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The History Channel


Primetime Programming Schedule

Listings For October 2003

NOTE: We are listing both EST/Pacific Time and individual television ratings. All rated [G] or [PG] unless noted. [NR] = Not Rated, news-related program.

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History Channel Primetime Listings

Wednesday, October 1, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Prisons
"All hope abandon, ye who enter here!" This
sentiment has permeated the masonry and clanging
bars of prisons built throughout the ages. We'll
see how the philosophy and architecture of
today's American prisons emerged from the sewer
cells and castles and dungeons of ancient Rome,
medieval Europe, and 18th-century England.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - The Railroads That
Tamed the West
The year was 1869 and America had just completed
the greatest building achievement in its
history--the Transcontinental Railroad. A thin
ribbon of steel and wood now connected East and
West. But the fledgling country now faced an even
greater challenge--how to harness the awesome
potential of the railroad to tame the still
wide-open and wild West.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Gunslingers
During America's western expansion, a new breed
of man arose--the gunslinger. Sometimes he wore a
badge, sometimes he was an outlaw. But he always
had a gun at his side, and the urge to step to
the edge and pull the trigger. Wild Bill Hickok,
Jesse James, Wyatt Earp. See why the weapons they
carried stamped these gunmen's existence.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - U.S. Mints: Money
Machines
How does America make money--literally? We visit
the United States Mint and the Bureau of Printing
and Engraving to see the secretive government
facilities where our legal tender is generated.
With a storied past as tantalizing as the wealth
they create, these mints can spit out fortunes in
an hour and keep our economy flowing.

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Thursday, October 2, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Engines
Story of the development of engines and motors,
with particular emphasis on the ones that have
profoundly changed society. Beginning with the
steam engine, we see how it was developed, how it
works, and how it led to the Industrial
Revolution. We review the electric motor,
internal combustion engine, jet engine, and
rocket engine, and conclude with a look at
futuristic engine technologies, including
hydrogen-powered cars and microtechnology engines
so small that they fit on the tip of a finger.

8-10pm -- Movies in Time - Posse
Movie. Mario Van Peebles stars in and directed
this untold story of the Wild West, where African
Americans created their own townships and were
both lawmen and outlaws. The action follows a
group of mostly black soldiers after the
Spanish-American War who form a posse and head
out to Freemanville. The black-run town, where
Van Peebles' character was born, is under attack
from neighboring white racists. With Stephen
Baldwin, Blair Underwood, Melvin Van Peebles,
Woody Strode, and Isaac Hayes. (1993)

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Logging Tech
When Paul Bunyan cried "Timber!", he never
foresaw today's cutting-edge, controversial
industry that feeds a ravenous, lumber-crazy
world--a world striving to protect nature while
devouring it. Come into the woods to see how
he-men and hi-tech combine forces to topple
4-billion trees annually; journey to 19th-century
America, when lumberjacks cut a legend as large
as the timber they felled; and travel with a tree
from stump to sawmill and learn its non-wood
uses--from aspirin to film to toothpaste!

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Friday, October 3, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Dynamite
Join us for an highly charged hour as we see why
Alfred Nobel's invention of dynamite took on
earthshattering dimensions as his product blasted
out the natural resources that built our modern
world. We also examine its impact on construction
of the roads, tunnels, and dams that provide us
with energy and transportation.

8-9pm -- Dead Men's Secrets - Operation
Bodyguard: D-Day Deception
Operation Overlord, the 1944 Allied invasion of
Western Europe, culminated from five years of
armed struggle against the Axis juggernaut. But
the odds seemed stacked against a successful
storming of Hitler's awesome beach defenses. To
insure victory, the Allies convinced Hitler that
the invasion would take place at Pas de Calais.
We examine the elaborate system of hoax and
deception devised by the Allies to trick the
Nazis--including fake armies, dummy landing
craft, and false intelligence.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - U.S. Guns of World War
II
An examination of the weapons that battled
through surf and snow, dense jungle and choking
dust...the guns of the American GI. Though WWII
introduced instruments that pierced the dark and
weapons that released the power of the atom, the
infantryman's guns were designed decades before;
but in dependability they were unequaled.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Japanese Guns of WWII
As Japan bombed its way into the Pacific during
WWII, Imperial soldiers carried pride, a sense of
invincibility, and an arsenal of clumsy and
outdated weapons. Convinced that the tactics and
tools that led to victory over colonial enemies
would be just as effective against the Allies,
Japan would see its weaponry lead to defeat.

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Saturday, October 4, 2003
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7-7:30pm -- Conquest - Weapons of the Ninja
Meet the challenges of extreme competition and
find out if you are as tough as you think! Host
Peter Woodward, an actor and fight master, and
his team of combatants take on different
challenges each episode with one goal in mind--to
win! Peter focuses on the technology behind the
equipment being profiled and demonstrates its
practical use and the tactics needed to win. Shot
on location around the world, he reveals the
skills needed throughout history to emerge
victorious!

7:30-8pm -- Mail Call - Marine Sniper
Rifle/BlowGun/Mulberry Harbor/French
Resistance/Frontline Medical Care/Berserk
At Camp Pendleton's sniper school, R. Lee Ermey
pops off a few rounds of the Marine's super
accurate M40A3 rifle, then takes on his old
enemy, a watermelon, using a blowgun--a weapon in
use for 40,000 years! Lee examines a WWII
"Mulberry Harbor"--floating concrete caissons
used to bridge the English Channel, weapons the
French Resistance used against the Nazis, and
improvements in frontline medical care. In our GI
Jargon segment, he explains the military origin
of the word "Berserk".

8-9pm -- Battlefield Detectives - Custer at
Little Bighorn
A tiny band of brave U.S. cavalrymen battle
bow-and-arrow and tomahawk-wielding Indians--this
image of Custer's Last Stand is one of the most
potent legends of the American Frontier. The site
of Little Bighorn has been researched like no
other American battlefield. Using the results of
this recent scientific research, we'll peel away
the myths about Little Bighorn, revealing that
there was no "last stand" and, in fact, few bows,
arrows, or tomahawks.

9-10pm -- Come Home Alive - Paradise Lost: The
Philippines
Palawan, Philippines, is a breathtaking island
hideaway with pristine beaches. But on May 27,
2001, 20 gunmen from the Muslim rebel group Abu
Sayyaf raided the Dos Palmas Island Resort,
taking 16 tourists and four staff hostage. Over
the course of a year, 12 hostages were killed,
several escaped, and some were released.
Americans Martin and Gracia Burnham and Filipino
Deborah Yap were held for 376 days...until
Filipino Scout Rangers located the rebel group
and opened fire. Only Gracia would survive.

