Petersburg from Amsterdam, struck a rock and sank
along with her cargo of fine Dutch art bound for
Russian aristocrats. For nearly 230 years, she
lay undisturbed on the seabed with little decay
due to the Baltic's brackish nature.

9-10pm -- Tactical to Practical - Deep Sea
Exploration/Blimps and Dirigibles/Snow Gear: #18
All submariners share a nightmare--being trapped
alive on the bottom of the sea. Host Hunter Ellis
takes an in-depth look at the history and
technology of submarine rescue, and at famed
treasure hunter Mel Fisher's search for the
treasure of the Nuestra Senora de Atocha, which
went down in 1622. Next, Hunter examines the
history of dirigibles and their use by the
military and for civilian exploration. Then, he
explores military application of snow gear, and
plays with cool new commercial snow toys.

10-11pm -- Wild West Tech - Gambling Tech
Ride on a luxurious riverboat to the
rough-and-tumble mining and cattle towns where
prospectors and cowboys earned and lost fortunes
as we explore Wild West games, techniques, and
cheating devices. Meet professional players who
made a living by outwitting others, including
famous riverboat gamblers George Devol and Canada
Bill Jones, and Tombstone duo Wyatt Earp and Doc
Holliday. Keith Carradine introduces the rules of
each game and demonstrates the types of weaponry
gamblers carried.

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Wednesday, May 26, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Machine Tools
Machine tools, power-driven machines of all
shapes and sizes, are used to make metal parts
and have built our modern world. Life today would
not be possible without them. Beginning with the
story of the steam engine and traveling forward
to modern-day "machining centers" that are used
to make incredibly complex space shuttle parts,
we'll examine the basic types of machine tools
and their development. We'll also look at machine
tools of the future that will change the way
products are made.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Train Wrecks
Throughout railroad history, disasters lay at the
heart of progress, since expansion and profit
proved the main goals of management. In 1875
alone, an average of 22 train accidents happened
daily; in 1890, over 6,000 people were killed.
We'll examine how safety, once a secondary
consideration, became a primary goal.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Car Crashes
In the mid-1960s, the U.S. lost an average of
55,000 people yearly to car crashes. Since then,
the number of cars on the road has doubled, but
fatalities have decreased by nearly a third. The
dramatic reduction is the culmination of research
and development that led to safer roads and cars
and quicker emergency response. But car-crash
technology's future involves removal of its
biggest threat--human drivers! Find out if
computers and radar can prevent everything from
fender-benders to pile-ups.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Plane Crashes
When the most sophisticated machines fail, they
do so horrifically, plunging to earth with a
terrifying loss of life. From the beginning of
manned flight, plane crashes have plagued the
aviation industry and terrorized the public. But
the truth is, passengers have never been safer
because of the brightest minds, best technology,
and billions of dollars focused on preventing air
disasters. Using famous crashes like TWA Flight
800, we examine safety improvement and what still
needs to be done.

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Thursday, May 27, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Plane Crashes
When the most sophisticated machines fail, they
do so horrifically, plunging to earth with a
terrifying loss of life. From the beginning of
manned flight, plane crashes have plagued the
aviation industry and terrorized the public. But
the truth is, passengers have never been safer
because of the brightest minds, best technology,
and billions of dollars focused on preventing air
disasters. Using famous crashes like TWA Flight
800, we examine safety improvement and what still
needs to be done.

8-9:30pm -- Time Machine - The Crash of Flight
191
What happens when an airline and federal agency
detect a design or mechanical flaw in an airliner
and choose to ignore the "acceptable risk"
because it's costly to fix and may not cause a
problem? On May 25, 1979, 271 people fastened
their seatbelts for a flight from Chicago to LA.
Almost as soon as the DC-10 took off, it
plummeted to earth, exploding in flames. It's a
story of greed and deceit, arrogance and spin
control, and how the fallout brought aviation
giant McDonnell-Douglas to its knees.

9:30-11pm -- Broken Wings - Broken Wings
Historian and adventurer Pat Macha introduces us
to the world of aviation archaeology, bringing to
life once-majestic planes and the men and women
who flew them. "Airplane wrecks that remain
undisturbed for years provide us with a sobering
opportunity to consider the power of nature and
the mistaken judgements of man," Macha explains.
Teaming up with forensic experts and aviation
authorities, Macha transports us to the past at
crash sites and pieces together the puzzle behind
the twisted metal.

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Friday, May 28, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Million Dollar Tech
For millennia, luxury toys have functioned as
flashy instruments of affluence, authority, and
identity and driven many kingly consumers to
covet, create, and purchase these status symbols.
From the Roman Emperor Caligula's special barges
to Carl Faberge's impossibly intricate eggs, from
plasma screen TVs to $600,000 Bentleys and Rolex
watches, we examine spectacular personal
possessions--paeans to the lords of a consumer
culture that grows richer and technologically
more sophisticated daily.

