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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For August 2004 (schedules available after the 1st)

Tactical to Practical NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Sunday, August 1, 2004
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6-8pm -- Killer Storm - Killer Storm
October 1991--an unpredicted monster storm ravaged the
U.S. Atlantic coast, unleashing its fury on land and
sea. Unique in destructive power and as a 100-Year
Meteorological Event, its 114-hour rampage posed
daunting challenges to weather forecasting, emergency
warning agencies, and search and rescue teams as we
see in this 2-hour exploration of the events
surrounding the savage storm.

8-10pm -- Isaac's Storm - 
September 8, 1900. Galveston, Texas. A typically hot
and humid day. Women tended to chores; men traveled
downtown to work, including Isaac Cline, head of the
National Weather Bureau's local office. Cline believed
the island was safe from hurricane, but by afternoon,
a Category-4 storm proved how wrong he was. In a
2-hour special based on Erik Larson's book "Isaac's
Storm", weather experts, historians, and survivors'
descendants guide us through that horrific day that
claimed over 6,000.

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - French Musketeer
Gear/Hellcat and Zero/U.S. Army's High Altitude Rescue
Team/XR-8 Syncopter: #56
R. Lee Ermy does some fancy footwork, fencing his way
through the gear of the French Musketeer's. Next, the
Gunny sizes up two of the greatest fighter planes of
World War II--the U.S. F6F Hellcat and the Japanese
A6M Zero. Then, we find out what it takes to be a
member of the U.S. Army's High Altitude Rescue Team.
Finally, Lee opens the "fabulous flops" file to
spotlight the XR-8 Syncopter, a helo with blades that
had a nasty tendency to intertwine.

10:30-11pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Midway
Six months after Pearl Harbor, American cryptanalysts
decipher a Japanese military message about a planned
raid on Midway--two small islands where U.S. aircraft
are stationed. If they succeed, they can easily take
Hawaii and control of the Pacific from the crippled
U.S. Navy. Part documentary, part interactive game, we
put viewers in the positions of Admiral Jack Fletcher
and Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, providing them with the
same information and available options, to re-fight
the battle.
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Monday, August 2, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Battle Gear
From battle armor to bubble gum, you might be
surprised by what soldiers have carried into
battle--and what they'll carry in future wars. In this
look at the development of weapons--from the Roman
soldier's gladius to the M16 assault rifle to infrared
scopes and biological weapons protection--we also
discover the evolution of body armor--from knights to
Kelvar-protected "Land Warriors". And we'll also find
out what the "Future Warrior" will look like.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Roswell: Final Declassification
In 1947, a strange object fell from the sky near
Roswell, New Mexico, and controversy brewed over what
it really was. In November 2001, we convened a team of
experts at the National Archives for an exclusive
first look at the top-secret government files of the
UFO incident. We unveil the remaining classified
files--11 boxes with 17 notebooks of declassified
files, photos, transcripts and audiotapes of dozens of
witnesses, and 22 films and videos--in a definitive
statement on the 50-year-old mystery.

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Japanese Sub at Pearl
Harbor
The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was a move of
unprecedented aggression that shook the U.S. out of
its peaceful slumber and into WWII. But for 60 years,
veterans of the destroyer USS Ward claimed they sank
an enemy submarine outside the harbor more than an
hour before the aerial attack began. The wreck was
never found, and the story was dismissed. In August
2002, a dive team crossed its path and their find made
headlines worldwide. We travel to Pearl Harbor to
investigate the midget sub mystery.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - Dead Sea Scrolls
The Dead Sea Scrolls are arguably the most important
manuscript discovery in history. Believers hoped they
would provide clues about the origins of Judaism and
Christianity and that the name Jesus might appear in
documents written during his life. We follow one
scholar in search of new caves that might contain
scrolls. As the dig team works along a cliff face near
Qumran, we trace the history of the Dead Sea Scroll
controversy and the evolving interpretation of what
was written 2,000 years ago.
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Tuesday, August 3, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Survival Technology
In an historic survey of man's adaptation to killer
environmental conditions, we travel to the desert, the
Arctic, the sea, jungle, and space, charting the
body's physiological responses to extreme
circumstances such as frostbite, heatstroke, and
hypothermia. We talk with military survival experts
and learn about the latest cutting-edge survival gear,
as well as the equipment aboard the space station, and
look to the future, when nano-technology will create a
new type of technology.

8-9pm -- Tactical to Practical - Rough Water
Boats/Panic Rooms/Adventure Journalists, War
Correspondents: #25
Host Hunter Ellis test drives the Ultimate Adventure
Boat as we look at the boats and ships that make it
possible to fight a war during any condition at
sea--from the Navy SEALs' Zodiac to the unsinkable
lifeboat, from white-water kayaks to icebreakers.
Then, Hunter learns how bunkers and bomb shelters have
led to panic and safe rooms. And he meets up with
military photojournalists of Fleet Combat Camera, and
heads out with Teton Gravity Research, a team of
out-there documentary filmmakers.

9-9:30pm -- Tech Effect - Apollo 11
In 1961, President Kennedy challenged the nation to
put a man on the moon before the decade ended. Just
under the wire in July 1969, Neil Armstrong set foot
on the lunar surface. We examine that decade's
technological advancements and see how they culminated
in Apollo 11 and the lunar landing, including:
spacesuits; Saturn V, the largest rocket ever built;
the computers and cameras onboard the lunar module;
and a deep-space network of satellites that beamed the
images around the world.

9:30-10pm -- Mail Call - Navy Marine Mammals/Field
Hospitals/Desert Ducks: #55
The Gunny proves that the Navy Marine Mammals program
is no fish tale--and discovers just how dolphins and
sea lions help win wars. Next, R. Lee Ermey discovers
how we got our injured soldiers from the battlefield
to field hospitals by the chain of evacuation
established in WWII; and he takes a ride in the WC54
ambulance. Finally, Lee profiles the Desert Ducks--the
Navy unit in charge of delivering the mail to ships in
the Persian Gulf.