10-11pm -- Dead Reckoning - Fingering the Killer
For 26 years, the Penny Serra Case was one of
Connecticut's most famous unsolved murders. In
1973, the 21-year-old dental assistant was
stabbed to death in broad daylight in a New Haven
parking garage. But the mystery wouldn't be
solved until 1997 after the development of a
computerized fingerprint database. And in the
Case of the Murdered Newspaper Girl, renowned
forensic expert Dr. Henry Lee reconstructs the
1998 murder of 11-year-old Angelica Padilla using
evidence from the crime scene.

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Sunday, October 5, 2003
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6-8pm -- Russia Land of the Tsars - 
A history of the Russian Empire spanning 1,000
years--from birth of the nation and the Orthodox
Church in the 10th century to the fall of the
last Tsar and the 1917 Russian Revolution. Part 2
covers the Empire's zenith under Catherine the
Great, the 19th-century struggle as the
autocratic dynasty tried to cope with the social
and economic upheaval of the Industrial
Revolution, and the social chaos that brought
Lenin and the Communists to power--and claimed
the lives of Nicholas II and his family.

8-10pm -- Stalin: Man of Steel - 
In almost three decades in power, Joseph
Stalin--self-named Man of Steel--transformed his
country from peasant society to nuclear
superpower. It was a brutal, murderous journey
filled with intrigue and assassination. Along the
way, 20 million Russians died--victims of one of
the 20th century's towering figures, and one of
history's greatest tyrants. Features rare archive
film and accounts from Stalin's bodyguard,
cameraman, victims, secret police, Gulag wardens,
and living survivors of his family.

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - WWII Half Track/Arctic
Vehicles/Weird Weapons/Navy Hydrofoils/Combat
Controllers/Gunnery Sergeant
Shot on location, R. Lee Ermey answers viewer
questions about the military with practical
demonstrations in the field. Lee tears around in
a WWII M2A2 half track, with a combination of
tracks and wheels; demonstrates Army vehicles
designed for extreme arctic conditions, including
the world's longest truck--the 572-foot Snow
Train; strange weapons used by the Allies in
WWII; and Navy hydrofoils. And he explains the
function of Air Force combat controllers and
Marine Corps gunnery sergeants.

10:30-11pm -- Extreme History with Roger Daltrey
- Surviving the Colorado River
Roger Daltrey, lead singer of the rock band The
Who, takes viewers back in time to experience the
nitty-gritty, day-to-day realities of some of
history's great moments. Daltrey, an avid history
buff, demonstrates the challenges of surviving
and in this episode takes on the mighty and muddy
Colorado River in a replica of the boat used by
one-armed Civil War veteran Major John Wesley
Powell, who, along with 9 men, charted the river
in 1869. Roger also climbs one-armed along the
500-foot-high river walls!

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Monday, October 6, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Army Corps of Engineers
Made up of soldiers and civilians, scientists and
specialists in an enormous variety of fields, the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was created over 200
years ago by Congressional mandate to respond, in
peace and war, to the nation's engineering needs.
The world's premier engineering and research and
development agency, the Corps has blown up,
excavated, grated, dredged, and remolded the
shape of our continent as we pushed to expand the
nation and harness the forces of nature!

8-8:30pm -- Mail Call - Unmanned
Aircraft/Bogey/1st Combat Helicopter/Forward
Observers/Fairbairn-Sykes Commando Knife
If unmanned aircraft are so good, why do we need
pilots? Travel with R. Lee Ermey to Edwards AFB
for a look at the latest in experimental planes.
See how Scottish kids, afraid of the Bogey Man,
gave rise to the pilot term for unidentified
aircraft. Watch the first combat helicopter, the
U.S. YR-4B, flown in WWII by Lt. Carter Harman in
Burma. See how forward observers direct artillery
fire, and join Ermey as he demonstrates the
Fairbairn-Sykes commando knife on his favorite
target--a watermelon!

8:30-9pm -- Guts & Bolts - Down on the
Farm/Combine Demolition Derby/Tractor Pull
See host Tim Beggy get behind the wheel of a New
Holland Combine Harvester and learn the true
meaning of separating the wheat from the chaff.
Next he checks out an Indiana fair during their
annual Combine Demolition Derby. Finally, Tim
meets up with the reigning king of the tractor
pull--and checks out his 12,000-horsepower
monster that belches flames from four jet turbine
engines.

9-10pm -- The Real Attila the Hun - 
No ruler in history represents the unbridled rage
and brutality of the barbarian as much as Attila
the Hun. In the 5th century, Attila swept through
Europe, effectively extinguishing the classical
Roman Empire. And for a time, he held the destiny
of all of Western Europe firmly in his grasp. But
in the end, it was Attila who unwittingly secured
the future of the civilized world and Christian
Europe. After his death, the Hun Empire began to
break up, and the marauding Huns "scattered to
the winds."

10-11:30pm -- Lionheart the Crusade - 


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Tuesday, October 7, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Castles & Dungeons
Some of the most imposing structures ever built,
medieval castles withstood both bloody assaults
and the test of time. Designed like machines with
nearly every architectural detail devoted to
defense, castles represented the perfect fusion
of form and function. Journey back to that unruly
era as we examine the complexity of their
construction and the multipurposes they
served--homes to kings and nobles, economic
centers, courthouses, treasuries, prisons, and
torture chambers.

8-9pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - The Death of the
Edmund Fitzgerald
Lake Superior is home to the "Witch of November"
and some of the worst storms a sailor will ever
see. On the night of November 10, 1975, the
29-man crew of the iron ore carrier Edmund
Fitzgerald faced the Witch head on. Fighting
30-foot waves and 95-mile per hour winds, she
mysteriously disappeared when only 17 miles from
safety. Features interviews with researchers and
divers of the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical
Society and incredible underwater footage of the
cutting of the ship's bell.

9-10pm -- Tactical to Practical - #5
Navy SEALS take Hunter Ellis aboard the latest
SDV (SEAL Delivery Vehicle), and he learns that
much of their equipment is now available to
civilian divers, including the latest in dive
computers, dry suits, rebreathers, and underwater
cameras. Hunter explores a shipwreck using the
scuba phone--first developed by the Navy. Next,
he sees how military food innovations changed the
way we eat and live. Then, he tracks the
crossover of robots from military to civilian
use.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Magnets
We played with them as children, but the world of
magnets isn't kid's stuff! The pervasive magnet
serves as the underpinning for much of modern
technology. They can be found in computers, cars,
phones, VCRs, TVs, vacuum cleaners, the washer
and dryer, the ubiquitous refrigerator magnet,
and even in an electric guitar! On the cutting
edge of technology, scientists experiment with a
variety of magnets. Magnets' amazing forces of
attraction and repulsion may take us to the far
reaches of outer space.

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Wednesday, October 8, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - West Point
For nearly 200 years, the U.S. Military Academy
at West Point, New York, has trained students in
the art of war. Located 50 miles north of New
York City, its 25 buildings overlook the Hudson
River on a 16,000-acre government reserve. During
the Revolutionary War, West Point stood guard
over the river, protecting it with artillery and
a 136-ton chain! From humble beginnings, the
academy grew with the nation, as each war forced
changes to keep pace with America's expanding
world responsibilities.

