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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For This Month (schedules available after the 1st)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Thursday, January 1, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Survival Technology
In an historic survey of man's adaptation to killer environmental conditions, we travel to the desert, the Arctic, the sea, jungle, and space, charting the body's physiological responses to extreme circumstances such as frostbite, heatstroke, and hypothermia. We talk with military survival experts and learn about the latest cutting-edge survival gear, as well as the equipment aboard the space station, and look to the future, when nano-technology will create a new type of technology.
8-9pm -- Time Machine - The Bible's Greatest Secrets
In the Holy Land, specialized archaeologists sift through the living sands of time to uncover vanished civilizations. We trace biblical archaeology's history and profile some of its prominent figures like the eccentric professor who had his head preserved for posterity, and a husband and wife team who have spent their lives digging the sands of Israel. We also explore the future of biblical archaeology and examine the high-tech tools that will someday make digging with pick and shovel obsolete.
9-10pm -- Time Machine - Apocalypse
A look at the prophesies and symbolism in the Book of Revelation, the last book of the New Testament, which contains the futuristic final showdown between God and Satan. Filled with fiery visions, cryptic numbers, and strange beasts, it's perhaps the Scripture's most puzzling book. With the ancient city of Megiddo as a backdrop--thought to be the site of the Battle of Armageddon--the program explores the 7 Seals, the 4 Horsemen, and asks why only 144,000 souls will reach the Kingdom of God.
10-11pm -- Love and Sex in the Hebrew Bible
On the sixth day of Creation, God pronounced the sexual union between husband and wife "very good." The Hebrew Bible is rich in tales of love and marriage, as well as rape, prostitution, adultery, and polygamy. Sometimes the Bible reads more like a tabloid than a holy book. What are the messages in these stories? Are there lessons to be learned from Solomon's excesses and David's adultery? We turn back the pages of time to see if these lusty yarns of the ancients are relevant to today's society.
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Friday, January 2, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Maginot Line
The Maginot Line, a defensive string of forts with enfilading firepower, was built by France between WWI and WWII. Conceived by Minister of War Andre Maginot, it was meant to forestall another German invasion until troops could arrive. But the French began to think of the line as a substitute for manpower. When Belgium declared neutrality and exposed France's flank, Germany was able to sidestep the line. We'll visit the "impregnable" line's forts, observation turrets, and underground railroads.
8-9pm -- Greatest Raids - The Dambusters
On May 15, 1943, 19 Lancaster bombers set off for Germany's industrial heartland, piloted by the brave young men of 617th Squadron, led by Guy Gibson. Using an ultra-secret weapon--the bouncing bomb--this daring raid was intended to breach the 3 Ruhr dams and thereby destroy the Nazi war industry. We detail the astonishing concept behind the bouncing bomb, and recreate the raids on each dam, using archive footage to relive the incredible feats of flying and marksmanship of the Dambusters.
9-10pm -- B26 Marauder!
Bombing from altitudes of over 10,000 feet, the Marauder had the lowest loss rate of any Allied bomber during WWII--less than one-half of one percent. By the end of the war, it had flown over 100,000 missions and dropped over 150,000 tons of bombs. Meet the designers, technicians, and soldiers who played integral roles in the Marauder's development.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Ball Turret Gunners
In war, certain missions demand the most and constitute much of the legends of bravery. Journey back to the Second World War when fearless airmen manned the B-17's belly guns--glass bubbles that at any moment could become their coffin. The ball turret gunners called their work "flying the ball", others called it crazy!
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Saturday, January 3, 2004
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7-7:30pm -- Terry Jones' Medieval Lives - The Knight
Former Monty Python member Terry Jones possesses a passion for the Middle Ages, and tackles--occasionally tumbling--iconic characters from medieval England. First, Jones looks at the role of the Knight and asks--Was he a noble hero in shining armor, or a murdering, looting, underpaid mercenary rapist? Discover some unsavory truths--and the dark side of chivalry. Shot on the great battlefields of Italy and at the Warkworth Castle in Northumberland, England. (Half-hour version)
7:30-8pm -- Terry Jones' Medieval Lives - The Monk
From France, Terry Jones investigates the Monk. A peaceful life of prayer in service to God? Not for many medieval monks, who devoted their lives to making lots and lots of money. Religion was big business in those days and the merchandising opportunities were endless. Filmed on location at Citeaux, France, headquarters of the Cistercian Order, Terry discovers that monks were also pioneers in architecture, technology, and business. (Half-hour version)
8-10pm -- Time Machine - Mountain Men
Join us as we trek across America's vast wilderness with the fur trappers who helped open up the unknown and savage land, and risked everything for a life of adventure, money, and wanderlust. Although their era (1807-1840) lasted little more than a generation, their impact was enormous as they blazed across the west. Highlights of this 2-hour special include an interview with author Robert Utley and narration by Pernell Roberts.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The Winchester
Winchester...the name still evokes images of the Wild West and the taming of the frontier--it was the first reliable repeating rifle and settlers brought it along as they moved west. Prized by Civil War soldiers, the lever-action rifle was preferred by lawmen and outlaws alike. A classic Winchester can command upwards of $100,000 from collectors trying to buy a piece of the Old West. We see how a shirt manufacturer named Oliver Winchester became the most famous gun maker of the American West.
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Sunday, January 4, 2004
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7-8pm -- Dead Reckoning - Fingering the Killer
For 26 years, the Penny Serra Case was one of Connecticut's most famous unsolved murders. In 1973, the 21-year-old dental assistant was stabbed to death in broad daylight in a New Haven parking garage. But the mystery wouldn't be solved until 1997 after the development of a computerized fingerprint database. And in the Case of the Murdered Newspaper Girl, renowned forensic expert Dr. Henry Lee reconstructs the 1998 murder of 11-year-old Angelica Padilla using evidence from the crime scene.
8-9pm -- The SS - Death's Head
Regarded as SS elite and perpetrators of its most diabolic crimes, Death's Head battalions were deployed whenever particular cruelty and absolute devotion to duty were required and were responsible for the implementation of mass genocide in Nazi extermination camps. We show how willing henchmen were schooled to place themselves body and soul, in the service of unimaginable barbarity--and how, or if, these atrocities weighed upon their consciences. Features an interview with Simon Wiesenthal.
9-10pm -- The SS - Waffen-SS
Opinions still differ on the military arm of the SS. Was the Waffen-SS the criminal terror instrument of Nazi genocide, or were they "soldiers like any others" as SS General Paul Hausser claimed after the war's end? The Waffen-SS found its true vocation in 1941 with Operation Barbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union. There, Himmler's "racial warriors" were the vanguard, determined to implement the "extermination of the Jewish-Bolshevik subhuman hordes" as decreed by Hitler.
10-11pm -- The SS - Odessa
It was the Nazi's most clandestine group--the organization of former SS members known as Odessa. By late summer 1944, even fanatical Death's Head Nazis realized the war was lost and SS leaders needed to disappear from the Reich. Odessa financed a new life abroad, found jobs in German companies, and paid for the legal defense of SS members with "appropriated" Jewish money. Who supported Odessa? Who escaped via Vatican "rat lines"? What did the Pope know? Was Odessa still active as late as 1996?
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Monday, January 5, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Battlefield Medicine
"He who would become a surgeon should join the army and follow it," Hippocrates counseled nearly 2,500 years ago. In this history of medicine under fire, we see how a small army of medics, nurses, surgeons, stretcher-bearers, and ambulance drivers, races to keep pace with the deadly advances of war.