10-11pm -- Wild West Tech - Hunting Tech
The Wild West was a vast and bountiful frontier,
filled with animals, fur  and opportunity. The men
who kept up with the latest advances in technology had
a big advantage as they tried to tame the West.
Whether it was a change in beaver trap production, a
new method of making skinning knives, or increases in
the power and accuracy of buffalo rifles, the tools of
the hunter shaped the story of the West. On WILD WEST
TECH: HUNTING TECH, we look at the evolution of
hunting tools and weapons, and how advances in
technology made the unthinkable -- the near-extinction
of the bison -- a reality. 
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Wednesday, August 4, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Stock Exchange
Welcome to the center of the American economy, where
nearly $90-million changes hands each minute. Journey
back to the wooden wall, built to hold back Indians,
where early traders signed a pact creating the New
York Stock Exchange; watch worldwide markets quake
with the crash of 1929; and visit today's
computer-driven wonder.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Breweries
From Pilgrim brew masters to early commercial ventures
to today's monolithic corporations, we'll imbibe
American beer's long history, focusing on the
commercial brewing industry that developed in the 19th
century and continues to today. We'll also taste
social experiments from the past, like the Temperance
Movement and Prohibition, to see how they left scars
on the industry and continue to influence sobriety
today.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Saloons
From a ladle and tin cup in an 1850s mining camp and
Civil War tent saloons to Prohibition-era speakeasies,
we investigate the history of the American saloon, and
go behind-the-scenes at Billy Bob's, a 3-acre Texan
saloon, and a Los Angeles sports bar with a
computerized liquor-dispensing system. We see what it
took to create the elaborate carved bars, the purpose
of the brass foot-rail, the impact of refrigerated
railroad cars on beer supply, and the transformational
power of the bottle cap.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Distilleries
From water and grain...to mash...still...vat...barrel
and bottle--the distilling of alcoholic spirits is a
big business and near-sacred religion. Its acolytes
eye the color, swirl the glass, inhale the bouquet,
sip, then ponder their ambrosia. What's your pleasure?
Bourbon, Scotch, Rum, Gin, Vodka, or Tequila? We trace
the history of distilling from the one-man/one-still
tradition to the Voldstead Act of 1920 that devastated
American distilleries to the mega-sales and
high-volume distillery of today.
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Thursday, August 5, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Police Technology
When police forces were born in the 1800s, British
"bobbies" made due with a billy club. Public wariness
and institutional resistance to change held back
technological advances for much of the 20th century.
But in the last decades, police have been swept up in
a technological revolution that has transformed nearly
all aspects of crime fighting.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - Highway Hangouts: Celebrating
America's Roadside Attractions
Hitch a ride and travel America's byways to discover
the wacky highway attractions that formed a roadside
culture that fed, housed, and amused us for decades.
Visit dinosaur theme parks, coffee pot-shaped diners,
and truck stops extraordinaire; and view a snapshot of
who we are as a nation. Based on John Margolies's
books.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Trucks
Icons of the open road, trucks form the backbone of
the construction and transportation industries. The
facility to handle nearly any load and the ability to
deliver goods almost anywhere make trucks integral to
modern life. From 18th-century steam-powered carriages
to tomorrow's computerized trucks, it's a long haul
you'll enjoy!
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Friday, August 6, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Maginot Line
The Maginot Line, a defensive string of forts with
enfilading firepower, was built by France between WWI
and WWII. Conceived by Minister of War Andre Maginot,
it was meant to forestall another German invasion
until troops could arrive. But the French began to
think of the line as a substitute for manpower. When
Belgium declared neutrality and exposed France's
flank, Germany was able to sidestep the line. We'll
visit the "impregnable" line's forts, observation
turrets, and underground railroads.

8-9pm -- Wild West Tech - Outlaw Tech
We think of outlaws as a primitive bunch, but these
badmen were ahead of their time and took advantage of
new technology. Host Keith Carradine shows how
dynamite and the telegraph assisted criminals, and how
photography stole their anonymity. As the 20th century
approached, the technology that had helped them outrun
authorities caught up with them in the form of a new
invention--the automobile. Butch Cassidy, Jesse James,
Henry Starr, Black Jack Ketchum, and a few others make
appearances.

9-9:30pm -- Decisive Battles - Marathon
Marathon, Greece, September 490 BC. King Darius leads
his Persian army in an attack on Greece. When the
Persian fleet, carrying massive infantry and cavalry,
arrived on Greek soil at Marathon Bay, the Greeks were
outnumbered 4:1. But in an heroic effort, the Athenian
hoplite warriors were victorious in a fight against
both greater numbers and time. Yet while they fought
on land, Persian ships were sailing round to sack the
undefended city. Athens had to be warned--thus
Phidippides' 26-mile run.

9:30-10pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Cambrai
In 1917, Germany's Hindenburg Line, fortified by deep
trenches and barbed wire, is considered unbreakable.
British General Sir Julian Byng develops a strategy to
storm the barricade with a barrage of tanks. It's
risky--tanks are new technology with a poor
performance record. But the charge is a success and
breaks the German stranglehold on WWI's Western Front.
Part documentary, part interactive game, viewers join
Byng and General Georg von der Marwitz on the
battlefield at Cambrai in Northern France.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Nordhausen
It was the world's largest underground factory--seven
miles of tunnels built to manufacture Hitler's secret
weapons, primarily the V-2 rocket. But Nordhausen kept
more than one secret. Technology and torture went
hand-in-hand--25,000 concentration camp workers died
there--and some of those associated with Nordhausen
later helped take America to the moon.
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Saturday, August 7, 2004
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7-8pm -- Wild West Tech - Cowboy Tech
A no-bull episode that roams the range hunting for the
gritty truth behind the Old West's most enduring
figure. Host Keith Carradine examines the cowboy's
trade tools--from saddle to spurs--and undergoes the
dangers of a cattle drive. Reenactments show off
cowboy skills, including roping, riding, shooting, and
branding, as we see how the tradition lives on in
rodeos. And, we shoot down reputations as we look
behind the myths of legendary cowboys like John Wesley
Hardin, Billy the Kid, and Tom Horn.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - American Eats: History on a
Bun
Join us for a 2-hour tasty tour of the fascinating
history of food, with a special focus on home-cooked
American treats. Find out if "Scorecard Harry" really
invented the hot dog, the Earl of Sandwich's culinary
contribution, and how an Italian immigrant began the
pizza craze. Get out your fork and knife and relish
our fabulous feast!

10-12am -- Time Machine - History of the Beach: The
Turning Tides of History
To the naked eye, seaside resorts appear to be a
non-stop party of sand, surf, sun, and sex--from Rio
to the Riviera, from Miami to Muscle Beach. But
building the beach meant centuries of struggle against
nature, fear, and man! Slather on the sunscreen and
slither into your bikini for a 2-hour history of
paradise on earth, where the awesome power of water
and waves helped turn hostile slivers of real estate
into the world's premier destinations for recreation,
relaxation, and adventure.

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Sunday, August 8, 2004
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8-9pm -- Outlaw Bikers - 
A nostalgic look at the days when leather-clad
hoodlums turned the motorcycle into a symbol of
violence and a Harley meant mayhem. Profiles "Wino"
Willie Forkner, who founded an outlaw biker gang
called the Boozefighters, and the notorious Hell's
Angels, who terrorized towns across America. (1-hour
version)

9-10pm -- Motorcycles - 
Set the sedan's safety brake and hop on your "hog" for
a high-speed history of the motorcycle--from the 1868
"steam velocipede" to the early 20th century, when
they were a low-cost alternative to automobiles; from
Harley-Davidsons preferred by Hell's Angels and police
to motocross riders who take bikes into the air and
onto the dirt. (1 hour version.)