8-10pm -- Failure Is Not an Option - 
Based on the bestselling memoir by retired NASA
Flight Director Gene Kranz, this 2-hour program
tells the story of Mission Control during
America's race to the Moon. For all the publicity
about the astronauts, the men of Mission Control
remain largely unknown to the public. Yet when
President Kennedy challenged the nation to reach
the moon, these young engineers were the ones who
had to make it happen. Join us as these unlauded
heroes tell their story for the first time.
Hosted by Jim Lovell.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The F-14
October 7, 2001: Missiles from lethal U.S. jets
rain down onto Afghanistan. One powerful and
deadly plane led the majority of the
assaults--the F-14 Tomcat, the world's most
complete military fighter. No other fighter jet
carries the F-14's unique combination of weapons.
Its state-of-the-art system can spot an oncoming
enemy plane at almost 200 miles. Its radar can
detect targets as low as 50 feet and as high as
80,000 feet and does so three times faster than
the radar of any other fighter jet.

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Thursday, October 9, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Limos
Limousines have been stretched to greater and
greater lengths--as has the notion of what can be
done inside them! You can have a rolling disco in
a stretched SUV, go for a rumble off-road in a
monster truck limousine, or take a direct hit in
an armored limo and still make your meeting. So,
sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride of your life
as we review the history of chauffeured
limousines--from weddings, proms, and funerals to
the ultimate adult playpen and the president's
"Cadillac One".

8-11pm -- Time Machine - The Last Days of World
War II
Hitler boasts that his glorious Third Reich will
last more than a 1,000 years. However, in the
fall of 1944, his soldiers are retreating on two
fronts. In this 3-hour special, we chronicle the
beginning of the end for the Nazi war machine
after the Allies storm the European continent and
survive the Battle of the Bulge. Nazi plunder,
last-chance secret weapons, the race for the
A-bomb, and Hitler's mysterious death are all
part of the frenetic activity leading up to V-E
Day.

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Friday, October 10, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Chunnel
The job of joining Britain and France via a
tunnel under the English Channel was a challenge.
Geologists tracked the only safe route with
satellite technology, and French and British
teams drilled towards each other using two of the
largest Tunnel Boring Machines ever made. We'll
explore the greatest underwater land-link of all
time.

8-9pm -- Dead Men's Secrets - Hitler's Nuclear
Arsenal
At the start of WWII, the race had begun between
the Nazis and the Allies to be the first to
create an atomic weapon. By teaming up with the
Japanese, Hitler planned to launch an atomic
attack on San Francisco on August 17, 1945. But
on August 6, an American Superfortress dropped an
atomic bomb on Hiroshima and the war ended
shortly after. We reveal shocking footage that
demonstrates just how close the Nazis came to
creating a atomic bomb and how close the U.S.
came to nuclear catastrophe.

9-10pm -- B-17 Flying Fortress - 
In 1937, the Boeing Aircraft Company built
America's first all-metal, four-engined heavy
bomber--the legendary B-17 Flying Fortress.
Taking on the worst the Luftwaffe offered, the
8th Air Force's Flying Forts flew daylight
bombing missions over occupied Europe's most
heavily defended cities. This is the story of the
young airmen of the "Mighty Eighth" and the
angers they faced at 30,000 feet! Features superb
interviews and home movie material shot by U.S.
airmen in Britain--never before shown on TV!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The Manhattan Project
At 5:30 a.m., July 16, 1945, scientists and
dignitaries awaited the detonation of the first
atomic bomb in a desolate area of the New Mexico
desert aptly known as Jornada del Muerto--Journey
of Death. Dubbed the Manhattan Project, the
top-secret undertaking was tackled with
unprecedented speed and expense--almost
$30-billion in today's money. Los Alamos
scientists and engineers relate their trials,
triumphs, and dark doubts about building the
ultimate weapon of war in the interest of peace.

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Saturday, October 11, 2003
____________________________________________________

7-7:30pm -- Extreme History with Roger Daltrey -
Surviving the Colorado River
Roger Daltrey, lead singer of the rock band The
Who, takes viewers back in time to experience the
nitty-gritty, day-to-day realities of some of
history's great moments. Daltrey, an avid history
buff, demonstrates the challenges of surviving
and in this episode takes on the mighty and muddy
Colorado River in a replica of the boat used by
one-armed Civil War veteran Major John Wesley
Powell, who, along with 9 men, charted the river
in 1869. Roger also climbs one-armed along the
500-foot-high river walls!

7:30-8pm -- Mail Call - Unmanned
Aircraft/Bogey/1st Combat Helicopter/Forward
Observers/Fairbairn-Sykes Commando Knife
If unmanned aircraft are so good, why do we need
pilots? Travel with R. Lee Ermey to Edwards AFB
for a look at the latest in experimental planes.
See how Scottish kids, afraid of the Bogey Man,
gave rise to the pilot term for unidentified
aircraft. Watch the first combat helicopter, the
U.S. YR-4B, flown in WWII by Lt. Carter Harman in
Burma. See how forward observers direct artillery
fire, and join Ermey as he demonstrates the
Fairbairn-Sykes commando knife on his favorite
target--a watermelon!

8-9pm -- Battlefield Detectives - Charge of the
Light Brigade
One of the most famous and romanticized defeats
in British history, Alfred, Lord Tennyson's poem
immortalized the suicidal charge by light cavalry
during the Crimean War's Battle of Balaclava. We
place the "Charge" in historical context and
carefully pick apart the legend, revealing that
the charge was both pointless and unsuccessful,
and that fewer than a quarter of the "Six
Hundred" actually died in action--and we uncover
what the "real" killers were that day.

9-10pm -- Come Home Alive - Journey through
Torture: India
The world's largest democracy and home to over
1-billion people from 7 ethnic groups speaking 18
languages, India is embroiled in a colossal class
struggle--from which rose a homegrown Mafia. We
follow the unlucky footsteps of California
medical student Marcus Villagren, who, while
studying pediatrics in India, was kidnapped. When
he couldn't meet the Mafia's ransom demands,
Marcus was turned over to a corrupt legal system
and sentenced to prison--for a "crime" of which
he has no knowledge.

10-11pm -- Dead Reckoning - Left at the Scene
In a series that presents forensic crime history
by making technology the star, we see how
scientific crime techniques solved difficult
cases. In 1994, Rhonda Maloney was abducted and
raped by Robert Harlan in Thornton, Colorado. We
retrace 7 days of Thornton Crime Scene
Investigator Bob Lloyd--from the abduction to
arrest to autopsy--as he methodically worked
several crime scenes. Then, we watch Senior Crime
Investigator Don Sollars finally solve the murder
of 78-year-old Frida Winters.

