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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For Dec. 2004 (schedules available after the 1st)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Wednesday, December 1, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Super Guns.
An examination of guns that exist on the cutting edge
of firearm technology. Fighting battles on computers
decades before an actual shot is fired, these super
guns may make the world safer...or more dangerous than
ever before.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Washington Monument.
The U.S. capital boasts many memorials, but none with
a more bizarre history than the obelisk erected to
America's first president. Over 55 stories high and
weighing over 90,000 tons, the Washington Monument
stands stalwart in the city's center. From concept to
completion, it took 100 years--years filled with
mystery, ceremony, conflict, government action, and
inaction. Proposed in the late 1700s by a group of
prominent citizens and finished in the late 1800s by
the Army Corps of Engineers, the exterior is mainly
Maryland white marble, while the interior is made of
granite, iron...and a few surprises. How did it come
together and why did it take so long? Historians tell
stories of stalling bureaucracy, secret societies, and
triumphant engineering. Stark and daunting on the
outside, we let viewers know what's inside.

9-10pm -- Full Throttle - El Camino vs. Ranchero.
The concept is simple--we give two teams classic cars
in similar disrepair and supply them with a garage,
tools, and parts. After 20 hours of repair time, we
hold an old-fashioned drag race on a legal, certified
track with safety devices for the novice drivers. The
winner gets to keep both cars. The loser gets nothing.
As we follow the teams, we interject history at each
step they take, including factory footage and
interviews with the legends behind the vintage
vehicles. In this episode, the eternal Ford/Chevy
battle continues when we take an El Camino and
Ranchero--the first "sport utility vehicles"--and put
in two new crate engines and racing
transmissions--giving these classic machines over 400
horsepower!

10-11:25pm -- Band of Brothers - The Breaking Point.
Having thwarted the Germans at Bastogne, Belgium, an
exhausted Easy Company must now take the nearby town
of Foy from the enemy. Several are killed and wounded
in fierce shelling, compounded by the incompetence of
their new commander, Lt. Dike (Peter O'Meara), about
whom Winters (Damian Lewis) can do nothing. Easy takes
Foy, but at an enormous cost.

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Thursday, December 2, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Cranes.
One of the most useful machines ever created, the
crane is a simple but important combination of the
pulley and the lever. Though cranes have been helping
us build civilization from at least the time of the
Egyptian pyramids, the modern steel-framed
construction cranes are a relatively recent
development. Put on your work boots as we ride through
the history of cranes from ancient days to skyscraper
construction sites, ocean-freighter docks, and the
International Space Station.

8-9pm -- Hitler and Stalin: Roots of Evil - 
An examination of the minds of two of the 20th
century's most brutal dictators and mass
murderers--Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin. Based on
recent psychological and medical studies, the program
explores the personalities of these ruthless leaders,
who were directly responsible for millions of
deaths--their paranoia, suspiciousness,
cold-bloodedness, sadism, and lack of human feeling.
Includes interviews with Martin Bormann's son and
Hitler's butler.

9-10pm -- Hitler's Lost Plan - 
In 1958, in a sweltering, converted torpedo factory in
Alexandria, Virginia, historian Gerhard L. Weinberg
was combing through massive stacks of documents that
the U.S. had captured from Nazi Germany. In a faded
green box, Weinberg came across an unknown prize--a
secret book dictated by Adolf Hitler in 1928, the
unpublished sequel to Mein Kampf. Mixed in with
Hitler's racial hatred, the book contained shocking
revelations of his master plan for continuous war. We
follow the clues to its discovery and show the
rigorous steps taken to authenticate the document--the
book is considered legitimate. And we reveal the
contents of the book, including Hitler's plan for
global domination culminating in an invasion of
America!

10-11:15pm -- Band of Brothers - The Patrol.
Easy Company arrives in an Alsacian town near the
German border, and is ordered to send a patrol across
the river to take enemy prisoners. Lt. Hank Jones
(Colin Hanks), fresh from West Point and eager for
combat experience, volunteers to lead, though he must
convince a skeptical Winters (Damian Lewis). Also
assigned to the patrol is Pvt. David Webster (Eion
Bailey), back in Easy after rehabilitation of an
injury. While successful, the mission costs a
soldier's life.

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Friday, December 3, 2004
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7-8pm -- Dead Men's Secrets - German Death Trap.
The Kammhuber Line, an integrated system of air
defense stretching from Denmark to Paris, protected
Germany from Allied bombers and thwarted Allied
intelligence efforts to crack it. But Allied
scientists soon discovered the secret warning systems
that detected approaching aircraft and directed German
fighters to the incoming Allied bombers. We explain
how the Kammhuber Line worked, how British scientists
cracked the code, and how Allied flyers got through
Germany's technologically advanced system.

8-9pm -- A-10 Tankbuster - A-10 Tankbuster.
The most feared aircraft in the Air Force arsenal, the
A-10 Tankbuster was the first aircraft in U.S.
aviation history designed specifically for Close Air
Support. From its first taste of battle in Desert
Storm to the recent assault on Baghdad, the A-10
carries enough weaponry into battle to disable 16 main
battle tanks, and with its amazing 30 millimeter
7-barrelled cannon, the "Flying Gun" dominates the
skies. Features interviews with A-10 pilots, many of
whom flew in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

9-10pm -- Battlefield Detectives - World War I: The
Somme.
During WWI, trenches and barbed wire ran across Europe
from the Mediterranean to the North Sea. On July 1,
1916 at 7:30 a.m., after a week of artillery
bombardment designed to destroy German barbed wire and
concrete bunkers, 27 British divisions advanced on 16
German divisions. Expecting minor resistance, as they
picked their way across no man's land, guns opened
fire, shells burst overhead, and waves of men were
gunned down. Almost 60,000 British were killed or
wounded--a military catastrophe of unprecedented
proportions. Filmed at the battlefield, in
laboratories, and on firing ranges--archaeologists,
military historians, and other experts, including
metallurgists and geologists, conduct tests to
replicate and understand the factors that turned one
terrible day into the British Army's bloodiest.

10-11:10pm -- Band of Brothers - Why We Fight.
Easy Company finally enters Germany to surprisingly
little resistance, and relaxes for the first time in
months. A patrol in a nearby forest discovers an
abandoned Nazi concentration camp, still filled with
emaciated prisoners. The local citizenry, unbelievably
disavowing knowledge of its existence, is made to
clean it up. Suddenly, news arrives from Berlin--Adolf
Hitler committed suicide!

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Saturday, December 4, 2004
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7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - Princess Diana.
Conspiracy theories capture the public's imagination,
and in this hour, we explore the death of Princess
Diana--the world's most photographed woman, who lived
and died amidst media madness. On August 31, 1997,
while being pursued by paparazzi, the frenzy turned
fatal when the car carrying Princess Di and boyfriend
Dodi Fayed crashed inside the Alma Tunnel in Paris.
From the start, conspiracists suggested that Diana's
death was political. The official French inquiry,
conducted in near-total secrecy, ignited numerous
theories--mainly placing British power behind her
death. And while the "official" British inquiry is
slated for release in 2005, its findings will likely
do little to squelch skeptics.

8-8:30pm -- Great Blunders in History - The Failure of
the Kamikaze.
Investigates the Japanese use of manned torpedoes,
speedboats packed with explosives, and midget
submarines in WWII. Most were poorly designed and
badly piloted, failing to achieve any real success and
costing many lives.

8:30-10pm -- We Stand Alone Together - 
This documentary, executive-produced by Tom Hanks and
Steven Spielberg, tells the remarkable story of "Easy
Company" (the men in "Band of Brothers") in their own
words. Featuring recent interviews with the real-life
company members, whose deeds are dramatized in the
miniseries, combined with rare and archival
photographs and film footage.

10-11:15pm -- Band of Brothers - Points.
Major Winters (Damian Lewis) leads Easy Company into
the Bavarian town of Berchtesgaden--once home to top
Nazi officers--and receives orders to take the
abandoned Eagle's Nest, Hitler's mountaintop fortress.
As German officers hand over their weapons, soldiers
raid wine cellars and snap up souvenirs. But their
elation is short-lived--most of the division faces
redeployment to the Pacific Theater. A closing
vignette tells what happened to the men of Easy
Company after they returned home.