8-8:30pm -- Mail Call - Cobra Attack Helicopter/Sidewinder Missile/C-54 Skymaster/MPs/Flintlock Pistol: #39
What puts the "super" in the Marines' attack helicopter, the AH-1W Super Cobra? As long as we're talking snakes, why are there so many AIM (Air Intercept Missile) Sidewinders? Why do many consider the C-54 Skymaster transport plane the true hero of the Berlin Airlift and the first Air Force One plane? What kind of training and gear are supplied to our military police? How accurate were the old Flintlock Pistols? Shot on location, R. Lee Ermey answers viewers' questions on military technology.
8:30-9pm -- Mail Call - Unmanned Aircraft/Bogey/1st Combat Helicopter/Forward Observer/Fairbairn-Sykes Commando Knife: #26
If unmanned aircraft are so good, why do we need pilots? Travel with R. Lee Ermey to Edwards AFB for a look at the latest in experimental planes. See how Scottish kids, afraid of the Bogey Man, gave rise to the pilot term for unidentified aircraft. Watch the first combat helicopter, the U.S. YR-4B, flown in WWII by Lt. Carter Harman in Burma. See how forward observers direct artillery fire, and join Ermey as he demonstrates the Fairbairn-Sykes commando knife on his favorite target--a watermelon!
9-10:30pm -- Titanic: High Tech at Low Depth
In its day, the Titanic was a technological wonder. People were so enthralled with the largest moving man-made object in the world that they truly believed it unsinkable--until it slipped out of sight on April 15, 1912. In a 90-minute special filled with spectacular footage of both recent and archival expeditions, we explore the history of the ship and the technology that finally found it and enabled exploration and salvaging dives.
10:30-12am -- The Hunt for the Lost Squadron
A team of U.S. adventurers hunts for a lost treasure on an Arctic glacier--a squadron of WWII fighter planes that disappeared after crash-landing in Greenland in 1942. Their quest to solve this historic mystery spans 20 years and demands heroic vision and innovative new technology, but also puts the team's lives in constant danger, destroys friendships, ends marriages, and causes individual financial ruin. It's a story of obsession, commitment, and the high cost of accomplishing the extraordinary.
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Tuesday, January 6, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Quarries
Dynamite explodes hills to bits, drills divide sheer stone walls, 400,000-pound blocks are pulled from pits by giant cranes, and men work around the clock to wrest rock out of the earth. Not diamonds or gold...rock, the raw material of civilization! Without rock, modern society wouldn't exist. Roads, sewers, dams, bridges, buildings, paint, glue, make-up, antacids, and even chewing gum need crushed stone. From ancient days to the present, we explore the evolution of quarrying techniques.
8-9pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Death on Lake Huron
In the winter of 1913, The Regina was sunk during 1 of the worst storms ever recorded on Lake Huron. Originally thought to have collided with another ship, she was found 73 years later and the mystery of her demise was solved. Teams of deep-water detectives use today's cutting-edge technology to make the wreck "tell its story." Told through fascinating underwater footage, expert interviews, archival materials, and dramatic reenactments, veteran divers John Chatterton and Richie Kohler host.
9-10pm -- Tactical to Practical - Submarines/Miracle Materials/Radar: #3
Today's naval submarine is the world's deadliest weapon. Join former Navy fighter pilot and series host Hunter Ellis as he explores the technology that led from the submarine to handheld sonar devices that help tourists catch that "big" fish. We also look at miracle materials, such as carbon-fiber technology, and radar--now being used to help locate people trapped in the rubble of collapsed buildings.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Smart Bombs
Precision-guided munitions, smart bombs were the media buzz of the first Gulf War and a major military and political driving force of the second. But their apparent sudden celebrity is deceptive. The history of smart bombs goes back to World War I and includes an ingenious, if eccentric, group of inventions and a cast of characters that boasts a Kennedy and a president of General Motors. Join us for the underground history of smart bombs, and a glimpse into the future of precision weapons.
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Wednesday, January 7, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Great Bridge: 8 Miles of Steel
San Francisco's Oakland Bay Bridge stands as an incredible feat of engineering against the nearly impossible. Once chosen as one of the 7 engineering wonders of the modern world, it features an unique double suspension structure in its west end. Join us as we cross this triumph of construction, while we visit its past and look to its future.
8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Winter Warriors
Armies engaged in cold-weather combat have suffered insurmountable casualties from freezing as well as enemy fire. Stories from Napoleon's attack on Moscow, the Battle of the Bulge, and Korea's Chosin Reservoir detail how Mother Nature can be the most formidable adversary. We'll see how contemporary armies train by incorporating lessons learned from past tragedies and Alaska's indigenous population.
9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Ice Road Truckers
During the harsh winter of Canada's Northwest Territory, remote villages and work camps are cut off from the world. To keep them supplied, a tenacious group of long-haul truckers drive their rigs over hundreds of miles on ice roads cut across the surface of frozen lakes. Sometimes the ice cannot support the heavy rig, and driver and cargo plunge through the ice and sink to the bottom. Hitch a risky ride along with the Ice Road Truckers as they drive headlong into bone-chilling danger.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Icebreakers
They are the toughest ships in the water, plowing headlong into 1 of nature's hardest obstacles. Modern icebreakers can smash through 10-foot thick ice sheets without stopping, allowing scientists and commercial shipping access to some of earth's most inhospitable spots. Join our bone-chilling journey as we patrol the Great Lakes on the USCG Cutter Makinaw and traverse the infamous Northwest Passage on the maiden voyage of the USCG Healy, the newest Polar Class Icebreaker in the U.S. Fleet.
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Thursday, January 8, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Commercial Jets
Fasten your seatbelts as we take off on a flight through the history of commercial aviation--from the first jet passenger plane, the de Havilland Comet, to today's wide-body jets and supersonic Concorde. It's a story of high-tech worldwide competition among a field of high-stakes players. Billion-dollar deals ride on cutting-edge designs. Pilots train for hours in ground-based simulators, while computers fly the planes. We also catch a glimpse of the double-decker flying hotels of the future.
8-10pm -- Time Machine - Stealing the Superfortress
A 2-hour investigation that answers 1 of WWII's most intriguing questions: How did the Soviet Union copy the U.S. B-29 Superfortress, the war's most advanced aircraft? With the aid of Russian and American historians who gained access to previously unavailable Soviet archives, the complete story can finally be told. Highlights include interviews with Boeing representatives, B-29 crewmen who were interned in the Soviet Union, Soviet TU-4 aviation designers and pilots.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - MiG 15
The MiG 15 was 1 of the 20th century's most feared high-performance weapons. When it first appeared in 1950, its high speed, lightning maneuverability, and intense firepower outclassed everything in the sky. During the Korean War, when Soviet MiGs engaged with America's F 86 Sabre jets, they finally met their match and a new era in air warfare had begun. Features exclusive interviews with MiG fighter pilots who flew against U.S. pilots and the nephew of the founder of the MiG Design Bureau.
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Friday, January 9, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Prisons
"All hope abandon, ye who enter here!" This sentiment has permeated the masonry and clanging bars of prisons built throughout the ages. We'll see how the philosophy and architecture of today's American prisons emerged from the sewer cells and castles and dungeons of ancient Rome, medieval Europe, and 18th-century England.
8-9pm -- Dead Men's Secrets - America and the Mob: Wartime Friends
At the beginning of WWII, America wasn't yet fighting, but her support for the Allies was clear. The 1941 Lend-Lease Act enabled FDR to ship weapons and essential materials to England. But were U.S. harbors being watched? In 1942, fire broke out on The Normandie, a luxury liner turned troop carrier. Was it Nazi sabotage? Decades later, Lucky Luciano claimed the Mafia had burnt The Normandie, and in the aftermath struck a protection deal with the government to prevent further "Nazi sabotage".