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Sunday, October 12, 2003
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Dead Reckoning - Fingering the Killer
For 26 years, the Penny Serra Case was one of
Connecticut's most famous unsolved murders. In
1973, the 21-year-old dental assistant was
stabbed to death in broad daylight in a New Haven
parking garage. But the mystery wouldn't be
solved until 1997 after the development of a
computerized fingerprint database. And in the
Case of the Murdered Newspaper Girl, renowned
forensic expert Dr. Henry Lee reconstructs the
1998 murder of 11-year-old Angelica Padilla using
evidence from the crime scene.

8-10pm -- Conquest of Hawaii - 
The Hawaiian Islands, created in a crucible of
tectonic fire in the midst of a watery
wilderness, were created by winds and waves.
Among those who would call themselves "Hawaiian"
were warrior kings, kidnapped sailors, cowboys,
New England missionaries, a tragic queen, and
robber barons. In this 2-hour view of watershed
moments in Hawaiian history--from discovery to
first contact with outsiders and the resulting
clash of cultures--we review one of the most
remote places on earth.

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - Military Pilot
Training/Flak/Doolittle Raid/One-Man
Submarine/Military Radios
How do we train our military pilots? What is flak
and what is the origin of the word? How did the
U.S. pull off the daring Doolittle Raid against
the Japanese during WWII? Did the OSS really use
a one-man submarine named Sleeping Beauty? What
kind of radios are used in the field by today's
military? Does a foxhole radio really work? Shot
on location, R. Lee Ermey answers viewers'
questions about military methods and technology
with practical demonstrations by military experts
in the field.

10:30-11pm -- Extreme History with Roger Daltrey
- Surviving a Buffalo Hunt
Never before in history have man and beast's
lives been more intertwined....To the Plains
Indian, the buffalo represented food, shelter,
and clothes. Roger Daltrey experiences the life
of America's ultimate big-game hunters. Guided by
foremost experts on American Indian culture,
Roger dons a wolf skin and stalks to within 30
yards of a huge herd of buffalo. After unleashing
his arrow, Daltrey learns how to turn a hide into
a blanket, makes his own arrows, and turns a
bison bladder into dinnerware.

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Monday, October 13, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Silver Mines
It was called the "mother lode", a deposit of
silver so massive that it would produce
$300-million in its first 25 years of operation,
establish Nevada as a state, and bankroll the
Union Army in the Civil War. Named after an early
investor, we'll see how the Comstock Lode,
discovered near Virginia City, proved to be a
scientific laboratory from which vast
improvements in mining technology and safety were
pioneered, including innovations in drilling,
ventilation, drainage, and ore processing.

8-8:30pm -- Mail Call - WWII Half Track/Arctic
Vehicles/Weird Weapons/Navy Hydrofoils/Combat
Controllers/Gunnery Sergeant
Shot on location, R. Lee Ermey answers viewer
questions about the military with practical
demonstrations in the field. Lee tears around in
a WWII M2A2 half track, with a combination of
tracks and wheels; demonstrates Army vehicles
designed for extreme arctic conditions, including
the world's longest truck--the 572-foot Snow
Train; strange weapons used by the Allies in
WWII; and Navy hydrofoils. And he explains the
function of Air Force combat controllers and
Marine Corps gunnery sergeants.

8:30-9pm -- Guts & Bolts - Personal
Watercraft/Hot Food Vending Machine/Munich
Airport Baggage
Take a Porsche 911, strip it down to nothing but
engine and seat, stick it in the water and climb
on! Now gun it and hang on for dear life! Tim
Beggy experiences 0-60 in under 4 seconds aboard
the world's fastest personal watercraft. Next,
Beggy checks out the latest in hot-food vending
machines and discovers that it was the brainchild
of a NASA rocket scientist! Then, he hops a
flight to Germany to check out Munich's
state-of-the-art baggage system.

9-11pm -- Wake Island: The Alamo of the Pacific -

It's a true life story of survivors on a desert
island--one that helped change the course of
WWII! Within hours of the 1941 Pearl Harbor
Attack, about 1,600 U.S. marines and civilians
found themselves under surprise attack from Japan
on a tiny Pacific Island. We take six survivors
of the siege of Wake Island back to the scene of
their heroic stand. They retrace those days in
which they suffered eventual capture, beatings,
executions of colleagues, and imprisonment--yet
survived to tell their story.

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Tuesday, October 14, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Gold Mines
Around the world and across the eons, gold stands
as a symbol of power, wealth, and love. The quest
for the yellow metal took men across oceans, into
the depths of the Alaskan winter, and miles
beneath South African earth. This is the story of
the hunters of the precious metal and their
methods for extracting it.

8-9pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - The Ghost Ship of
New England
On a bleak Thanksgiving weekend in 1898, a trio
of tempests engulfed New England, sank hundreds
of ships, and killed more than 400 people. The
disappearance of the passenger steamer SS
Portland that weekend remains one of New
England's worst maritime disasters. In July 2002,
marine archaeologists zeroed in on the paddle
wheeler's location, and the dramatic story of the
nearly 200 people trapped onboard can finally be
told. Features ROV video of the wreck and
interviews with victims' descendants.

9-10pm -- Tactical to Practical - #6
When the Navy SEALs needed a better way to travel
the desert, they asked Chenowth Racing to build a
car that could stand up to the desert. Host
Hunter Ellis shows off their DPV (Desert Patrol
Vehicle) at the Baja 1000. Next, he sees how
battlefield medicine provided lifesaving changes
in emergency medicine--from cutting-edge triage
to "smart" bandages, and how UAVs (Unmanned Air
Vehicles) have moved from military to myriad
uses, including law enforcement, Hollywood, and
even archaeological digs!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Inviting Disaster: #1
Based on the popular book "Inviting Disaster" by
James Chiles, we investigate the causes and
consequences of technological breakdowns and,
through vivid demonstrations, show why the battle
between man and machine may be escalating beyond
manageable limits--and why we all have a stake in
the war's outcome! As we reconstruct moments of
confusion as systems collapse and operators make
fateful incorrect choices, we uncover surprising
links between past and present tragedies.

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Wednesday, October 15, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Banks
Backbones of worldwide economics, for centuries
banks enabled the creation of wealth, and
industry leaders became icons. But modern
technology revolutionized the way banks do
business, and the Internet insures they must
adapt or disappear. From banking's early European
origins to "e-banking", this is an hour you can't
afford to miss!