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Sunday, December 5, 2004
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7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - Majestic Twelve: UFO Cover-Up.
What really happened in Roswell, New Mexico in the
summer of 1947? Did a flying saucer crash in the vast
desert scrubland? The initial Army Air Force press
release claimed they had recovered a flying disk. But
a day later, the story dramatically changed--now they
called it a weather balloon! In 1987, secret documents
surfaced indicating the existence of the "Majestic
12"--an elite group of scientists and military and
intelligence officials, allegedly brought together by
President Harry Truman. Did the MJ-12 truly exist? If
so, did these men forever trivialize the most
talked-about UFO event in history, as well as all UFO
sightings thereafter?

8-9pm -- The Bible Code: Predicting Armageddon - 
Is there a prophetic, highly accurate code locked
within the Bible that outlines past and future events?
Does the Code contain hidden messages about people
such as Napoleon, Einstein, and Hitler, and key world
events like WWII, the Kennedy brothers'
assassinations, and 9/11? More frightening are
references to future events--including Earth's
impending end. We take a balanced look through the
eyes of Code supporters and critics and let viewers
determine its accuracy in predicting the future.

9-11pm -- Ben Franklin - 
Meet Dr. Benjamin Franklin--a far more complex figure
than the squeaky-clean, larger than life Founding
Father whose grandfatherly visage graces the hundred
dollar bill. Inventor, politician, writer,
businessman, scientist, diplomat--that, of course, is
the mythic, legendary Ben Franklin. But it's not the
only Ben Franklin. By his own admission, Franklin had
more than his share of shortcomings and failures.
Photographed largely on location in Philadelphia in
High Definition, and featuring in-depth interviews
with biographers and historians, as well as liberal
doses of Franklin's own, often humorous observations,
the special allows viewers to "walk" in Franklin's
footsteps. In this vivid portrait, we meet an earthy,
brilliant, and flawed Franklin that one biographer
believes would feel right at home in today's world.
Hosted by Nicolas Cage. (Please note: Mr. Cage hosts
the December airings only!)

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Monday, December 6, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Tool Bench: Hand Tools.
Well over 2-million years before modern man evolved,
his primitive ancestors were making tools. The ability
to extend the hand and strengthen the arm is
considered one of the keys to human evolution. Join us
as we nail down the history of hand tools, and look at
a new generation of computer-designed, high-tech hand
tools.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - New UFO Revelations: The Gray's
Agenda.
According to ufologists, the Grays--beings from
another world--abduct humans, implant devices, and
conduct reproductive experiments. The most "familiar"
alien, we see their images in every media. What do
they want? Where are they from? Do alien life forms
kidnap humans in order to replicate their dying race?
Is our government in collusion with extraterrestrials
in exchange for advanced technology? Hundreds of
eyewitnesses swear they encountered aliens and dozens
claim they have actual physical proof. To test their
claims and sift fact from fiction, we conduct a
hypnotic regression in which abductees relive shocking
alien encounters, witness surgery to remove a foreign
object, and sweep the night sky looking for possible
alien-inhabited planets. So join us as we go in search
of the Grays and their alien agenda.

9-11pm -- Boys Toys - Private Collections.
Priceless collections. Compilations devoted to with
such passion, entire lives have been spent perfecting
them. From rescued trash to treasure-troves with
values known to only the most discerning eye, people
collect for many reasons. For some, the thrill is in
the find; for others, collecting is an escape from
daily life. But all collectors have one thing in
common--they love it! This 2-hour special shows what
people hoard--from the largest Star Wars collection to
the largest private collection of Elvis
memorabilia--and the extent to which they go to
satisfy their hobby, their passion, their addiction.
Among the collections we view are Steven Seagal's
ancient Japanese swords and rare guitars, Arnold
Palmer's golf clubs (over 10,000), and Penny
Marshall's sports memorabilia (she often battles Billy
Crystal for the top online bid). Boys' Toys week is
hosted by Carmen Electra.

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Tuesday, December 7, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Tool Bench: Power Tools.
The history of civilization could easily be measured
in terms of our ability to make, use, and improve
tools--an activity that is at least 4-million years
old! At the tip of our toolmaking timeline are power
tools. We'll examine today's power tool industry,
which is booming thanks to more powerful, lighter, and
quieter cordless tools.

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Massacre Tech
Mormons massacre a wagon train filled with overland
settlers. Horse thieves decimate a camp of Chinese
prospectors. Yavapai Indians slay a stagecoach full of
passengers. No stranger to the Old West, technology
often lent a helping hand to atrocity. From the swivel
gun of the 1830s to a makeshift armored car in 1914,
host David Carradine looks at the role technology
played in some of the most heinous crimes in Wild West
history.

9-11pm -- Boys Toys - Motorcycles.
Set the sedan's safety brake and hop on your "hog" for
a 2-hour high-speed history of the motorcycle--from
the 1868 "steam velocipede" to the early 20th century,
when they were a low-cost alternative to automobiles;
from Harley-Davidsons preferred by Hell's Angels and
police to motocross riders who take bikes into the air
and onto the dirt. We also look to the motorcycle's
future, featuring Jay Leno's jet-propelled Y2K
sportbike and Erik Buell's bike-without-a-gas-tank
creation. Boys' Toys week is hosted by Carmen Electra.

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Wednesday, December 8, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bathroom Tech.
From tub to toilet to toothpaste, here's everything
you ever wanted to know about the most used and least
discussed room in the house. From the first home
bathrooms in ancient India, Roman latrines, and
bizarre Victorian-era bath contraptions, to modern
luxurious master bathroom suites, we trace the history
of bathing, showering, and oral hygiene. And we reveal
the messy truth about what was used before toilet
paper--brainchild of the Scott Brothers of
Philadelphia--and why astronauts wear diapers.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 15.
A series of construction errors causes a devastating
flood that brings Chicago to a standstill. A deadly
accident traps hundreds in a smoke-filled Alpine
tunnel, with no ventilation. Three boilers explode on
a Mississippi riverboat resulting in thousands of
deaths and earning the disaster the title of the worst
in maritime history. Two buildings, halfway around the
world from each other, collapse from the same type of
shoddy construction methods--14 years apart. And a
cockpit warning system malfunctions, causing a fiery,
fatal crash before the jetliner ever takes off. We
interview design and construction experts as we
investigate what went wrong. And we talk with rescue
personnel, eyewitnesses, and victims as we visit the
tragedies' sites to see what improvements have been
implemented to insure against these kinds of
disasters.

9-10pm -- Boys Toys - Full Throttle: Gremlin vs.
Pacer.
History heads to the drag strip as popular cars of the
past are transformed into fine-tuned machines,
revamped and ready for the speedway. Part reality
show, part history, we give car lovers a chance to get
under the hood of some of their favorite rides. In a
"Battle of the Uglies", the 1970s are back, when two
of the history's homeliest cars go head-to-head in a
drag race--bracket style. We put modern
high-performance technology into these machines,
including a shot of horsepower-inducing nitrous to
make them roar to life. Two teams are supplied with
garages, tools, and parts, and just two days to get
their wheels into high gear as they prepare to compete
in an all-or-nothing drag race. The winner drives away
in both cars; the loser walks away empty-handed; the
viewer gets an adrenaline dose of automotive history!
Carmen Electra is host of Boys' Toys.

10-11pm -- Boys Toys - Limos.
Limousines have been stretched to greater and greater
lengths--as has the notion of what can be done inside
them! You can have a rolling disco in a stretched SUV,
go for a rumble off-road in a monster truck limousine,
or take a direct hit in an armored limo and still make
your meeting. So, sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride
of your life as we review the history of chauffeured
limousines--from weddings, proms, and funerals to the
ultimate adult playpen and the president's "Cadillac
One". Carmen Electra is the host of Boys' Toys.