9-10pm -- F117 Nighthawk Stealth
Designed in 1977 by Lockheed's covert development arm, The F117 Nighthawk was America's most secret armament program. Dogged by controversy and shrouded in secrecy, F117s have become the world's first truly stealth aircraft. First bloodied in Panama in 1989, F117s have been involved in all major conflicts of the past 20 years, providing the U.S. an unbeatable advantage in combat. Using archive film and color reenactments, we reveal the top-secret "black" world of stealth--the F117 Nighthawk.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The F-14
October 7, 2001: Missiles from lethal U.S. jets rain down onto Afghanistan less than a month after Sepember 11th. One powerful and deadly plane led the majority of the assaults--the F-14 Tomcat, the world's most complete military fighter. No other fighter jet carries the F-14's unique combination of weapons. Its state-of-the-art system can spot an oncoming enemy plane at almost 200 miles. Its radar can detect targets as low as 50 feet and as high as 80,000 feet and does so 3 times faster than the radar of any other fighter jet.
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Saturday, January 10, 2004
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7-7:30pm -- Terry Jones' Medieval Lives - The King
Meet the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly--three King Richards of England, or so history books say. The Good (Richard the Lionheart) spent most of his life crusading and only six months of a 10-year reign at home. Richard II was murdered to squash a popular uprising against those who deposed him. As for "child murderer" Richard III, his disfigurements were probably Tudor propaganda. Terry Jones also uncovers evidence of a King Louis--who seems to have been airbrushed from history. (Half-hour version)
7:30-8pm -- Terry Jones' Medieval Lives - The "Damsel"
Passive, shy, helpless, in distress and in need of rescue? It may have been centuries before Women's Liberation, but that doesn't mean medieval damsels had little control over their lives. Some medieval women ran businesses and others led armies. Not only were many women strong, powerful, and sexually confident, it wasn't unknown for a damsel to abduct a knight! One famous example produced the Scottish hero Robert the Bruce. (Half-hour version)
8-9pm -- Nazi Spies in America
The attacks on September 11, 2001 did not mark the first time foreign nationals were secreted onto American soil. At the height of WWII, 8 German saboteurs crossed the Atlantic in a pair of U-boats, surfacing on the eastern shore with plans to attack, destroy, and terrorize. When captured, 6 of the 8 were executed, while the ringleader languished in prison. Recently declassified FBI documents paint a new portrait of the doomed mission and offer a surprising account from the spies' point of view.
9-11pm -- Time Machine - Nazi America: A Secret History
In a 2-hour survey of Nazism in the U.S., we trace the history from the fairly benign organization that gave structure to newly-arrived German immigrants to today's neo-Nazis, who breach the borderline of free speech by using radical action to force their agenda of Aryan purity. It's also a history of the imperfection of American freedom.
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Sunday, January 11, 2004
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7-7:30pm -- Mail Call - Cobra Attack Helicopter/Sidewinder Missile/C-54 Skymaster/MPs/Flintlock Pistol: #39
What puts the "super" in the Marines' attack helicopter, the AH-1W Super Cobra? As long as we're talking snakes, why are there so many AIM (Air Intercept Missile) Sidewinders? Why do many consider the C-54 Skymaster transport plane the true hero of the Berlin Airlift and the first Air Force One plane? What kind of training and gear are supplied to our military police? How accurate were the old Flintlock Pistols? Shot on location, R. Lee Ermey answers viewers' questions on military technology.
7:30-8pm -- Mail Call - Avenger/Stinger & Red Eye Missiles/Military Firefighter & Smokejumper/Kiowa Helicopter/Kilroy: #38
R. Lee Ermey checks out the Marine Corps' Avenger Air Defense System; explains the difference in the Stinger and Red Eye missile that replaced it; finds out how military firefighters train differently than their civilian counterparts; learns about the first military smokejumpers--an all African-American unit known as the 555th Test Platoon or Triple Nickels; discovers the function of the Kiowa Scout Helicopter on the battlefield; and unravels the mystery behind the WWII drawings "Kilroy was here."
8-9pm -- Secret Luftwaffe Aircraft of WWII
German military aircraft designs were decades ahead of their Allied counterparts. To insure Luftwaffe superiority, their designers tested advanced concepts including swept-wing and vertical take-off aircraft and stealth bombers. Using computer-generated images and archival footage, we trace development of Hitler's airborne arsenal.
9-10pm -- Secret Japanese Aircraft of WWII
In the 1930s, Japanese designers created a range of warplanes, culminating in the legendary Ki-43 "Oscar" and the A6M "Zero". As the war turned against Japan, designers created the rocket-powered "Shusui", the "Kikka" jet fighter, and the experimental R2Y "Keiun". We also disclose frantic preparations to assemble a secret airforce of jet and rocket planes to counter an anticipated U.S. invasion in1945, and chronicle post-war aviation and the birth of the Japanese rocket program in the 1950s and '60s.
10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - Golden Knights/Flying Tigers/AC-130U "Spooky": #40
Join R. Lee Ermey as he prepares to jump with the Air Force's Golden Knights--and find out if he's too chicken! Then, Lee focuses on the Flying Tiger volunteers who risked their lives in China before America entered WWII. And, he profiles the modern gunship AC-130U. Terrifying to the enemy, it flies at night, hence its nickname "Spooky".
10:30-11:30pm -- Tactical to Practical - #12
Former Navy fighter pilot and series host Hunter Ellis explores technology, inventions, techniques, and products born in the military that went on to find useful and exciting applications in civilian life. In a high-action, high-tech, high-adventure approach to military and historical storytelling, Hunter goes on location to illustrate how these products came out of military conflict, their development, and their evolution into usage in everyday life.
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Monday, January 12, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - U-Boats
They came within days of single-handedly winning both world wars. Now, men who served in--and fought against--Germany's famed submarine corps remember the days of the dreaded Wolf Pack.
8-9pm -- UFOs: What You Didn't Know - UFOs in the Bible
Journey back through time into the mysterious world of UFOs as revealed through ancient biblical texts. Through intensive reinterpretation of early religious documents, researchers believe that they have found evidence of ancient UFO activity. From Elijah's flying "chariots of fire" to Ezekiel's "wheels within wheels in the sky", and even the enigmatic aerial phenomenon leading Moses during the Exodus, we put a modern perspective on the writings of the Bible in the context of UFOs.
9-10pm -- UFOs: What You Didn't Know - UFO Hot Spots
For those who study the UFO phenomenon, "UFO Hot Spots" are places around the globe known for a long history of UFO sightings and reports. From Brazil to Mexico, from Washington State to Florida, multiple witnesses, including air traffic controllers and even the military, confirm that something unexplained is repeatedly happening in the night sky. Tales of alien abductions, bizarre and chilling photographs of UFOs, and hours of videotape all abound as we search for UFO Hot Spots.
10-11pm -- UFOs: What You Didn't Know - When UFOs Arrive
It's all hush-hush as we track a secretive global paper trail, delving into government plans on how to deal with other-planet visitors. Searching historical records, we find that protocols are in place--from the U.S. military's JANAP-146 reporting requirements to France's Cometa files, from Chapter 13 of the FEMA Fire Officer's Guide to Disaster Control titled "Enemy Attack and UFO Potential", to a now-repealed federal law titled "Extraterrestrial Exposure".
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Tuesday, January 13, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Egyptian Pyramids
Constructed as tombs for the ancient pharaohs, over 100 pyramids remain in Egypt. Built during a span of well over 1,000 years, they stand as cultural and engineering marvels of staggering proportions. But many things about these monuments, including the exact methods used to construct them, remain tantalizingly obscure. Travel back in time as we investigate their evolution--from the earlier mastaba to the Step Pyramid, Bent Pyramid, and of course, the magnificent necropolis at Giza.