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Hoover Dam
The task was monumental: Build the world's
largest dam in the middle of the desert, and tame
the river that carved the Grand Canyon--all in
seven years! When the Hoover Dam was completed in
1935, it was the largest dam in the world. We'll
reveal how this engineering wonder of the world
was conceived and built.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - Chesapeake Bay Bridge
& Tunnel
Named one of the seven engineering wonders of the
modern age, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and Tunnel
connects Virginia proper with its easternmost
land mass. Stretching 17 miles across the
historic Chesapeake Bay, the structure represents
a man-made boundary between the Bay and the
Atlantic. The structure includes two two-lane
highways supported mostly by trestles, four
man-made and one natural island, two truss
bridges, and two revolutionary sunken tube
tunnels.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Lake Pontchartrain
Causeway
In the land of Mardi Gras, jambalaya, and zydeco,
is an engineering marvel called the Lake
Pontchartrain Causeway that seems to go on
forever. Two ribbons of concrete span the largest
inland body of water in Louisiana, and at nearly
23.87 and 23.88 miles long, these two spans form
the world's longest automobile bridge. At
midpoint--12 miles out--water surrounds travelers
who are unable to see either shoreline. The
bridge is so long, it actually transverses
1/1000th of the earth's circumference!

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Thursday, October 16, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Stock Exchange
Welcome to the center of the American economy,
where nearly $90-million changes hands each
minute. Journey back to the wooden wall, built to
hold back Indians, where early traders signed a
pact creating the New York Stock Exchange; watch
worldwide markets quake with the crash of 1929;
and visit today's computer-driven wonder.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - Basic Training:
America's Proving Ground
Army, Navy, Airforce, Marines--each have a
recently renewed recruiting mandate to train the
best defense force of the 21st century. Join us
for a 2-hour tour of the history and process of
joining America's heralded fighting forces. From
the frost of Valley Forge, where a rag-tag band
of settlers fought for freedom, to the dizzying
heat of California's desert and a well-oiled
Marine recruit outfitted in the latest
battledress, we take you step-by-step through the
trials and pride of Basic Training.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Bullets
From "safe" bullets that stop hijackers but leave
aircraft unscathed to bullets that chain-saw
through steel and "smart" bullets
computer-programmed to hit a target, this
explosive hour examines the evolution of bullets
from origin in the 1300s--stones and round lead
balls shot from iron and bamboo tubes. Lead balls
ruled until 1841 when a conical-shaped bullet
changed ammo forever. We learn how to construct a
modern cartridge, and at pistol and rifle ranges
view demonstrations of modern firepower.

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Friday, October 17, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - U.S. Mints: Money
Machines
How does America make money--literally? We visit
the United States Mint and the Bureau of Printing
and Engraving to see the secretive government
facilities where our legal tender is generated.
With a storied past as tantalizing as the wealth
they create, these mints can spit out fortunes in
an hour and keep our economy flowing.

8-9pm -- Dead Men's Secrets - Secrets of Hitler's
Special Forces
Hitler's special forces, led by the ruthless Otto
Skorzeny, carried out some of the most daring
raids of WWII, including the first glider-borne
assault, a paratroop aerial assault on the Island
of Crete, and the audacious rescue of Italian
dictator Benito Mussolini from his mountaintop
prison. For the first time, the hidden world of
these elite forces is uncovered as we feature
never-before-seen footage filmed by German
cameramen.

9-11pm -- The Face of Evil: Reinhard Heydrich - 
Reinhard Eugen Tristan Heydrich was arguably the
most enigmatic Nazi leader, and as the "Final
Solution" architect, definitely the most
murderous as we see in a 2-hour analysis of his
meteoric rise to command over the Gestapo, SS
intelligence network, and Czechoslovakia. In
1942, Heydrich was considered the most dangerous
man in Germany after Hitler. The Allied plot to
assassinate him--planned in England and carried
out in Prague--was the most brazen of its kind.
Narrated by Charlton Heston.

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Saturday, October 18, 2003
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7-7:30pm -- Extreme History with Roger Daltrey -
Surviving a Buffalo Hunt
Never before in history have man and beast's
lives been more intertwined....To the Plains
Indian, the buffalo represented food, shelter,
and clothes. Roger Daltrey experiences the life
of America's ultimate big-game hunters. Guided by
foremost experts on American Indian culture,
Roger dons a wolf skin and stalks to within 30
yards of a huge herd of buffalo. After unleashing
his arrow, Daltrey learns how to turn a hide into
a blanket, makes his own arrows, and turns a
bison bladder into dinnerware.

7:30-8pm -- Mail Call - WWII Half Track/Arctic
Vehicles/Weird Weapons/Navy Hydrofoil/Combat
Controller/Gunnery Sarge: #34
Shot on location, R. Lee Ermey answers viewer
questions about the military with practical
demonstrations in the field. Lee tears around in
a WWII M2A2 half track, with a combination of
tracks and wheels; demonstrates Army vehicles
designed for extreme arctic conditions, including
the world's longest truck--the 572-foot Snow
Train; strange weapons used by the Allies in
WWII; and Navy hydrofoils. And he explains the
function of Air Force combat controllers and
Marine Corps gunnery sergeants.

8-9pm -- Battlefield Detectives - The Gallipoli
Disaster
The largest amphibious assault of WWI, it became
the most public disaster of the Allied campaign,
destroyed reputations, including those of
Churchill and Kitchener, and created a war hero
for the Turks--Kemal Ataturk, who later founded
modern Turkey. Military historians have
consistently blamed the Gallipoli disaster on
commander incompetence, but we tell a different
story. Did the Allied leadership ignore
scientific experts? Was the campaign doomed to
failure due to geographical reasons?

9-11:30pm -- Time Machine - Who Wrote the Bible?
What are the origins of the Bible? Who actually
wrote it? We'll explore possible answers with
visits to Egypt, the Galilee, the Israel Museum
in Jerusalem, and the caves of Qumran, where the
Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered.

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Sunday, October 19, 2003
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7-8pm -- History Alive - The Battleships: Clash
of the Dreadnoughts
The outbreak of hostilities between Germany and
Britain in August 1914 saw the battleship at
almost the peak of its superiority among fighting
ships. In firepower, nothing could equal that of
the dreadnought--now the ultimate class of
battleship in navies worldwide. On windswept
waters of the North Sea, the world's two greatest
navies put their fleets to the test of fire. We
see how, despite losing more ships and more men
than Germany, Britain's Grand Fleet remained
master of the North Sea in WWI.

8-9pm -- History Alive - The Battleships: The
Darkness of the Future
With the signing of the Treaty of Versailles
ending WWI, the entire German High Seas Fleet was
scuttled. But soon a new arms race began between
Britain, the U.S., and Japan. Radical new
battleships, larger and with even more firepower
were planned. By the mid-1930s, Italy, Russia,
and a re-emerging National Socialist Germany
began building up their fleets. As political
conditions deteriorated in Europe, it was clear
that the battleship would play a major strategic
part in future armed conflicts.

9-10pm -- History Alive - The Battleships: Terror
from Above
Although the early months of WWII saw some of the
most dramatic surface naval battles of all time,
the rise of the aircraft carrier spelled the
demise of the battleship. From the sinking of the
British Hood and German Bismarck through the
destruction of the Japanese Fleet by U.S. Air and
Surface Forces, through Korea, Vietnam, and the
Gulf War, where the modernized battleship played
a support role, we witness its passing. Today,
not one battleship remains in commission in any
navy.