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Thursday, December 9, 2004
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6-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Robots.
"Unchecked, robots will enslave our entire species."
So said Isaac Asimov, who, through archival interviews
explains how science fiction inspired generations of
young scientists to tackle robotics. We visit the
minds and laboratories of some of the greatest
inventors of the 20th century to witness the
2,000-year history of the robot.

8-9pm -- The Mysterious Howard Hughes - 
Reclusive, elusive, and blatantly bizarre, billionaire
Howard Hughes was a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside
an enigma. Aeronautical genius, film producer,
financial wizard--he dwelt in a weird world of his own
making. When the devious prankster died, the hoaxes
continued and the mysteries intensified. Join us as we
unravel a few.

9-10pm -- Boys Toys - Howard Hughes Tech.
An in-depth look at the technology conceived or
developed by America's first billionaire. A passionate
aviator, Howard Hughes built and flew planes that
broke speed records, and developed war machines, spy
aircraft, and commercial airliners. Despite the
impressive heights reached by his technological
empire, his health and mental well-being were fragile.
During his last years, he wasn't seen publicly or
photographed, rarely left the hotel suites he
occupied, and was terrified of germs. But when Hughes
died in 1976, he left a huge legacy in aviation and
technology. When we board an airliner, view TV via
satellite, or marvel at America's military might, we
might do well to remember the risk-taker who flew
faster than his peers and was at heart an aviator
obsessively dedicated to both the art and science of
flight. Carmen Electra hosts Boys' Toys.

10-11pm -- Boys Toys - Tactical to Practical: # 10.
The military has developed some of the world's most
sophisticated technology. In a special episode, host
Hunter Ellis counts down his top-10 favorite "toys"
from the season. Then, on the civilian side, Hunter
examines the Draganflyer remote-controlled
gyro-stabilized helicopter, custom choppers, jet skis,
and hang gliders. On the tactical end, he checks out
high-tech military wearable communications gear and
armored clothing. On the practical side, he shows how
special gear makes extreme sports safer. Carmen
Electra is the host of Boys' Toys week.

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Friday, December 10, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Radio: Out of Thin Air.
Though now considered a country cousin when compared
to the sophisticated television, merely a century ago,
the radio galvanized communications as it linked the
world without wires. The program examines the long
life of the radio.

8-9pm -- Battlefield Detectives - The Mexican-American
War: Battle of Palo Alto.
On May 8, 1846, Mexico and the United States met in
battle at a place called Palo Alto, near Brownsville,
deep in Southern Texas. The two countries had been
anticipating war since the annexation of Texas in
1845. The future President, General Zachary Taylor led
the Americans--among his officers, 51 future generals,
including Ulysses S. Grant and George Meade. But for
over 150 years, what really happened has remained
obscure. The official contemporaneous sketches implied
the battle ended in a draw. Yet by day's end, the
Mexican army was in full retreat. Now, battlefield
archaeology is working on the hidden story of Palo
Alto. Archaeologists, forensic scientists, and
historians join forces, and aided by tests at the U.S.
Army's Yuma Missile Proving Ground, are cracking this
military mystery.

9-10pm -- Boys Toys - Private Jets #1.
From today's ultra chic, state-of-the-art private jets
to Lockheed's 1957 Jetstar, this 2-part special
investigates the history, the luxury, and technology
of America's corporate jets. In the first hour, we
meet a few of the men and women who pioneered
them--Bill Lear, Clyde Cessna and his nephews, Walter
and Olive Beech. Carmen Electra is the host of Boys'
Toys week.

10-11pm -- Boys Toys - Private Jets #2.
Actor Michael Dorn explains what it takes to buy a
previously-owned jet. Then, we travel to Dallas to
visit the Associated Air Center, a company that
creates very high-end, lavish jet interiors; review
the latest in kit jets; and look into the new
must-have of the super rich--personal jets the size of
commercial airliners. Carmen Electra hosts Boys' Toys
week.

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Saturday, December 11, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Boys Toys - Limos.
Limousines have been stretched to greater and greater
lengths--as has the notion of what can be done inside
them! You can have a rolling disco in a stretched SUV,
go for a rumble off-road in a monster truck limousine,
or take a direct hit in an armored limo and still make
your meeting. So, sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride
of your life as we review the history of chauffeured
limousines--from weddings, proms, and funerals to the
ultimate adult playpen and the president's "Cadillac
One". Carmen Electra is the host of Boys' Toys.

8-10pm -- Ben Franklin - 
Meet Dr. Benjamin Franklin--a far more complex figure
than the squeaky-clean, larger than life Founding
Father whose grandfatherly visage graces the hundred
dollar bill. Inventor, politician, writer,
businessman, scientist, diplomat--that, of course, is
the mythic, legendary Ben Franklin. But it's not the
only Ben Franklin. By his own admission, Franklin had
more than his share of shortcomings and failures.
Photographed largely on location in Philadelphia in
High Definition, and featuring in-depth interviews
with biographers and historians, as well as liberal
doses of Franklin's own, often humorous observations,
the special allows viewers to "walk" in Franklin's
footsteps. In this vivid portrait, we meet an earthy,
brilliant, and flawed Franklin that one biographer
believes would feel right at home in today's world.
Hosted by Nicolas Cage. (Please note: Mr. Cage hosts
the December airings only!)

10-11pm -- Weird U.S - 
From Alaska to California to Florida--from all across
America we investigate macabre legends, peculiar
places, and strange stories that aren't written up in
history books, but merely whispered about in the Weird
U.S. In Morristown, New Jersey, our hosts and travel
guides Mark Scuerman and Mark Moran expose the
gruesome tale of a man who was hung in 1833,
dissected...then turned into wallets! In Tennessee,
Mark and Mark untangle the twisted tale of folks
claiming descent from the first American settlers--not
Pilgrims, but Melungeons. And after investigating Cold
War nuclear bunkers, they head to Florida to tour the
country's most unusual retirement community, where the
circus sideshow comes to rest.

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Sunday, December 12, 2004
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7-8pm -- Siberia: How the East Was Won - #2.
Siberia today is a land with a tragic past and a
problem-riddled present. To really understand Siberia,
one must first understand the Gulag--the prison labor
camp system begun by Stalin. Today, the Gulag is
purposefully forgotten; physical traces have all but
disappeared. But Russia cannot escape its
psychological legacy. The Gulag helped give rise to a
servile mentality in the Russian people that persists
to this day--a fear of power and a conviction that to
rule a country, freedom must be restricted. But when
the Iron Curtain finally fell, capitalism
arrived--accompanied by crime, drugs, prostitution,
abandoned children, and AIDS. Yet Part 2 reveals
Siberia's sense of hope and promise. Buried deep
beneath Siberia's frozen soil lies oil--and Siberia
has sprouted dozens of Wild East Towns to exploit it!

8-9pm -- Ultimate Survival - Defiant Courage.
This is not a typical WWII combat tale. The mission it
recounts failed, yet seldom has a war story documented
such astonishing heroism and human determination. Our
story begins in March 1943 with a team of 12
expatriate Norwegian commandos, disguised as
fisherman, sailing home from a secret British training
base. Bound for the coast of Nazi-occupied Norway,
their mission was to organize and supply the Norwegian
resistance above the Arctic Circle. Betrayed by Nazi
sympathizers, German soldiers ambushed the platoon.
Only one man survived--Jan Baalsrud--and this is his
story of fortitude against incredible odds. Astrid
Scott, author of Defiant Courage, provides an intimate
portrait of Baalsrud, while arctic medical expert, Dr.
Peter Hackett, explains what an amazing medical feat
it was that Baalsrud not only survived, but fully
recovered and returned to Norway as a commando one
year later.

9-10pm -- Ultimate Survival - The Rescue Season.
Severely injured and perched 14,000 feet up the rocky
face of Alaska's Mt. Augusta, extreme climber Jack
Tackle will die if help doesn't come soon.
Fortunately, a squad of U.S. Air Force Parajumpers, or
PJs, is ready for action. Thus begins one of the most
daring rescues in the history of Alaska's storied
210th Pararescue Squadron. Over the next 30 hours, PJs
from the 210th risk their lives to save Tackle. To
most of us, it's a story of extreme physical acts of
bravery in one of Earth's most dangerous landscapes.
But it's just another workday for the PJs, who are
able to parachute from rescue planes in full scuba
gear into frozen seas, fast-rope from helicopters into
glacial crevasses, or perform surgery on the high cols
of Alaska's 17 mountain ranges. There's a saying: When
Air Force One dials 911, a PJ answers the call!