8-9pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Lost Treasure Ship Found!
No tale inspires shipwreck hunters more than rumor of priceless treasure lying on the bottom of the sea. Such ships have been found, but few as unique as the 1999 discovery of the Vrouw Maria. Caught in a storm in October 1771, the 2-masted merchant vessel, en route to St. Petersburg from Amsterdam, struck a rock and sank along with her cargo of fine Dutch art for Russian aristocrats. For nearly 230 years the vessel lay undisturbed on the seabed with little decay due to the Baltic's brackish nature.
9-10pm -- Tactical to Practical - Attack Planes/Animals at War/Inflatables: #4
Hunter Ellis shows off the best in 21st-century fighter jets, including the F-22 Raptor--the stealthiest aircraft ever--and sees how business and personal jets offer some of the same avionic and design features. After demonstrating prop-driven war machines of the past, Hunter hops into an F-18 for some Top Gun fun with his Blue Angel buddies. He also sees how animals are used in combat and by civilian authorities, and how surplus WWII air-filled pontoons developed into white water-rafting boats.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Non-Lethal Weapons
They stun, debilitate, immobilize--providing police and peacekeepers with options other than shouting or shooting. From the ancient caltrop--a multi-pointed contraption hurled by foot soldiers into a horseman's path--to sting ball grenades, electrical shock devices, and sound, light, and energy weapons, we examine non-lethal weapons that disperse crowds and take down criminals. And in a nod to the future, we see why the government thinks stink bombs might prove useful in the war against terror.
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Wednesday, January 14, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Booby Traps
All it takes to set off a booby trap is an unsuspecting victim lifting, moving, or disturbing a harmless-looking object. Booby traps continue to worry law enforcement; made from easily acquired items, information detailing their construction and needed materials are accessible through the mail--anonymously! And unlike a land mine, they can be anywhere. We detail the history of booby traps--from the ancient Egyptians, Chinese, Greek, and Romans to the Middle Eastern crisis and the War on Terrorism.
8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Inviting Disaster: #1
They make our lives more comfortable, more rewarding, and more secure. They are the magical machines that have brought us to the edge of the new frontier of limitless possibilities. But it is a hinterland filled with dangers and demons of our own creation. Based on the popular book "Inviting Disaster" by James Chiles, in this episode we explore the nuclear nightmares of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl.
9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Inviting Disaster: #2
The amazing machines of human invention most often do our bidding with uncomplaining proficiency. But when they go wrong, they exact a terrible wage. In August 2000, the Russian submarine Kursk glided through the depths of the Arctic Sea. But the demands of the Cold War had planted the seeds of disaster in this great ship--118 men would pay with their lives. Their deaths would bring about an enormous step forward in Russia's evolving democracy. Based on James Chiles's book "Inviting Disaster".
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Inviting Disaster: #3
No program better symbolizes human mastery of machines than does the space shuttle. But the breakups of Challenger and Columbia revealed the program is tragically flawed. Based on the James Chiles's book "Inviting Disaster", we look at the 1930 crash of the R-101, a dirigible which, much like Challenger, was rushed into flight and met with disaster, and the Hindenburg, whose 1937 explosion ended dreams of commercial flights for an entire industry. Will the shuttle program go the way of the dirigible?
Rumor has it that President Bush will soon announce the end of the shuttle program as of the year 2010.
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Thursday, January 15, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Statue of Liberty
It started as an idea at a French dinner party and became the symbol of the free world. The story of France's gift to the U.S. reveals a 20-year struggle to design and build the world's largest monument--using paper-thin copper sheets.
8-9pm -- Lady by the Sea: The Statue of Liberty
Stay tuned for details about this documentary from and narrated by Martin Scorcese on the Statue of Liberty.
8:55-9:55pm -- Ellis Island
An examination of the history of Ellis Island, called the "Isle of Hope, the "Isle of Tears". Dozens of immigrants recall their adventures and heartaches at the threshold of America's Golden Door. Using archive footage and family stills, we meet members of nearly every ethnic group that made the journey and learn what drove them here, while firsthand accounts highlight the diversity of experiences faced by the tide of humanity that swept through Ellis Island and made America what it is today.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Empire State Building
The amazing story of how the New York City skyscraper was constructed during the depths of the Depression. Requiring 10-million bricks and 60,000 tons of steel beams, and using a revolutionary technique to hold the steel girders in place--hot rivets--the landmark building was completed four months ahead of schedule.
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Friday, January 16, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Machu Picchu
Perched on a ridge in the Peruvian Andes is the engineering marvel Machu Picchu. Originally built by the Incas, this magnificent structure remains a mystery. Was it an observatory? Pleasure retreat? Fortress? This program presents the most current theory. A previous topic on Leonard Nimoy's In Search Of
8-9pm -- Dead Men's Secrets - Stalin's Spy Ring
A steady drip of crucial information made its way out of Germany and over to Russia during the course of WWII. It came from the Red Orchestra--a group of people from nations worldwide, united by their faith in Communism. The information the spy ring provided was so startlingly accurate that today many people believe there must have been a Communist spy in the highest echelons of Nazi government. We follow the stories of Red Orchestra members and attempt to track their superspy.
9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Guns of the Russian Military
Forged in Europe's shadow, Russian small arms were once dismissed as crude copies. Often lacking the finish of Western counterparts, Russian guns have been battle-proven worldwide, with their emphasis on robustness and simplicity of design. Review the long history of Russian small arms--from Peter the Great to the Cold War.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Bunkers
From the earliest bunkers of WWI through the ultra-futuristic ones of tomorrow's wars, we trace the story of defensive fortifications. In the constant struggle to hold off ever more potent forms of attack, bunkers function in a variety of forms. Three mammoth block structures comprise a submarine bunker at Lorient, France, able to house 20 subs. We visit Churchill's Cabinet War Room and Hitler's Berlin bunker, as well as backyard Cold War bunkers and those that protect nuclear weapons themselves.
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Saturday, January 17, 2004
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7-7:30pm -- Terry Jones' Medieval Lives - The Alchemist
Since the age of science and reason, the Middle Ages has been dismissed as a period shrouded in ignorance and superstition. But the reputation of medieval scientists, known then as philosophers, has been unfairly blackened. Not only did they understand more than we accredit, but they had a more ethical approach that we could learn from today. (Half-hour version)
7:30-8pm -- Terry Jones' Medieval Lives - The Minstrel
Supposedly wandering gaily from town to town, medieval minstrels were written off as an effete and ineffectual footnote to history. But, according to Terry Jones, this is unfair. Medieval showbiz could prove a risky career choice, with minstrels often caught up in wars and political wranglings. (Half-hour version)
8-10pm -- Time Machine - The Little Big Horn: The Untold Story
We'll look with fresh eyes at the infamous battle, using over 2 decades of research by Dr. Herman J. Viola, Curator Emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution, whose close friendship with Dr. Joseph Medicine Crow, grandson of one of Custer's 6 Crow scouts, afforded him unique access to the Native-American community's insights.
10-11pm -- Wild West Tech - Outlaw Tech
We think of outlaws as a primitive bunch, but these badmen were ahead of their time and took advantage of developing technology. See how the invention of dynamite and the telegraph assisted these criminals, and how photography stole their anonymity. As the 20th century approached, the technology that had helped them outrun authorities caught up with them in the form of a new invention--the automobile. Butch Cassidy, Jesse James, Henry Starr, Black Jack Ketchum, and a few others make appearances.