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - #57
At ease, Private! R. Lee Ermey is your commanding
officer in this weekly series that answers viewers'
questions about military methods and technology with
practical demonstrations by military experts. Viewers
go on the frontlines, to foreign lands, and into basic
training as Lee demonstrates the hows and whys behind
weaponry, military hardware, vehicles, and jargon.
It's a glimpse of military life and history that
civilians rarely see.

10:30-11pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Cambrai
In 1917, Germany's Hindenburg Line, fortified by deep
trenches and barbed wire, is considered unbreakable.
British General Sir Julian Byng develops a strategy to
storm the barricade with a barrage of tanks. It's
risky--tanks are new technology with a poor
performance record. But the charge is a success and
breaks the German stranglehold on WWI's Western Front.
Part documentary, part interactive game, viewers join
Byng and General Georg von der Marwitz on the
battlefield at Cambrai in Northern France.
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Monday, August 9, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Cannons
Cannons have fired balls of iron and atomic bombs,
changed the way wars are fought, and now come equipped
with smart weapons. Beginning with 13th-century
cannons that were designed to penetrate forts of the
day, we'll see how cannons were first cast and later
forged, and show how large cannons terrorized
civilians and soldiers in WWI and WWII. Moving to the
present, we feature the 40-ton self-propelled Crusader
that launches 100-pound steel artillery shells more
than 33 miles.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Crop Circle Controversy
The puzzling formations known as crop circles have
appeared worldwide throughout history. In the Middle
Ages, they were called "witch" or "pixie" circles, and
a 1678 woodcut, the "Mowing Devil", depicts one
thought to be Satan's work. But in the 1980s, the
phenomenon escalated, with dozens of crop circles
popping up in England and other countries. 

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Death by Human Torpedo
During WWII's final stages, the U.S. established what
it believed was safe anchorage in a Western Pacific
lagoon called Ulithi Atoll. But on the morning of
November 20, 1944, an explosive attack by one of
Japan's new secret weapons sent a refueling ship, the
USS Mississinewa, to the bottom of the lagoon along
with 53 sailors. By 2001, nearly every major U.S. WWII
shipwreck had been found except for the Mississinewa.
This is the story of the efforts to locate the last
mystery shipwreck of WWII.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - Napoleon's Mass
Grave
In March 2002, in Vilnius, Lithuania, construction
workers uncovered a mass grave filled with close to
2,000 skeletons. Scientists determined that the
remains belonged to the last remnants of Napoleon's
Grand Army retreating from Moscow in 1812. The find
offers new insight into Napoleon's invasion of Russia,
the largest military disaster ever recorded. Follow
scientists as they seek to learn who these people were
and how they died. Was it a massacre, an epidemic, or
the result of brutal cold?
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Tuesday, August 10, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Torture Devices
For more than 3,000 years, emperors and generals,
dictators and police, criminals, clerics, and even
medical doctors have created and used a vast array of
torture devices--everything from the ancient Greeks'
Brazen Bull, which slowly barbecued the victim, to the
elaborate mechanical apparatuses of the Spanish
Inquisition. A medical doctor who specializes in
victims of torture reveals how the human body responds
to their use--from the earliest devices to the more
modern.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Dangerous Cargo
Toxic traffic is everywhere! An average of 800,000
shipments of hazardous materials hit our highways and
railways daily. From Wild West wooden crates filled
with explosives to HAZMAT containers of nuclear waste,
we shadow dangerous cargo. We ride shotgun on a
hazardous material shipment that's tracked by
satellites; hunt down the hush-hush "ghost
fleet"--trucks carrying classified government
materials; and board a Con-Air flight moving another
kind of nasty stuff--dangerous felons!

9-9:30pm -- Tech Effect - Hollywood Bank Shootout
On February 28, 1997, two heavily armed men attempted
to rob a Bank of America branch in North Hollywood,
California. Police officers on routine patrol
disrupted the carefully plotted plan when they spotted
the suspicious men entering the bank and heard
gunshots. 

9:30-10pm -- Mail Call - French Musketeer Gear/Hellcat
and Zero/U.S. Army's High Altitude Rescue Team/XR-8
Syncopter: #56
R. Lee Ermy does some fancy footwork, fencing his way
through the gear of the French Musketeer's. Next, the
Gunny sizes up two of the greatest fighter planes of
World War II--the U.S. F6F Hellcat and the Japanese
A6M Zero. 

10-11pm -- Wild West Tech - Western Towns
Out of hundreds of western towns, a handful survived
through technological ingenuity to become icons of the
Old West. We discuss why certain areas were chosen for
settlement, how the towns sprang up, their
construction, water supplies, sanitation, and
protection against Indian attack. 
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Wednesday, August 11, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Forts
Fortification evolved along with man's need to defend
his territory from attack. From hills surrounded by
fences to walled cities to impenetrable castles, these
strongholds of the past echo the history of battles
for territorial control. Join us as we learn how, as
weaponry grew in sophistication, those walls came
tumbling down.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Liberty Ships of WWII
Focusing on a brief but glorious period of American
ingenuity, we'll study shipbuilders' response to the
demands of WWII. Combining rare National Archive
footage with photography shot on vintage ships, we'll
see how industrialists transformed the nation's
shipyards into mass production facilities in a matter
of months.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil Fire Fighting
When a burning gusher shoots flames into the air, only
a handful of men know how to snuff out the monster.
Fighting fire with fire, they place explosives around
the flames to blow it out, or douse it with tons of
water. The modern world depends on these risk takers,
but their industry began less than 100 years ago. Join
us for a scorching hour as we review the rich history
of this "breed apart", and look at modern
heat-resistant clothing, new technology, and
regulations that protect oil firefighters.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Oil Tankers
The biggest moving objects ever built by man, oil
tankers dominate the world's waterways, both in size
and numbers. Upwards of 10,000 strong, the world
tanker fleet's vast number results from the modern,
insatiable thirst for oil. We'll dig into the history
of oil transport--from Civil War days to the critical
WWII years and invention of the supertanker in the
1950s. And we examine the financial impact of
modifying these steel leviathans to prevent future
catastrophic environmental disasters.
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Thursday, August 12, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Train Wrecks
Throughout railroad history, disasters lay at the
heart of progress, since expansion and profit proved
the main goals of management. In 1875 alone, an
average of 22 train accidents happened daily; in 1890,
over 6,000 people were killed. We'll examine how
safety, once a secondary consideration, became a
primary goal.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - Godfathers
A 2-hour panoramic and global overview of the
phenomenon known as Cosa Nostra--from the mass
immigration of Italians to the U.S. at the end of the
19th century up to the arrests in 2000 on the New York
Stock Exchange, where the Mafia was laundering money.
What becomes evident in a chain of stories depicting
the most renowned "godfathers" is their uncanny
ability to act as political representatives of an
illegal state within the legal state and to exploit
major cycles and 
crises throughout history.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Bullets
From "safe" bullets that stop hijackers but leave
aircraft unscathed to bullets that chain-saw through
steel and "smart" bullets computer-programmed to hit a
target, this explosive hour examines the evolution of
bullets from origin in the 1300s--stones and round
lead balls shot from iron and bamboo tubes. Lead balls
ruled until 1841 when a conical-shaped bullet changed
ammo forever. We learn how to construct a modern
cartridge, and at pistol and rifle ranges view
demonstrations of modern firepower.