10-11pm -- Conspiracy? - Oklahoma City Bombing.
At 9:02 a.m., on April 19, 1995, a massive explosion
detonated outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal
Building in Oklahoma City, collapsing the 9-story
building and killing 168, 19 of them children, and
wounding more than 700. Convicted by the federal
government and executed in June 2001, Gulf War veteran
Timothy McVeigh claimed he acted alone. Yet, multiple
eyewitnesses identified McVeigh at ground zero with
unknown accomplices before and after the blast. The
original indictment charged McVeigh, Terry Nichols,
and "others unknown" with conspiracy and murder. Was
the bombing part of a greater pattern of Middle
East-sponsored terrorist attacks, including the 1993
World Trade Center attack, bombing of the Khobar
Towers and the USS Cole, and 9/11? Were homegrown
neo-Nazi militia groups involved?

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Monday, December 13, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Breaking the Sound Barrier.
For decades, the sound barrier loomed as an
impenetrable wall against manned flight that buffeted
planes with shock waves as they approached the speed
of sound. Scientists thought the barrier couldn't be
breached--until the development of jet technology and
rocket fuel at the end of WWII. This is the dramatic
story, told through the eyes of many who were there,
of the work leading up to October 10, 1947, when
24-year-old test pilot Chuck Yeager smashed through
the sound barrier in a Bell XS-1 aircraft.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - New UFO Revelations: China's
Roswell.
Legends from China tell of 716 mysterious stone discs,
known as "The Dropa Stones". Some believe the stones
hold secrets about ancient contact with
extraterrestrials. Discovered in a cave in 1938, each
12" disc contains a double spiral of tiny hieroglyphs
that are said to contain the historical record of an
alien race called the Dropa that crash-landed in an
isolated region of China 12,000 years ago. The story
of the Dropa Stones is an amazing tale filled with
mystery, deceit, and conspiracy, and today, skeptics
and true believers wage an ongoing battle over what
they are, what they mean, and if they even exist at
all. Regardless, the Dropa Stones continue to consume
the imaginations of scientists, journalists,
historians, UFO buffs, and stargazers in general.

9-10pm -- Ultimate Survival - Mawson's Will.
In 1912, Australian explorer Douglas Mawson tested his
will against Antarctica's frozen wilderness and
miraculously survived. 85 years later, explorer Mark
Stasik evoked Mawson's spirit with a treacherous
Alaskan journey. This is the story of two men and one
obsession--to explore the limits of human endurance in
Earth's most forbidding landscapes. In the winter of
1912, Douglas Mawson lost expedition partner Belgrave
Ninnis to an icy crevasse. He and his other partner
Xavier Mertz were stranded 320 miles from base camp
with few supplies. After Mertz died, Mawson somehow
made it back alone. In the winter of 1996, Mark Stasik
survived marauding wolves, a tent fire, avalanches,
and near starvation. Discover the grip the frozen
wilderness has on the human spirit and imagination and
the allures that high-risk treks hold for those
determined to live at the edge of Ultimate Survival.

10-11pm -- Ultimate Survival - Disaster on the
Mountain.
On the surface, the gentle slopes of Mt. Washington
seem tame. But this New Hampshire mountain has a
ferocious weather pattern that equals any in the
Himalayas. Mt. Washington has the highest recorded
wind velocity in history at 231 mph, and more than 100
climbers have died on its slopes. Hugh Herr was a
mountaineer skilled enough to challenge Mt.
Washington's dangers. At 17, he was considered one of
the world's best rock climbers. On January 23, 1982,
he and climbing partner Jeff Batser set out to test
Hugh's sense of invincibility against the intensity of
Mt. Washington. This is the story of what happens when
a fearless climber challenges a ferocious mountain.
Today, a professor of biomedical engineering at
Harvard and MIT, Dr. Herr explores new horizons in
technology to help others with disabilities and his
goals are now aimed higher than the tallest mountain.

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Tuesday, December 14, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Hangars.
Come in for a smooth landing as we explore the history
of hangars--stark, massive structures that house and
protect flight vehicles. We visit the first hangar,
built on a German lake; Boeing's Delta Four rocket
hangar; Hangar Number One in Lakehurst, New Jersey,
that housed all U.S. airships built in the 1920s and
'30s; and the Space Shuttle's hangar--as big as four
Chicago skyscrapers! Back in Germany, Cargolifter's
mammoth hangar, big enough to enclose the Superdome,
signals the rebirth of an industry.

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Biggest Machines in the
West
In this episode, we find out that size did matter in
the Old West, where cowboys wanted big toys! Big
profits required big equipment to dig, dredge, paddle,
and plough through the wilds of America. Technology
would replace the pan and the pick with massive
machines roaming the forests and deserts like
dinosaurs, feeding on the minerals above and below the
soil. Even weaponry was super-sized! We take a look at
the huge and deadly Hotchkiss cannon and the
cumbersome Colt Buntline Revolver, carried by famous
frontier personalities like Wyatt Earp, Frank and
Jesse James, and Judge Roy Bean. And we review the
history of the infamous Mankato Gallows, built to
execute 38 Dakota warriors at the same time on
December 26, 1862 in Minnesota--the largest mass
execution in U.S. history. Hosted by David Carradine.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Ice Road Truckers.
During the harsh winter of Canada's Northwest
Territory, remote villages and work camps are cut off
from the world. To keep them supplied, a tenacious
group of long-haul truckers drive their rigs over
hundreds of miles on ice roads cut across the surface
of frozen lakes. Sometimes the ice cannot support the
heavy rig, and driver and cargo plunge through the ice
and sink to the bottom. Hitch a risky ride along with
the Ice Road Truckers as they drive headlong into
bone-chilling danger.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Icebreakers.
They are the toughest ships in the water, plowing
headlong into one of nature's hardest obstacles.
Modern icebreakers can smash through 10-foot thick ice
sheets without stopping, allowing scientists and
commercial shipping access to some of Earth's most
inhospitable spots. Join our blustery journey as we
patrol the Great Lakes on the USCG Cutter Mackinaw and
traverse the infamous Northwest Passage on the maiden
voyage of the USCG Healy, the newest Polar Class
Icebreaker in the U.S. Fleet.

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Wednesday, December 15, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Air Shows.
From barnstormers to Blue Angels, antique aircraft to
supersonic jets, each year there are an astonishing
425 air shows in America alone, entertaining over
18-million spectators. From futuristic festivals to
billion-dollar expos, we explore the world of amazing
aerobatics and their ever-evolving aircraft and see
how aviation technology has affected air shows--and
how air shows have advanced aviation. Find out why
these high-flying events are second only to baseball
as America's favorite family event.

8-9pm -- Full Throttle - 1971 Datsun 240Z.
In this episode, Japanese hustle meets American
muscle! The Datsun 240Z was the first affordable
people's sports car. We get an up-close look at the
1971 Datsun design engineering that proved light years
ahead of its American competitors. Diving into their
overhead cam engine, we tear it down and build it back
up for a head-to-head drag race at full throttle!
After supplying two teams with the classic cars,
garages, tools, parts, and 20 hours of repair time, we
hold an old-fashioned drag race on a legal, certified
track with safety devices for the drivers. As we
follow the teams, we interject history at each step
they take, including factory footage and interviews
with the legends behind the vintage vehicles.

9-10pm -- Time Machine - Avalanches: White Walls of
Death.
A look at the terror of high, frozen places, at sudden
deaths and hairbreadth rescues from avalanches.
Features rare footage of the 1910 Wellington Train
Disaster. In that tragic event, an avalanche swept two
trains off the side of a pass in the Cascade
Mountains, killing 96. Since the passengers were
stranded for six days before the avalanche hit, many
kept journals or wrote letters about their ordeal.
Some of these writings have survived and give intimate
human dimension to large-scale tragedy. Also covered
is the ordeal of gold miner Jay Morlang, who in 1985
was caught in not one, but three separate avalanches,
was buried for 22 hours at a time, and was the object
of a daredevil aerial rescue. Helicopter pilot Robert
Coma lifted Morlang from a deep ravine while his rotor
blades were brushing the rock walls.