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - #37
R. Lee Ermey returns as host for another season
of exciting answers to viewers' questions on
military technology. With American armed forces
deployed in the war against terrorism, this
season will focus on today's military. Shot on
location, Ermey answers viewers' questions about
military methods and technology with practical
demonstrations by military experts in the field.

10:30-11pm -- Extreme History with Roger Daltrey
- Surviving the Wild West
For 20 years, thousands of cowboys drove millions
of steer through the rugged prairies of Texas and
Oklahoma via the Chisholm Trail--a lonely,
dust-choked path fraught with hardship and
danger. Roger Daltrey travels back to 1867 as he
straps on his spurs and heads to West Texas to
experience the rough-and-tumble life of a cowboy.
From driving cattle to gunfighting to catching
and cooking Western Diamondback rattlers, Roger
takes on the extreme elements of the cowboy's
golden age.

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Monday, October 20, 2003
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7-8pm -- The Real Attila the Hun - 
No ruler in history represents the unbridled rage
and brutality of the barbarian as much as Attila
the Hun. In the 5th century, Attila swept through
Europe, effectively extinguishing the classical
Roman Empire. And for a time, he held the destiny
of all of Western Europe firmly in his grasp. But
in the end, it was Attila who unwittingly secured
the future of the civilized world and Christian
Europe. After his death, the Hun Empire began to
break up, and the marauding Huns "scattered to
the winds."

8-10pm -- Movies in Time - Attila, Pt. 1
Movie. Shot in Lithuania, this 2-part movie
portrays the life of one history's most feared
men--Attila, King of the Huns in the 5th
century--and the Western World's fate,
represented by a rapidly diminishing Roman
Empire. Part 1 follows young Attila, who survives
the murder of his chieftain father and the
slaughter of his village, and goes on to become a
great warrior whose exploits draw the attention
of Roman General Flavius Aetius. Starring Gerard
Butler, Powers Boothe, and Alice Krige. (2001)

10-12am -- Movies in Time - Attila, Pt. 2
Movie. After defeating his brother, Attila
becomes king and marries N'Kara--who tragically
dies in childbirth. Attila grows in power, and
after a series of triumphs over Roman
fortifications in Gaul, finally meets Aetius on
the battlefield. The fate of each man is
intertwined in a tangled web of revenge,
deception, and betrayal--and the outcome of the
Battle of Chalons will decide the fate of Western
civilization. Starring Gerard Butler, Powers
Boothe, Tim Curry, and Simmone Jade MacKinnon.
(2001)

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Tuesday, October 21, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Nuclear Subs
The most priceless jewels in the arsenals of a
handful of countries, some nuclear submarines
carry more firepower than all the bombs dropped
in history. Since the 1950s, these lethal steel
sharks have been a cornerstone of U.S. defense
policy. The Cold War launched an underwater race
for supremacy with the Soviet Union. The result:
engineering miracles, which roam 70% of the
earth's surface, providing deterrence to enemies,
intelligence about adversaries, and an abiding
sense of dread.

8-9pm -- Deep Sea Detectives - The Hunt for the
Derbyshire
In September 1980, a typhoon south of Japan
plagued the Pacific Ocean. Caught in the thick of
it, the British freighter Derbyshire struggled to
escape. Without even an SOS, she vanished with 44
lives aboard. After 14 years, marine experts
using SONAR technology finally found her
scattered on the bottom of the sea. Did the storm
or a structural flaw in the ship's design kill
the crew? Using underwater footage, animations of
the sinking, and interviews with victims'
relatives, we search for the truth.

9-10pm -- Tactical to Practical - Humvee/Night
Vision/GPS: #1
Former Navy fighter pilot and series host Hunter
Ellis examines military solutions to problems
that crossed over into civilian life. Hunter
explores the Army's relationship with four-wheel
drive--from WWII Jeeps to the Humvee. From
off-road to the dark of night, he takes a glowing
green look into night vision technology, now used
in law enforcement and wildlife research. And, he
shows how GPS (Global Positioning System) came
into its own in Desert Storm and is about to make
the compass obsolete!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Inviting Disaster: #1
They make our lives more comfortable, more
rewarding, and more secure. They are the magical
machines that have brought us to the edge of the
new frontier of limitless possibilities. But it
is a hinterland filled with dangers and demons of
our own creation. Based on the popular book
"Inviting Disaster" by James Chiles, in this
episode we explore the nuclear nightmares of
Three Mile Island and Chernobyl.

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Wednesday, October 22, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Autobahn
Imagine a superhighway designed for
speed...thousands of miles of roadway unhindered
by limits of any kind. Buckle up for safety as we
take you for the ride of your life when we
explore the fascinating history and current
reality of the world's fastest freeway. The
number-one works project of the Third Reich, the
Autobahn was known as Adolf Hitler's Road until
Germany's defeat in WWII. Reconstructed and
extended to more than four times its original
size, it became a symbol of the New Germany.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Panzers
German tanks revolutionized military doctrine.
Their speed and tactical usage, backed up by the
Luftwaffe, helped create the blitzkrieg, or
lightning war, that stormed over Europe and
dominated battlefields.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - The Luftwaffe
Hermann Goering's well-trained flyers filled the
skies of Europe with dread and rained terror upon
its great capitals. So how did the poorly
equipped British Royal Air Force finally defeat
them? Veterans and historians reveal the secrets.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - T-34: Russian Victory
Born out of a desperate need to defend the
Motherland, Stalin enlisted the ideas of an
American engineer, J. Walter Christie, to develop
in total secrecy one of the most formidable tanks
in history. In 1941, straining under Operation
Barbarossa, Stalin ordered his new weapon into
the fray and changed the course of WWII. Using
detailed reenactments and interviews, we reveal
what life was like inside Russia's "secret"
weapon, the T-34, and the horrifying reality of
combat on the Eastern Front.

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Thursday, October 23, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Security Systems
Since civilization's earliest days, man has
sought protection from those who would rob him of
riches, knowledge, and even life. This is the
story of the evolving systems designed to
safeguard our most precious possessions, and of
the enduring psychological war between protectors
and thieves, each intent on outfoxing the other.

8-10pm -- Time Machine - Last Secrets of the Axis
In this 2-hour special investigating the
remarkable historical confluence that led to the
rise of German-Japanese cooperation during WWII,
we reveal the story of Karl Haushofer, the keeper
of many Axis secrets. A distinguished German
geography professor, he coined the term
"geopolitics" and laid an intellectual rationale
for a German-Japanese alliance and a link between
the Aryan myths and samurai traditions. We'll
also examine Axis activity in the Middle East.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - The Aircraft Carrier
The dramatic story of how the Essex-class
aircraft carriers rose like a phoenix after the
Pacific Fleet's destruction at Pearl Harbor.
Weighing in at over 27,000 tons, and over 800
feet in length, they were known as floating
cities--and the spearhead of every naval battle
in the Pacific Theater of War. Despite their huge
size, each carrier was terrifyingly vulnerable,
holding tens of thousands of gallons of fuel.
Though the target of kamikaze assaults, no
carrier was sunk by the Japanese.