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Friday, August 13, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Apollo 13
The Apollo 13 mission was intended to be a "routine"
trip to the moon. But when an oxygen tank exploded,
the spacecraft was crippled and its 3-man crew placed
in mortal danger. The Lunar Module, intended for
deployment on the moon's surface, instead became a
"lifeboat". Scientists and engineers on earth fought a
race against time to save the crew. We'll examine the
mission, which nearly ended in tragedy, but instead
was a resounding success, and in some ways became
NASA's finest hour.

8-9pm -- Snipers - One Shot--One Kill
Statistics prove it's damned hard to kill an enemy
soldier on the battlefield. That's why the U.S. Marine
Corps urges its best marksmen to become snipers--human
machines, inhuman patience and precision. 

9-9:30pm -- Decisive Battles - Thermopylae
Using cutting-edge computer gaming technology, we
recreate conflicts that shaped the ancient world and
witness great battles like never before. Hosted on
location by Ben Browder, we return to Thermopylae in
480 BC, where 300 Spartans occupied a mountain pass
and held off the colossal army sent by the Persians to
avenge their defeat at Marathon. The Greeks held the
pass for over a week in one of history's greatest
displays of military heroism--and died to the last man
rather than surrender.

9:30-10pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Stalingrad
The fate of a nation hangs in balance when Germany
invades the Soviet Union in 1942. Nazi armies sweep
through, overtaking its citizens and troops. But at
Stalingrad, the Germans, commanded by General
Friedrich von Paulus, face a fierce and determined
resistance, led by General Vasily Chuikov. Soldiers on
both sides battle brutal weather, starvation, and
sniper fire. Part documentary, part interactive game,
viewers join von Paulus and Chuikov as the battle
boils down to bloody street fighting.

10-11pm -- Snipers - World's Deadliest Snipers
Among the world's best, the British Royal Marines
build on their noble traditions and the lessons of
history to hone the skills of snipers and place them
in a proud global lineage. 
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Saturday, August 14, 2004
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7-8pm -- Wild West Tech - Execution Tech
Journey back to the days when justice was swifter than
a saloon girl on a Saturday night and examine the
horrors of human design that brought terror to the Old
West. 

8-9pm -- The Bible Code: Predicting Armageddon - The
Bible Code: Predicting Armageddon
Is there a prophetic, highly accurate code locked
within the Bible that outlines past and future events?

9-10pm -- Bible Code II: Apocalypse and Beyond - 
As we delve further into the provocative theory that a
code exists in the Bible outlining past and future
events, we learn how the code works from supporters
and examine supposed examples of precise messages. 

10-12am -- Nostradamus: 500 Years Later - Nostradamus:
500 Years Later
The life story of Nostradamus unfolds in medieval
Europe at the time of the Great Plague and The
Inquisition. He lived in an age of superstition and
magic and believed that he could foretell the future.
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Sunday, August 15, 2004
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7-8pm -- Investigating History - Investigating
History: D-Day: The Secret Massacre
A cogent look at the massacre of U.S. paratroopers and
French civilians on D-Day. 

8-10pm -- Movies in Time - Ike: Countdown to D-Day
(Movie) Tom Selleck plays General Dwight D. "Ike"
Eisenhower in this sweeping story of the tense days
leading up to the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied
Europe in WWII. Ike confronts seemingly insurmountable
problems--not enough landing craft, tanks may get
stuck on the beaches, paratroopers may be massacred in
the sky, and weather threatens to doom the operation.
Ike must make tough decisions--and accept the blame if
the invasion fails! With Timothy Bottoms as "Beetle
Smith. (2004)

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - #58
At ease, Private! R. Lee Ermey is your commanding
officer in this weekly series that answers viewers'
questions about military methods and technology with
practical demonstrations by military experts. Viewers
go on the frontlines, to foreign lands, and into basic
training as Lee demonstrates the hows and whys behind
weaponry, military hardware, vehicles, and jargon.
It's a glimpse of military life and history that
civilians rarely see.

10:30-11pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Stalingrad
The fate of a nation hangs in balance when Germany
invades the Soviet Union in 1942. Nazi armies sweep
through, overtaking its citizens and troops. But at
Stalingrad, the Germans, commanded by General
Friedrich von Paulus, face a fierce and determined
resistance, led by General Vasily Chuikov. Soldiers on
both sides battle brutal weather, starvation, and
sniper fire. Part documentary, part interactive game,
viewers join von Paulus and Chuikov as the battle
boils down to bloody street fighting.
____________________________________________________
Monday, August 16, 2004
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Parachutes
The idea of floating to earth from great heights dates
back centuries, and from the beginning parachutes
combined entertainment with life-saving utility. The
parachute has also played a vital role in modern
warfare since WWI. We'll see how parachute technology
has made the world safer, and more fun!

8-9pm -- Secrets of the Aegean Apocalypse - 
Around 1,200 BC, an ancient Armageddon destroyed
nearly every known civilization. What could have
caused it? The theories are many, but most now include
one mysterious and massively destructive factor--a
force only the Egyptians survived to name: The Sea
People. Who were these warriors and how could they
take down the world's greatest powers in a span of
just 50 years? Scale the dizzying heights of Crete's
mountain fortress with archaeologist Krzysztof Nowicki
as he searches for clues.

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - U-Boats in the Gulf!
In Summer 1942, with the U.S. at war in Europe and the
Pacific, few Americans knew that the war raged in
their own backyard. Dozens of Hitler's U-boats had
penetrated the Gulf of Mexico, sinking merchant
vessels and oil tankers. Of all the U-boats that
attacked the Gulf, only one rests at the bottom of the
sea--the U-166. Experience the excitement of the first
thorough investigation into the wreckage since
discovery in 2001 and learn of the technological
advances that made its identification possible.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - Wyatt Earp at the
O.K. Corral 
Virtually unknown to history before Hollywood crafted
his saga in the 1930s, Wyatt Earp was an itinerant
gambler, convicted horse thief and pimp, sometime
saloonkeeper, and occasional lawman. We investigate
this last incarnation and the shootout with the
Clanton gang in Tombstone's O.K. Corral. Did Earp hide
behind his tarnished badge to settle personal scores?
Using court records of the gunfight investigation, we
cut through the lingering gunsmoke to recreate the
reality of the bloody gunfight.