10-11pm -- Time Machine - Blizzards: Whiteout!
When those deadly winter snowstorms hit, they cut off
communications, deplete food and fuel supplies, and
sometimes set the stage for anarchy! Join us for a
journey through four deadly storms: the 1888 blizzards
that hit Nebraska and New York City and the 1967 and
1979 snowstorms that enveloped Chicago.

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Thursday, December 16, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Runways.
What do you think about when you gaze out the window
as your plane takes off? Probably not about the least
heralded part of our infrastructure--airport runways.
But runways play a vital role as the backbone of
aviation. They're where rubber meets road and land
gives way to sky. Did you know that airports like JFK
train falcons to keep little birds from becoming a
hazard to the big, shiny birds? Join us for an
engrossing look at the brawny concrete and asphalt
runways that make aviation possible.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Snackfood Tech.
Extruders, molds, in-line conveyor belts. Are these
machines manufacturing adhesives, plastics, or parts
for your car? No, they're making treats for your
mouth--and you will see them doing their seductively
tasty work in this scrumptious episode. First, we
visit Utz Quality Foods in Hanover, Pennsylvania, that
produces more than one million pounds of chips per
week, and Snyder's of Hanover, the leading U.S.
pretzel manufacturer. Next, we focus on the world's
largest candy manufacturer, Masterfoods USA, which
makes Milky Way, Snickers, Mars, and M&Ms, and check
out the world's largest lollipop producer, Tootsie
Roll Industries. And at Flower Foods' Crossville,
Tennessee plant, an army of cupcakes rolls down a
conveyer belt. The final stop is Dreyer's Bakersfield,
California plant, where 20,000 ice cream bars and
9,600 drumsticks roll of the line in an hour.

9-11pm -- Alaska: Big America - 
Alaska--a land of extremes. Its size is
staggering--nearly 600,000 square miles, or more than
twice the size of Texas. Its vast distances, extreme
weather, imposing landscape--all helped shape its
history and the lives of those who come under its
spell. Our 2-hour special heads to far-flung corners
of the 49th State to hear compelling stories of life
in the bush--from Russian expeditions in the 1700s to
building of the Alcan Highway to the WWII Battle for
the Aleutian Islands and 1959 statehood.

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Friday, December 17, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Helicopters.
From the early "egg beaters" of World War II to the
"flying tanks" of Operation Desert Storm, we'll fly
aboard one of the most agile and potent weapons on the
battlefield--the helicopter. Meet the first pilot to
fly a combat rescue mission in WWII and a USAF female
aviator; and view classified footage of the Apache in
Iraq.

8-9pm -- Heavy Metal - PT Boat.
Pound for pound, the Patrol Torpedo (PT) boats were
WWII's most heavily armed fighting boats. Screwed and
glued together on a hull made of wood, these 50 tons
of fast fighting fury were hated by the Japanese who
nicknamed them "The Devil Boats of the Night". With
their three powerful marine engines and speedboat
designs, they took on the enemy at close quarters with
greater frequency than any other type of surface
craft--from firefights with coastal barges to
protecting the invasion fleet at D-Day. And they
attacked the enemy from the freezing seas of the
Aleutian Islands to the treacherous waters of the
South Pacific. Using unique archive film,
reenactments, and extraordinary interviews, here is
the story of how this wooden wonder struggled for
early recognition, but through the brilliance of its
design, daring of its missions, and courage and
sacrifice of its crews would play a major part in
WWII.

9-10pm -- Battlefield Detectives - American
Revolution: Battle of Cowpens.
One of the American Revolution's most critical
clashes, the Battle of Cowpens in South Carolina was a
signpost pointing directly to Yorktown, where the
British surrendered in less than a year. On January
17, 1781, an American force led by a brilliant
Revolutionary War commander, Daniel Morgan, routed a
British army commanded by an imperious and greatly
feared cavalry colonel, Banastre Tarleton. Due to his
ruthless tactics, "Bloody Ban" was the most hated
British officer in the South. But Morgan chose the
battlefield and used the terrain to his advantage. The
British arrived tired, cold, and hungry after marching
for several days and nights to catch the rebels. In
less than an hour, it was all over. Now, historians,
soil scientists, tacticians, psychologists,
geographers, and weapons experts analyze this crucial
battle.

10-11pm -- Heavy Metal - Challenger Tank.
When this 60 tons of high-tech military hardware
rumbles onto the battlefield at nearly 40 mph, there's
nowhere for the enemy to hide. Behind its impenetrable
armor lies one of the most effective computerized
weapons systems. Its main weapon--an awesome 120mm
rifled gun that can take out a football-sized moving
target three miles away. Men who serve in this
metallic monster claim the hard-hitting warhorse is
the world's best battle tank. An underdog during
military competitions in the late 1980s, the
Challenger proved itself in Operation Desert Storm and
was back in action for Operation Iraqi Freedom. Unique
archive film, riveting reenactments, extraordinary
interviews, and dramatic computer graphics tell the
story of this British battlefield heavyweight and the
men who have taken it into the heat of battle.

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Saturday, December 18, 2004
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7-8pm -- Conspiracy? - Oklahoma City Bombing.
At 9:02 a.m., on April 19, 1995, a massive explosion
detonated outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal
Building in Oklahoma City, collapsing the 9-story
building and killing 168, 19 of them children, and
wounding more than 700. Convicted by the federal
government and executed in June 2001, Gulf War veteran
Timothy McVeigh claimed he acted alone. Yet, multiple
eyewitnesses identified McVeigh at ground zero with
unknown accomplices before and after the blast. The
original indictment charged McVeigh, Terry Nichols,
and "others unknown" with conspiracy and murder. Was
the bombing part of a greater pattern of Middle
East-sponsored terrorist attacks, including the 1993
World Trade Center attack, bombing of the Khobar
Towers and the USS Cole, and 9/11? Were homegrown
neo-Nazi militia groups involved? 

8-11pm -- Clear and Present Danger (Movie)
Novelist Tom Clancy's popular CIA operative
Jack Ryan is back in action in this thriller about a
close friend of the U.S. President's who gets involved
with Colombian drug lords and pays for it with his
life. Stars Harrison Ford, Anne Archer, James Earl
Jones, and Willem Dafoe. (1994)

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Sunday, December 19, 2004
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6:30-8pm -- Rwanda: Do Scars Ever Fade - 
This 90-minute special presents the complex and
riveting history of Rwanda, providing an in-depth look
at the propaganda campaign that's crucial to
understanding how genocide leaders got ordinary
citizens to participate. In 1994, the small African
country was awash in blood. An estimated 75 percent of
the Tutsi minority was slaughtered, and in just 100
days, more than 800,000 were killed. And, at least
50,000 politically moderate Hutus also perished. We
explore the 1994 genocide and post-genocide period,
and grapple with the question: How does a country
recover from its haunted past? Unfolding through
firsthand experiences of Rwandans who lived through
the genocide, we document stories of survivors,
perpetrators, and government officials and sort
through the difficulties of balancing justice with
reconciliation.

8-10pm -- Shot from the Sky - 
On June 14, 1944, pilot Roy Allen and the 10-man crew
of his B-17 embarked on a mission over Nazi-occupied
France that was supposed to be a milk run. Instead, it
proved more dangerous than anything they ever
imagined. Blasted by flak, Roy was forced to parachute
into France. Trapped behind enemy lines, a 21-year-old
schoolteacher-- French Resistance patriot Colette
Florin--saved his life. On his way back to England, a
traitor within the Resistance betrayed Roy. Captured
by the Gestapo, tortured, imprisoned and labeled a
terrorist by the Nazis, he became one of 168 Allied
airmen who shipped across Europe on a nightmare rail
journey to Buchenwald Concentration Camp. In the heart
of the Nazi empire, the only thing that kept them
alive was each other. It's a human story of courage
and loss, determination and sacrifice by ordinary
people whose lives were profoundly altered by war.