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Sunday, January 18, 2004
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6-8pm -- Movies in Time - Attila, Pt. 1
Movie. Shot in Lithuania, this 2-part movie portrays the life of one history's most feared men--Attila, King of the Huns in the 5th century--and the Western World's fate, represented by a rapidly diminishing Roman Empire. Part 1 follows young Attila, who survives the murder of his chieftain father and the slaughter of his village, and goes on to become a great warrior whose exploits draw the attention of Roman General Flavius Aetius. Starring Gerard Butler, Powers Boothe, and Alice Krige. (2001)
8-10pm -- Movies in Time - Attila, Pt. 2
Movie. After defeating his brother, Attila becomes king and marries N'Kara--who tragically dies in childbirth. Attila grows in power, and after a series of triumphs over Roman fortifications in Gaul, finally meets Aetius on the battlefield. The fate of each man is intertwined in a tangled web of revenge, deception, and betrayal--and the outcome of the Battle of Chalons will decide the fate of Western civilization. Starring Gerard Butler, Powers Boothe, Tim Curry, and Simmone Jade MacKinnon. (2001)
10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - Blimp/Military Shotguns/Navy Graveyard/Poop Deck: #41
R. Lee Ermey flies in a new hi-tech blimp the military is testing as an anti-terror surveillance platform that can hover over areas for hours, and he examines the first aerial recon balloon from the Civil War. Then, he loads up and takes aim with military shotguns. Next, Lee goes where ships go to die in Washington State--water storage for many WWII and Vietnam-era ships. And finally, Lee finds out why the Navy has so many terms involving the word "Poop"--which dates back to Ancient Rome.
10:30-11:30pm -- Tactical to Practical - Submarines/Miracle Materials/Radar: #3
Today's naval submarine is the world's deadliest weapon. Join former Navy fighter pilot and series host Hunter Ellis as he explores the technology that led from the submarine to handheld sonar devices that help tourists catch that "big" fish. We also look at miracle materials, such as carbon-fiber technology, and radar--now being used to help locate people trapped in the rubble of collapsed buildings.
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Monday, January 19, 2004
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7-8pm -- The Horrors of Hussein
Everyone knows Saddam Hussein was a tyrant, but the invasion of Iraq by coalition forces in 2003 revealed the full extent of the terror apparatus Saddam used to maintain power. In this gripping hour, we examine the roots of this dictator-madman--how he used violence beginning in his teens to achieve his ends--and talk to victims of his terror. We also see how his ministry of terror became a family affair: his 2 sons, Ouday and Qusay, intended to establish a reign of terror that would last generations.
8-9pm -- The Hunt for Osama and Saddam: Tracking Down the Killers
For the 8 months it took to track down Saddam Hussein, he was the subject of one of the two most intense manhunts in history--the other one, of course, is Osama bin Laden. In trying to track them down, the U.S. used everything in its arsenal--the world's most sophisticated spy satellite network, Special Operations task forces, and the biggest cash rewards in history--$25-million per man. We review the successful tactics used to bird dog Saddam and see if they may apply in flushing out Osama. S.O.B. must pay
9-11pm -- Barbarians - Vikings/Goths
From the 9th Century BC through the 14th Century AD, barbarian hordes on horseback thundered across Europe, Asia, and Africa. Shot in film on location, we examine their conquests and also their cultures, leaders, and roles in shaping history. In a 2-hour special, we shatter myths about the Vikings, and see how they became agents of social and political change, and the Goths, who sacked Rome itself, and ironically, maintained Roman art and culture in their Goth kingdoms as the Empire faded away.
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Tuesday, January 20, 2004
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7-8pm -- Barbarians - Vikings
Nordic peoples from the coasts of Scandinavia, these raiders and warriors were also explorers and merchants, whose slender ships carried them from Arabia to the New World--hundreds of years before Columbus set sail. After savage infighting among their own clans spurred development of the longship, the Vikings struck out across the seas, seeking plunder, slaves, and new lands. But in the end, they assimilated into European cultures and became agents of social and political change.
8-9pm -- Barbarians - Goths
Terrorized by the Huns savage raids, the Goths made a desperate bid for safety in the Roman Empire, but were forced into squalid concentration camps along the imperial borders, starved and degraded, their children sold as slaves. But Rome made a big mistake--the Goths kept their weapons and exploded in rioting and looting. After centuries of broken treaties, King Aleric sacked Rome. Ironically, the Goths maintained Roman art and culture in their new Goth kingdoms as the Empire faded away.
9-11pm -- Barbarians - Mongols/Huns
In this 2-hour special, shot in film on location, we examine the barbarian hordes that swept across Europe, Asia, and Africa, from the 9th Century BC through the 14th Century AD. First, we look at "The Mongol Catastrophe"--the invasion by nomadic warriors that swarmed out of the east overwhelming the Ottoman Empire. Then, we examine the mysterious Huns, who fell upon the European continent like the vengeance of God. Some say the Chinese built the Great Wall to keep them out.
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Wednesday, January 21, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Drive-Thru
Join us for a ride through the history of car-culture commerce from the first gas station to the drive-thru funeral parlors and wedding chapels of today. We chronicle the birth of the first drive-in restaurants that paved the way for a billion-dollar fast food dynasty, and feature many lesser-known drive-thru venues, such as dry cleaners, flu-shot clinics, liquor stands, and drug stores. And we'll take a journey to the future to see what products might be passing through the drive-thru of tomorrow.
8-9pm -- Hitler and Stalin: Roots of Evil
An examination of the minds of two of the 20th century's most brutal dictators and mass murderers--Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin. Based on recent psychological and medical studies, the program explores the personalities of these ruthless leaders, who were directly responsible for millions of deaths--their paranoia, suspiciousness, cold-bloodedness, sadism, and lack of human feeling. Includes interviews with Martin Bormann's son and Hitler's butler.
9-10pm -- The Horrors of Hussein - see description Monday
10-11pm -- Reign of Terror
The bloody life and times of the Saudi terrorist who has been linked to a number of deadly attacks against U.S. troops and citizens and who has called on Muslims to kill Americans everywhere in the world. Follow Osama bin Laden's trail from his privileged childhood as the son of a wealthy oil businessman to his battle against the Soviet Union in Afghanistan and his involvement in the infamous 2001 World Trade Center bombing.
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Thursday, January 22, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Submarines
Deadly steel sharks that stalk their prey below the surface, submarines reign supreme in the undersea world. With a pedigree dating back to 1787, U-boats came of age in the 20th century and completely revolutionized water warfare.
8-9pm -- The Real Attila the Hun
No ruler in history represents the unbridled rage and brutality of the barbarian as much as Attila the Hun. In the 5th century, Attila swept through Europe, effectively extinguishing the classical Roman Empire. And for a time, he held the destiny of all of Western Europe firmly in his grasp. But in the end, it was Attila who unwittingly secured the future of the civilized world and Christian Europe. After his death, the Hun Empire began to break up, and the marauding Huns "scattered to the winds."
9-10pm -- Ivan the Terrible: Might and Madness
The life of the bloodthirsty first Tsar of Russia. Ivan killed his own son and had several of his wives murdered.
10-11pm -- Caligula: Reign of Madness
Caligula ruled the Roman Empire fewer than four years, and was only 28 when assassinated by officers of his guard in 41 AD. His reign was a legendary frenzy of lunacy, murder, and lust. Between executions, he staged spectacular orgies, made love to his sister, and declared himself a living god. Join us for a look at this devoted son, murderer, pervert, and loving father whose anguished life was far more bizarre than the myth that surrounds him.