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Tuesday, August 17, 2004
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7-8pm -- Time Machine - Oracle of Delphi Secrets
Revealed
Myth and science meet at Delphi, where the ancient
Greeks said the oracle (always a woman), in a trance
and often a frenzy, spoke on behalf of the gods.
Scholarship rejected the claim that vapors rising from
the temple's floor inspired the oracle. But now, a
wealth of evidence compiled by a geologist,
archaeologist, chemist, and toxicologist suggests the
ancients were right, and the discovery of two faults
intersecting below the temple indicate the geology
could have released intoxicating fumes.

8-9pm -- Ancient Monster Hunters - 
One-breasted female warriors; the one-eyed, man-eating
Cyclops; the ferocious griffin, part bird, part lion.
Were these creatures, celebrated by the ancient Greeks
and immortalized by Homer, something more than
myth?Join the hunt with some of today's leading
paleontologists as we explore newly-translated
evidence and examine remains that may link the Greek
classical age with earth's prehistoric past. New data
suggests that the ancients searched for, excavated,
measured, and displayed massive fossils.

9-9:30pm -- Tech Effect - Transcontinental Railroad
Promontory, Utah, May 10, 1869. The Union and Central
Pacific railroads are at last joined by a golden
spike, which in turns connects the entire U.S. A
journey that once took months, now takes weeks. Thus
begins an industrial revolution and a revolutionary
new way of life for Americans. We take a look at the
technological innovations needed to complete the
massive task, and how the telegraph spread the news
almost instantly, and stereographic pictures captured
the life-altering event.

9:30-10pm -- Mail Call - Marine Corps Marksmanship/The
BAT/Maritime Safety & Security Teams: #57
Marine Corps marksman, sharpshooter, expert? What's
the difference? R. Lee Ermey aims to find out the
difference, and handles some of the Corps' heralded
Vietnam snipers' gear. Next, the Gunny reviews WWII
coast artillery and examines one of WWII's most
sophisticated missiles, the BAT. Finally, R. Lee
checks out the Coast Guard's latest approach to the
War on Terror, the Maritime Safety and Security Teams,
and looks back at the first plane to cross the
Atlantic, the Navy NC-4 flying boat.

10-11pm -- Wild West Tech - Brothel Tech
As prospectors and frontiersmen moved west, debauchery
followed--and women trekked across the frontier to
serve these sex-starved men. We examine the technology
used by prostitutes to protect themselves from
violence and disease, prevent pregnancy, and
occasionally please themselves! Host Keith Carradine
takes us back to the 19th century to see how condoms
were made, how steam-powered vibrators operated, and
how brothel architecture allowed for easy access--and
escape!

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Wednesday, August 18, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - International Airports II
In this history of international airports, we focus on
several airports to illustrate the developments and
technology of their construction and operation,
beginning with Miami's Dinner Key and including New
York City's LaGuardia and JFK, London's Gatwick,
Dulles near Washington, D.C., Los Angeles' LAX, Denver
International, Japan's Kansai, and Korea's new Inchon.
It all began on a farmer's field near a flat
beach--the next step may see them expand into
interplanetary platforms!

8-9pm -- Secrets of the Acropolis - 
With a thrilling combination of dramatic
reconstructions and 3-D animation, we step back in
time to the Golden Age of Greece and the birth of
democracy, to an era of unparalleled human creativity
that produced the magnificent architecture on the
Acropolis. Powerfully evoking the pagan rituals that
made the Acropolis the heart of Athenian life, we
explore all four key buildings: the Propylaia, the
Erectheion, Athena Nike, and the Parthenon--the most
influential building in Western civilization.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - The Colosseum
Nothing symbolizes the Roman Empire at its height or
Rome in magnificent ruins more than the Colosseum.
Built in 70 AD, it seated 80,000 people, boasted a
retractable roof, underground staging devices, marble
seating, and lavish decorations. It still serves as
the prototype for the modern stadium. The complexity
of its construction, the beauty of its architecture,
and the functionality of its design made it the
perfect place for massive crowds to congregate for the
bloody spectacles it contained.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Athens Subway
Under the bustling metropolis of Athens, an
engineering project is transforming the city--a new
underground Metro system to meet the needs of its
modern inhabitants. But to dig stations and tunnels in
the heart of one of the world's oldest sites of
continuous habitation, engineers had to accomodate the
largest archaeological excavations conducted to date
in Athens. Thousands of artifacts were found, spanning
more than 25 centuries. We explore the difficult
balance between progress and preservation.

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Thursday, August 19, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Booby Traps
All it takes to set off a booby trap is an
unsuspecting victim lifting, moving, or disturbing a
harmless-looking object. Booby traps continue to worry
law enforcement; made from easily acquired items,
information detailing their construction and needed
materials are accessible through the
mail--anonymously! And unlike a land mine, they can be
anywhere. We detail the history of booby traps--from
the ancient Egyptians, Chinese, Greek, and Romans to
the Middle Eastern crisis and the War on Terrorism.

8-9pm -- Ancient Olympics: Let the Games Begin - 
Set in 448 BC, we recreate the main events of a
single, 5-day Olympiad. Dramatic reenactment, computer
graphics, and expert commentary bring these events to
life. The athletes "starring" in our games are
real--their lives recorded in history. We meet the
competitors at their training camp, then see them in
action. The events covered include chariot racing,
running, jumping, discus, and javelin, and two
man-to-man combat finals--boxing and "pankration", a
form of extreme fighting.

9-10pm -- Time Machine - Revenge!
After the murder of 11 Israeli athletes by Palestinian
terrorists at the 1972 Munich Olympics, Israeli Prime
Minister Golda Meir and her cabinet decided they'd had
enough. In a precedent-shattering move, she directed
the Israeli secret service to carry out covert
assassinations of those Palestinians directly or
indirectly responsible for the attack. This is the
story of how the Mossad tracked down the leaders of
the terror group Black September over the next 8 years
with deadly success.

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Friday, August 20, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Machu Picchu
The engineering marvel Machu Picchu sits perched on a
ridge in the Peruvian Andes. Originally built by the
Incas, this magnificent structure remains a mystery.
Was it an observatory? Pleasure retreat? Fortress?
This program presents the most current theories.

8-9pm -- Dead Men's Secrets - The Mysterious Death of
Admiral Yamamoto
On April 18, 1943, the aircraft carrying Admiral
Isoroku Yamamoto was shot down by U.S. fighters.
Yamamoto--chief architect of the attack on Pearl
Harbor--was visiting the forward Japanese bases at
Bougainville, some 650 miles from the nearest U.S.
base. His clash with U.S. fighters so far from their
territory was more than simple bad luck--the pilots
must have known where and when to find their target.
We talk to the U.S. pilots and find out why the
mission had to remain secret until war's end.

9-9:30pm -- Decisive Battles - Spartacus and the Slave
Revolt
Spartacus is one of the Ancient World's most famous
figures. A Thracian soldier, Spartacus was captured by
Romans and sold as a slave for training as a
gladiator. With 70 other gladiators, he escaped and
hid on Mount Vesuvius in 71 BC, where he raised an
army of rebel slaves and defeated two Roman legions.
But Roman vengeance was soon delivered by Crassus, who
put an end to Spartacus's desperate bid for freedom
and crucified over 6,000 men along the Via Appia as
warning to other slaves.