10-11pm -- Conspiracy? - CIA and the Nazis.
Six months after Allied Forces liberated German
concentration camps, a military tribunal formed at
Nuremberg to prosecute Nazi war criminals. Some of the
most dangerous were brought to justice--but not all.
Over 4,000 former Nazis went to work for the U.S.
government, without the public's knowledge, to help
fight the Soviet Union. Reinhard Gehlen, an
intelligence officer for Hitler's General Staff, was
tapped to head the U.S. intelligence program in West
Germany to spy on the Russians. At the same time,
former Nazi scientists and engineers were welcomed
onto American soil. In 1998, a bill was finally signed
into law that mandated declassification of documents
concerning recruitment of former Nazis. We dig into
the records to see if the ends justified the means and
ask how far the U.S. should go to partner with a
former enemy to fight another.

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Monday, December 20, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - World War I Tech.
The first bombing airplanes and widespread use of
chemical weapons...earliest tanks...submarines. When
Industrial-Age technology and war first mixed on a
large scale, the end result was ruthlessly efficient
destruction. World War One epitomized the dark
underbelly of the Industrial Revolution. We see how
technological achievements that streamlined
19th-century production, improved transportation, and
expanded science were used to efficiently decimate a
generation of soldiers in the early 20th century.

8-9pm -- Battlefield Detectives - The Civil War:
Antietam.
General Robert E. Lee's first invasion into the North
ended in the Battle of Antietam--the bloodiest single
day in the Civil War--and in all U.S. history. Just 12
hours of fighting resulted in nearly 23,000
casualties. On September 17, 1862, two determined
armies gathered near Sharpsburg, a quiet backwater
near Antietam Creek in western Maryland. Union forces
were desperate to repel the South's invasion of their
territory. The Confederate Army of Northern Virginia,
its back to the Potomac River, was fighting for its
very existence. Much was at stake. But just why was
Antietam such a terrible killing field? Now the latest
forensic techniques are shedding new light on the
question. Experts from the fields of archaeology,
geology, weapons technology, and pathology investigate
this uniquely horrific moment in American history.

9-10pm -- Battlefield Detectives - The Civil War:
Gettysburg.
July 1-3, 1863: Over three hot days, Union and
Confederate forces clashed in and around a small
Pennsylvania town. When the Battle of Gettysburg
ended, the two exhausted sides had inflicted more than
50,000 casualties upon one another--the largest battle
ever fought on American soil. The third day is
considered the Confederacy's "high-water mark"--when
General Robert E. Lee lost the decisive battle of the
Civil War. But scientific battlefield evidence now
suggests that by the time the artillery began firing
that day, the Confederate fight was already doomed.
And when Pickett's Charge--the famous full frontal
attack against Union lines--got underway, the battle
effectively was over. Experts in physics, geology,
crowd control, and cartography join forces with
military historians to better understand this epic
battle.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - Was Napoleon
Murdered?
On May 5, 1821, when Napoleon Bonaparte died in exile
on the island of St. Helena, doctors weren't certain
of the cause. Possibilities included hepatitis,
syphilis, scurvy, and cancer. They finally agreed on
stomach cancer. But more than 50 years ago,
researchers suggested that a servant working for the
ruling power in France murdered Napoleon. The poison
theory is still debated by two hostile camps--one
believes in an elaborate conspiracy, the other thinks
the truth isn't nearly so complicated. Over the years,
investigators from prestigious scientific
laboratories, including the FBI and Scotland Yard,
joined the search to solve the mystery. We sort
through the many theories--including recent
investigations conducted by toxicologists from the
Paris Police Department and French medical doctors
that conclude death from conventional causes. We'll
let viewers decide: Was Napoleon murdered?

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, December 21, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Satellites.
Strong enough to survive their fiery launch into
orbit, sophisticated enough to provide life-saving
images or relay tens of thousands of phone calls at
the same time. By monitoring weapons systems and troop
movements, these "eyes in the sky" may be the
difference between security and annihilation. From the
futuristic visions of a British sci-fi writer to
creations of a German rocket designer for the Nazi war
machine to the Cold War technological race, we review
the satellites that link our world.

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech "Freak Show Tech"
The deformed didn't ask to be born...and sometimes,
they weren't! Sure, Wild West freak shows featured
plenty of people who were different through the
circumstances of their birth. But many so-called
"freaks" were man-made. Technology helped pull the
wool over the eyes of the unsuspecting masses. Freak
show operators used every trick in the trade to
provide some of the most disturbing "entertainment"
the West would ever see. From pickled severed heads to
mummified outlaws, we look at the wild, the woolly,
the weird, and the swindlers who assured that the
freak shows would be unforgettable. Hosted by David
Carradine.
Repeated 1-1-05 Saturday

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil Fire Fighting.
When a burning gusher shoots flames into the air, only
a handful of men know how to snuff out the monster.
Fighting fire with fire, they place explosives around
the flames to blow it out, or douse it with tons of
water. The modern world depends on these risk takers,
yet their industry began less than 100 years ago. Join
us for a scorching hour as we review the rich history
of this "breed apart", and look at modern
heat-resistant clothing, new technology, and
regulations that protect oil firefighters.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - More Dangerous Cargo.
It comes in many deadly shapes and sizes, and the
transportation of dangerous cargo is one of the most
meticulously planned procedures in the shipping world.
We hitch a ride on a "dynamite run" from explosives
factory to construction site; learn how liquid natural
gas is shipped, a fuel that could vaporize entire city
blocks if ignited; accompany a Drug Enforcement
Administration truck as it transports confiscated
illegal drugs to an incinerator site for destruction;
fly with Air Net as it moves radioactive
pharmaceuticals from factory to hospital; and tag
along with two tigers, part of a breeding program for
endangered species, as they travel from Texas to Ohio.
As each story progresses, we explore the history of
the transport of that particular form of Dangerous
Cargo.

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Wednesday, December 22, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Ancient Discoveries: Ancient
Computer?
Journey back in time for an eye-opening look at the
amazing ancient roots of technologies we like to think
of as modern. New research suggests that many of the
inventions of the last 200 years may, in fact, have
already been known to the ancients. In Part 1, we
explore the Antikythera mechanism, an ancient machine
that was discovered deep in the Aegean Sea. Could it
perhaps have been an ancient computer? Could
Archimedes have had a hand in its creation?

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Ancient Discoveries: Galen,
Doctor to the Gladiators.
In this fascinating series, we examine ancient
inventions once believed to have been created in
modern times, and test the wits of ancient inventors
against some of the world's great modern inventors.
Part 2 uncovers the revolutionary work of Galen, the
great Roman doctor to the gladiators, who was
performing brain surgery 2,000 years ahead of his
time. We also explore the sophistication of Roman
medicine and compare it to modern techniques.

9-10pm -- Full Throttle - 1967 VW Beetle.
Fasten your seatbelts as we head to the dragstrip in
popular cars of the past that have been revamped into
fine-tuned machines by two teams--each given the same
model of car in similar disrepair. We supply them with
garages, tools, and parts--and just two days before
they compete in an all-or-nothing drag race. The
winner drives away in both cars; the loser walks away
empty-handed; the viewer gets an adrenaline dose of
automotive history. In this episode, we turn "The
Peoples' Car" into a Quarter-Mile Drag Racer by
ripping out the 1967 Volkswagen Beetle's original
4-cylinder motor and replacing it with a powerful
racing engine and transmission.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Commercial Fishing.
Battered and fried or simply raw--seafood is a popular
dish, no matter how you serve it. Americans consume
more than 5-billion pounds yearly, an order that takes
more than a fishing rod to fill and worries
conservationists. We follow the fish, the fishermen,
and the science trying to preserve fisheries for
future generations--from ancient ships on the Nile to
a modern technologically sophisticated factory trawler
on the Bering Sea to the University of New Hampshire's
open-ocean aquaculture research project. And we
witness a wide variety of fishing methods--from
gillnetting and longlining to lobster trapping. Hop
aboard and sail through time and around the globe as
we explore the harsh conditions of life at sea and
experience firsthand one of history's deadliest jobs.
Brace yourself and feel the ice-cold, salt spray on
your face as we explore commercial fishing!