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Friday, October 24, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Household Wonders
Reviews the revolution in home improvement and
glimpses the kitchen of tomorrow. Included: the
development of the stove, sewing machine,
refrigerated air, washing machine, vacuum
cleaner, toaster, and mixer.

8-9pm -- Dead Men's Secrets - Plotting to Kill
Hitler
The course of history could have been so
different if the first plot to kill Adolf Hitler,
in 1939, had been successful. But Hitler proved a
hard man to kill. We review the many attempts on
his life, and analyze what went wrong.

9-10pm -- The F-15 - 
Built to put U.S. pilots back in charge of the
skies, the F-15 Eagle proved its superiority in
Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom. In a
dogfight, it can maneuver against the toughest
fighters and climb to Mt. Everest's height in 60
seconds. One of the toughest planes in the world,
one fortunate F-15 pilot flew back to base after
losing a wing! Featuring interviews with
Operation Iraqi Freedom pilots and footage that
puts the viewer right in the cockpit of the
world's greatest fighter aircraft.

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - Bunkers
From the earliest bunkers of WWI through the
ultra-futuristic ones of tomorrow's wars, we
trace the story of defensive fortifications. In
the constant struggle to hold off ever more
potent forms of attack, bunkers function in a
variety of forms. Three mammoth block structures
comprise a submarine bunker at Lorient, France,
able to house 20 subs. We visit Churchill's
Cabinet War Room and Hitler's Berlin bunker, as
well as backyard Cold War bunkers and those that
protect nuclear weapons themselves.

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Saturday, October 25, 2003
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7-7:30pm -- Extreme History with Roger Daltrey -
Surviving the Wild West
For 20 years, thousands of cowboys drove millions
of steer through the rugged prairies of Texas and
Oklahoma via the Chisholm Trail--a lonely,
dust-choked path fraught with hardship and
danger. Roger Daltrey travels back to 1867 as he
straps on his spurs and heads to West Texas to
experience the rough-and-tumble life of a cowboy.
From driving cattle to gunfighting to catching
and cooking Western Diamondback rattlers, Roger
takes on the extreme elements of the cowboy's
golden age.

7:30-8pm -- Mail Call - Episode 27
At Camp Pendleton, R. Lee Ermey checks out the
Marines' 13,000 horsepower CH-53 Super Stallion
heavy-lift helicopter, and a Korean War
helicopter, the Piasecki H-21B Workhorse--a.k.a.
the Flying Banana. He gives us the scoop on the
Navy's "Crossing the Equator" ritual--a ceremony
of creative hazing for "polliwogs"--and how the
Seabees built runways in the middle of the
Pacific in WWII. Lee explains the military phrase
"the G-2" and troops at Fort Knox demonstrate the
Abrams battle tank's firepower.

8-9pm -- Battlefield Detectives - What Sank the
Armada?
The defeat of the Spanish Armada is
legendary--Good Queen Bess versus Phillip II of
Spain, her former brother-in-law and one-time
suitor. It has always been told as a story of
English heroism and skill--beating off the
greatest armada ever assembled--well, helped a
little by the weather! Now marine archaeology and
new documentary evidence tell a new tale,
suggesting that the Spanish were ill-prepared for
a naval battle. Did they simply never intend to
fight at sea?

9-11pm -- German and Japanese Kamikazes - No
Surrender: German and Japanese Kamikazes
This 2-hour special recounts the desperate
measures taken by Axis forces to stave off defeat
in WWII and the mythical origins of the Japanese
kamikaze and their Nazi counterparts. Many in
leadership were opposed to suicide tactics--the
driving forces were often young junior officers
who had grown up in a culture of militarism and
extreme nationalism. As well as assessing the
contribution of myth and propaganda, we reveal
the more human stories behind those caught up in
the kamikaze phenomenon.

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Sunday, October 26, 2003
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7-8pm -- History Alive - Hell's Battlefield:
Kursk
In the summer of 1943, one of the greatest
clashes of WWII took place on the Eastern
Front--the Battle of Kursk. Vast in scale and
terrible in intensity, German and Russian armies,
millions strong on each side, engaged in a fierce
attack and counterattack that went on for 50
days. The battle proved to be one of the most
decisive of WWII, irreparably damaging the German
Army. We see how the combined battles of
Gettysburg, Verdun, Normandy, and the Bulge
cannot equal the violence at Kursk.

8-9pm -- History Alive - Hell's Battlefield:
D-Day, Omaha Beach: Eight Hours of Defeat
The Normandy invasion was an Allied victory, but
at the Omaha sector a human tragedy developed on
June 6, 1944. The shocking losses, failures, and
chaos in the Omaha landings have been obscured.
Mortar fire pounded men wading ashore from boats
grounded on sandbars; machine guns ripped apart
those who made the beach, and the water quickly
took on a crimson color. We trace the landings on
this deadly section of Normandy, and see how,
Omaha Beach became Hell's Battlefield.

9-10pm -- History Alive - Hell's Battlefield:
Battle of the Bulge: The First 15 Days
In December 1944, Hitler prepared a strike force
to split the Allies, hoping to destroy all Allied
forces north of the Antwerp-Brussels-Bastogne
line. With 22 new divisions, reequipped with
tanks and Luftwaffe units to support his ground
attack, Hitler was ready to surprise Allied
commanders in a plan that he called "Operation
Grief". See how the largest pitched battle in the
history of U.S. warfare became the scene of some
of WWII's fiercest fighting, making the Bulge one
of Hell's Battlefields.

10-10:30pm -- Mail Call - #38
R. Lee Ermey returns as host for another season
of exciting answers to viewers' questions on
military technology. With American armed forces
deployed in the war against terrorism, this
season will focus on today's military. Shot on
location, Ermey answers viewers' questions about
military methods and technology with practical
demonstrations by military experts in the field.

10:30-11pm -- Extreme History with Roger Daltrey
- Surviving Like a Primitive Man
Millions of years ago, our ancestors weren't at
the top of the food chain, but a merely a tasty
item on its menu. Roger Daltrey goes prehistoric
for a hands-on look at how humans survived and
thrived in an often hostile world. Roger learns
the secrets of making fire and how to fashion
history's first tools and weapons. He builds and
sails one of history's first boats, slaps
together one of history's first houses, and picks
up his stone-age weapons for a very real manhunt!

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Monday, October 27, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Ball Turret Gunners
In war, certain missions demand the most and
constitute much of the legends of bravery.
Journey back to the Second World War when
fearless airmen manned the B-17's belly
guns--glass bubbles that at any moment could
become their coffin. The ball turret gunners
called their work "flying the ball", others
called it crazy!