9:30-10pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Waterloo
Liberated from exile, in 1815, Napoleon raises an army
and attacks Belgium, headed towards Brussels. A master
of the "divide and conquer" strategy, Napoleon plans
to attack a vital communication point between the
English and Prussian armies. At the height of a
difficult battle, the Duke of Wellington orders his
secret cavalry and infantry to charge down from a
ridge and destroy Napoleon's offense. Part
documentary, part interactive game, viewers join
Wellington and Napoleon on the battlefield.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The M-16
The most powerful assault rifle ever used in combat,
the M-16 became the symbol of our lost
war--Vietnam--and can easily be called America's most
unloved gun. Yet, 30 years after its introduction, it
stands as a potent icon of U.S. military strength
worldwide. We'll explain how it almost ended up on the
scrap heap!

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Saturday, August 21, 2004
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7-8pm -- Wild West Tech - Military Tech
Featuring expert demonstrations, we focus on
technologies used by the U.S. military after the Civil
War in the western frontier, and show how some of the
greatest advancements laid the groundwork for
America's high-tech future. We spotlight such stories
as the Wagon Box Fight in 1867, when 26 soldiers and
six civilians fought off 800 mounted Sioux warriors
using the new Springfield-Allin breechloading rifle,
and Pancho Villa's raid, which ushered in the era of
motorized vehicles into the U.S. military.

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Sunday, August 22, 2004
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7-8pm -- Investigating History - The Holy Grail 
Rennes le Chateau is a small village in the Pyrenees
of Southern France. It's a quiet place until tourists
arrive hunting its secrets. According to legend, the
Knights Templar brought the Holy Grail here for
safekeeping. Those who come on pilgrimage think the
Grail is very different than history records. Was it
proof of marriage between Jesus and Mary Magdalene?
Did it verify their bloodline survived? Permission has
been granted to dig in Rennes le Chateau...and history
or legend is about to change.

8-9pm -- D-Day to Berlin - The Battle for France
In 1944, Europe's future hung in the balance. Our
3-part series follows the story of Allied forces--from
Normandy to the assault on Germany--and the victories
that led to WWII's end in 1945. We begin on the day
after D-Day, unfolding over the summer of 1944 as the
initial narrow sliver of French coastline gained by
the Allies is slowly extended. By the end of August,
Allied victory seemed assured. Rommel had been
wounded, Hitler was directing the battle, and the
German army was in full retreat.

9-10pm -- D-Day to Berlin - The Struggle toward
Germany
Hitler's armies were in headlong retreat. Paris was
liberated in August 1944, Brussels in the first week
of September. Only one thing stood between the Allies
and the German border--the Allied generals themselves.
In Part 2, we see how the most basic debate remained
unsolved--how to conquer Germany itself. Personality
differences and radical disagreements over strategy
threatened to create a rift between Eisenhower and
Montgomery, and burst the alliance wide open.

10-11pm -- D-Day to Berlin - Last Days of the Reich
Hitler's last great offensive in the Ardennes failed.
With British and U.S. armies poised to cross the Rhine
in the west, and Soviet forces advancing towards the
River Oder in the east, only one offer was on the
table for Germany--unconditional surrender. The Allies
would not negotiate with a country that had plunged
Europe into war twice in 30 years. When the
unconditional surrender came, it did give birth to a
new European order--but one dominated by Stalin, not
democracy and freedom.

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Monday, August 23, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Spy Technology
Espionage has been used for at least the last 4,000
years. And where there are spies, you find gadgets! We
focus on the last 100 years of cloak and dagger
technology--from early code-breaking computers to
satellite reconnaissance--and take a look at the James
Bond-type gadgets of the Cold War.

8-10pm -- Targeted - Osama bin Laden
Featuring former and current CIA agents, Special
Forces soldiers, Washington insiders, and best-selling
authors such as Mark Bowden ("Black Hawk Down"), Steve
Coll ("Ghost Wars"), Phillip Smucker ("Al Qaeda's
Great Escape"), and Simon Reeve ("The New Jackals"),
we take a 2-hour groundbreaking look at the hunt for
the world's #1 archenemy. Filmed in 10 countries
around the world, we trace Bin Laden's rise through
the Jihad against the Soviets in Afghanistan to his
present incarnation.

10-12am -- The True Story of Killing Pablo - 
An exploration of the criminal life of Pablo Escobar
that culminated in the largest manhunt in history and
the controversial 1993 killing of Escobar on a rooftop
in Medellin, Colombia. Based on his book "Killing
Pablo: The Hunt for the World's Greatest Outlaw",
author Mark Bowden anchors the program, guiding us
through pivotal moments of Escobar's life and sharing
startling revelations he uncovered during the research
for his book. Features interviews with key officials
of Colombia and the U.S.

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Tuesday, August 24, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Guns of the Civil War
It was a war in which brother fought brother and
battlefields became slaughterhouses. During the Civil
War, the country was in the midst of an industrial
revolution and developed the most destructive killing
machines the world had ever seen. Join us for a test
fire of Civil War guns--the first truly modern
weapons.

8-9:30pm -- Inside North Korea - 
When North Korea admitted to the world that it had
restarted its nuclear weapons program, a spotlight
shone on a country that for 50 years has been shielded
from the eyes of the Western world. Using current
events as the jumping off point and the words and
experiences of North Korean defectors, we tell the
history of the world's most secretive country.
Starting with its creation in the aftermath of WWII,
we focus on the only two leaders in North Korean
history--Kim Il-sung and his son Kim Jong-il.

9:30-10:30pm -- The Real Dr. Evil - 
North Korean President Kim Jong-il, widely regarded as
the world's most dangerous man, was dubbed "Dr. Evil"
by "Newsweek" magazine in January 2003. As well as
being on the U.S. "Axis of Evil" shortlist, it is
thought that Kim Jong-il's regime may have nuclear
material it is willing to sell. We track down some of
the people who have met Kim Jong-il to uncover how
this lazy student, frustrated artist, and dandy became
one of the world's most powerful leaders.

10:30-11pm -- Reign of Terror - 
It's been called one of the most evil institutions of
the 20th century. Operating under the code name S-21,
Pol Pot's secret prison was an interrogation, torture,
and execution center used to exterminate suspected
traitors of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge. From 1976 to 1979,
thousands entered its gates--only seven escaped alive.
While focusing on the prison, we see how Pol Pot's
campaign of forced labor, starvation, and murder left
1.7 million Cambodians dead.

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Wednesday, August 25, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - D-Day Tech
By the spring of 1942, Hitler had made a fortress of
Europe, and the Allies began to plan the biggest
invasion in military history. The history-altering
success of the D-Day Invasion depended on innovative
engineering and technological advances. This is the
story of those scientific and mechanical
breakthroughs--the overwhelming array of landing
craft, specialized weapons, and ingenious
electronics--used to breach Fortress Europe on June 6,
1944.