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Thursday, December 23, 2004
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7-8pm -- The History of Christmas - 
Fascinating story of how the bawdy Roman Saturnalia, a
week-long festival of food and drink that culminated
on December 25, became the centerpiece of the
Christian year, and why the holiday is known as much
for shopping as the birth of Christ. Interviews with
experts, harried bargain hunters, and excited children
round out the program.

8-10pm -- Seven Wonders of the World - 
The Great Pyramid of Giza, Mausoleum of Halicarnassus,
Statue of Zeus at Olympia, Colossus of Rhodes, Temple
of Artemis, Hanging Gardens of Babylon, and the Pharos
of Alexandria. Of the Seven Wonders, only the Great
Pyramid remains. Why did ancient scholars select these
sites? What can the crumbled remains say about those
who built them?

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters #16.
Chaos in Guadalajara, Mexico, when the city streets
explode; an airplane crash outside of Paris that ranks
as one of the worst in history; two mining dams in
Italy collapse engulfing a village in a tidal wave of
sludge; a generation of children in a small Texas town
are entombed in the rubble of their school; an oil
tanker runs aground off the coast of England and
introduces the world to the devastation of the first
super spill... Engineering Disasters 16 delves into
the shocking chain of events leading up to each of
these horrific catastrophes and examines resulting
technological improvements designed to prevent similar
tragedies in the future.

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Friday, December 24, 2004
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7-8pm -- The Real King Herod - 
One of the most fascinating and appalling biblical
figures, King Herod remains an enigma--the cruel king
portrayed in countless Christmas plays as the monster
that slaughtered hundreds of babies in an effort to
kill the infant Jesus. But who was Herod? We draw
physical evidence from current excavation of Herod's
magnificent port Caesarea, written accounts of
Josephus, and scrolls newly unearthed at Petra. In a
startling development, a reexamination of historical
texts shows that in old age, Herod suffered from
chronic kidney disease. Was his "evil" life a physical
manifestation of the illness that tormented his body?
Did he order the murder of children in a paranoid
attack? And why did the Romans create the title "King
of the Jews" specifically for him?
Alice Cooper as King Herod in Jesus Christ Superstar

8-9pm -- History Alive - The Lost Youth of Jesus.
Thousands of Christians make pilgrimages to the Holy
Land yearly to visit sites connected to Jesus. But are
they authentic? The search for the historical Jesus
began with the first pilgrim--Constantine the Great's
mother Helena Augusta. Scholars have been trying to
prove--or disprove--her amazing claims ever since.
Traveling to Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Sepphoris in the
footsteps of Jesus, we run into heated debate about
where he was born, baptized, and grew up, and reveal
startling new discoveries.

9-10pm -- History Alive - From Galilee to Jerusalem.
Following in the footsteps of Jesus, we dig for the
truth behind "accepted" Holy Land sites and review
archaeological controversy about these important
religious places. We examine: an Israeli scholar's
1987 discovery of the lost city of Bethsaida, where
Jesus called his first disciples, healed a blind man,
and fed the multitudes; a boat on the Galilee's
shoreline dating to the time of Jesus; a house in
Capernaum that may have belonged to St. Peter; and the
possible grave of Lazarus.

10-11pm -- History Alive - The Way of the Cross.
The search for evidence of Jesus's life moves to
Jerusalem and the traditional sites associated with
his final days. Deep beneath the city, we explore the
buried remains of Herod's temple and tread a pavement
where Jesus may have walked. Delving into the
mysterious histories of the Cenacle Room, Gethsemane,
and the Roman Praetorium, we investigate the latest
archaeological theories concerning probable sites of
Jesus's last supper, arrest, and trial. Does science
support or refute biblical accounts?

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Saturday, December 25, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- The Holy Grail.
The Holy Grail...Christ's cup from the Last Supper.
Medieval poets sang its praises, and King Arthur's
knights chased it to the ends of the earth. Did Joseph
of Arimathea really claim the cup after the Last
Supper and collect Jesus's blood in it at the
Crucifixion? Why are there so many Grail tales, no two
of which fully agree? And why does the scent of heresy
linger about the sacred cup? Many treasures are
bigger, but none more precious or elusive as we
discover in this quest for the venerable vessel.

8-10pm -- A History of God - 
A fascinating look at how God has manifested himself
to people from Abraham's days to the present. We
explore fertility rites of the ancient Middle East;
the awesome revelations at Mt. Sinai; the jealous yet
compassionate God of the Hebrews; Jesus and the
mystery of the Trinity; and Allah, the Muslim God of
Unity. Here is the story of thousands of years of
wrenching and revolutionary encounters with God that
prophets, saints, and mystics have experienced, and
mankind's quest for comfort and meaning.

10-12am -- Time Machine - 
The world of the Bible was one beset by terror, when
disasters of truly biblical proportions ravaged
humanity. It was a time of global flooding, fiery
destruction, plagues, earthquakes, killer epidemics,
and famine. Are these biblical accounts fact or
fiction? We'll explore new and controversial evidence
as we seek to learn how ancient disasters may provide
valuable insight for a modern world besieged by
similar catastrophes.

____________________________________________________

Sunday, December 26, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- The Real Spartacus - 
Long before Stanley Kubrick's film starring Kirk
Douglas, Spartacus had unwittingly become a
mythological icon of resistance against oppression
worldwide. We'll look at the real Spartacus, focusing
on his struggle against Roman forces, his time as a
gladiator, and his role in the infamous slave revolt
against Rome in 73 BC, which convulsed the great
empire for 2 years before the uprising was put down
and 6,000 slave rebels were crucified along 150 miles
of the Appian Way.

8-10pm -- Countdown to Armageddon - 
Asteroids on a collision course with Earth, super
volcanoes, global warming, killer viruses--all are
potential catastrophes that threaten to wipe out life
on our planet. Are these simply natural disasters that
have been occurring since time immemorial? Or are
these threats terrifying prophesies from the Bible
that are at last coming true? Are our fears overblown?
Or are the infamous Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
riding among us in a countdown to Armageddon?

10-12am -- Nostradamus: 500 Years Later - 
The life story of Nostradamus unfolds in medieval
Europe at the time of the Great Plague and the
Inquisition. He lived in an age of superstition and
magic and believed that he could foretell the future.
For this he was labeled both a prophet and a heretic,
and his cryptic journals continue to inspire
controversy just as they did in the 16th century. In
this 2-hour examination of his life, we visit his
birthplace in France and trace his career as doctor,
astrologer, father, and seer.

____________________________________________________

Monday, December 27, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Coal Mines.
Coal--the fuel responsible for more than half the
electricity used daily. We unearth the amazing
technological advances that have led to today's
extremely efficient methods--from ancient techniques
to the simplistic bell-pit method, from drift mining,
surface mining, and strip mining to modern longwall
mining, when a massive machine extracts an entire wall
of coal in seconds. We go underground with miners in
West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Wyoming, and also
address environmental concerns.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Soviet UFO Secrets Revealed.
In an investigation of some of the most puzzling UFO
sightings in Soviet history, we uncover the work of an
underground network of believers and reveal a
clandestine 13-year government investigation of UFOs.
Many Russian UFO enthusiasts believe that proof of
alien encounters exists--but it's being hidden from
them! We also meet George Knapp, an American broadcast
journalist who traveled to Russia in the early 1990s
and believes there's a treasure trove of KGB UFO files
that remain top-secret.

9-11pm -- Hell: The Devil's Domain - 
Our in-depth History of Hades begins with the story of
a negative near-death experience, in which a man
thinks he went to Hell after being declared clinically
dead and before resuscitation. Following Lucifer's
trail from cave paintings in France circa 6,000 BC to
current portrayals in popular culture, our 2-hour
exploration shows how Hell and the Devil remain
powerful forces--at a church in Texas, where souls are
delivered from Satan's grip; in talks with a survivor
of the 1980s recovered memory craze, who "recalled"
attending Witches' Sabbaths that practiced
cannibalism; and at the modern Church of Satan. We
review literary landmarks that expanded our ideas of
the Underworld, from Dante's Inferno and Milton's
Paradise Lost to Mark Twain's anti-hero, and trace
development of Christian, Moslem, Jewish, and Buddhist
conceptions of the afterlife.