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Friday, January 23, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Luftwaffe
Hermann Goering's well-trained flyers filled the skies of Europe with dread and rained terror upon its great capitals. So how did the poorly equipped British Royal Air Force finally defeat them? Veterans and historians reveal the secrets.
8-10pm -- Hitler: Tyrant of Terror
In a 2-hour profile, we see how various aspects of Adolf Hitler's personality were reflected in German policy and the conduct of the war. As Hitler consolidated power, he created a climate of fear while anesthetizing the masses with the cult of the "Fuehrer". We also examine his macabre philosophy, from birth of his anti-Semitism to state-sanctioned mass murder. Rare extracts from speeches, eyewitness accounts, and startling film footage create a shocking psychological portrait.
10-11pm -- Japanese War Crimes & Trials
Though most people have heard of the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials, few know that Japanese officers were also tried for crimes against humanity. This program deals with the horrific stories of those held captive, and the trials of those held responsible for the greatest crimes during WWII.
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Saturday, January 24, 2004
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7-7:30pm -- Terry Jones' Medieval Lives - The Outlaw
Unlike the altruistic Robin Hood of legend, outlaws were often members of the gentry who robbed the poor to give to the rich. Remarkably, these outlaws gained a place of respect in society. (Half-hour version.)
7:30-8pm -- Terry Jones' Medieval Lives - The Peasant
Terry Jones, who possesses a passion for the Middle Ages, looks at the life of the peasant, and finds that contrary to the accepted version--miserable, dirty, poor, and ignorant--peasants had more holidays than we do! Very often their houses were bigger, they frequently ate better, and arguably had more influence in the corridors of power. The politicized working class depicted in "Monty Python and The Holy Grail" was not so far from the truth after all! (Half-hour version)
8-10pm -- Barbarians - Vikings/Goths
From the 9th Century BC through the 14th Century AD, barbarian hordes on horseback thundered across Europe, Asia, and Africa. Shot in film on location, we examine their conquests and also their cultures, leaders, and roles in shaping history. In a 2-hour special, we shatter myths about the Vikings, and see how they became agents of social and political change, and the Goths, who sacked Rome itself, and ironically, maintained Roman art and culture in their Goth kingdoms as the Empire faded away.
10-12am -- Barbarians - Mongols/Huns
In this 2-hour special, shot in film on location, we examine the barbarian hordes that swept across Europe, Asia, and Africa, from the 9th Century BC through the 14th Century AD. First, we look at "The Mongol Catastrophe"--the invasion by nomadic warriors that swarmed out of the east overwhelming the Ottoman Empire. Then, we examine the mysterious Huns, who fell upon the European continent like the vengeance of God. Some say the Chinese built the Great Wall to keep them out.
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Sunday, January 25, 2004
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7-8pm -- The Hunt for Osama and Saddam: Tracking Down the Killers -
For the 8 months it took to track down Saddam Hussein, he was the subject of one of the two most intense manhunts in history--the other one, of course, is Osama bin Laden. In trying to track them down, the U.S. used everything in its arsenal--the world's most sophisticated spy satellite network, Special Operations task forces, and the biggest cash rewards in history--$25-million per man. We review the successful tactics used to bird dog Saddam and see if they may apply in flushing out Osama. S.O.B. must pay
8-9pm -- Targeted - Engineer of Death
An action series about global manhunts for the world's foremost criminals, terrorists, drug lords, and kingpins. Featuring author Mark Bowden as the central storyteller, each episode offers high-adrenaline covert operations and special forces missions that explode in a climax of capture or kill. First, we look at the 3-year Israeli manhunt for Yehiya Ayyash, aka The Engineer, a Palestinian bomb maker who became a legend among his people, and who engineered the horrifying tactic of suicide bombings.
9-10pm -- Targeted - The Evil Genius
In this episode of an action series about global manhunts for the world's foremost criminals, terrorists, drug lords, and kingpins, author Mark Bowden tracks the worldwide hunt for Ramzi Yousef, the terrorist prodigy responsible for the World Trade Center bombing of 1993. His terrorist plot destroyed the belief that the U.S. was a safe haven from the brutal world of terrorism. This is the story of the unrelenting pursuit to bring Yousef to justice and to stop his next terrifying plan...
10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - Guided Missile Destroyer/WWI Aircraft & Aces/Marine Corps FAST Teams: #42
R. Lee Ermey travels to San Diego and boards one of the Navy's newest destroyers, the USS Preble. Then, he examines the most effective aircraft from WWI and finds out who the best pilots were, such as American Ace Eddie Rickenbacker. Finally, he takes a look at the Fleet Anti-Terrorism Team. These elite Marines protect important military assets against terrorist attack worldwide and guard the nuclear material on docked nuclear subs.
10:30-11pm -- Mail Call - Episode 27
At Camp Pendleton, R. Lee Ermey checks out the Marines' 13,000 horsepower CH-53 Super Stallion heavy-lift helicopter, and a Korean War helicopter, the Piasecki H-21B Workhorse--aka the Flying Banana. He gives us the scoop on the Navy's "Crossing the Equator" ritual--a ceremony of creative hazing for "polliwogs"--and how the Seabees built runways in the middle of the Pacific in WWII. Lee explains the military phrase "the G-2" and troops at Fort Knox demonstrate the Abrams battle tank's firepower.
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Monday, January 26, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Security Systems
Since civilization's earliest days, man has sought protection from those who would rob him of riches, knowledge, and even life. This is the story of the evolving systems designed to safeguard our most precious possessions, and of the enduring psychological war between protectors and thieves, each intent on outfoxing the other.
8-8:30pm -- Mail Call - Golden Knights/WWII Army Air Force or Air Corps?/Flying Tigers/AC-130U "Spooky": #40
Join R. Lee Ermey as he prepares to jump with the Air Force's Golden Knights--and find out if he's too chicken! Since people get confused about what to call the Air Force during WWII, when it was a part of the Army, he digs into the history. Then, Lee focuses on the Flying Tiger volunteers who risked their lives in China before America entered WWII. And, he profiles the modern gunship AC-130U. Terrifying to the enemy, it flies at night, hence its nickname "Spooky".
8:30-9pm -- Mail Call - M-1 Garand Rifle/First Assault Rifle/JATO/Golden Knights Parachute Team/Barrage Balloons: #28
R. Lee Ermey answers viewer questions about the M-1 Garand, the rifle General Patton called "the greatest battle implement ever devised", and demonstrates the world's first assault rifle, the German MP-44. He takes to the sky to explain jet assisted take-off (JATO); offers an eye-popping look at the stunts performed by the Golden Knights, the Army's precision freefall parachute team; explains how barrage balloons protected London during the Blitz; and goes through the alphabet--military style!
9-10pm -- Targeted - Pineapple Face
General Manuel Antonio Noriega was on the CIA's payroll long before becoming Panama's strongman. The U.S. funded his army under Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan; meanwhile, the dictator used torture, witchcraft, and Santeria to keep detractors at bay and citizens in line. But the U.S. wasn't about to let him control the Panama Canal and indicted him for drug trafficking. In 1989, after a U.S. Marine was killed at a roadblock, Bush launched the largest military invasion in history to target a single man.
10-11pm -- Targeted - Arkan: Baby-Faced Psycho
One of the world's most heinous war criminals, Zeljko Raznatovic--aka "Arkan"--cut his teeth on the Yugoslavian underworld of organized crime. A flamboyant and ruthless killer, Arkan purportedly operated at the bidding of Slobodan Milosevic, enforcing his policy of ethnic cleansing. Indicted by The Hague for war crimes, he was targeted by Delta Force, British SAS, and French Commandos. Finally the manhunt ended in Belgrade, when a masked gunmen put a bullet in Arkan's head. Author Mark Bowden hosts.