8-9pm -- Tyrants on Trial - 
How will Saddam Hussein be prosecuted? Who will get
the opportunity to decide his fate? Does Saddam have
any options? We take a look back in history, from
ancient times to the present, at what the world had
done with deposed tyrants. Some were executed, some
jailed for life, and others exiled. As you will see,
the history of deposed dictators has been at times
violent, bizarre, and certainly checkered. And we sit
down with Saddam's lawyer for a peek into the
surprising defense strategy.

9-10pm -- Saddam Hussein: Butcher of Baghdad - Saddam
Hussein: Butcher of Baghdad
Profile of the former Iraqi leader. Focuses on his
bloody rise to power and includes an interview with
the man who "doubled" for Saddam's brutal son and
defected. Includes a look at the 2003 Iraqi War and
the hunt for and ultimate capture of Saddam.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Extreme Aircraft
Join us for a supersonic look at some of the most
cutting-edge aircraft ever developed--from the X-1
that first broke the sound barrier to the X-43
Scramjet that recently flew at Mach 7. These extreme
aircraft have made their mark on aernautical history,
and sometimes on political history as well. The U-2
and SR-71 spy planes played a crucial role in the Cold
War, and now Lockheed Martin's top-secret "Skunkworks"
division is touting the new "air dominance" fighter
plane-- the F/A-22 Raptor.

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Thursday, August 26, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Machine Tools
Machine tools, power-driven machines of all shapes and
sizes, are used to make metal parts and have built our
modern world. Life today would not be possible without
them. Beginning with the story of the steam engine and
traveling forward to modern-day "machining centers"
that are used to make incredibly complex space shuttle
parts, we'll examine the basic types of machine tools
and their development. We'll also look at machine
tools of the future that will change the way products
are made.

8-9pm -- Barbarians - Vikings
Nordic peoples from the coasts of Scandinavia, these
raiders and warriors were also explorers and
merchants, whose slender ships carried them from
Arabia to the New World--hundreds of years before
Columbus set sail. After savage infighting among their
own clans spurred development of the longship, the
Vikings struck out across the seas, seeking plunder,
slaves, and new lands. But in the end, they
assimilated into European cultures and became agents
of social and political change.

9-10pm -- Barbarians - Goths
Terrorized by the Huns savage raids, the Goths made a
desperate bid for safety in the Roman Empire, but were
forced into squalid concentration camps along the
imperial borders, starved and degraded, their children
sold as slaves. But Rome made a big mistake--the Goths
kept their weapons and exploded in rioting and
looting. After centuries of broken treaties, King
Aleric sacked Rome. Ironically, the Goths maintained
Roman art and culture in their new Goth kingdoms as
the Empire faded away.

10-11pm -- Barbarians - Huns
The Huns were a mysterious people who fell upon the
European continent like the vengeance of God. Some say
the Chinese built the Great Wall to keep them out. In
the 5th century, the Huns struck a divided and
decaying Roman Empire. The Romans tried to deal with
them diplomatically, even allowing children of Roman
nobility to live as guests (hostages) in Hun camps.
One of these, Aetius, would become one of Rome's
greatest generals, and it was he who would face one of
the Huns' greatest rulers--Atilla.

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Friday, August 27, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Castles & Dungeons
Some of the most imposing structures ever built,
medieval castles withstood both bloody assaults and
the test of time. Designed like machines with nearly
every architectural detail devoted to defense, castles
represented the perfect fusion of form and function.
Journey back to that unruly era as we examine the
complexity of their construction and the multipurposes
they served--homes to kings and nobles, economic
centers, courthouses, treasuries, prisons, and torture
chambers.

8-9pm -- Hitler and Stalin: Roots of Evil - 
An examination of the minds of two of the 20th
century's most brutal dictators and mass
murderers--Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin. Based on
recent psychological and medical studies, the program
explores the personalities of these ruthless leaders,
who were directly responsible for millions of
deaths--their paranoia, suspiciousness,
cold-bloodedness, sadism, and lack of human feeling.
Includes interviews with Martin Bormann's son and
Hitler's butler.

9-9:30pm -- Decisive Battles - Chalons
Chalons, 451 AD. What made this battle so compelling?
Attila the Hun, the terrifying menace who had his eyes
set on what was left of the Western Roman Empire. By
this time, huge chunks of the Roman Empire operated
under the autonomous control of various barbarian
kings and no unity remained. Rome needed one more
hero, and Flavius Aetuis--the Last of the Romans--was
to be that man. He worked tirelessly and fought
tigerishly to drive Attila away and preserve the West
from Hunnic ravages.

9:30-10pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Saratoga
In 1777, British Major General John Burgoyne came up
with devious plan. Isolate New York, split the
colonies, and divide the Revolution. After recruiting
German mercenaries and American Indians, he marched on
Albany. But rebels led by General Horatio Gates
blocked the road by felling trees, while sharpshooters
attacked British troops. Part documentary, part
interactive game, viewers join Burgoyne and Gates in a
battle that ultimately kept the Hudson free and
convinced France to aid the rebels.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Bunkers
From the earliest bunkers of WWI through the
ultra-futuristic ones of tomorrow's wars, we trace the
story of defensive fortifications. In the constant
struggle to hold off ever more potent forms of attack,
bunkers function in a variety of forms. Three mammoth
block structures comprise a submarine bunker at
Lorient, France, able to house 20 subs. We visit
Churchill's Cabinet War Room and Hitler's Berlin
bunker, as well as backyard Cold War bunkers and those
that protect nuclear weapons themselves.

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Saturday, August 28, 2004
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7-8pm -- Wild West Tech - Hunting Tech
The Wild West was a vast and bountiful frontier,
filled with animals, fur  and opportunity. The men
who kept up with the latest advances in technology had
a big advantage as they tried to tame the West.
Whether it was a change in beaver trap production, a
new method of making skinning knives, or increases in
the power and accuracy of buffalo rifles, the tools of
the hunter shaped the story of the West. On WILD WEST
TECH: HUNTING TECH, we look at the evolution of
hunting tools and weapons, and how advances in
technology made the unthinkable -- the near-extinction
of the bison -- a reality. 

10-12am -- Wake Island: The Alamo of the Pacific -
Wake Island: The Alamo of the Pacific
It's a story of survival on a desert island--and it
helped change the course of WWII! Within hours of the
1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, about 1,600 U.S. marines
and civilians found themselves under surprise attack
from Japan on a tiny Pacific Island. In a 2-hour
special, we take six survivors of the siege of Wake
Island back to the scene of their heroic stand. They
retrace those horrific days in which they suffered
eventual capture, beatings, and imprisonment--yet
survived to tell their stories.