____________________________________________________

Tuesday, December 28, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Non-Lethal Weapons.
They stun, debilitate, immobilize--providing police
and peacekeepers with options other than shouting or
shooting. From the ancient caltrop--a multi-pointed
contraption hurled by foot soldiers into a horseman's
path--to sting-ball grenades, electrical shock
devices, and sound, light, and energy weapons, we
examine non-lethal weapons that disperse crowds and
take down criminals. And in a whiff of the future, we
see why the government thinks stink bombs might prove
useful in the war against terror.

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Disaster Tech
The frontier was full of rivers that needed taming and
mountains begging to be blasted--and our forebears
hoisted a hefty bag of tools to help them do it all.
But of course, no one expected a frontier so
dangerous--or so tempting! Trains, ships,
towns--nothing could stop our expansion, until those
technological monsters started biting back. Even then,
we didn't always learn, and sometimes, it took massive
disasters to teach us some very tough lessons. In this
episode, we'll see how man's folly, pride, and
stupidity led to some of the Wild West's worst
catastrophes.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Doomsday Tech 1.
Doomsday threats range from very real (nuclear
arsenals) to controversial (global warming) to
futuristic (nanotechnology, cyborgs, and robots).
Despite the Cold War's end, we live under the shadow
of nuclear weapons, arms races, and accidental
launches. Next, we stir up a hotter topic--the
connection between global warming and fossil
fuels--and ask if they're cooking up a sudden, new Ice
Age. And we examine 21st-century technologies that
typify the dual-edged sword of Doomsday Tech with
massive potential for both creation and
destruction--nanotechnology (engineering on a tiny
scale), robotics, and cybernetics. We witness amazing
applications in the works, wonder at the limitless
promise, and hear warnings of a possible
nano-doomsday, with tiny, out-of-control machines
devouring everything around them.
Would you like to play a Wargame?

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Doomsday Tech 2.
The second deadly hour examines more threats--both
natural and manmade--that may endanger civilization.
From the far reaches of space to tiny viruses,
doomsday sources are many. But so are technologies
used to keep doomsday at bay. Asteroids of significant
size have hit our planet before and likely will again.
Asteroid hunters demonstrate the Near Earth Asteroid
Tracking (NEAT) program and methods being developed to
destroy earth-aimed asteroids. Then, it's onto
bioterrorism's sinister technologies--how highly
virulent agents like smallpox and plague can be
weaponized. Next, an ex-hacker turned cyber-security
expert shows how vulnerable the nation's computers are
to cyberterror. Finally, we visit the controversial
world of biotechnology. Could genetically engineered
crops backfire? Does a brave new world of genetically
selected beings loom in our not-so-distant future?

____________________________________________________

Wednesday, December 29, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Firing Ranges.
Discover how military and police personnel, as well as
private citizens, hone their shooting skills with one
of the oldest of training techniques when we review
the history of firing ranges--from a simple knot on a
tree, old bottles, rusted tin cans, and highway signs
to high-tech targets and advances in weaponry.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - UFOs in the Bible.
Journey back through time into the mysterious history
of UFOs as revealed through ancient biblical texts.
Through intensive reinterpretation of early religious
documents, researchers believe that they have found
evidence of ancient UFO activity. From Elijah's flying
"chariots of fire" and Ezekiel's "wheels within wheels
in the sky" to the enigmatic aerial phenomenon that
lead Moses during the Exodus, we apply a modern
perspective to the writings of the Bible in the
context of UFOs.

9-10pm -- The Bible Code: Predicting Armageddon - 
Is there a prophetic, highly accurate code locked
within the Bible that outlines past and future events?
Does the Code contain hidden messages about people
such as Napoleon, Einstein, and Hitler, and key world
events like WWII, the Kennedy brothers'
assassinations, and 9/11? More frightening are
references to future events--including Earth's
impending end. We take a balanced look through the
eyes of Code supporters and critics and let viewers
determine its accuracy in predicting the future.

10-11pm -- Bible Code II: Apocalypse and Beyond - 
As we delve further into the provocative theory that a
cryptogram exists in the Bible outlining past and
future events, we learn how the Code works from
supporters and examine supposed examples of precise
messages. And we hear from critics who present
compelling arguments that the Code is merely a
statistical anomaly. We uncover how military and
intelligence organizations interact with the Code, and
compare it with other sources of biblical prophecy.
And watch out for the 7th Sign

____________________________________________________

Thursday, December 30, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Times Square.
The Crossroads of the World, New York City's Times
Square is the screaming marketplace of our culture and
time. It's urban life pushed to the limit--the most
electrified, visceral, crowded, and vibrant area in
the world's most dynamic city. A unique district that
forever changes its face, it sank into crime and
sleaze in the 1970s, only to rehabilitate in the '90s
into a dubious family entertainment paradise. Join us
for a trip to America's Town Square at the
intersection of Broadway and 7th Avenue in the Borough
of Manhattan.

8-9pm -- The Doomsday Clock - 
Developed in 1947 as an image to symbolize urgency in
the Cold War and the threat of nuclear disaster, the
mission of the Doomsday Clock has expanded to include
non-nuclear global security issues. Maintained by the
Board of Directors of the Bulletin of the Atomic
Scientists, it's based at the University of Chicago.
In response to world events, they move the clock's
minute hand closer to or away from midnight--doomsday.
In this hour, we cover the clock's history, its
effectiveness, and its critics.

9-11pm -- Countdown to Armageddon - 
Asteroids on a collision course with Earth, super
volcanoes, global warming, killer viruses--all are
potential catastrophes that threaten to wipe out life
on our planet. Are these simply natural disasters that
have been occurring since time immemorial? Or are
these threats terrifying prophesies from the Bible
that are at last coming true? Are our fears overblown?
Or are the infamous Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse
riding among us in a countdown to Armageddon?

____________________________________________________

Friday, December 31, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Las Vegas Hotels.
Out of the bleakness of a vast desert arose a city
built on wish fulfillment and indulgence. Unencumbered
by tradition or notions of good taste, for 50 years
Las Vegas has taken tourists to the height of their
imaginations while reaching into their pockets. Visit
11 of the world's largest hotels in the country's
biggest playground.

8-9pm -- History Alive - Ancient Civilizations.
In this hour, we study sex in the ancient world--from
Mesopotamians, who viewed adultery as a crime of
theft, to Romans, who believed that squatting and
sneezing after sex was a reliable method birth
control. We also look at revealing Egyptian and Greek
practices--from the origins of dildos, to intimate
relations between Egyptian gods and goddesses, to the
use of crocodile dung as a contraceptive.

9-10pm -- Time Machine - The Eastern World.
An exploration of sex in China, Japan, India, and the
Arab world that offers an intriguing perspective on
the interrelation of sexuality and spirituality in
eastern culture. Among the topics presented are the
ancient Chinese equivalent of Viagra, Japanese
acceptance of prostitutes and pornographic art, and
tips from the Kama Sutra.

10-11pm -- Time Machine - The Middle Ages.
In this steamy history, we trace the evolution of
sexual beliefs and practices from the fall of the
Roman Empire through the Renaissance. We'll also
uncover the conflicting extremes of medieval romance
and sex--from the bawdy life of European city dwellers
to the staid and dangerous practice of courtly love.
Medieval scholars offer humorous and interesting
carnal tales of lusty knights, bawdy widows, naughty
priests, and chaste maidens.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
January 2005

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January 2004

Official HistoryChannel.com Homepage
From the invention of the electric battery in 1800 to the murdered remains of missing Washington intern Chandra Levy being discovered in a Washington D.C. park*, find out what happened when with our exclusive History of the World Timeline!
GO TO: HistoryChannel.com/worldtimeline

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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