8-11pm -- Movies in Time - Midway
Movie. Charlton Heston, Henry Fonda, and Robert
Mitchum head an all-star cast in this epic WWII
drama depicting America's first major victory
against the Japanese in the Pacific. Near the
tiny Island of Midway, an outnumbered U.S. Navy
defeats a massive Japanese flotilla, turning the
tide of the Pacific Theater. (1976)

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Saturday, May 29, 2004
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6-8pm -- Time Machine - Highway Hangouts:
Celebrating America's Roadside Attractions
Hitch a ride and travel America's byways to
discover the wacky highway attractions that
formed a roadside culture that fed, housed, and
amused us for decades. Visit dinosaur theme
parks, coffee pot-shaped diners, and truck stops
extraordinaire; and view a snapshot of who we are
as a nation. Based on John Margolies's books.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - Making a Buck
Making a buck and faking a buck have always gone
hand in hand as we see on a 2,600-year
journey--from the earliest known counterfeiters
of ancient Greece to the latest in
anti-counterfeiting technology. In this 2-hour
history of a crime as old as money itself and as
current as the cash in your wallet, we capture
the combination of seriousness and whimsy
inherent in the subject through some of
counterfeiting's most remarkable stories,
schemes, and characters.

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - Tank/Gatling
Gun/Samurai Sword: #1
R. Lee Ermey, who played the sergeant in "Full
Metal Jacket", applies his gruff sense of humor
in this half-hour series that answers viewers'
mail about what the armed forces were, and really
are, like! Shot on location, Ermey reads the
questions on air and then sends them out to
military experts in the field for answers and
brief demonstrations. In this episode, he finds
out how to steer the WWII tank M5A1 (the Stuart);
how fast a Gatling gun can fire; and why the
samurai sword is so powerful.

10:30-12am -- Godfathers - Godfathers
A panoramic and global overview of the phenomenon
known as Cosa Nostra--from the mass immigration
of Italians to the U.S. at the end of the 19th
century up to the arrests in 2000 on the New York
Stock Exchange, where the Mafia was laundering
money. What becomes evident in a chain of stories
depicting the most renowned "godfathers" is their
uncanny ability to act as political
representatives of an illegal state within the
legal state and to exploit major cycles and
crises throughout history.

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Sunday, May 30, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Investigating History - Napoleon's Mass
Grave
In March 2002, in Vilnius, Lithuania,
construction workers uncovered a mass grave
filled with close to 2,000 skeletons. Scientists
determined that the remains belonged to the last
remnants of Napoleon's Grand Army retreating from
Moscow in 1812. The find offers new insight into
Napoleon's invasion of Russia, the largest
military disaster ever recorded. Follow
scientists as they seek to learn who these people
were and how they died. Was it a massacre, an
epidemic, or the result of brutal cold?

8-9pm -- Save Our History: WWII Memorial - The
National World War II Memorial
The National World War II Memorial is the first
national memorial dedicated to all those who
served in WWII. Established by the American
Battle Monuments Commission, it honors all
military veterans, citizens on the homefront, the
nation at large, and the high moral purpose and
idealism that motivated the nation's call to
arms. Dedicated on May 29, 2004, we detail its
history and talk to those involved in its
conception and the fundraising that made it
possible.

9-11pm -- Nostradamus: 500 Years Later -
Nostradamus: 500 Years Later
The life story of Nostradamus unfolds in medieval
Europe at the time of the Great Plague and The
Inquisition. He lived in an age of superstition
and magic and believed that he could foretell the
future. For this he was labeled both a prophet
and a heretic, and his cryptic journals continue
to inspire controversy just as they did in the
16th century. In this 2-hour examination of his
life, we visit his birthplace in France and trace
his career as doctor, astrologer, father, and
seer.

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Monday, May 31, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- History Alive - Unsung Heroes of Pearl
Harbor
The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was so
overwhelming in its surprise and force that
almost every U.S. soldier, sailor, or marine that
rallied to resist it became part of a doomed and
heroic last stand. These unsung heroes were let
down by luck, fate, and bureaucracy. This
gripping special takes viewers to the actual
locations were these heroes fought and died, with
blow-by-blow accounts of the tragedy from the men
who lived that terrible day.

8-10pm -- Barbarians - Barbarians: Vikings/Goths
From the 9th Century BC through the 14th Century
AD, barbarian hordes on horseback thundered
across Europe, Asia, and Africa. Shot in film on
location, we examine their conquests and also
their cultures, leaders, and roles in shaping
history. In a 2-hour special, we shatter myths
about the Vikings, and see how they became agents
of social and political change, and the Goths,
who sacked Rome itself, and ironically,
maintained Roman art and culture in their Goth
kingdoms as the Empire faded away.

10-12am -- Barbarians - Barbarians: Mongols/Huns
In this 2-hour special, shot in film on location,
we examine the barbarian hordes that swept across
Europe, Asia, and Africa, from the 9th Century BC
through the 14th Century AD. First, we look at
"The Mongol Catastrophe"--the invasion by nomadic
warriors that swarmed out of the east
overwhelming the Ottoman Empire. Then, we examine
the mysterious Huns, who fell upon the European
continent like the vengeance of God. Some say the
Chinese built the Great Wall to keep them out.

  Sorry, no descriptions received for 1 to 14 of month
For more on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket
(movie available on video and DVD)

Hellcats of the Navy Previous History Channel primetime listings:

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January 2004

Official HistoryChannel.com Homepage
From the invention of the electric battery in 1800 to the murdered remains of missing Washington intern Chandra Levy being discovered in a Washington D.C. park*, find out what happened when with our exclusive History of the World Timeline!
GO TO: HistoryChannel.com/worldtimeline

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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