8-8:30pm -- Mail Call - Military Pilot
Training/Flak/Doolittle Raid/One-Man
Submarine/Military Radios: #36
How do we train our military pilots? What is flak
and what is the origin of the word? How did the
U.S. pull off the daring Doolittle Raid against
the Japanese during WWII? Did the OSS really use
a one-man submarine named Sleeping Beauty? What
kind of radios are used in the field by today's
military? Does a foxhole radio really work? Shot
on location, R. Lee Ermey answers viewers'
questions about military methods and technology
with practical demonstrations by military experts
in the field.

8:30-9pm -- Guts & Bolts - Personal
Watercraft/Camera Pill/Sewer: #7
Take a Porsche 911, strip it down to nothing but
engine and seat, stick it in the water and climb
on. Now, gun it and hang on for dear life! Host
Tim Beggy experiences 0-60 in less than 4 seconds
aboard the world's fastest personal watercraft.
Next, we view a rarely seen side of Tim--his
inside! Join us on a photo safari of Tim's
digestive tract when he swallows a camera pill.
Finally, Tim asks the ultimate question: "Where
does everything go after you flush?"

9-10pm -- Rats, Bats & Bugs - Rats
The thought of them sends shivers up the spine as
they scurry in the dark. From ancient myth to
modern misconception, we delve into the
complicated relationship between man and rat in
their ceaseless competition for food and shelter.
As civilization spread, so did rats along with
the plague and other rat-borne diseases. And no
matter how hard we try, we can't eliminate them.
Is it time to call a truce and learn to coexist?
Hosted by Alice Cooper.

10-11pm -- Rats, Bats & Bugs - Bats
One of the most misunderstood creatures, we
explore the bat's positive contributions to our
ecosystem, while debunking a few myths. We also
look into the bat's impact upon the military. Bat
guano is essential to gunpowder, and bats armed
with incendiary bombs came close to attacking
Japan--until the atom bomb beat them to it. And
their ability to use sound waves as a guidance
system played a role in development of radar and
sonar. Hosted by Alice Cooper.

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Tuesday, October 28, 2003
____________________________________________________

7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - The Colosseum
Nothing symbolizes the Roman Empire at its height
or Rome in magnificent ruins more than the
Colosseum. Built in 70 AD, it seated 80,000
people, boasted a retractable roof, underground
staging devices, marble seating, and lavish
decorations. It still serves as the prototype for
the modern stadium. The complexity of its
construction, the beauty of its architecture, and
the functionality of its design made it the
perfect place for massive crowds to congregate
for the bloody spectacles it contained.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Inviting Disaster: #2
The amazing machines of human invention most
often do our bidding with uncomplaining
proficiency. But when they go wrong, they exact a
terrible wage. In August 2000, the Russian
submarine Kursk glided through the depths of the
Arctic Sea. But the demands of the Cold War had
planted the seeds of disaster in this great
ship--118 men would pay with their lives. Their
deaths would bring about an enormous step forward
in Russia's evolving democracy. Based on James
Chiles's book "Inviting Disaster".

9-10pm -- Tactical to Practical - Spy
Gear/MedEvac Helicopters/Specialty Boats: #7
Spies have been a part of war as far back as 1800
BC, and we look at spy gear from the past at the
International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C.
Then, host Hunter Ellis teams up with a private
investigator to check out new gumshoe
technologies. Next, Hunter takes to the sky to
see how today's MedEvac helicopters are rooted in
WWII's flying ambulances, and out at sea, he
learns about an intriguing array of watercraft
for both consumer and military use.

10-11pm -- Investigating History - Jesse James
Jesse James led a deceptive, mysterious life--and
the truth about his death remains buried in
controversy. Was he shot in the back by a fellow
outlaw, or did he make that story up? Did he fake
his own death to get the law off his back? Is it
really the body of Jesse James that lies in his
coffin? Using new DNA evidence, host Bill Kurtis
turns the tables on accepted fact to uncover the
truth behind one of history's most intriguing
enigmas.

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Wednesday, October 29, 2003
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7-8pm -- Modern Marvels - Axes, Swords and Knives
Blade implements have been a part of civilized
man's arsenal since the Paleolithic Age, when
sharp tools were chipped off of flint or
obsidian. But with the discovery of metallurgy,
people were able to forge stronger, more
versatile blade implements. We visit an
axe-throwing contest in Wisconsin for an
introduction to the least subtle of the blade
tools. Then we visit a swordsmith and an
experienced swordfighter who work in traditional
methods from ancient sources, and review the
history of knives.

8-9pm -- Modern Marvels - Non-Lethal Weapons
They stun, debilitate, immobilize--providing
police and peacekeepers with options other than
shouting or shooting. From the ancient caltrop--a
multi-pointed contraption hurled by foot soldiers
into a horseman's path--to sting ball grenades,
electrical shock devices, and sound, light, and
energy weapons, we examine non-lethal weapons
that disperse crowds and take down criminals. And
in a nod to the future, we see why the government
thinks stink bombs might prove useful in the war
against terror.

9-10pm -- Modern Marvels - The Magnum
It's known as the most powerful handgun in the
world, made famous by Clint Eastwood in the
"Dirty Harry" movies. But its origins stretch
back more than a century to the Indian Wars of
the American West and African safaris, where
hunters stalked big game. Join us for a review of
the history of the biggest, baddest gun available
today--unlimited firepower at the pull of a
trigger!

10-11pm -- Modern Marvels - FBI's Crime Lab
To spearhead its fight against crime and
terrorism in the 21st century, the FBI is relying
on its $150 million-plus building, the new Crime
Lab at Quantico. Here, nearly 700 highly trained
scientists and technicians utilize cutting-edge
forensic technology to unearth identities of
perpetrators. We review the lab's history, from
humble start in a lounge in 1932 to today's
state-of-the-art complex, and see how 9/11 and
the FBI's new mandate to fight international
terrorism changed the lab forever
Watch Mail Call every week if you know what's good for you, scumbag, hosted by R. Lee Ermey of Full Metal Jacket (movie available on video and DVD)

Previous History Channel primetime listings:
Sept. 2003

August 2003

July 2003

Official HistoryChannel.com Homepage
From the invention of the electric battery in 1800 to the murdered remains of missing Washington intern Chandra Levy being discovered in a Washington D.C. park*, find out what happened when with our exclusive History of the World Timeline!
GO TO: HistoryChannel.com/worldtimeline

A&E Prime Time listings for this month

Find out more about any topic any time, including this day in history (your choice of decade), with our Best Search in History: www.historychannel.com

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* Congressman Gary Condit (D), who reportedly told police he'd had an affair with Levy, is no longer considered to be a suspect in the case. Condit lost his bid for re-election in the Democratic Primary of 2002.

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