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Tuesday, January 27, 2004
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7-8pm -- Gold Rush Money
The dramatic story of how finding gold in California spawned a rogue economy that played out through scenes of chaos, murder, bank runs, and debauchery. Miners, merchants, and bankers schemed against one another to reap the riches of a lawless land. Charlton Heston traces the riveting tale of how this dangerous "wild west economy" was finally tamed.
8-9pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Gold Rush Disaster: The Frolic
Just off the coast of Northern California, our Deep Sea Detectives dive into a cove near Mendocino--a rocky inlet called "the Washing Machine" for its turbulent currents. There they find the wreckage of The Frolic, a clipper that smuggled opium into China during the 1840s. Who built and owned it? How did remnants of its cargo--Chinese ceramics--turn up in 1984 in a Native-American village in the Redwood Forest? How could there be no historical record of a shipwreck just off the California coastline?
9-10pm -- Tactical to Practical - Navy SEALs Dive Gear/Food Tech/Robots: #5
Navy SEALs take Hunter Ellis aboard the latest SDV (SEAL Delivery Vehicle), and he learns that much of their equipment is now available to civilian divers, including the latest in dive computers, dry suits, rebreathers, and underwater cameras. Hunter explores a shipwreck using the scuba phone--first developed by the Navy. Next, he sees how military food innovations changed the way we eat and live. Then, he tracks the crossover of robots from military to civilian use.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engines
Story of the development of engines and motors, with particular emphasis on the ones that have profoundly changed society. Beginning with the steam engine, we see how it was developed, how it works, and how it led to the Industrial Revolution. We review the electric motor, internal combustion engine, jet engine, and rocket engine, and conclude with a look at futuristic engine technologies, including hydrogen-powered cars and microtechnology engines so small that they fit on the tip of a finger.
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Wednesday, January 28, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Police Guns
Police represent a thin blue line protecting ordinary citizens from hardened criminals. We'll look at the vast array of weapons that police officers across America have wielded for over a 150 years in their endless fight to maintain law and order.
8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - War Planes of World War II
Flight was born in America at the turn of the 20th century. But WWII saw more planes built in a single year--300,000--than had been built in the previous 40. Footage of restored aircraft, historic film ranging from factory floors to dogfights, and interviews with pilots and designers recapture the aviation industry's finest hour.
9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Jet Engines
Strap on a parachute and soar through the saga of jet propulsion, which radically transformed our world since inception in WWII--from the Nazi's first jet-powered aircraft to the U.S. F-22 jet fighter, from the Concorde to tomorrow's scram-jet, a hypersonic transport plane that switches to rocket power outside earth's atmosphere!
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Runways
What do you think about when you gaze out the window as your plane takes off? Probably not about the least heralded part of our infrastructure--airport runways. But runways play a vital role as the backbone of aviation. They're where rubber meets road and land gives way to sky. Did you know that airports like JFK train falcons to keep little birds from becoming a hazard to the big, shiny birds? Join us for an engrossing look at the brawny concrete and asphalt runways that make aviation possible.
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____________________________________________________ 7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Metal
Metal constitutes the very essence of the modern world; the cadence of our progress sounds in the measured ring of the blacksmith's hammer. From soaring skyscrapers and sturdy bridges to jet planes and rockets, metals play a key role. Our journey begins before the Bronze Age and takes us into the shiny future when new metal structures--engineered at a molecular level to be stronger, lighter, and cheaper--shape human progress, as they have since man first thrust copper into a fire and forged a tool.
8-10pm -- Engineering Disasters - Engineering Disasters
Throughout history, the builders and engineers who paved our way out of the caves and into the modern world have also caused some of our worst disasters. What happens when their calculations prove wrong and it all comes tumbling down? From Hammurabi's days, when the first building laws were instituted, to today's potential nuclear or chemical disasters that can spell death for thousands, we'll take a harrowing 2-hour tour through some of history's greatest engineering mistakes.
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Disaster Technology
An examination of the historical development of technological tools that help science mitigate nature's fury. It's a survival story that begins with comprehending the force of disaster. As environmental calamities unfold, viewers witness the urgency for change that each crisis compelled and innovations designed to lower death tolls.
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Friday, January 30, 2004
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8-9am -- History's Mysteries: Nazi Ghost Train
In 1944 in Brussels, the Gestapo loaded 1,500 prisoners on a train bound for Germany and almost certain death. Among them were Allied invaders and Resistance workers. But the Resistance foiled Nazi plans and prevented the train's departure. We talk to survivors and former Resistance members at a 1999 Comet Line Reunion in Brussels.
9-10am -- History's Mysteries - Ghost Plane of the Desert: "Lady Be Good"
April 4, 1943 -- 25 B-24 Liberators take off from their base in Libya on a bombing mission to Italy, but only 24 return. In 1959, a British survey team discovers a plane, deep in the desert. Using the diary of 2 crewmembers, along with the crew's remains, we learn of their struggle to cross 100 miles of desert, without food or water.
10-12pm -- Time Machine: Ghosts of Gettysburg
In July 1863, the Union and Confederacy clashed in a bloody conflict at the sleepy Pennsylvania crossroads town of Gettysburg. The resulting battle left 50,000 dead and wounded in its wake, and fertile ground for an incredible amount of paranormal activity. Based on Mark Nesbitt's bestsellers, our 2-hour special dramatizes some of the most fascinating, famous, and frightening Gettysburg ghost stories, many told by the people who experienced them.
12-1pm -- History's Mysteries: Ghost Ships
Ships sailing without a crew? Phantom destroyers? Boats that disappear, then reappear? The Flying Dutchman, The Mary Celeste, The Dash, The Teazer, and the more recent Joyita. Crews of these vessels vanished without a clue to their fates. We travel the 7 seas seeking answers and hear from witnesses to the bizarre events.
1-2pm -- Modern Marvels: Cemeteries
More than 2-million people die in the U.S. each year. That works out to about 5,500 burials a day, with roughly 80 percent taking the long goodbye in a casket, and the remaining 20 percent electing to be cremated or finding some alternative method of crossing eternity's threshold. We take a look at dealing with the dead throughout the centuries, and at today's $20-billion funeral industry. Any way you look at it, it's a healthy business, with new generations of customers year after year!
2-3pm -- History's Mysteries: Nazi Ghost Train (repeated)
3-4pm -- History's Mysteries - Ghost Plane of the Desert: "Lady Be Good"
4-6pm -- Time Machine: Ghosts of Gettysburg
6-7pm -- History's Mysteries: Ghost Ships
7-8pm -- Modern Marvels: Cemeteries
8-9pm -- Dead Men's Secrets: Secrets of the Desert War
In 1940, Italian dictator Benito Mussolini declared war on Britain and her allies and opened a new front in North Africa--if he could push the British out of Egypt, he could control the Suez Canal. And when Germany's Erwin Rommel and his Afrika Corps joined the fray, the stakes soared. The British could only spare a small force and used deception, camouflage, and sheer brilliance to win in North Africa, aided by virtuoso magician Jasper Maskelyne. Find out how he made the Suez Canal "disappear"
9-10pm -- Tiger Attack!