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Sunday, August 29, 2004
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7-8pm -- Investigating History - Investigating
History: Lincoln: Man or Myth?
Abraham Lincoln remains our country's most beloved
president--but nearly 200 years after his birth, we're
still trying to piece together a true picture of this
man who never fails to fascinate, surprise, and
enlighten us. Scholars and historians examine how
Lincoln became a myth. Was he really the Great
Emancipator who deeply wanted to free slaves or a
racist and white supremacist? Did the writings that
inspired a nation truly come from his pen? Do we
really even know what he looked like?

8-9:30pm -- The Duel with Richard Dreyfuss - 
In a 90-minute special, Academy Award-winning actor
Richard Dreyfuss ponders the 1804 duel between Vice
President Aaron Burr and former Secretary of the
Treasury Alexander Hamilton. Novelist Gore Vidal,
biographer Ron Chernow, journalist Rick Brookhiser,
and historian Joanne Freeman join Dreyfuss to lay bare
the personal and political rivalry, while questioning
the conventional story. And at a Manhattan eatery, the
experts duel with each other over the events that led
to Hamilton's death.

9:30-10pm -- Tales of the Gun - Guns of Infamy
Review guns that changed history as we examine the
firearms used to assassinate Presidents Kennedy,
McKinley, Garfield, and Lincoln, and the gun that
triggered WWI when it was used to kill Archduke
Ferdinand. We'll also look at candidates for the gun
that fired the "shot heard 'round the world" in the
American Revolution.

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - #59
At ease, Private! R. Lee Ermey is your commanding
officer in this weekly series that answers viewers'
questions about military methods and technology with
practical demonstrations by military experts. Viewers
go on the frontlines, to foreign lands, and into basic
training as Lee demonstrates the hows and whys behind
weaponry, military hardware, vehicles, and jargon.
It's a glimpse of military life and history that
civilians rarely see.

10:30-11pm -- Command Decisions - Battle of Saratoga
In 1777, British Major General John Burgoyne came up
with devious plan. Isolate New York, split the
colonies, and divide the Revolution. After recruiting
German mercenaries and American Indians, he marched on
Albany. But rebels led by General Horatio Gates
blocked the road by felling trees, while sharpshooters
attacked British troops. Part documentary, part
interactive game, viewers join Burgoyne and Gates in a
battle that ultimately kept the Hudson free and
convinced France to aid the rebels.

____________________________________________________

Monday, August 30, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Bombs
Bombs...the most feared and powerful weapon in any
nation's arsenal. What began as incendiary devices in
the 7th century has evolved into weapons that can
literally blow the human race off the face of the
earth! From the use of diseased carcasses flung over
castle walls to Greek Fire to today's smart bombs, we
review the evolution of bombs.

8-9pm -- UFO Files - Area 51: Beyond Top Secret
Born during the Cold War, Area 51 in Nevada, also
known as Groom Lake or Dreamland, became not only the
Air Force's most strategic test site, but also a
symbol of everything that was sneaky about the U.S.
military-industrial-intelligence complex. In recent
years, UFO investigators claimed that the top-secret
planes tested there were built with technology gleaned
from captured alien aircraft. We uncover the secrets
of the cryptic desert facility and look into
mysterious deaths of base workers.

9-10pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - Time Bomb of the Deep
In 2002, a series of mysterious oil spills spread
alarm up and down the Northern California coastline,
when a 200-mile stretch of beaches became littered
with the carcasses of oiled animals. Experts soon
realized they had an escalating disaster on their
hands. Finally, the leak was traced to a 50-year old
wreck--the SS Jacob Luckenbach, a tanker that sank in
200 feet of water. Join our divers as they explore the
deteriorating tanker and learn the extreme challenges
the oil-removal team faces.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - Investigating
History: D-Day: The Secret Massacre
A cogent look at the massacre of U.S. paratroopers and
French civilians on D-Day. When members of the 507th
PIR were dropped 20 miles from their objective, the
village of Graignes voted to help them. Six days of
fighting ensued--followed by severe Nazi retaliation.
The heroic collaboration of paratroopers and French
civilians delayed the SS and aided one of D-Day's most
crucial victories. 40 years later, 507th veterans
return to France to honor 11 citizens with the
Distinguished Civilian Service Award.

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Tuesday, August 31, 2004
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - FBI's Crime Lab
To spearhead its fight against crime and terrorism in
the 21st century, the FBI is relying on its $150
million-plus building, the new Crime Lab at Quantico.
Here, nearly 700 highly trained scientists and
technicians utilize cutting-edge forensic technology
to unearth identities of perpetrators. We review the
lab's history, from humble start in a lounge in 1932
to today's state-of-the-art complex, and see how 9/11
and the FBI's new mandate to fight international
terrorism changed the lab forever.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Engineering Disasters 7
Four engineering disasters are about to reveal their
darkest secrets. They include a dam that suddenly gave
way, spilling liquid havoc in a quiet neighborhood
(Baldwin Hills Dam in LA); a mysterious plane crash
that killed all aboard (Lockheed Electra); a massive
freighter's shuddering crash into a bridge (Sunshine
Skyway in Tampa Bay); and an earthquake that took down
poorly engineered buildings and stole lives (1994
Northridge, California). Engineers and architects
investigate what went wrong.

9:30-10pm -- Mail Call - Silencers/Flashbang
Grenade/WWII Japanese Gear/HITRON Teams: #58
The show opens with a "whisper" while the Gunny
discovers why the military uses silencers in a
live-fire demonstration, and he learns why silence
isn't always golden in a demo of the flashbang
grenade. Next, R. Lee Ermey checks out the weapons and
gear of Japanese soldiers in WWII's Pacific Theater.
And in Jacksonville, Florida, Lee catches up with the
tough new Coast Guard HITRON teams, and profiles one
of the military's premier heavy-lifting helos, the
CH-54 Skycrane.

10-11pm -- Wild West Tech - Native American Tech
Explore the might and power of the Native American
tribes that once populated the Wild West with host
Keith Carradine. We examine their weaponry--tomahawk,
lance, slingshot, bow and arrow, and club--and how
they cleverly adapted modern weaponry to their own
use. You'll learn about their battle strategies as we
introduce their most famous leaders, including
Geronimo, Crazy Horse, Red Cloud, and Sitting Bull.
And we demonstrate various medicinal and surgical
procedures that they used on wounded warriors.

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For more on UFOs, check out the interview on MonsterVision's Mars Attacks page

Watch Mailcall or drop and give me 20 Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag,
hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket
(movie available on video and DVD)

Hellcats of the Navy Previous History Channel primetime listings:

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January 2004

Official HistoryChannel.com Homepage
From the invention of the electric battery in 1800 to the murdered remains of missing Washington intern Chandra Levy being discovered in a Washington D.C. park*, find out what happened when with our exclusive History of the World Timeline!
GO TO: HistoryChannel.com/worldtimeline

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Find out more about any topic any time, including this day in history (your choice of decade), with our Best Search in History: www.historychannel.com

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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