Developed from a desperate need to turn the tide of war in his favor, Adolf Hitler was personally involved in the Tiger Tank, one of history's finest armored fighting vehicles. It was big and bad, and fit the Nazi ideal of a weapon. With detailed color reenactments and interviews, we enter the Tiger's world and meet its crews that fought on every major battlefront in the European Theater. Told from the German point of view, the program is produced in association with the Imperial War Museum, London (repeated 12am)
10-11pm -- Modern Marvels: Bombs
Bombs...the most feared and powerful weapon in any nation's arsenal. What began as incendiary devices in the 7th century has evolved into weapons that can literally blow the human race off the face of the earth! From the use of diseased carcasses flung over castle walls to Greek Fire to today's smart bombs, we review the evolution of bombs (repeated 2am)
11-12am -- The Most Ancient Taboo: Cannibalism
From the ancient Greeks to the American Anasazi, evidence shows that nearly every culture has had its taste for cannibalism. Or have these tales been fabricated as propaganda? What is it about cannibalism that both repulses and fascinates us? Join historians as they dig into the past, and meet modern cannibals, such as Jeffrey Dahmer (repeated 3am)
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Saturday, January 31, 2004
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7-8am -- 20th Century with Mike Wallace: Pioneers in Space
reviews the early days of America's space program and the race to space with the Soviet Union during the height of the Cold War. It focuses on NASA's Mercury Project and the first 7 astronauts who were part of it.
8-9am -- Automobiles: Jeep
9-10am -- Tales of the Gun: The Gunslingers
Wild Bill Hickok, Jesse James, Wyatt Earp. See why the weapons they carried stamped these gunmen's existence.
10-12pm -- Greatest Movie Gadgets
Cars that fly and drive themselves. Spiffy spy tools that see under doors and through walls. Water "Harleys" that fly above and below the surface. Only in the movies, right? Hollywood may have dreamt these things up, but regular guys are making them for real as we see in a 2-hour special combining clips of recent blockbusters and hilarious old movie serials, along with a look at real-life creations, including intelligence-gathering "insects" and undersea robots. Gadgets lovers beware your bank accounts!
12-1pm -- Blackbird Stealth!
Designed in the late 1950s by aeronautical genius Kelly Johnson at the mysterious Skunkworks, the SR-71 Blackbird was the world's first stealthy aircraft, designed to over-fly enemy territory with impunity while photographing 100,000 square miles in an hour. While serving 6 presidents, it saw action on hot and cold war fronts alike. Interviews with crews and commanders combined with unbelievable footage puts viewers in the cockpit of this amazing spy plane, flying at speeds of 2,000 miles an hour.
1-2pm -- Modern Marvels: The Junkyard
Uncover how junkyard operators create order out of seemingly random piles of junk.
2-3pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Gold Rush Disaster: The Frolic
Just off the coast of Northern California, our Deep Sea Detectives dive into a cove near Mendocino--a rocky inlet called "the Washing Machine" for its turbulent currents. There they find the wreckage of The Frolic, a clipper that smuggled opium into China during the 1840s. Who built and owned it? How did remnants of its cargo--Chinese ceramics--turn up in 1984 in a Native-American village in the Redwood Forest? How could there be no historical record of a shipwreck just off the California coastline?
3-4pm -- Modern Marvels - Space Shuttle Columbia
Combination rocket, spacecraft, and airplane, the space shuttle is the most complex vehicle ever built. Long before it ever flew, the shuttle was nearly scuttled due to political pressures, technological challenges, and cost overruns. The program not only overcame these challenges, but opened space to an international community of scientists, explorers, and dreamers. This is the story of the Columbia, the first shuttle to fly outer space, from inception to tragic demise in January 2003.
4-5pm -- Tactical to Practical - Navy SEALs Dive Gear/Food Tech/Robots: #5
5-5:30pm -- Hands on History: Tires
5:30-6pm -- Hands on History: Highways
Host Ron Hazelton can't wait to get on the road again as he visits America's most famous highway--Route 66--to explore the history and evolution of road building. He does it all from clearing out a roadbed with a bulldozer to laying down asphalt with a state-of-the-art lay-down machine.
6-6:30pm -- Guts & Bolts: Inside the Arena: #4
Nothing revs up a crowd like a mechanical bull, except a real bull at a rodeo! Tim Beggy takes on both beasts for the ride of his life. In New York, he learns that Madison Square Garden is 1 giant flash bulb--snap your shutter and the arena lights up for 1/250th of a second. He helps a crew transform Philadelphia's First Union Center from basketball court to hockey rink overnight.
6:30-7pm -- Shifting Gears #4
At Becker Automotive Design, host Josh Hancock assists in turning a Ford Excursion into a mobile, armored, stealthy boardroom on wheels--with satellite uplinks for TV and Internet. Josh travels to Santa Monica to a place where they sell some of the most powerful gas in the country--100 octane. Who buys this stuff? Then, he demonstrates the Lincoln Aviator's "reverse beep" technology, and meets the unsung heroes of the auto world--Crash Test Dummies.
7-8pm -- Days That Shook the World: Fermi's Chain Reaction/Chernobyl
Atomic power was to be the energy of the future...no one had considered the possibility of an accidental nuclear disaster. Two days, more than any other, reflect the positive benefits and terrifying possibilities of harnessing the colossal power of the atom. December 2, 1942, Enrico Fermi and a team of physicists at the University of Chicago trigger the first controlled nuclear chain reaction; April 26, 1968, a routine test at Chernobyl power station turns into the world's worst nuclear disaster.
8-9pm -- Days That Shook the World: Hiroshima
August 6, 1945. A B-29 Bomber took off from a South Pacific Island on a clandestine mission to drop a bomb unlike any other--one that forever changed the world. Archival footage and dramatic reconstruction of events leading up to the first atomic bombing provide insight, along with testimony from Japanese living in Hiroshima in 1945 and Paul Tibbets, who piloted the mission. The physical blast killed 100,000 and flattened 47,000 buildings...but the long-term impact will be felt forever (repeated 12am).
9-10pm -- Days That Shook the World: Assassination of Archduke Ferdinand/Last Day in Hitler's Bunker
Two great global conflicts defined the 20th century. The First World War began with a single bullet, fired by a young Serbian nationalist, killing Archduke Ferdinand; the bullet that Adolf Hitler fired into his head finally brought World War Two to a close. Just two bullets, fired less than 31 years apart, gave birth to the modern world--for better or worse. Dramatic reconstruction and archival film help explore the complex sequence of events
10-11pm -- Presidents on Super Sunday
On the last Sunday in January, American eyes turn to the battlefield called the Super Bowl. And included among the millions of fans immersed in the game is the President of the United States, who unlike the average fan, must remain focused on matters of national and international significance. Join us for a pugnacious look at presidential moments during Super Bowl Sunday, featuring interviews with former presidents and key administration officials--from the first Super Bowl in 1967 to today (repeated 2am & Sunday 5pm).
11-11:30pm -- Vanishings! The Disappearance of Michael Rockefeller
On November 18, 1961, 23-year-old Michael Rockefeller set out from a missionary outpost to visit remote villages deep in the interior of Papua, New Guinea. He never made it back to shore. When his native catamaran was swamped in rough seas, Michael decided to swim for help--he was never seen again. Nelson Rockefeller, Michael's father and New York's Governor, coordinated an extensive search, but no remains were found. Did Michael drown or meet a gruesome fate at the hands of headhunters? (repeated 3am)
11:30-12am -- Vanishings! Alfred Loewenstein: The Missing Millionaire
On July 4, 1928, a private aircraft took off from Croydon, England's biggest commercial airport, headed for Brussels. Onboard was Belgian financier Alfred Loewenstein--one of the world's richest men. But by the time the plane landed, the financial wizard was no longer onboard. Somewhere over the English Channel, at an altitude of 4,000 feet, Loewenstein had vanished without a trace. Had he fallen out of his plane? Was he murdered? Even today, the cause of his disappearance remains a mystery (repeated 3:30am).

For more on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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